Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003
File 001
File size: 12.24 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 001. 2003-04-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-11). Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/782

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003 - File 001, 2003-04-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/811/show/782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1172, April 11, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date April 11, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Great outdoors Local and nat ional groups help organize gays who like to commune with nature. Page 15 ISSUE 1172 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. APRIL 11, 2003 INSIDE Houston health officials urge gay men to be tested as cases of syphilis rise sharply among men who have sex with men. Page 3 From the practical to the fun, cars of all types can be found at affordable prices for any gay budget. Page 17 Jim Brochu and Steve Schalchlin show theater audiences that anyone's 'Big Voice' can come from unexpected places. Page 18 Lawmakers move DOMA forward Texas versions of the anti-gay Defense of Marriage Act pass both House and Senate committees By PENNY WEAVER The Texas Senate was poISed to vote Thursday on a state version of the Defense of Marriage Act, which would prohibit the state from recognizing same-sex civil unions, even though Texas already does not validate such "marriages." In the last week, committees in both the Texas House and Senate approved DOl\1A legislation, which gay rights activists have called a "slap in the face" to gay Texans. Those moves send the issue to each cham· ber for a vote by all lawmakers. "I think what the GLBT community in Texas should be aware of is it's very obvious in both the Senate and the House that they are going to do what they want to do and are not engaging in a dialogue," said Randall Ellis, executive director of the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. "Texans should be outraged at that. What's next? •·we have to beg and plead" to be heard by lawmakers, Ellis added. On Thursday, April 3, the Texas Senate Committee on State Affairs signed off on legislation that would ban the state from recognizing same-sex civil unions. The proposal, Senate Bill 7, is also known as the Defense of Marriage Act (DOl\1A), and was scheduled before the full Senate on Thursday, April 10, for a vote. "Clearly the point of the blll is to encourage and protect the mstitution that ls fundamental to our whole society and that is traditional marriage" between one man and one woman, said bill sponsor, Sen. Jeff Wentworth, R-San Antonio. ''People talk about discrimination as though it were a bad thing,'' Wentworth said in defending the bill. "It is something we do all the time." Please see TX DOMA on Page 8 Randall Ellis. executive director of the Lesbian/Cay Rights Lobby of Texas, said gay Texans should be 'outraged' that both state House and Senate com­mittees have approved a Defense of Marriage Act <DOMA). He said with the conservative Republican majority in the current Texas Legislature, gays have to 'beg and plead' to be heard by state representa­tives. (Photo by Penny Weaver) Partners of gay troops wait alone Couples face added worries under 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' By LOU CHIBBARO JR. Lauren, the domestic partner of a senior Navy enlisted person, drove her partner to the California port last November so she could embark on the destroyer that would soon set sail for the Persian Gulf and the expected war in Iraq. Hundreds of teary-eyed but enthusias· tic spouses and family members waived to their loved ones in the military as the giant ship pulled away from the dock. But "Lauren," a lesbian who a.~ked to remain anonymous to protect the identi­ties of the couple, was not among them. "I dropped her off that day," Lauren said. "But I did not get out of the car. We said our good-byes at home. It was for her safety of not being discovered." Lam-en's partner Is among the thousands Please see MIUTARY GAYS on Page 10 The military offers programs for heterosexual spouses of service members servmg m the Iraq war, including support groups and emergency assistance. But the 'Oon1 Ask. Don t Tell' poltcy force<; gay partners to lude their relationships and miss out on opportunities for help. (Photo by Greg Bryan/AP Photo Illustration by John NaJl) 2 APRIL ll, 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE RETROVIRUS · How do I get my face back? AID d · Where have all my cheeks gone? ate The drugs aren't working anymore. What next? Hard truth about structured treatment interruptions. Resistant to everything? New AIDS drugs on the way. Buffalo hump/protease belly-prevention and treatment. Come to hear new information that you.r doctor may not have time to tell you.. Shannon Schrader, MD - Keynote Speaker- 10 a.m. Also presenting are CHARLIE SMIGELSKI, R.D., Internationally-known speaker and author ram Harvard University and ANNA LOVE, facial technician and expert 'on facial restoration 9:30 Arrival and Continental Breakfast 10:00 Welcome and lntroauction 10:05 Shannon Schrader, MD, Updates from the Retrovirus AIDS Conference 11:30 LUNCH (FREE) 11:45 Charlie Smigelski, R.D., Updates on treating lipodystrophy 1:30 Anna Love Getting Your Face Back: What are Your Options? • ~~N\. Saturday April 19, 2003 9:30 a.m. -2:30 pm seLecT· Holiday Inn Select 2712 Southwest Freeway (Kirby & Highway 59) HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I ocal news Health leaders warn of threat to gays Syphilis on the rise particularly among gay men, while staph outbreak seen in general population as well By PENNY WEAVER Health officials are urging awareness of a sexually transmitted disease that appears among more gay men than the general popula· tion, while downplaying the increase of anoth· er potential health risk to gay Houstonians. New statistics from the Houston Department of Health and Human Services show that infec· tious syphilis cases in 2002 in Houston and Hanis County rose 7.5 percent overall and near· ly doubled among gay and bisexual men. includ· ing those who don't identify as such, according to a hf!aith department press release. This is a particular concern for men who have sex with men (MSM}, health officials note, because early symptoms of syphilis, which can be cured with antibiotics, are genital sores, which also can help transmit HIV The rise in reported cases also causes concern that it sig· nals a rise in HIV because gay and bisexual men are increasingly practicing unsafe sex. Officials urge men engaging in anony­mous unprotected sex to get immediate test· ing for syphilis. ':Anonymous sexual encounters hamper intervention efforts," said John Patrel, STD Prevention Program manager with the depart· ment's Bureau ct HIV /STD Prevention. "Without the ability to notify anonymous partners, we are unable to provide testing and treatment to se.-rual contacts ct people with the disea9e." New infectious cases of syphilis - known as primary, secondary and early latent, or hid· den rose last year to 245 from 2'i8 in 2001. The total number of syphilis cases, including people who have progressed to the late latent stage of the disease, reached 969 in 2002 in this area. Some 899 cases were reported in 2001, according to the health department. Among gay and bisexual men, the number of new infectious syphilis cases in 2002 increased to 116, nearly double the 59 reported In 2001. The total number of syphilis cases among MSMs was '1ZI last year, up from 107 in 2001. The local increase mirrors that of other major U.S. cities. Last fall, federal health offi· cials reported that a rise in syphilis cases among gay and bisexual men in a few large Houstonian Tony Dodd is prepared for a blood test by a Houston health department worker during test· ing hours at All Star News bookstore. A recent rise in cases of syphilis among gay men sparked owners of the bookstore to offer the location for free testtng each Thursday (Photo by Dalton DeHart) cities that surfaced last year had spread into urban and rural areas nationwide. The trend sparked prevention efforts aimed at sexually active gay men. despite a focus by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention on abstinence as the mam defense against sexually transmitted diseases, accord· ing to Ron Valdiserri, deputy director of the CDC's Program for HIY, STD & TB Prevention. "The overall syphilis rate in the United States rose by 2 percent between 2000 and 2001," Valdiserri said. "The syphilis rate among men in the United States rose by 15 percent [in the same time period)." Houston health officials urge medical providers, particularly those with many gay and bisexual men as clients, to conduct risk assessments, increase testing and provide prompt treatment. Syphilis is easily treatable with antil>ioucs, health leaders note. Without adequate treat· ment, however. the disease progresses to the secondary stage when one or more areas of the skin break into a rash, usually non-itchy and typically on the palms and soles. Other second· stage symptoms include fever. swollen lymph glands, sore throat. patchy hair loss, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches and fatigue. According to the health department. syphilis often goes undetected because the signs and symptoms are misinterpreted or unnoticed. Houston staph infection outbreak under scrutiny In late February, Houston health offi· cials reported an outbreak among 0 Houstonians of a skin infection that began surfacing late last year among gay men in San Francisco and Los Angeles. At the time. Mark Sanders, director of clinic services for Houston's Montrose Clinic, which treats a number of gay men. said it was too early to tell if the increase in incidences of the infection was primarily among gay men. The skin condition is kno\\n as Methicillin· Resistent Staphylococcus Aureus, or ~ffiSA. and also has been reported on the rise among gay men in Washington. D.C., and Atlanta. Wayne Bockman, !\ID. a Montrose Clinic physician, said the rise in ~ffiSA does not appear to be unique to gay men. "We are seeing it. We've got several cases. Whether it's particular in gay men or not, ifs too early to say," Bockman said. "What I think is happening is we're seeing MRSA in the general community. It's everybody's prob­lem, not just gay folks." Bockman said the STD portion of the clinic has about SO percent gay clients, and not all new incidences of staph infections are among gays. "Of the 10 cases I've got, I think three are m heterosexuals," he said. Bockman noted that other doctors. whose clients are primarily heterosexual. also have treated more cases of MRSA late!;: "They tell me they're seeing the same thing in their patient population," he said. ''It's here but I don't think it's just in the gay comm unit):" Sanders said MRSA is treatable, even though it is more resistant to some antibiotics. "We're still seeing [more staph infections]. Some of these are getting bad," he said. ''We've got some good treatment protocols in place. "It's heightening our awareness," Sanders added. According to Kathy Barton. chief of public affairs for the Houston health department, health officials still are unsure how widespread the staph infection outbreak may be. "We don't know how big the problem is," Barton said. "It's actually difficult to diag· nose in many cases." An epidemiologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the cases appear to confirm earlier findings by CDC researchers that a new, undetermined factor is causing l\ffiSA to flourish in a wider group of people, including gay men. Until the late 1990s, the pesky skin infection had been confined mostly to elderly patients in hospi· tals and nursing homes, CDC officials said. Health officials said MRSA can be con· tracted easily through casual contact. "It's a relatively easy-to-pass infection." Sanders said. "It can be spread sexuall); but it can be spread in many ways." () MOREINFO 10 pm·l am. at EJ's and Midtowne Spa IB-526-0555. ext 231, 227 or 226 Testing done by Montrose Clinic worlrers Testing done by Montrose Chnic wor1<ers 8 pm.-midnight at Keys West Thomas Street Chrnc • 9 am.·l pm. Free HIV and STD testing Thomas Street Clinic • 9 a.m.·l pm. Testi¥,J ckn! by MJrtrose C1ri:: ~ Cj b-~.Shira\ 713-87>4157 2015 Thomas St OraSure method. Montrose Clinic Inc. Cj b-~.Sh.mi. 71.3-87>415Z Tuesdays T1usdays • 7-9 p.m. • All Star News 215 Westheimer • 713-830·3000 Saturdays • 11 p.m.·2 a.m. at Viviana's Houston Area Community Services 3415 Katy Freeway • 713-869-7878 wwwmontrosecltnic.org Testing done by Montrose Clime worl<ers 10 a.m.