Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
File 013
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 013. 1996-03-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/824.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-03-29). Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/824

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 013, 1996-03-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/824.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 29, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 HOUSTON VOICE / MARCH 29. 1996 Not All Battles are Fought with a Sword. Come by and see our NEW LOOK!! Still A Tradition - w*t***Uvf? Coming Soon Westheimer Street Festival April 13 - 14th Lee Chardon (Just out of retirement with her infamous Roof Top Review) Saturday March 30th, 10am - 4pm LVL PWA Holiday Fund Car Wash Mary's parking lot Benefits The Holiday Fund Working Account SUNBANCE CATTLE COMPANY HOUSTON TEXAS ] HAPPV HOURS Morning 7am-2pm ■ Afternoon 5pm-9pm ■ Saturday ?am-?pm 1022 WESTHEIMER - HOUSTON - (713) 527-9669 Economic Pressure; Athletic Prowess What are some of the products gays and lesbians have boycotted over the years ? Boycotts have been a useful form of political action for the American gay and lesbian community in the last several decades. While petitions and marches bring some measure of publicity and visibility to participants, boycotts are much quieter. They allow a leshian in rural America who would be terrified if her neighbors knew she favored gay rights to register her protest by simply ceasing to buy orange juice or visit Colorado. One of the first nationwide efforts by the gay and lesbian community to boycott a specific product came in 1973, when gays and lesbians around the country began to boycott Coors beer. As with many boycotts, this one spread by word of mouth much more than by organized political action. Reasons for the boycott included unfair labor practices at Coors (including asking potential employees if they were gay) and the anti- gay donations by the Coors family. The local Coors boycott in San Francisco was organized by none other than future supervisor Harvey Milk. In 1977 Coors took out ads in The Advocate declaring that the company and the Coors family do nol give money to anti- gay organizations, but the boycott continued. In 1982. the company even filed an unsuccessful lawsuit against Solidarity, a gay organization pushing the boycott. In 1987, when the AIT.-CIO settled its labor disputes with Coors, the boycoit fizzled, but some gays and lesbians still refuse lo drink Coors. and some community bars still don't sell its brand of beer. Another major beverage hoycoti by gays and lesbians came in 1977 when Florida orange juice spokesperson (and former pop singer and Miss Oklahoma) Anita Bryant began her crusade to repeal non-discrimination laws in Miami and other parts of the country. To protest the "'Save Our Children" campaign. Bryant opponents around the country stopped purchasing and drinking Florida orange juice. Some gay bars even displayed signs which insisted "We use California orange juice only." In 1980 Bryant was dropped by the Citrus Commission, and Florida orange juice reappeared on the breakfast tables of same-sex households throughout America...at least until Rush Limbaugh was hired by the Florida Citrus Commission in 1994. Probably the biggest gay and lesbian boycott in recent years hasn't been of a product, but of a state—Colorado. On election day 1992. just as gays and lesbians around the country were celebrating the election of Bill Clinton. Colorado voters approved "Amendment 2." This measure, sponsored by Colorado for Family Values, sought to forbid any jurisdiction within the state from protecting gays and lesbians from "any claim of discrimination." The very next day, activists announced their plan to boycott Colorado's tourism industry, which continued until a court suspended (he initiative. The case has been appealed, and the Supreme Court is expected to render i major decision this spring as to whether states can ban gay rights laws Earl) indications suggest the Courl will be sympathetic to opponents of Amendment 2. hui should they decide the othei way, many activists are likely to call for a return to the Colorado boycott. Unlike the Coors and orange juice boycotts, however, the Colorado boycott has generated significant controversy within the gay and lesbian community. Some gays and lesbians have questioned whether by boycotting the state, activists were abandoning Colorado when it needed outside help most. Others questioned the wisdom of boycotting Gay Ski Week in Aspen—a city which had passed a non-discrimination law that Amendment 2 had voided— and instead vacationing in Park City, Utah, which never even protected gays from discrimination in the first place. On the other hand, the boycott has deprived Colorado of millions of dollars in convention and tourism revenue. More than simply punishing the state for its 1992 vote, Colorado's loss of funds has sent a financial warning to other states and cities considering such initiatives. Why aren't the Gay Games called the Gay Olympics? They were, once. In 1982, Olympic decathlete Dr. Tom Waddell organized what he hoped would be a "Gay Olympics" in San Francisco. More than a thousand athletes from around the world came to San Francisco for the August event, but arrived to find out that the name had been changed to the "Gay Games" because of a court order secured by the United Slates Olympic Committee (USOC). Of course, the USOC had no objection to the Police Olympics, the Special Olympics, or even the Canine Olympics, hui the Gay Olympics was unacceptable to them. Waddell's organization sued. and the case went all the way to the Supreme Court. In one of the highest-profile gay or lesbian cases ever to come before the nation's top court, the justices ruled 7-2 that the USOC did have the right to stop the gay olympiad from using the word "Olympics." The case, San Francisco Arts and Athletic vs. United States Olympic Committee, held in effect that the Amateur Sports Act had given the USOC broad rights to determine who could and could not use the term "Olympics." The initial reaction among Gay Olympics supporters was anger and protest. The city of San Francisco even defied the initial court order and declared August 28, 1982 "Gay Olympics Day." But soon the squabble over the name was overshadowed by the sense of power, unity, and fun that came with the largest ever gay athletic competition. At the opening ceremonies for the Gay Games in 1986. again in San Francisco, writer Armistead Maupin told the more than 2,000 athletes gathered there that the important word was "Gay." not "Olympics." The Gay Games have grown geometrically since then, with the 1990 games in Vancouver, and the 1994 games in New York drawing thousands of tourists to those cities. As athletes around the world prepare for Gay Games V in Amsterdam two years from now. the squabble over the name is barely remembered. (David Bianco, M.A., teaches gay and lesbian history and politics at the Institute of Gay and Lesbian Education in West Hollywood. If there's an] thing about the history of gays and/or lesbians you've always wondered about, contact him care of this newspaper or through his E-mail address: An Bianco®aol.com, "Pasl Out" appeals twice a month).
File Name uhlib_31485329_n805_012.jpg