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Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
File 011
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Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 011. 1996-03-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/822.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-03-29). Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/822

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 011, 1996-03-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/822.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 29, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript 10 HOUSTON VOICE/ MARCH 29. 1996 And the winner is. ... Academy Awards recap and Voice Oscar Contest wrap-up By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice For the record: Not only did I cough-up $50 to the as-yet-to-be-revealed winner of the Houston Voice Oscar Contest, I also blew an additional $45 on bets that The Postman ($25) and Babe ($20) would be shut out at the 68th Annual Academy Awards. (OK, Jon. next year we split the critical half of the contest prize money.) When all was said and done, more different movies than at any time in memory— 11—had finished the evening with an Oscar. Seven different films won one each, while four others each took two. And the big winner of the evening with a meager (compared to previous big winners) five awards was Braveheart. Mel Gibson's glorious Scottish independence epic was named Best Picture in an evening filled not only with unexpected winners and Oscar surprises but wonderfully full of touchy, teary-eyed moments as well. Whoopi Goldberg did a great job as emcee. She met Jesse Jackson and his moronic protest head-on. and she also struck a blow for lifting the awards ceremony from political gestures (fat chance!) by saying she had received so many ribbons to wear, for so many causes, that she wouldn't hear of concealing her brand new, expensive dress under them. Whether by coincidence or design, Goldberg's stance set the tone, as fewer than a dozen presenters/recipients were bedecked with red ribbons. Goldberg congratulated Alec Baldwin for being acquitted of assault charges against one of those intruding papar- such is LIFE! azzi, and she took aim at Charlie Sheen and Hugh Grant and the things they've paid for. Goldberg's unfettered aplomb and good- natured humor served as a nice contrast to the evening's heartstring-tugging moments, and there were plenty of them. Mira Sorvino gave a glowing salute to her father Paul Sorvino, who wept with pride in the audience. Kirk Douglas stood tall and strong despite slurred speech from a recent stroke as he accepted a Lifetime Achievement Award. Pointing out his four sons and his wife in the audience, Douglas said they're "proud of the old man." From their seats, the fours sons all cried, while Mrs. Douglas veritably balled (and completely ruined her makeup in the process). But the evening most special moment came when Christopher Reeve, appearing as resplendent and handsome as ever, appeared center stage to introduce a montage of clips from social impact films. A few seconds of stunned silence was followed by a standing ovation of nearly two minutes, as the audience, many of them wiping away tears, acknowledged the tremendous courage of one of their own. It was a classic Oscar moment and years from now, it will be recalled as one of those special moments that makes the Oscars so special. The ceremony had its flatter and lighter moments too, of course. Jackie Chan and Kareem Abdul-Jaabar presented the awards for Live Action Short and Animated Short, and the two together just stank. Their jokes were bad and made all the worse by their delivery. It was a perfect time to run to the restroom. Sharon Stone, looking like a million bucks in her basic black off-the-rack attire (black t-shirt from The Gap, with a fitted, long black coat and a black skirt which she already had hanging in her closet), gets the cool-under-pressure award. She was presenting the awards for Original Score-Comedy/Musical and Original Score-Drama along with telecast producer Quincy Jones. The two got through the award just fine, but after reading through the nominees for Dramatic Score, they discovered there was no envelope. While Jones ran off backstage to find out whose name should be announced as winner. Stone remained at the podium and asked the audience for a "psychic moment," so they could all learn the name of the winner. "It's coming to me," Stone quipped, and Jones walked up and whispered the winner's name in her ear. Stone's pointed rebuff of fashion designers yearning to have their creations showcased in front of a billion- strong television audience did not carry over to others at the ceremony. Black was not as ubiquitous on the women as it has been in recent years. Browns— Anjelica Huston, Susan Sarandon, Sandra Bullock—were present in various shades. And pinks—Elisabeth Shue, Christine Lahti, Kate Winslet—made a pale presence. Tradition was the rule of thumb for the men as well. Bow ties were back in a big way, outnumbering the tieless collars by two-to-one, but Jim Carrey and Jimmy Smits low-balled the affair by wearing neckties. Kevin Spacey looked particularly dashing in a white lux, but Gibson had the best thematic tux: the fabric for the vest used his family tartan, and he wore a sword pin on his lapel. It was all very Braveheart . Besides Best Picture and Best Director accolades for Gibson, Braveheart also garnered awards for Cinematography, Sound Effects Editing and Makeup. Best Actor Nicholas Cage ("Leaving Las Vegas"), Best Actress Susan Sarandon ( Dead Man Walking ) and Best Supporting Actress Mira Sorvino ( Mighty Aphrodite ) picked up the only awards for their respective films. Best Supporting Actor Kevin Spacey ( The Usual Suspects ) was one of two award- winners for that film, as Christopher McQuarrie took the Original Screenplay for penning the complex crime story. Other double winners were: Apollo 13 for Editing and Sound; Pocahontas for Original Score-Musical/ Comedy and Original Song (Disney sings again); and Restoration which scooped up Art Direction and Costume Design (does it count that I never actually saw this one?). Other single winners were: Sense and Sensibility (Adapted Screenplay), The Postman (Original Score-Drama) and Babe (Visual Effects). With only a 45% accuracy rate, it was the worst year ever for my personal predictions (and I've been doing this for almost 20 years now). Not everyone was plagued by cloudy crystal halls though. Readers Aaron Coleman, Peter Krespan and Tracy Nelson all correctly predicted 14 out of 20 winners. But only one of them can claim the prize. And the winner is Tracy Nelson ! INTERNET: HTTF'://iAiVVW.GAYWIREDC0M/UNITY/*3UACIs/SUCHLIFE.HTM E-MAIL aUACK.ATEEKfl.AOL.COM ©EARL STORM THE TALK SHOW THAT RESPONDS TO THE RIGHT-WING WACKOS WITH A QUACK! Queers Uprising Against Collective Krapi Miss Camp Hm-erica Foundation, Inc. Prcscnts Thc Come Meet Our Lusty Not So Busty Debs! Sunday • March 31, 1996 • 4 m 7 Rich's • 2401 San Jacinto Cash Bar • SPECIAL DRINK PRICES • Drawing For Door Prizes, *5 Suggested Door Donation With Guest Entertmners! * Please make note of our new phone number (713) 940-STAR Our Designated Charities For 1996 • AIDS Foundation Houston-Stone Soup * The Assistance Fund • The Bering Care Center • Body Positive I Positive Friend Program 'The NAMES Project-Houston Sponsored bu Miss Camp Hmerko" foundation. Inc. Gr.Am.Puz. Solution c 1996 GULF FEATURES, Puzzle TX171 Initialed names: Benjamin Franklin, Ronald W. Reagan, RogerMudd, Robert Mad*Jeil,Dwlg'-*t David Eisenhower. Albert Einstein. George Washington HOSTS OlDVMA Y D A Yi&B fB «A S E SlROUNDROCK s»rwbHyKi8|once E E R P A R«ISA|HO U S T O JpN ZjLAKM BgCglgASSER t0r n a a I B i, ;: a|a«dD TOE Si§J E FfERlftNlLAY S ■ A ;i G I, E ' .7. A L E S YWwD0 2ED mcuMs I A N S MM D I P S T Can't Always Find Your Copy Of The HOUSTON VOICE ? Subscribe (713) 529-8490
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