·.2 p m • Joseph-Hines Clinic Houston Area Community Services ECHOS • 9610 S. Gessner Sllldays 8 pm.-midnight al Club Houston 10 a.m.-2 pm • Joseph-Hines Clinic Call for dates and times of services 9 p.m.·midmghl at Club Inergy 4-8 p.m. at 611 Club 11 am.·3:30 pm • Gallery Medical Clime 713-270-0369 Tesltng done by Montrose Clinic worl<ers Testing done by Montrose Clime worl<ers 5900 North Freeway E-mail echos-houslon'ruswbell.net Wemesdays and Club Toyz from 9 p.m.-midoight. Houston Health Department • HIV/STD Mondays 4-8 pm at M.lry's 4-8 p.m. at The Outpost lnformatlOll Hotline • 713-794-9020 Houston Area Commumty Services 9 p.m. -midmght at Ripcord s pm. rin at Brams Rr.Er B«tooi. Crusits Fridays• 10 p.m.·2 a.m. at The Meatr.d 9 a.m.-noon • ~oseph-H1nes Chmc 10 pm.·! am at EJ's 10 p.m.-1 a.m. at Toyz Disco 1710 West 25 h St 10 p.m.-1 am. at Mldtowne Spa Testing done by Montrose Clinic wtr1cers APRIL 11. 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1172 LOCAL NEWL.·---··---·--····-3 NATIONAL NEWS·--·-··----·-9 FORUM.·--·-·-------·-·---·---·12 OIIT ON TIIE BAYOU _JS COMMUNITY CAl!NDAIL 19 APPOINTMENT 19 ClASSinEDS 0 Q P\IZZl.L_ ...21 MY STARS .26 AROUND TEXAS El Paso gay activists praised that city's mayor, Raymood CabaDero after city officials added sexual orientation and gender identity to the Municipal Code on discrimination. Page 6 CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR Gay Marine reservist Stephen Flit seeks conscientious objector status. saying his sexual orientation influenced his morals and opposition to the U.S. war in Iraq. Page 10. EDITORIAL Writer Miles Clvistian Daniels chronicles personal and ideological changes between the 1991 Gulf War and the rurrent conflict in Iraq. Page 12. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006. Houston Voice is published weekly, on Fnday by Window Media LLC. Subsaiptions are S92Jyear for 52 issues (only Sl 77 per issue). 4 APRIL 11. 2003 American Federated Mortgage Corp. Over 50 years Experience Apply online at· americanfederatcdmortcage.com Denise Wargo Sr. Loan Officer 713.516.0534 cell • Purchase or retina e • Zero down programs as we 1 as 1umbo loans over $45DK • Apply on/me m person or by phone • We offer cash-out refmancmg • Loans available for less-than­perfect credit. • Fast approvals '"We strive to make your mortgage solutions Fast, Fair and Easy.· Les Powell Vice Pre ident Sr Loan Officer 281.787.9610 cell $200 off closing costs by mentioning ad! CORPORATE OrFicr. • 811 H EIGHTS B ot.1 F.\ARD • H msnr-., TX 77007 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE around houston Keynote speaker announced for transgender unity banquet The nth annual Houston Transgender Umty Banquet w111 be held on Sunday, April 26, and the keynote speaker for 2003 will be Lisa Mottet A Washington, D.C. resident, Mottet is thl.' legislative lawyer for the Transgcnder Civil Rights ProJect at the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. Through her work at NGLTF. Mottet assists transgmller activists and alliPS with passing anti-discrimination laws and ordinances that prohibit dlscrimi· nation based on gender identity and expression at the local, state and federal level. She graduated cum laude from Georgetown Umvers1ty Law Center in 2001 and magna cum laude from University of Washington in 1998. The master of crremonies for this vear's Houston Transgender Umty Banquet will be Don Gill of Don Gill Productions. The ban· quet also "lllill feature lr.e entertainment and a dance to follow in the grand ballroom of the Southwest Hilton Tickets are available at unity tickets a.hotmail.com. Indiv"idual tickets $40; Platinum Sponsors are $600; Gold Sponsors are $250; Silver Sponsors are $125; and Friends Sponsors (a ticket for someone 111 your name) are $60. On Saturday, Mottet has requested a round table dJScussion for all gay activists in the Houston area. This round table will be held at the hotel from noon until 2 p.m. @ MOREINFO Houston T ransgender Unity Banquet Saturday. Apnl 26 • Tickets: $40 Hilton Houston Southwest 6780 Southwest Freeway 713-9777911 • wwwbreodalcom/urntyhtm GLBT center to mark National Poetry Month Local gay poet Howard Michael will be the fratured poet at a Friday, April 11, reading at the Houston GLBT Community {'enter 111 Montrose The readmg, which IS free and open to the public, will mark National Poetr} Month. Other poets scheduled to read Include Thomas Blanton, who organizrs monthly poetry readings at the center; Aaron Coleman; and Hampton Burt For more information, contact Blanton via e­mail at thomas" roadsidezoo.com The Houston GLBT Community Center is home base for gay, lesbian, bisexual, nnd transgen· der individuals in the metropolitan area and southeast TrXllS, according to center leaders. ~ =~slp~~day. Apn1 n ouston GLBT Community Center 3400 Montrose Blvd. Suite 207 www.houstonglbtcenter.org Charity groups benefit from Black Tie Dinner Houston Black Tie Dinnez; Inc. has rumounced that proceeds from the fall event were dis­tributed to the seven organiz.auons selected as beneficianes of the 2002 Houston Black Tie Di.lmer. Each of the followmg groups received $8,oo:l, for a total ci $56,oo:J donated: Bermg Omega Community Services, H.A.TC.H., Lesbian Health Initiative, Montrose Clinic. Monn"OSC Counseling Cmter, People With AIDS Coalition of Houston and Resurrectlon Metropolitan Community Church. Dinner officials also announced new members elected to the board of directors for 2003: Rocky Atwood, B:Jl Lee, Mary Ann McBee. John Parker and Wllliam Tayar The 2003 Black Tie Dmner will be held on Saturda): Nov. 15. at the Doubletree Hotel Post Oak, with entertain ment by the comedienne and actress Kathy Na.ii.ml, best known for her roles tn thr. mOVJes "Sister Act," "Soapdish." and ·~fhe Wedding Plannei:" as well as for her co-starring role on the television comedy "Veronlca 's Closet" Il .c.~ !h:ous!tonb~la.ck!tie!di~Mero.<or g Houston"S Krtwe of Olympus Texas. Inc pre<;ented a total of $35.000 to five non-profit organizations tlus month The money was raised by the group through a number of fun<k"alSers over the course of several months. From left are Denise Martin of the Krewe; Matt Soileau of Montrose Clinic; Galy T eixelra of PFLAG/HATCH: Bob Hergenroeder of Houston Buyers Club; Krewe member Robert Brooks; and Amie Couch. Krewe president (Photo by Dallon DeHart) Krewe of Olympus presents $35,000 to local charities Krewl.' of Olympus Te.xas. Inc. ended its fis­cal year by presenting rhecks to designated charities Sunday, :March 30, at Santa Fe. A total of $.15,000 was donated. Presented wtth $8,000 checks were the followtng: The Houston Buyer's Club: Woman's Initiative, Casa de Esperanza d" los N111os, PFLAGIHATCH Youth Srholarship Foundation, and Montrose Clinic, Inc s Endowment Fund. Legacy Counseling Center in Dallas also received a check for $3,00). Supporters and guests at Olympus Ball XXXIII "Colours" helped the group ralse funds for the non-profit organizations. In addition, many peopl" donated at vanous fund ra1Sing artivities that orcurred throughout the year to assist the Krewe The Kn:;\ of Olympus Te."'raS. Jnc. L<; a Mardi Gras Krewe. now based In Houston, that ortg· inated 111 New Orleans in 1970 This IS one of the largest predominately gay Krewes 111 the Umted States. although membership ts open to all. The organization's principal aims are to perpetuate and continue Mardi Gras tra dit1ons and to raise money for conununlty charities. In the last six years. the Krewe has donated more than $140,000 to Houston and Dallas charitable organ iz.ations. PENNY WEAVER @ MOREINFO ' -- - Krewe of OlymptJs Texas Inc. 713-683-1867 • wwwmard1graste~com HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com APRIL 11. 2003 5 You know how to accessorize ... 6 APRIL 11, 2003 FINAL HOUSTON ENGAGEMENT THE I THE ORD www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE la und ex as City council includes gays, transgenders in anti-bias code EL PASO LAMBDA GLBT Community Services praised the F.J Paso City Council on Tuesday for voting to add sexual orientation and g1mder Identity to the city's Municipal Code on discrimination. ''Today's vote is a major victory for gay. lesbian, bisexual, and trans· gendered El Pasoans and an important sign of progress for the entire city," said LAMBDA President Rob Knight in a press release from the group. "El Paso has affirmed its commitment to ending all forms of discriminatron. and for the first ttme in this city's history. gay men and women. and transgendered persons, are no longer~ ond-class citizens." Knight praised the efforts of Mayor Raymond Qiballero and Jan Sumrall, Distlict 1 representative for the City of El Paso, in passing the legislation. LAMBDA is El Paso's oldest and largest non-profit agency serving~; lesbian, bisexual, and trans· gendered residents. Sinre 1991, LAMBDA has provided services throughout the region aimed at eliminating inequality, mistreat· ment, and violence that result from anti.gay bias. Cay activists pra!Sed El Paso Mayor Raymond Caballero after city officials tins week added sexual orientation and gender identity to El Paso's Municipal Code on discrimination. rft - MORE INFO - LAMBDA GLBT Community Services • 915 562-4297 e-mail: admm a,lambda.org • www.lambda.org Gay-rights group opposes promotion of fonner leader SAN M'TOmO - A former Fort Campbell commander nominated for a lieutenant gener­al promotton faced opposition from gay-rights am-ocates meeting In San Antonio last week, the Assoctated Press reported. Members of the American Veterans for Equal Rights contend that Maj. Gen. Robert T. Clark bears some responsibility for a 1999 hate crime at Fort Campbell, Ky. The San Antonio nati~e. now a Fort Sam Houston general, was the post com· niander at Fort Campbell when Pfc. Barry Wmchell, 21, was beaten to death in his sleep by a drunken soldier on Jnly 5, 1999. Winchell's parents, who live in Kansas Cit;: Mo., spoke April 3 to about 40 members of Amertcan Veterans for Equal Rights. Wally Kutteles, \\rmchell's stepfather; and his Wife, Patrtcia, said they feel an anti-gay environment at Fort Campbell caused their son's death. The couple aren't sure if their son was ~· because he dated yowig women, whilP openly befriending gays. Clark said in an inter. lew that he began teac.hmg values about respecting fellow SOI· d1ers In February 1!00, when he became com· mander of Fort Campbell After the kUing, the post instituted specific policies to di300urage antl gay remarks and actions, Clark said. "\\e v.ere very proactive" in d.:scouraging a hostile e!JVlfOnmcnt for gay soldiers, he said Clark was cleared of any wrongdoing after an Army mvestigation. A private named Calvin Glover, of Sulphur, Okla., receh'ed a life sentence in the murder. Conroe librarian honored for defending banned books A woman who helped fight efforts to ban two young adult sex education books from Montgomery Count}' Itbrary shelves has been awarded this }ear's PE"I NeY.man s Own Fir t Amendment Award, the Associated Pres report d Jer1lynn Willl:ims, director of the Montgomery County Library. y, ill recel\'e a $25,000 pri~ at PE1'."s annual gala on Apri' 22 in New York (1t1 J t August (;o:nEis loners In Montr. erv C: iuntv, located north of Hou ton agrl'l'd to teonporaril:r remove two Looks. It~ P rfcctl Norma: and Its '!O Am ,, th bv Ro!J1 H H<.:irm af> r complaints, particularly from the conserva· ttve Republican Leadership Council. The group objected to what it described as the books' pro-homosexual stance and explicit illustrations. Williams worked to convince a reVIew committee looking into the books to put them back on library shelves "Librarians like Jerilynn Williams are on the front lines of censorship battles every day, their commitment to intellectual free· dom often the only thing standing between us and the book-burners," said Pat Schroeder, president and CEO of the Associat10n of American Publishers and one of this year's judges for the PEN/Newman's Own Award. Gay tolerance issue brings controversy to A&M faculty COLLEGE STATION - A bitter controversy that erupted in February in the Texas A& M Umvemty College of Educat10n regardmg a proposed tolerance statement for gays has prompted faculty members to accuse each other of blgotr); the campus newspaper. the Batallion, reported late In March. Others ques­tion whether Texas A&M Dean Jane Conoley ts unpo~ing her poLtlcal views on the college The college's faculty advisory committee was to cons!drr a final draft of a diversity statl'­ment it first proposed Feb. 4. Eight professors, mcluding Stephen Crouse. associate dean of the college, signed a letter objectmg to the statement, which says faculty must "celebrate and promote all forms of human diverstty" and lists sexual orlentation as a protected sta· tus, along wtth rare, gender and other cate­gories. The l"tter suggests the committee adopt a general non-discrimination statement similar to that of the university. and said Christian facult:Y ~hould not haVl' to "celebrate and promote" a lifestyle they believe Is Immoral In a Feb. 26 memo Conoley rebuked the argumrnts Crouse and others set forth In their letter. Conol Y also instituted a ncy, pou­cy that states the college "celebrates and cher tshes GI,BT people." The statement, which ts enforced as the college's policy and Is soparate from the faculty committre's sta•ement. grants gays on th faculty 'special access to protection and suppor," nncl ~tates that any decISIO:l ' promotion • tenure involv ing cm s deserve ' I: ightencd scrutin}t .. from staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com APRIL 11. 2003 7 8 APRIL 11. 2003 www houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I 1ocal news TX House vote on DOMA could come any day TIC OOMA. continued from Page 1 Daniel Graney of San Antonio took offense to the bill. He said be and his part­ner of 29 years pay truces and then- bills, vote and ltve like any married couple, even though they can't get married. "Now the Texas state Legislature wants to pass a law that tells me that my 29-year relationship WJth the one I love has no value whatsoever and I find that deeply offensive and hurtful," Graney said. Ellis urged lawmakers to vote agamst the legislation, saying Texas law already prohibits gays qnd lesbians from obtaining a marriage license in Texas. Ellis said he believed the legislation reinforces "the fact that gay and lesbian Texans are regarded as second class. ·we must stand up to state sponsored discrimination," he said. "Gays and les­bians are denied hundreds of rights and privileges that heterosexuals enjoy. Tax exemptions, legal protections, the right to make medical decisions for our partner there are literally hundreds and hundreds of rights and benefits that we do not have. "If we try to protect ourselves with legal documents, it can cost thousands of dollars," ElllS added. "The second-class status that has been cast upon gays and Jes· b1ans must come to an end.'' Wentworth said the bill does not dimin· ish "my feeling of respect and even love for friends and acquaintances and people that I know who are gay. I have great respect for those people," he said. "This bill has noth­ing to do with that." The bill passed on a 7-1 vote. Sen. Rodney EillS, ().Houston, voted against the bill. "The Senate has decided to fuel the fu-es of discrimination," Ellis said. "This bill does nothing more than create a hos· tile environment toward lesbian and gay Texans. We have a budget crisis, an insur­ance crisis and a school finance crisis. Texas would be better served by our legis­lators making policy that supports Texas families." On Monday, the House Committee on State Affairs approved legislation that would ban the state from recognizing same-sex civil unions a House version of a state DOMA That proposal now moves to the full House for a vote. In the House, the act is known as House Bill 38 and IS sponsored by Rep. Warren Chisum, R-Pampa. The bill passed commit­tee 6-2, with Reps. Glenn Lewis, D·Fort Worth, and Mike Villarreal, D-San Antonio, castmg the "no" votes. ElllS said the Te."GIS Legislature, led by a Republican majority. now IS particularly unfriendly to gays, as evidenced by bills like these. "It's not the same as it wru; the past 10 years," Ellis said. "We can no longer 'skate' in that we (no longer] have friends in high places anymore. uGarnet Coleman and Jessica Farrar cannot carry the weight of the GLBT community on their shoulders," he added. "I really hope that this serves as a wake-up call." Sen. Rodney Ellis, (}.Houston, was the only member of the Senate Committee on State Affairs to vote against the anti-gay Senate Bill 7 last week, known as a Defense of Marriage Act. Gay activists call state DOMA 'slap in the face' Gay activists including the LGRL's Ellis have called the state DOMA proposals "redundant" and •·a slap in the face" to gay Texans, pointing out that federal legisla· tion already allows states to refuse to honor same-sex unions. Congress approved and President Bill Clinton signed the federal Defense of .Marriage Act in 1996 to prohibit federal recognition of gay marriages. DOMA also purports to grant states the right not to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. The federal law also creates a defini· tion of marriage as a "legal union between one man and one woman as hus­band and wife." Vermont is the only state that recog­nizes same-sex civil unions. Since Vermont approved its bill in 2000, lawmak· ers in five states California. Connecticut, Hawaii, Rhode Island and Washington - have introduced civil union legislation, according to the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. On the other hand, 36 states across the country have enacted laws in recent years that limit legal recognition of civil mar­riages to heterosexual couples. Dozens of legislators have signed onto the Texas House DOMA proposal. Lawmakers who have signed as joint authors to the bill are Charlie Geren (R· River Oaks), Edmund Kuempel (R-Segum), Scott Campbell (R·San Angelo) and Chuck Hopson (D-Jacksonville). Among the Texas House members who signed as co-authors to the Chisum DOMA bill are several Harris County lawmakers: District 132 Rep. Bill Callegari (R­Houston), District 127 Rep. Joe Crabb (R Kingwood), District 129 Rep. John Davis (R· Houston), District 133 Rep. Joe Nixon (R· Houston), and DL~trict 128 Rep. Wayne Smith (R-Baytown). Sen. Jeff Wentworth R·San Antonio, said his DOMA bill is designed to 'encourage and protect' traditional marriage between one man and one woman. Last session. a Texas Defense of Marriage Act was passed out of the Senate, but failed to make It out of com­mittee in the House, LGRL officials noted. Lobbyists contend that the shift in the bal· ance of power in the House after the November elections increases the possibil· ity of this session's bill passing both chambers of the Legislature. Number of gay-focused bills are on Legislature's agenda A number of measures related to gay Texans have been filed before the current legislature, in its 78th session. In addition to the House and Senate DOMA measures, those bills include: ·H.B. 194, filed on Nov. 15 by Rep. Robert Talton (RPasadena). This bill would dis· qualify gay men. lesbians and bisexuals in Texas from serving as foster parents. H.B. 194 was referred on Feb. 6 to the Juvenile Justice & Family Affairs Committee. Chair of that panel is Harold V. Dutton Jr. of Houston. a Democrat. Rep. Chisum and Rep. Fred Hill, R Richardson, signed on as co-authors to Talton's bill as of March 6. • H.B. 574, filed on Jan. 27 by Rep. esslca Farrar <D·Houston). This measure would prohibit employment discrimina· tion on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. The pro-gay H.B. 574 was referred to the Business & Industry Committee on Feb.11. Chair of that committee ts Rep. Helen Giddings of DeSoto, a Democrat. A public hearing was held on March 25 on the bill, which remains pending in committee. At the public hearing, Farrar explained that the measure is not revolutionary. "Currently, 13 states and the District of Columbia offers similar protections to their citizens." Farrar said. "More than 300 of the Fortune 500 companies have policies in place that protect workers against discrimination in the work place. It is good public policy, good for business and good for Texas." State Rep. Garnet Coleman <D· Houston) signed on as a joint author to Farrar's bill •H.B. 862, filed by Coleman on Feb. 11. This measure, also known as the Dignity for AU Students Act, would protect Texas students from discrimmation based on characteristics including race, religion and sexual orientation. H.B. 862 was referred to the Public Education Committee on Feb. 18. Chair of that committee is Rep. Kent Grusendorf of Arlington, a Republican. Members of the panel include Rep. Scott Hochberg of Houston, a Democrat. Farrar signed on as a joint author to the Dignity for All Students Act about a week after it was filed. • H.B. 916, filed on Feb. 12 by state Rep. Sid Miller (R-Stephenville). He calls the bill the Defense of Families Act; it would prevent two people of the same sex from filing a joint petition for adoption of a child H B. 916 was referred to the Juvenile Justice & Family Affairs Committee, just as Talton's H.B. 194 was sent to that panel. To date, no other lawmakers have signed on as sponsors, co-authors or joint authors to Miller's proposal. · H.B. 1136, filed on Feb. 20 and referred to the State Affairs Committee on Feb. 26, was proposed by Democrat Villarreal. The legislation that would ban dis­crimination in housing and employment based on sexual orientation. It defines sexual orientation as "having a prefer­ence for heterosexuality, homosexuality or bisexuality; having a history of such a preference; or being identified as having such a preference.'' It also states: "This Act may not be con­strued to mean that this state condones homosexuality. bisexuality. or any equiva­lent lifestyle." If passed. the legislation would prohib­it employers from firing, refusing to hire, or otherwise discriminating against any­one based on sexual orientation. The bill also would make it illegal to refuse to sell or rent property based on sex· ual orientation. The sexual orientation leg­islation proposal also lays out rule,s for hotel and motel operators, reaitors, labor unions, employment agencies and adver­tising publishers. • H.B. 1911. filed by Talton, would pre· vent unmarried Texans from serving as foster parents. It was referred to the State Affairs Committee on March 12 and has no other legislators signed on as co· authors to date. The Associated Press contributed to this nory. ~---------- ft MOREINFO l..esbm'Gay Ri!#s Lobby of Texas P.O. Box 2340 Austin, TX 78768 512-474-5475 wwwlgrt.org HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I~ around the nation Fla. politician apologizes for comment linking gays, porn HOLLYWOOD, Fla. - Hollywood Commissioner Sal Oliveri drew protests from gay residents when he spoke out April 2 against the city allowing an adult entertainment business. the South Florida Sun-Sentinel reported. "Wake up America ... other­wise you have a pervert or a homosexual living next to you," Oliveri said durmg a commission meeting. Almost a dozen protesters gathered out­side of City Hall two days later to demand an apol­ogy. " I want you to know I'm offended for anyone to say my sexual category throws me into a pedophile category;" Carol Hoehn, a pediatric nurse. told Oliveri after he came outside to meet with them. Oliveri, a 13-year veteran of the commission, apol­ogized for including gays in his criticism. "Everyone who is righteous has a right to live the way they do," he said. Sal Ofiveri, a commissioner in Hollywood, Fla.. apologized after being criticized for anti-gay com· ments he made during a recent com­mission meeting. ACLU sues on behalf of gay Ark. student LITTLE ROCK, Ark. A federal lawsuit filed by the ACLU on April 8 claims that the Pulaski County Special School District violated the constitutional guarantees of free speech, equal protection. pnvacy and separation of church and state in it~ treat· ment of gay student Thomas McLaughlin. 14. Over the course of 18 months. school officials at Jacksonville Junior High School allegedly told the teen's parents he is gay, forced him to keep quiet about his sexual onentation and suspended him for not doing so. "My school forced me out of the closet when I should have been allowed to come out to my family on my own terms and when I thought it was the right time," McLaughlin said earlier this month. "And now the school has been trying to shove me back into it ever since." The lawsuit seeks an injunction on further action against McLaughlin. "We're taking them to court to ensure that other lesbian and gay students in the district wouldn't face similar discrimination," said James Esseks, litigation director for the ACLU's Lesbian & Gay Rights Project. S&M convention prompts protests in Okla. city EDMOND. Okla. (AP) A S&M leather con­vention last weekend, dubbed Tribal Fire 2003, raised the hackles of local religious lead· ers. Paul Klas.sen, president of the F..dmond Ministerial Alliance, urged Christians to devote the w1-oekend to prayer and fasting. "We ask God to deal, forgive and deliver all who are in bondage to a self-destructive life," the alliance said in a statement The event, held April~ at the Ramada Plam Hotel Edmond. featured seminars and demonstrations by nationally recognized S&M leaders. "'l'he hotels wouldn't invite us back if we were a problem." said Susan Wright. spokesperson for the National Coalition for Sexual Freedom. Tiie NCS~' spoke out last year when compL1ints from religious groups prumpted Cendant C.orporatlon. the hotcl franchiser that includes Ramada and Howard Johnson, to issue a letter warning local hotels about bookmg "controversial guests." In a clarifica· tion IE'tter sent to the coalition. Cendant promic;ed tohonortherightsof franchisees to sell room5 and meeting space to "U1e persons of thetr choice." Colo. student suspende for calling referee 'gay' GRAND JUNCTION. Colo. (AP) - A sixth-grader whose ball was called out of bounds during a playground game was suspended for two-days for saying the call of the student referee was "ga}:" West Middle School student Ben Madison. 12. said he thought the word meant '"dumb" until his mother explained it. Principal Jody Mimmack said students are warned about such behaviors before they are suspended. "We work very hard to create a safe envi­ronment for students." Mimmack said. The principal said Madison also would have been suspended if he had referred to the playground call as "dumb" or if he had teased the other student about a hairstyle or ethnicity: But Madison's mother complained her son was being treated "as a test case." Lesbian teacher in Utah wins effort to oust her from job SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - The Utah Supreme Court on April 4 left it up to edu­cation officials whether to fire a lesbian high school teacher. The ruling was a vie· tory for psychology teacher Wendy Weaver, who came under attack from par· ents and students at Spanish Fork High School in a heavily Mormon part of Utah. Teachers are required by law to be moral models for their students. A lawsuit accused Weaver of failing to be a good role model because her sexual orientauon conflicted with state laws prohibiting sodom}'. Weaver, who now uses her unmarried name Wendy Chandler. said the court's decision was a relief "What they were going after was not really with· in their right as citizens to do," Weaver said of her critics. Weaver disclosed her sexual orientation when a~ked by curious students in 199i. Shortly thereafter, the high school barred her from talking about it. and Weaver later won a federal lawsuit against the Nebo School Distnct for that requirement. Parents and stu­dents tried to remove Weaver by com­plaining to the local school board, but the district did not fire the award-winning, 20-year teacher. From staff and wire reports APRIL 11, 2003 9 April 13 • "Are You Ready For /.~ Maranatha :; Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion• Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/ Children's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery 1s available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group· services on Tuesdays and Wednesda}'S. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship !YfCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 71.3-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1..net www.maranathamcc.com Celebrating 26 Years in the Community SaturJ.1ys.il 7:30pm Maundy Thursday 1turgy at 7pm Good fdday Liturgy, at 10 APRIL 11. 2003 www houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I natio al news Little support for partners of military gays MIUTARY GAYS. continued from Pagel of gays in the military deployed to the war in Iraq, while Lauren is among the part­ners left behind \\'ho must conceal the true nature of their relationships. Gays deployed to Iraq and other loca­tions in the Persian Gulf region must endure the same fears and family disrup­tion associated with war as their hetero­sexual counterparts, according to officials with the Serivcemembers Legal Defense ~etwork, a military watchdog group that assists gay service members. But unlike their heterose..'O.lal compatri­ots, SLDN says, gay service members and their same-sex spouses must endure the added fear of being ensnared in the military's "Don't Ask. Don't Tell" policy: which calls for the immediate discharge of gay service mem­bers who disclose their sexual orientation. Although gays can secure a d.ischarge wxler the policy whenever they wish by com­ing out of the closet, few chose to do so, said Steve Ralls. SLDN's communications director. Ralls and Kathy We~cott, an SLDN attorney, said the organization is flooded with inquiries by gay services members seeking advice on communicating with loved ones at home without violating the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell~ policy: Benefits missing in action On top of the pain of saying goodbye to their loved ones, partners of gays in the mil­itary disrover that they do not qualify for a wide range of military programs available to other service members' families. Among them are spouse support groups, emergency financial aid and regularly scheduled brief· lngs on the st.atus of the units to which ser­vice members are deployed. The Metropolitan Community Churches, a Los Angeles.based network of gay-support­ive Christian denominational congregations in cities throughout the U.S. has stepped in to provide some support services to partners of gays in the military, said Rev. Marty Luna­Wolfe, pastor of the New Life Metropolitan Community Church of Hampton Roads, Va But Luna-Wolfe said congregations like hers, which ministers to gay service mem­ber stationed at the giant Norfolk, Va., Naval base, don't have the resources to match all of the services the military provides. There Is little the church can do to alter the military's rules on partner notifica­tion. where gay partners can only be clas­sified as ordinary friends on a special mil­itary list of next of kin. The military uses that list to contact the families of service members killed or wounded in action. "The military will contact everybody on the list," said Heather. the partner of an Iraq-bound Army reservist who was called into active duty last month. "But it will take longer for those who are not blood rel· alive to be contacted." 'I'm going' Heather. 26. who also asked to remain anonymous, has lived with her partner outside Philadelphia for more than eight years. The partner, 40, is an officer who has been in the Army reserves for more than 15 years and works full-time in a profes­sional field in civilian life. Heather described how she learned that her partner's Army reserve unit had been activated last month and was being shipped out with less than two weeks notice. "One day she came back from drill," Heather recalls. "She just hugged me and would not let go. I said, 'What happened?' She said, 'I'm going.' So we had about a week to get our lives in order." Heather drove her partner to the air­port, where the partner flew on her own to join her unit at a military base in the U.S. The partner expects her unit to be trans­ported to the Persian Gulf, most likely Kuwait, within a week or two, Heather said. Military families are invited to see their service member loved ones depart for their overseas journey, but Heather isn't sure If she wants to go. "She would like me to sec her. We have to be careful about our usual way cL talking to each other and touchmg each other," Heather said. Like Lauren. Heather said she doesn't want to compound the stress and chal· lenges her partner faces in the coming weeks by coming out as lesbians. 'Tm at a loss," Heather said. ''I've been sending her mail. I sort of take things day by day. It's very hard." Although she doesn't think her letters are being monitored, Heather said she tries her best not to write anything that would cause problems for her partner. "I try to keep them general, like someone who just cares about her, to make it sound like a family." In doing this, she insisted, she is telling the truth. ''I'm including our pets, a dog and four cats - a dog who is not happy his mom is gone." Anonymous e-mails Lauren. whose partner's ~hip is in the Persian Gulf. said the two consider them­selves lucky because e-mail communica­tion so far has been readily available, and the partner can sometimes call her on the ship's satellite phone. "Her e-mail is monitored for security," Lauren said. "So I set up an e-mail account without my name. I never put my name anywhere on it. It's not fool proof. but it's safer than using my regular e-mail." Within the confines of her anonymous e-mail messages. Lauren added. she feels free to express her true feelings. "We feel we have to communicate with each other," she said. "I tell her I love her and I miss her. I tell her that all the time." In describing her partner's job on the destroyer, Lauren said, "Her main duty is to sit at a console and watch a radar screen," which she said "sees a picture" of the surface and the air. including all ships, planes. and missiles in the Gulf. "lf you want to know if the Gulf is dan­gerous. it is," she said. "The entire Gulf is considered a combat zone and a hot spot." Luna-Wolfe of the MCC Church in Hampton Roads said gay service members and their partners have been members of her congregation for years. She said the sud­den deployment of thousand of troops in the Norfolk area. which is home to eight sepa­rate military inst.allations, placed a great strain on military families, especially part­ners and loved ones of gay service members. "Like any denomination, our military members are commg to us for support," she said. "It's a place for partners and loved ones to talk and cry. It's a place where they know they're not alone." Like family members of all service mem­bers, Luna-Wolfe said partners of gay troops engaged in combat in Iraq have been glued to therr televisions. their emotions swinging from a sense of pride and joy to fear and hor­ror. The gay service members, who mootly have acljusted to the task of having to con­ceal th<'ir sexual orientation, are sending back message of confidence, she said. "When they get to a phone - it's not very often - they always say, 'We're going to be alright.' They say that all the time," Luna-Wolfe said. Heather said the assistance that MCC churches plan to offer is sorely needed. "The onr. thing I would like people to know is we are so di'lCOruleCted." she said. "I have been left out of thr. loop of families of service members .... I don't have access to any of this." ft MORE INFO Servicemembers legal Defense Networic PO Box 65301 Washington. D.C. 20035 202-328-3244 wwwsldn.org Gay Marine seeks conscientious objector status Reservist says sexual orientation influenced his 'moral development' By LAURA llOOGlAS-mlWN SAN' JOOE, Cal.it: Asan unknown nwnberr:L gay soldiers serve in sllence in the US war against lraq-lxmned fmn l.i<.ingopen!y ~the mllitary's "Doo't Ask. Dcn't Tell" pol.icy - a gay Marine resavist came out earlier this month as part r:L his applicatim for CXl1ScienOOus objector status. Lance Cpl Stephen Funk, ro, drew national media attention when he held a press confer­ence April l outside of the 1st Beach Terminal Operations, 4th Landing Support Batt.alion in San Jose much more press attention than the plight of gay soldiers serving in lraq receives. But F\mk's case likely won't have mtxh impact in the ~ing debate about gays in the mililm); according to Aaron Belkin, direcUr of the C.enter for the Study r:L Semal Minorities in the Military at the University r:L Califcrnia, Santa Barlma ''S<me opponents cL inclusion could cite this case as evkience that gays and lesbians are not patriotic." Belkin said. "I do not think most peo­ple v.oold find that argument compelling. howeV· ei: since even the Pentagon has agreed that gays and lesbians are as patriotic as everybody else." At the press conference, Funk said he did­n't realize the full implications of military service when he enlisted last year. "I refuse to kill," Funk said. "lt is scary to con­front the mllit.ar}: because the military teadles you to su'llnit to orders even when you object" As part of his application for conscien­tious objector status. Funk told military com­manders that he is gay. "My moral development has also been largely affected by the fact that I'm homosex· ual," Funk wrote. "I believe that as a gay man, someone who is misunderstood by much of the general population, r have a great deal of e.~ence with hatred and oppression." Flanked by hrs sister and mother, gay Marine reservist Stephen Fri spoke to reporters April 1 before turning himself m at his unit m San Jose. Cafif. (Photo by Eric Risberg/AP) To some critics - Including conservative talk radio hosts Rush Limbaugh and Neal Boortz-the move smacked cl someone v. illing to take any route to get out cL the militaJ;: ''What we are seeing with what he is doing is obviously someone who doesn't want to serve," said Maj. Carolyn Dysart; spokr.sperson for the Marine Forces Reserve. Acknowledging his sexual orlentahon could make Funk eligible for discharge under the mil­itary's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, which bans o~nly gay service members. But triggering a possible DADT discharge isn't Funk's reason for saying he isga): according to Amy Allison. a conscientious objector from the first Gulf War who is serving as an informal adviser to Flink as he seeks similar status. "Stephen has never requested discharge for any other reason than being a oonscientious objector - he ls opposed to war," Alli.son said. "But there is a conflict between 'Don't Ask. Don't Tell,' which says peoplP. in the service shouldn't disclose their sexual orientation. and thP regulations around applying for conscien­tious objector status, which require service members to be since.re and honest in outlining the lnfluences on their moral development and why that is incompatible with military service." HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com ro police Philly district attorney to investigate trans homicide PHILADELPHIA -Philadelphia District Attorney Lynne Abraham decided April 3 to investigate the killing of Nizah Morris. a transgendered woman bashed on the head in December. the Philadelphia Daily News reported. ~If the dL~trict attorney can unearth somethmg, we'll be happy with that," Homicide Capt. Thomas Lippo said. Gay act1vio;ts accuse police of a sloppy investigation, but authmi ties say they have no clues and no witnesses. Morns, 4i, was found lymg Ln the street with a massive head wound on Dec. 22. The medical examiner's ollke said she was murdered. but police didn't rule it a homicide for wet>ks, fueling criticism that they were not taking the ca'le seriously because Morrls was transgendered. On the night of her attack. Morris collapsed dnmk outside a gay bar and refused a ride home in a police cm: Passing motorists found her lying in the street minutes later. Police won't release toxicology reports and did not file a report on offering Morris a ride. Pluladelphia Distnct Attorney Lyme Abraham opened an investigation into the slaying of a transgendered woman after criticism that police weren't doing enough to find the killer. (Photo by Dan Loh/AP) Three held over for trial in Calif. trans teen killing HAYWARD, Calif. (AP) - Three men pleaded innocent to murder April 2 in the killing of transgendered teen Gwen Araujo, and their trials could start nine months to a year from now, said Gloria Allred, attorney for the victim's family. The killing took place Oct. 4 after Araujo was discovered to be biologically male at a party at the home of Jose Antonio Merel, 23. Araujo was beaten to death, and her body was buried in a shallow grave. Merel, along with Jason Michael Cazares and Michael William Magidson, both 22, face charges of murder in a hate crime. A four th man, Jaron Chase Nabors. 20, pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter in return for testifying against his friends. Madigson was released on bail Ln February to undergo drug counseling, but was sent back to jail at the end of the preliminary hearing. No action has been taken on a motion by his lawyers to again grant bail. Lesbian judge in Calif. held for trial in domestic dispute SANTA MARIA, Calif. (AP) - A lesbian Santa Barbara County judge was ordered April 1 to stand trial on charges of bat· tery, brandishing a gun and drunken driving, which could end her career on the bench if convicted. The trial date will likely be set at an April 18 hear ing. Hall, 52, was arrested Dec. 21 after an argu . ment with her domestic partner, Deidra Dykeman. who told officers Hall threat· ened to shoot one of their dogs. The con­frontation came after Dykeman discov­ered that Hall took some Christmas wrappings that Dykeman purchased for herself. "I never saw her like that before," Dykeman said in a preliminary hearing. Hall brandished a loaded .38-cal­ibrr revolver and smashed the telephone before driving off, according to Dykeman. Hall was later arrested for drunken driving with a 0.18 blood-alco· hol level, more than twice the legal limit. Using a gun to dissuade a witness and destroying a telephone to block calls to police are felonies. Partner arrested in gay leader's stabbing death WlLKES-BARRE, Pa. (AP) - A man was arrested and charged with crimmal homi cide m the death of his Jover April 3 after telling police the Jover attacked him then fled. Kenneth Stephens, 21, told police he was stabbed by Michael Pierson, a 40- year-old gay activist and health educator, during a Jan. 28 domestic argument. Stephens was hospitalized, and police filed a warrant charging Pierson with assault. Pierson's body was found March 12 in a golf course lake near where the argument allegedly took place. An autop· sy showed that Pierson suffered a single, fatal stab wound to the chest. "[Stephens] never indicated that Mr. Pierson had been stabbed or injured in any manner," said Trooper Chuck Sands. Stephens is being held without bail. Pierson's friends said the couple broke up a few days before he disappeared. Accused gay LAPD deputy chief joined program to boost pension LOS ANGELES Two days after gay Los Angeles Police Department Deputy Chief David Kalish was suspended over allegations that he sexually abused male teens in a police-youth program in the '70s, he joined a deferred pension pro­gram that boosts his income more than 60 percent, according to the Los Angeles Times. The city program pays each month into an interest-earning account to be spent at retirement. Employees who sign up must retire within five years. "It appears that he qualifies for it," said Capt. Jim Tatreau, director of the Command Officers Assn. "But this Is cPrtamly not what the program was designed for." Whatever the outcome of the criminal investigation, which the district attorney is still considering turning over to a grand jury, Kah h will receive the extra payments that began accruing April 1. Six people, including three who contacted authorilies after Kalish's suspension became public, allege that Kalish abused them. From staff and wire reports APRIL ll. 2003 11 BERING MEMORIAL U~ITED METHODIST CHURCH The KOLBE Project Offering Peace & Reconciliation to the Alienated 1030 Height.., Bhd Hmt'>ton, TX 77008 ph. 713.861JSOJ mvmkdbep1ujat.org CALENDAR Friday • April 11 Morning Prayer l Oam Movie Night 7 pm "One Hour Photo" Saturday • April 12 Breakfast 9:30am Monday • April 14 Scripture Study 6:30pm "The Book of Jonah" Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • April 18 Good Friday Service 1 Oam Sunday • April 20 Happy Easter Monday • April 21 Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • April 25 Morning Prayer 1 Oam Movie Night 7pm "Harry ~otter and the Chamber of Secrets ' I 1f1il E:1td ll voice STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor PENNY WEAVER editor 1thoust011V01Ce.C001 Procb:tion BONNIE NAUGlf. JOEY CAROUNO Q:w respOlidenls: LOU CH!BBARO JR. LAURA DOWAS-6ROWN. MIKE FlEMn."G. MATTHEW HENNif. BRIAN MOYlAN. KEVIN NAFF. JENNIFER SMITll. RHONDA SMITH. STEVE WEINSTEIN Conbtutars 00.~ IJOSER. JOE PHIWPS ~ DAI.TON DEHART. KIMEERl.Y THOMPSON WelJmasti!r JED DEMPSEY SALES & ADMINISTRATION General MNlager DANI!'· ' \'' '':' . '" dernericll(1thoustonwice.com Aam1I f.xecutives BRETT CUUUM - baJllum a,!Joustllll'IOICUOlll DONNA HUU - dhuft a,houstonvctceJ:o BRIAN MARHN - bmartiti@;houstonvoicewn Hatiooal AMrtisirr,i ~ Rivmfell Marketing ~ Inc. 212--242-6863 Nllisher· WINDOW MEDIA llC President· WIWAM WAYBOURN Editorial Dirtcbir· CHRIS CRAIN Corporat! r.ontrcller· BARNETTE HOISTON Art Director· ROB BOEGER General 1.!ana!Jer· MICHAEL KITCHENS M.Jrtetilg M.wger· OAN GARRIOTT MEMBER ... ._d....a. .....1......D .,_r CHARTER MEMBER Est.ibfMed 1974 as the Mont/Tise St.Ir 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77C1J6 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 WWW .houstonvoice.com Contents copynght 2003 Office hours: 9 am to 5:30 pm weekdays To SliJnlt a letter Letters sl10!ild be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will wit!:lrold names lllXll ~ but you must rndude yar name and phone runber for ¥e11f1Cation. Please send mail to Houston Voice. 500 l.INe!I Blvd. Sllite 200. Houston. Texas n006; fax (713J 529-9531 or e-mail to editor'i;houston- , voice.com. Opinions expnssed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice guest editorial A new war, a new me Eleven years ago, when bombs fell on Baghdad, I was singing the national anthem in support. This time around, coming out has changed my view. By MILES CHRISTIAN DANIELS WAS ON MY WAY HOME from 7-Eleven when a song was interrupted with news that America was bombing Iraq. A nervous reporter gave play-by· play commentary. Bombs and bullets exploded in the background. I had just turned 14 and remember the sense of pride I felt that night. In some· what silly fashion, I joined a few of my friends in placing our right hands over our hearts and singing together, "Oh, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed?" I was still in the closet in 1991. And I would stay that way for nine more years, both 1n terms of my sexual orientation and the way I thought things were sup­posed to be. But a few details from Operation Desert Storm are still fresh. Peter Arnett and Bernard Shaw became household names. That ghostly green night-vision camera, which brought the bombing mto our living rooms, still occasionally emerges In my dreams. And I fondly remember Mom hanging the American flag on our front porch post and tying a yellow ribbon around the rusted anchor in our front yard. That war lasted less than two months, and Bush Sr. declared victory. Years later I would learn we didn't even come close to winning, and that hopeful Iraqi citizens, who had welcomed our troops with song and dance, were later slaughtered as they tried to finish what we had started. I also learned that all we did to help was toss stale bread from a moving aircraft. THOUGH WANCHESE. OUR SMALL fishing village in coastal North Carolina, had sent no tro0ps, the community rallied behind George Bush Sr., much ltke It's doing today with his son. And I stood behind them not only on the issue of war, but on other moral Issues. I believed abortion was murder, with no exceptions. I believed that gays went to Hell, even though I battled those "demons" myself. I believed Bush Sr. was seated next to the Father's right hand and that listen· ing to liberals would poison my thoughts and hinder my walk with God. I guess, in a way, being gay has been good for me. And being gay and from Wanchese even better. Though I'm still loved by many there, even more consider me a depraved sinner and an embarrassment. E\'en in high school and early college, I held onto my beliefs. I vi.TOie a newspaper column for the Virginian-Pilot in Norfolk about how wondetiul Newt Gingrich's "Contract with America" would one day be for my generation. I became a licensed minister in my denomination, and served for a year-and· a-half as a full-time youth minister. Life was on·track and Wanchesers, as they're known, couldn't have been more proud. Until I came out. AT FIRST. I WOl\'DERED ff MY MORAL metamorphism was a sort of inner revolt a way of coping with the fact l was now deemed a sinner - an immoral enemy in thw eyes of those I had loved and grown up with I started \\Tlting newspaper columns about gay Issues and accepting and lovmg all people reganlless of their differences. The beliefs I once held so dear HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 11. 2003 PAGE 12 had seemingly deteriorated. A few nights before our current president announced our invasion of Iraq, I stood in downtown Wilmington, N.C , holding a lit candle poked through a paper cup holder. Crowded around were a couple hundred people who - like me - did not think we were doing the right thing. There were Catholics from the down· town parish, activists from the Green and Democratic parties, a handful of local college professors and students, and a healthy representation of gay men and lesbians. We silently prayed for peace and then we went home. Though I tried to conjure up the emo­t Ions I had felt during the first Persian Gulf War, they just weren't there. In fact, at that moment, I would have been lucky to stumble through that first line of the .. Star Spangled Banner." And, in addition to my prayer for our brave troops, I added a few others to the list. like those Iraqis whose lives would be lost in the line of erroneous bombs and bullets - those civilians who had asked for none of this. I even offered a prayer for Saddam Hussein. After all, I was taught that Christ came for the most grave of sinners. While standing silently at that vigil. I also thought about how my life has changed in these brief years since America's first war in Iraq. How only a few years ago, I would have been on the other side of the street waving our flag, holding high my sign proclaiming Hussein a devil, and shouting at tho>e who were not being patriotic. I guess, in a way, being gay has been good for me. And being gay and from Wanchese even better. Though I'm still loved by many there, even more consider me a depraved sinner and an embarrassment. So, I've had to learn the hard way what it's like to be thrust on the other side of enemy llnes,. And I've felt the pain of those who are hated. spit upon and for some - even murdered for simply being who they are. @ Miles Christian Daniels is a free-lance writer and documentary filmmaker in Wilmmgton. N.C. He can be reached at mcd5024 wuncwrl.edu. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com po1• n REV. JIM WEBB Support for sodomy laws is built on a platform of religious fraud, taken out of context to repress gays and support a notion of public morality. Sins of Sodom revisited again TEXAS' BAN ON GAY SEX SHOULD BE overturned because it violates the constitu· tional right to privacy. I hope it will be over· turned because it deprives Texans of equal protection under the law - the law applies only to gays. The Texas law against "homo­sexual conduct" is based on religious tl!lllch· ings, so it also constitutes a violation of th• separation between church and state. Conservative groups support the law because gays are not so popular among the religious right. But their attack of private acts on the basis of "public morality" is built on a platform of religious fraud. Sodomy laws are based on Biblical teachings taken out of context, misunderstood and misin· terpreted by time, translation and design. Most of us are woefully ignorant of its teachings, except for a few "just-so" stories from Sunday School, and the Hollywood Biblical epics. In this case. our lgtxrance is used against us. The Biblical misunderst3l¥li created sodomy laws that are used as a m?apOO against us. They are seloctively enforced to ruin lives and terroriz.e. THE SIN OF SODOMITES WAS NOT "THE wickedness of homosexuality" as those on the religious right would have you believe - it was a lack of hospitality and their wor· ship of pagan idols. Sodom was a tiny fortress in the barren wasteland of the Dead Sea, according to biblical scholar Dr. Rembert Truluck. The only strangers that the people of Sodom ever came into contact with were enemies bent on destroying them, or on taking over valuable trade routes. When word spread through this small enclave that Lot had visitors, Sodom's inhabi· tants naturally became curious and wanted "to know" them. It is illogical that they wanted .. to know them in the Biblical sense," but simply that their fear ci strangers fueled their curiosity As the crowd became larger, more fearful and more unruly, Lot sent out his daughters. If the male inhabitants of Sodom had been gay, it is illogical that Lot would have appeased them by sending out his daughters. When God destroyed this cit}: we believed that God did so as a result of homosexuality. But this biblical passage's mistranslation ci the phrase "to know" contributed to a religious, cultural, and legal bias against homosexuals. The DI •11t11 llll•11111 llcl1l LH1 If DID llEEI ertc_omereethangrHll.com iWase "to know" is used 9l3 times in the Bible, aax>rding to Truluck. and is only lntapreted to mean "to have sexual relations with" twice. In both places \\Tiere it is used in this VI~ the tradi­tional meaning c{ ''to know" makes m<re sense. Other biblical passages that reference Sodom and Gomorrah actually refute the premise that God destroyed these cities due to homosexualil): For example, Ezekiel 16: 48-&l clearly indicates that God destroyed Sodom due to its inhabitants' lack of hospitalil): Deuteronomy 29: 21-28 adds idolatry to the list of "sins" that caused this city to be destroyed.. Neither passage mentions homosexual.it): THE CONCEPT OF SOOOMY DIDN'TEVE.~ really exist until the 11th centun: when Christian n!ormer and hermit Peter Damian coined the term to categoril.e an abstract set ci homoerotic acts, elevating them to the le'lel prero:upying sin. according to Marte D. Jordan in his book ''The Invention ci Sodomy in Christian Theology." This categorization was based on the same misinterpretations of Sodom and Gomorrah. APR!nl. 2003 13 and fueled by the early church fathers' contin­ued discomfort with human sexualil)( which had been evolving for centuries. In this e.~­ple, the truth became distoned not only because of translation differenre; - translat· ing Aramaic speech into Greek writings - but also when the early church fathers' discomfort \\ith sexuality and pleasure influenced the interpretation of the ancient teachings. This distortion has been the basis of reli· gious intolerance, social oppression and legal­ized victimization of gays through sodomy laws that are still enforced today. Sodomy laws not only violate our right to privacy and equal protection under the la\\; the laws also violate the separation and church and state when it is held up to the scrutiny cl the truth This i5 a ca~e where the truth can literal· ly set us free. Rev .in Wetm is an ordained interfaith minister and aJtln livlrg in Washington, and can berWiedat ~ •1 Eric lr11r '" 14 APRIL 11. 2003 NE\IV VC>RK I EUROPE I L.A. Designer Fashion Now Aueiable Al:. 1/21R 8uarant11d 11newa11111 111mb1nhl••I 713.524.9932 4040 milam St. Houston Between Richmond 6 Alabama In montrose www.fltnessbchonge.cc www.houslon voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on the record "Sexual preference? Jesus. no. it means nothing to me. [One of my mentors] ii; as gay as Christmas. and so's my brother. I've been around gay guys since I was, oh, 16. They're just good pals. From Day One we got on. made jokes, and I thought nothing of it." Irish actor Colin Farrell (Washington Post. April 9) "How do I handle a gay proposition? 'Not interested, thanks.' You know, it's amazing the changes in people . ... These same people who would've freaked a few years ago - well, they're not on their knees [bawdy slang], don't get me \\Tong- but they know that a good person is a good person." Farrell. on changes in attitudes toward homosexuality (Washin~ton Post. April 9) "I never thought I'd be sitting around talking about oral sex in front of my mother. That just got to me." Gay Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.). whispering to Congresswoman Maxine Waters (D-Colif) during testimony in the Clinton impeachment hearings, in which Frank's 86-year-old mother; Elsie, was present; all captured in the newly released docu· mentary "Let's Get Frank" (Washington Post, March 27) "[San Francisco) awarded a man who had a sex change as its Woman of the Year. When 'he' accepted the award. 'he' said there was a part of 'him' that didn't want to accept It- but that's gone now." "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno, on the male-to-female transsexual honored by gay California Assemblyman Mark f,mo (D-S.F.); f,eno's monologue prompted protests from transgender rights activists (NBC's ''Tonight Show," March 31) "World's highest-paid female impersonator . ... [She] sports the face of Jimmy Cagney on the body of Mayor McCheese and lugs around the personality of George Wallace. The only good thing about Leona Helmsley is she's so mean, stupid and ugly that you honestly can't even envy her riches." .\'aming f,eona Helmsle;,: one of the "50 Jfost f,oathsome New Yorkers" (New York Press. March 25) "Homosexuals can and do serve honorably in the Marine Corps. Homosexuals can and do make some of the best Marines. Homosexuals are capable of military service and can and do perform as well as anyone else in the military. We hesitate to discharge Marines solely based on a statement they make about their sexual orientation." A prii•ate memo written by Marine Corps Captain Darrell Allen, of the Tu·enty·Nine Palms Marine Corps base in California. subsequently leaked to the Servicemembers f,egal Defense Network "While people were requesting we get involved, it was not a role I felt our station should take. We have a very wide audience, and a lot of our listeners are people who have children. People see our DJs as role models in some ways." Doug Gillen. general manager of KISS 105.3 FM. the most popular radio station on the University of Florida campus. on u·hy the station declined to participate in a college Pride Fest. prompting boycotts against the station from campus student groups (365gay.com, March 31) "(The oral argument in Lawrence vs. Texas) proved to be a mismatch of advocates to a degree rarely seen at the court." Longtime correspondent Unda Greenhouse, describing the quality of presentations by gay Washington attorney Paul Smith and Harris County. Tex., District Attorney Charles A. Rosenthal before the US. Supreme Court on March 26 in the Texas sodomy case (Neu• York Times, March 27) "OnrP sodomy is m,'lde legal, what's next? How atxmt polygamy? As we have been reminded in the case of Utah's Eli7.abcth Smart and her abduction by a prac­ticmg polygamist, there are people who believe they have a right to that sexual and relational preference." Conservative syndicated columnist Cal Thomas. on the Te.xas sodomy case (Tribune Media Services, March28) APPOINTMENTS: Montrose Softball League hosts its first golf tournament as a charity fund-raiser this weekend. Page 19. I THEATER: 'Big Voice' shows that a delightful theater experience can include a little bit of religion. Page 18. Out on the Ba HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 11 2003 PAGE 15 Reclaiming the great outdoors Spiritual, psychological renewal leads nature lovers to hit the trail this season By MIKE FLEMING and PENNY WEAVER T HERE ARE NF.ART.¥ AS MANY ''TYPES" OF gays as there are gay people. Social and support organi­zations abound for gays of every ilk based on a wide variety of interests and demographlc factors. And that includes gays who love getting together for "back to basics" outdoor activities that not only engender camaraderie, but for man); an overt or mdirect renewal of their personal spirituality. The gay men's spiritual group for outdoor enthusiasts that springs to mind for many is the Pagan-based Radical Faeries, founded in 1979 by gay rights pioneer and Matachme Society founder Harry Hay, who died last year. '1'he Radical Faerie Fellowship is a diverse and unorga· ni7.ed group of gay men who center their spiritual lives around various and sundry pagan doctrines," according to the group's Web site. '-While no particuLv doctrine predominates, the movement Is deeply rooted in the precepts of Native American spirituality. There are also Druids, Wicrans. Taoists, Shamans. Hindus and any number of other recognil.1..'!I and unrecogniU!d beliefs present among Radical Faeries." "Basically, it's a bunch of guys who get together in the '70s spirit of free love," says Ian Schmitz, a longtime par­ticipant in outdoor Radical Faerie "gatherings" like the one scheduled this month in Tennessee. "We aren't afraid of. and in fact celebrate, our sexuality through guileless acts of appreciation for each other.·· Sclunitz says. ''Woodsy retreats are perfoct S(•ttings to be back in touch with Mother Earth and with our feelings for our fellow faggots." Some Faeries have reclaimed the word "faggot" as a rebuttal to negative use of the term in the same way some gays embrace the word "queer," he says. The only aspect of the group that every Radical Faerie seems to agree on is that there is no one philosophy that governs their activities. "We are self-Oefin.ing," says the group's Web site. "We choose to be who we are. and there L~ no authority but our hearts. We gather togethei; get naked and beautiful in oh-so-many different ways, drop the world and open to each other-unless we don't feel like it, in which case we do something else." GROWING TO INCLUDE M&'1'BERSHIP NATIONWIDE. GAY Spirit V1Sions is "committed to creating safe. sacred space for lov· ing gay men to explore and strengthen our spiritual identity that is open to all spiritual paths," according to the group's Web site. The Atlanta-based group accomplishes its goal to cre­ate a healing, spiritual community and help its members live with integrity by supporting each other and by shar· ing experiences and insights. Gay Spirit Visions considers itself tribal in nature to provide escape, community and solace to its members. ''We at GSV use this tradition to provide a safe place for men who love l!IC'n to spook from their hearts," the Web site states. ft MOREINFO Hoostoo ~ Croi.., • 713-KAMP-OUT Bird watdirr,i on H9i Island • Apnl 19 Enchanted Rocle Weekend • Apn1 25-27 RaiOOow Ftsling Club • IB·52J.6381 e-mail: rambowfishingclub 'tilhotmaJ1.com Ra<ical Faeries • www.radfae.org Cay Sjii\mls·www~ Spring Retreat • April 18-20 Mountain Retreat & Leaming Centers Highland, NC • 828-526-5838 gayspint wmmdspringJ:001 Surruner Camp • June 18-22 Gay outdoor groups from the specf.i­cally sprntual to the more actmty. focused coocentrate on escapmg I crty and c 1oymg the reg on s rich nat ural wondm Members of grou Mountain Retreat & Leaming Centers Fall Conference • Sepl 17-21 Mountain Retreat & Leaming Centers For elght ·hour trips, cost is sro with a deposit af ~ required. Cost Includes the use r:l rod, reel. bait and tackle. The eight· hour trips depart at 7 am. and return at 3 p.m. For l.2bour trips. cost is $75. h JS Gay Sp ViS1ons off new act V'1 fD Photo c THE LOCALLY FOCUSED HOUSTON OUTDOOR GROUP brings together gay Bayou City residents for a number of activities based on enjoying nature. HOG is defined in its monthly newsletter as "a social group for gay men, lesbian women and gay-friendly per­sons who enjoy the outdoors." The group sponsors events ranging from sports activities to social activities. This month, HOG members plan an outing for bird watching on High Island. Known as one of the best bird· watching spots in the world, the island is home to Boy Scout Woods and Smith Woods. According to HOG's newsletter. April is the best month to see North America's most colorful songbirds here, including Scarlet Tanagers. Blue Grosbeaks, Baltimore Orioles and more as they migrate from South America across the Gulf of Mexico to the Tuxas coast. During the April 19 HOG trip, mem· bers al.o;o will vL~it a nearby rookery to see ~te Spoonbills, Great Blue Herons and other birds raising their hatchlmgs. Cost for the trip is SS. which benefits the How.ion Audul.xm Societ): and the group \\ill leave from the House cf Pies on Kirby at 10 am. For more infonnation. contact Jeff at 7l!Vi29-iili2. Durmg the weekend of April 2.'>-27, HOG members will hold an Enchanted Rock campout at the state natural area about 70 miles V.b1 of Austin. Reservations must be made. Pets are welcome: vaccination papers must be sho\\11 at the park gate and pets must be on a six-foot leash. The group plans a pre.camp meeting at i p.m. Mo~ April 21, at Cafe Express on Kirby between Alabama and Richmond. Fbr more infonnation, contact Howard K at 713-528-61 i4. Future events for the Houston Outdoor Group include Guadalupe River rafting from June 6-8. ALSO FOCUSED ON GAY HOUSTONIANS IS THE Rainbow Fishing Club. which frequently sponsors deep· sea fishing in addition to other fishing trips. Upcoming dee1>-sea fishing trips include an eight-hour tour on Saturday, April 26; a 12-hour trip on Sunday, May 11; a 12-hour trip on Saturda}; May 31; a 12-hour trip on Sunday, June 15: an eight-hour trip on Sunda}; June 15; and a 12-hour trip on Saturda}; June 28. The group also invites e.x-perienced and novice anglers alike for fishing at the Galveston Pier. This event will be held Saturda); May 17, at the pier at 89th and Seawall Boulevard. Cost of admission to the pier is :)8 per person, or I for chil­dren age 12 and under, or S6 for senior citizens over ng 60. 'Womyn' festivals celebrate great outdoors with music, camaraderie By MIKE FLEMING A Jove of the doors mspu-es !\"em= restiVaJs that begm as soon as outside temperatures nse and connnue through the fall The Gulf Coast \\omyn's Festl\'lll and the huge Southern \\umyn s Festh'lll tick off the 1S0n inth popular perfa:111ers and camplng under the stars with a distinct lesbtaI? bent First up. tbe l5tb Annu3l Gulf Qmt \\ow::'s Thsti\'31 takes plaCe II Je9. blan-Owned Camp Si&er SpJrtt !n Ol'l!!t. ~ O\W EaslB" \\ mnd. Ajl1l I" -31 "Tins fest val creates a commun tr of rs of many agei., manr races and manv v."llks of « 'or elllj)OWl'rment. encolll"3gc t e tertamment." ~ Brenda H v.11 fi nded the Cam., S r s te %1th her partner. l\anda Hensoo '!be CO\lll faced ad\'ers ty from neighboring res dents v.11en they d ded t hnd the te ~fter years of banssm t. d berate y set Ii and Called legal a pts • sbur don the based oo monl ob the H nsons h t expen need m IDOi"' than and now co-EX peacefully v. th ighbors, they~ Th!s year's llneup at the festil'al ilr.lllles wgl't!Ilan and meat diWs. a craft shav.. !Utep ~fir thcR v.to desire them. g3lll!'S, lmhs and wtrk shqis. Mu.mans !'dlOOuled to perl.Jrm inclll!e such lesbian fawrites IS W:ie Blue ~ Hirsdl. Trish Williams, Shelley Graff ml Fla.sh SiJvert,!oon. Pre-rei;istration IS reqUL'-ed, and men and accompanied cluJdren are welcome Henson says. As the homier Gulf Coast Festival attracts hundreds of VIS!tors li1lln around the reg! n. Southern '\\omyn's Festl\'31 books big name lesbian acts that draw national crowds of thousands to its v.1lmen-only festivities. 1h! May~12M11t um :,w-hltures iμlrnothnci lesbian~ llily lt:lr am (n;Willmn.=Ot!H~~~Emre"Swift.k:sbla!ldoo Hak:)m. cmn!IJ!l.5 \"dde ~ m'IMari;i GooJez ml s;da1 mi:! art1st5 ROOin G. '\\'hilemlC.(' Cane:aresttoawm: "'lh!!!s~ir~noma! b!' .. tat )OOl'nnml infmm>."Sl)"SLD!a.Jadooi.~rf the~ A I'd! Coast WQ111y11"s Festiv31· ~17-20 • CanlJ Sister Sprrt . CMtt. MS ~ • • www~t.com • Soullil!rn Wcmyr(s Festival• MJy 8-12 • wwwi;aywomyn.org • Dragon Hills • Bowdon. ('.enrgia 30108 16 APRIL 11. 2003 Masque Ball &.. Dinner Friday, April 25 - Bpm Double Tree Hotel Downtown Tickets on sale! For more information, call 713.861.9149 30th Anniversary! 30th Anniversary Wors • eivic Sunday, April 27 - 1 pm Rev. Elder Troy Perry www.houston voice.corn HOUSTON VOICE Children§ Easter Eggstravaganza• Satt.rday, Aprf l2 2-4pm Holy Week Services Palm Sunday Service April 13 - 9dm &. t lam Holy Wednesday Service April 16 - lpm Maundy Thursday Service April 17 - 7pm I Noche Espiritual Worship Celebration Saturday, April 26 - lpm Rev. David Pettitt (Pastor of ICM Monterrey Mexico) will offer the Spiritual Encouragement at the 7pm service. Scramble Golf Tournament Saturday, April 26 - Barn At Bear Creek Golf Course Now registering players &... sponsors! For more information, call 713.937.7926 or 281.337.4546 or e-mail will offer the SplrttuaJ·----­ncouragement at------yc~-- Spedal music: The Noche Esp/ritual Music Team and The AnOJnt/ngl mccgo f03~ah0o.com. 9am &... 11am. join us for a Pot-Luck lunch after I the 11 am seNice. • ~~unri~ Service ril 20 - 6:30am Easter Sunday Services April 20 - 9am &. 11 am 2025 W. 11th St.@ T.C.Jestei: • 713-861-9149 • www.resurrectlonmcf.org J_)-;:JJJJ r 3_/ j ~_!J_{ -.S~J A . P P mi· er car care Center mer1ca's re HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com tos JOE PHILLIPS How to play the numbers on affordable but cool cars and come out a winner Five under 25 SUCH A MAGICAL NUMBER, 25. A silver anniversary. The sum of the first five odd numbers (1,3,5,7,9). And five years to the big three-0. Ah, the lure of Botox irtjections. It's also the limit (at $25,000) that many gay guy or gal needs to go cruisin' - in a car. that is. Whatever the criteria practical. fun, cutting-edge, stylish, versatile - there's no need to spend a penny, or a quarter, more. PRACTICAL Ford Taurus sedan · $19.415-$23,730 Tired of the club scene? Need something sensible to offset your party·animal aura? Then look no further than the stable TaW1lS. For 18 years, consumers hl:ve been bullish on Ford's bread-and·butter sedan. Practical. Roomy. And loaded as in stan­dard features. not the sobriety status of your last circuit party playmate. Thanks to high crash-test scores, it's also safe and secure. If only that were true of some blind dates, as well. But we digress. Side air bags and antilock brakes are optional. Best of all, automaker rebates and dealer incentives mean thousands off the sticker. All the better to jet off on a cruise. A possible downside: Such rebates/ incentives may mean a poor resale price later. All the better to stay home and watch '"Will & Grace" reruns instead. STYUSH Mazda 6 sport sedan • $19050-$21.620 If macho is more your style, then jump in the athletic Mazda G. Available in manual or automatic transmission, the VG engine easi­ly outruns the base model's pokey 4 cylinder. The ride is firm yet smooth. The han­dling is taut but compliant. Fit and finish are highJ.y toned with sleek trim inside and a muscular, head-turning body. Damn, it's one of the few cars that force you to the gym so you can look as buff as it docs. A tight rear - not a good thing in this Ford Taurus ca<;e - means lots of knee-knocking for back­seat passengers. But the rot 40 spilt folding rear seat expands an already generous trunk. Anti-whiplash front seats are a plus. as are optional side and head-curtain airbags. And as if there weren't enough creature comforts throughout, lighted audio/crui.se<ontrol switches are available on the stee1ing wheel. A 10 for looks. Ditto for driving pleasure. FUN Toyota Echo compact coupe./sedan • $10.105-$10.695 Sometimes you feel like a nut, some­times you don't. With Toyota's Echo. it easy to have fun either way. Nutty details include the speedometer, which is in the top center of the dash (instead of on the left. in front of the steering wheel). Then there's the funky, egg-shaped body - for high driving position, easy access, and, oops, some sway when cornering. But think of this as anoth­er way of groovin' to the musn:. More traditional features include tons of storage nooks. A spirited four-cylinder - in either manual or automatic - gets an impressive 3B mpg. And inside, it's as quiet as the live audience dozing through Bette Midler's failed sitcom. Perhaps the only sour note: Most features aren't standard. they're options even the clock. Still, even at $19,500 ?.ith all bellc;.and Toyota Echo whistles included, this automotive bit of whimsy is way below our $25,000 limit CUTTING EDGE Ponfoc Vibe sport wagon • $16.435-19.735 • MPG: 26 Lord knows many gays can't see them· selves in a station wagon. But a ga5-guzzling SUV seems so politically incorrect these days. And last time I checked, minivans were strictly for breeders and Fro deliveries. But back to the point How to get the use­fulness of a wagon/SUV minivan without sacrificing every hip tip Martha taught us before that nasty stock-manipulation scaOOal? Just check out Pontiac's all-new sport wagon, which blends the usefulness of a 5- door hatchback with the handling and com· fort of a small sedan. Based on the popular Toyota Matrix, the Vibe is boxy-cltlc, nimble and spacious - no small feat considering It's slightly shorter than the Honda Civic sedan. Backseats fold down for a large. flat floor. Power comes from a so-so 4-cylinder or a peppy VG. Side airbags and ABS are options on some models. And at 26 mpg, this trendy car makes both a fashion and political statement. VERSATILE Subaru Forester SUV • $20545-22.895 Introduced five years ago, Subaru's Forester was fully redesigned for 2000. It's fresher, larger and has an all-new body for better handling. Best of all, the "Martina­mobile" is full of standard features. includ­ing power windows, locks and mirrors, cruise control, tilt steering, AM/FM weath­erbandJ CD audio. side airbags. ABS, daytime nmmng lights and remote keyless entry Other plusses include better brakes, high crash-test results and two option pack­ages. It still offers high, firm seating, a C8J'o like ride and full-time/all-wheel drive. So Forester still retains all the ortginal quali­ties that made it appealing in the first place APRIL 11. 2003 17 "BEST PICTURE OFTHEYW!" THE NEW YORK TIMES TIME MAGAZINE PREMIERE MAGAZINE 2WINNER BAFTA AWARDS - - - BEST ORIGINAL ~LAY talkt0her a film by Almodovar NOW PLAYING AT THESE THEATRES lANDMAl!K RIVU OAKS 3 2009W Gtcyll 713-624-2175 Ever ~I like you are missing something In life? Most people only operate at about 10% of their capacity. A lot of people are not doing what they need to be doing Learn to follow your heart and develop the other 90%. It's time for you to learn what you were put on this earth to do. Saturday, Aprtl 26 rrom tOam to noon S25 - c..I or e-mal ID prH ....... 1 4040 Milam. Suite 31 O 'fllnesS~Sklg all BJZ.28J 1390 or ~ dmnfrA*m'cdn'mn ~-donnled•y.com Getting on with Life After Separation and Breakup • A,..,... ~Coltpk:J;kg'f' lltt ~lfll«*MIMl .4»'f Unless you learn to deal with It, you are destined to repeat It It's time to wake up and know that you are not alone, and that you can and will make It 1he results are phenomenal with virtually no downside! You owe It to you15elf. Take back control or your life and look forward to a new future 18 APRIL ll. 2003 ·. :- - -_'.:.;.: _l .HtA'"·rRt Nt'N 'Nt4ST cw:1J•"·" Need Tax Help? rn •!• Individual •!• Corporate and Small Business •) Accounting Janet S. Langham, CPA 3701 Kirby Drive, Suite 118-4 Houston, Texas 77098 713.622.2650 • CP. SL@aol.com ·STARTS TODAY! www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE theate DON MOSER 'Big Voice' shows that deity abounds in some of the most unexpected places Theater can be divine THE QUESTION ASKED AND THEN answered by both Steve Schalchlin and Jim Brochu m "The Big Voice: God or Merman?" is: Where does someone find direction in life? Throughout their sepa· rate and combined journeys on stage, the two talented performers share with the audience their travels on the road to understanding their place and God's role in the world. It's fortunate, though, that the two are Merman queens and not Judy ones; otherwise, according to Jim's thinking, their travels together would have been doomed. The above brand of humor is part and parcel to this autobiographical pro­duction of wit and music by two long· time partners: Jim, a Brooklyn-born Catholic, and Steve, a Southern Baptist from Texas. At an early age, both men were called to the service of God within in those very different denominations. but the "big" voice never would arrive for them, even in the most sacred and devout of settings. ACCORDING TO JIM, IT WAS ALWAYS the little voice in their heads that pre· vailed, and his practicing of papal bless· ings at the Vatican and Jim's studies at a Bible college were to no avail. However hard they would seek. their efforts came up comically short. Many moments and songs performed by the duo, about their careers and marriage, have that bittersweet edge to finding some sort of purpose in life. "Our original concept was to write a play about God, but we found we were writing a play about each other." says Brochu. "We change the course of each other's lives all the time, and we never know it - that's what the play is about." BROCHU. A 30·YEAR VETERAN OF stage and screen, has his epiphany of career direction in musical theater, when he gets to meet Ethyl Merman. From that moment, he understands that God can be found in the theater. His tale of that discovery, with its subtle humor and tested compassion, includes times when the public's hate for his homosexuality is not understood. The question of where God is during those times remains an underlying concern m his career. As for Schalchlin. a composer/lyn· cist best known for his semi·autobio· graphical, award-winning work "The Last Session," his darkest but most miraculous moment comes upon being diagnosed with AIDS. Of the many Real·hfe partners Jim Brochu (left) and Steve Schalchlin wrote and star in 'The Big Voice: God or Merman?' The production is showing now at Stages Repertory Theatre and 1s directed by Anthony Barnao. A portion of proceeds from the play's Houston run goes to PFLAG-Houston and the PFLAG/HATCH Youth Scholarship Fund. (Photo by Bruce Bennett) poignant and comical numbers in "The Big Voice: God or Merman?", the one concerning Steve's coping with that dis· ease is the most remarkable. At a time when there was little known about the illness, Steve, along with Jim's tremen· dous faith, conquered it literally through hope, the "impossible" hope of performing his work on Broadway. Not only did he overcome the disease, but also his show played on Broadway for nine months. If you are in the mood. then, to hear personal testimony of the power of theater to change lives, go see "The Big Voice: God or Merman?" By way of Jim Brochu's and Steve Schalchlin's humor and catchy tunes, you will leave with a lighter heart and a little more "religion." @MORE INFO ihe Big Voice: God or Merman?" Through April 19 7:30 p.m. Tues, Wed., Thurs. and Sunday B p.m. Fri. and Sat. 4 p.m. Sat matinee, April 19 Tickets: $30 Stages Repertory Theatre 3201 Allen Parkway 713-527-0123 wwwstagestheatre.com wwwihebigvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I community calendar SATURDAY, APRIL 12 GLOB.O. Balle k!cl:-cll parly. lll.OB.O ~Gays & ltsblans Org.Jn&zed by Orgullo, a newly formed l>'.Jll1ll1)fit organflation servlnQ the Latino/a COllll1Ul1ity ., Houston. Baile is an nml formal g.1ia fealll'· Ing live music ~ting 9dY pride for Latinos. Noon-9 p.m EJ5. 6501 Ralph Sl Food raffles and entertainment are planned. T1tkett S30 !"'"sale or S35 at the door. 713-642-9797 Glif Coast Trimgender eonmtt... M<ftmg. 71>780--4282 Houston 8uyss CU>. Free BIA (Bioelectrical I~~) the fin! two Saturdays of the montl1. Hain: 10 a.m-2 pm Houston Buyers Club. 3400 MJntrose Blvd, Suite b04 11>520-5288. htLPJ/Www~.crxrvbia,_~htn lblslalG'¥&L.m.i Pam. FW~~- ~Pair. www!~ Mel's GathemQ of Houstan. Dialogue~ 6.30~.30 Plll 1ho ~ d t11! Tr.J'IS!l'llllw Ccrmuily' Fdt.ilin wil idlle Brm1a nm... fr.t t.nt.mi lkiwrslist Oud> d tWsl!x\ 5200 Fam Oud> phone; 71>526-5200. Men's Gathering of Houston: ro-528-4461 Prt Pistols" Houstllll Field trip to QIMI ranqe, 2 p.m. IOO!lllln to be deternined Pink Pistols of Houston. 1826 M.mette. Houston, TX T/074 7'J-m- !265 WWW~ EVERY SATURDAY Al-Sp;irish W..,,., ~ ~ 6 Plll Rfslmction IMn>­polt. rl Coomnty Oud\ 202!> W lltn 713-l03-3409or'/13-&l-9149. Afta' Holn. KPFT 90.1 FM 1-4 a.m D9r!y mass. 7:30 p.m for gay Cathorocs. 713-880-28n Free HIV Tesq Mootrose Cliic.11 p.m.-2 a.mat VM.nt'!. 713-8J0.3000 Gay & Lesbian Brealdast CU>. 930 a.m 281--437-0636 Hwston Wrestlilg CU>. Practice. l30 p.m 713-453-7406 Lambda C81ter. Alcoholics Anonymous.11:30 a.m Eye Opener Groop. 8 pm Satrily N ~ ~ 930 p.m. Willing Onts Group. 1201 W Clay 713-521-l243 or 7!>528-9m www larrM1houston.°'9 ~ 11*r.1een wal< the sti.ets ID""" Pl"l""l lll!e crila 9.30 p.m. Cor'-"'!at camuilycerur 713-528-SAFE E-f1\1l ~ Sl Stephen's Epi5copol Clvch Rosary 8 a.m 1805 W Alabama. 71>528-6665 Houston GL8T Carrmnty C81ter. llrq>-lri. noon-5 p.m.. l<lCdS Associatllln for Transsexual Support (TATSJ, 3 plll • 3400 Montrost, -1r"077''-S:'4· .~.~ SUNDAY, APRIL 13 amic ChmiS C. CU>. Sp'r<J car show. noon-5 pm. at South 8tad\ JOO PaClfic St cctC- 713-797-8615. www.~°'9 EVERY SUNDAY llelilg MemoNI lMUd Methocist OudL Services at 8.30 & 10.50 a.m. Sunday ldml 945 a.Jll 71>52b-1017 C81ter for Spiritual ~ Services at IJ a.rn, for children at 10:50 un. 6610 Harwtn. 713-339-1808. The Cflllfr also has C0111rutment c~ met.lpl1ylical bookstore and classes. Conmnty Go5pel. Sfrvict at ll am. & 7 p.m s.ndJy Sd1ool for clildr"1 IO a.m filSS0-9235 orwww~ Qrmuty d l(id'!d si-ts n Blu10t. ~ lll 6 pm.1575 sp-ddq> Ave, Beaooiont. Tt"'1S. 409-813-205~ E-mail: cksr!Y~t i:o.-t Qud\ Eamrial, llJenl BaiJbst. Smlct 9.30 a.Jll & tdJcJtlOn hour ll a.Jll ~ Emorson ~ OudL Mllt eciJcatlon, 10 a.m. Service, II am. lJllCh at noon. WWW~~ Fht Congregational Clvch (Memor;af) Service at JO 1.m. Christian Etilcalion ll30 am. 713--408-9543 or ~ frst lWbriarl ~ OudL s.ims at 'l-.30 & ll.30 am l!nlndl at 10-.30 a.Jll 71>526-5200. durth@Fclw~ Fret HIV Testllg. Monbw Clinic. 9 p m.-micng111 at CUI 1""111' fil830-3000 Gq Bowling Leagues. 7 p.m. Palace Lanes. Bellaire Bl'ld 713-861-1187 Gay Catholcs ti Sl Anne's-lbJS!on. 5 p.m 'NOMp service. Oinner and iocial alexcaJ1\4'wlnet 7l3-62J-0930 r.1.0BAL Gay Lesbtan Or Bii.•llilf Alliance Uni.....,,ty of Houston GLBT student group meebrq. 2 p.m. at the Houston Ltsbian & Gay Comroomty Center, 3400 Mootrose. Suite 207 713-524-3818. www "1.edW-9k>ba1- E-malt global@bayoo uh.edi. Gr.ice AsS«riJ:1 Cluth Gay/9.1y-affimurq tcngrtgatlOll. 11 a.m ser.ice. 567 ~ G•ow. llvingston. Texas. n35l 936-646-nl4 E·m.iil: leol awttwiel Gna llllhenn avdl. Sinlay school for Ill ages 9 a.m Service 10-.30 a.m 713-528-3269 Houston ~ ~ CU>. Practict from 4-6 p.m. For'"""' lrlfonNtierl. log on to wwwnlll)l1necbrugb ~ Hwston Temis WI. 9 a.m-noon. Memlri3I Fin at the Temis Center lw>tootenniscll(__aiaol.com Untcll c.iar. Alcddcs Analyn1cus. 9.30 a.m. Om! to 8diM Gn>i.ip. 1201 W eta, 713-521.1243 or 713-521l-'1772. wwwbntcblwslon°'9 Mnllllha ~ Metropoibft OudL 10 a.m 5elV1Ce. 3333 Famil\ Suite 106. fil528-6756 Nor1l!woods Uribri;n lb'ltrsaist OudL 5ffllces at q-45 & ll:l5 1.m. 5"nday ldml 945 a.m 281-298-2780. R5mction MCC. ~ 9 and n a.m. Cllikhn and Youth Sunday School JO am. Cl1lldt-eITT servlce.11 a.m ID-861-9149 St Slliftn's EjSqJil Oum Hett flda!ll. ~ L 145 am. Hett WMst. Rltl!IJ,855am,~llv,10am.Omlfld1iristlla.m.~ Sllnd.iy Bn.nc11. For HIV positive men.11 a.m. R1va1, Ul7 M!lSOlli SL Pa"- 713-880-0690 Hnail: PoznBufl w.ot.aim. 11lf Women's Grol4). Med~ and 6scussion. 10-45 a.m 71>529-B57l Thorui lWtNl LWwnall:t ~Md! ciscusslon. 9 a.m SrMce, lllS a.m 281-m-8882. wwwtwc«g. ~ Fei>mp o1 Gatmton Cully 502 Ouch Sl Service, 10-.30 a.m. 409-765-8330. ~ Ftlowsbp of Houston. Mrlt forum. 10 a.Jll Service, 11 a.m 713-686-5876. lblllon <UT Conmnty Cdr. Orop-«12-6 p.m. • r.tBT Conmnty Outh with RPI.~ Wood: Bible sblfy. IG-!0:45am. ~ lla.m. www~ • LOAF (l..esbW6 0Yer Aqe F'lftyl. 2 p.m. •SIS­TERS ti HoostOll !i4'POll '11ll.ll for African.American le5bin. 3:30 p.m. • 3400 Moolrose, Sijte 211/. 713-524-3818 WWW~on} EVERY MONDAY C81terforSpiibal ~Meet • "'(drvp-in).11.30 a.m.-1 pm. 6610 H.1twin 71>339-1808. me HIV Tesq Houstllll An!e Camuitr SIM:e5. 9 a.m-mon lll .bifl>­Hines Clu1IC. mo w..t 25th st 7!>526-0555. ext 23~ m or 226. me HIV T es1nJ Ma1!rw> Ch:. 8 pm.-niti;tt fi)'s V"5l 713-I00-3000 Frost Eye Cine. Fm eye tXdl11S for peope with HIV 713-830-3000. Gay Bowling Leagues. 9 pm Palace Une$. Bellair! Blvd 713-86l·ll87 Gq Fathrs/Fathors frst. Support~. 8-9.30 plll Bemo MtmoriaJ lhted Methodist Cluth Toln ~WWW~ ~ Gna Assembly OudL Gaylgay-afftrlTing CCl1QltCJ<1IXn 7 pm.­bics class. 567 Cedar GrlM. Uvingston, Texas, IBSl 936-646-n14 E-mail: loo! aesttexM Grief & OMm Support GnqJs. 7 p.m llelilg 713-526-1017. ext 208. Houston ~ ~ CU> Prac!Ke from b.30.S-.30 p.m. For more information, log on to www~on} Kolle l'lqect. Eucharist 7:30 Plll 713-861-1800. Lambda C81ter. Alroholics AnonymM 8 plll Jle9iMerS' r,,oup. 1201 W Clay fil52J· l243 or 713-528-9m. WWW lambdahouston.~ Montrose Che. Offen~ peer~~ for gay and bisexual men w'th HIV. Spanish~ '11ll.ll meets. b:30. p.m. 215 Wi!stheinu 713-830-3050 Cncx> de PfX1iO iaa Lati'los gay y bisexwles VlH posl­lJYos. IJfts b:30. P.r.i mas ilfonnacion llama al 7ml30-3025. Q1.1M1' Voices R>llo Show S.10 p.m. KPFT 90.l lblllon GI.BT Clrmuity c.mr. J)oQp-il 2-9 p.m. • M:llln:lse ~ Prcjec1. 7 pm. • IU!al Rii11ls ~ Ajtic;if Action Ccrmitttt. 7 p.m. .3400 .. ' .. s..: 7"fl~3818~~ TUESDAY, APRIL 15 ~for AIDS. M• <er. 7 pm 1407 H.lwttlome. 713-527.a210. EVERY TUESDAY Bemg Support~ i.JJl1Ch &nch ~ 11a.m.71>526-1017 Cenlll' for Spiibal ~ M<ditation (drop-in), ll.30 a.m·l p.m. 6610 Harwn 71>339-1808. Free HIV Tesq Houston An!e ~ S1M:e5. 10 a.m-2 pm. lit JolePt-Hines en; mo Vll5t 25 St 7!>526-0555. ed. 23l m or 226. Fret HIV Testllg. Mootrose Clinic. 8 plll-modnl9h\ at Club Houston. Also 4-8 p.m. at 61J Club, 61J Hyde Pait 11>830-3000. Gar youth. New program for )'OllllJ gay males. ages 18-29. 7 p.m 614 Avondale. 71>533-9786 GL8T Pwrtec:ostils. Billie sllldy prayer, 7 plll In the Heqib. For ilfo: 936-931-376t e--rreil: wwwWgbl947@cs.com Houston WDnWl's ~ T earn. No _.a nec=vy Practice. 6 30-8.30. w.stbnd YMCA. !Yy, 713-208-1529 1ntroduction to lblclism. AJI ...iccn.. a.t 034 w r• 11 the Height~ 7 plll CarftOI\ 713-8b2-8129 RariJow llil9"n-Fla CAN/ dam~ !him RMr-~No p;Wll' ~ ll!ginr 2 5-W;ftz, SIUtle & s.q ~pm. 713-528-9192. Houston GL8T Carrmnty Cenlll'. Orq>in 2-9 p.m.. L!stli.1n Ccmlng Out~ 7 plll • 3400 Montrose, Slilt 207 71>524-3818. WWW houslDn9fbtcenter~ EVERY WEDNESDAY C81ter for Spirt1a1 ~ M<'lit.atlOll (drop-tnl ll30 a.m.-1 p.m. SOM °""""°" & ExploralJOI\ 7 pm 6610 HMwin 71>339-1808. Ciyst1I ~Anonymous (CMA). 8:15 pm meet1119- Montrose Colllsel111CJ Center, 701 Ridrnond Ave.. Room l~ llelilg Manorial lntod Mltfwdst Oud\. Support Nt1-i< Pill lJd Oinner, 6.30 p.m. Vanous support Ql1lUP\ 7 pm. 71>526-1011 Bille Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m St Sltphen's EpiscqJal. 713-526-6665. Fret HIV Testing. Montrose Cliric. 4-ll P1ll at M.lry\ 9 p.m.-riti(tit at R!xmt 10 pm.-1 a.m II EJi; ID pm.-! a.m lll ~Sia 713-IOO-XXXI Fret HIV Testllg. Thomas Stmt Clinic. 9 a.m·l pm 2015 lluras St Ora5'.lr! metllod Call for appoiltment. SharU\ 713-873-4157 Gay 8ovoi1g l.ell,Jles. 6..30 p.m. Palact lfts, Belait IM 7U&HIBZ Gna AssemblyOudL ~ ~ 7 p.m. aero­bics cJ.m 567 CeV Grove. Uvi1gstln T~ m51 '130-646-n14 E-mail leol@easttexM. Houston Pride em 0peo ~ 7-9 p.m. 1307 Yale 71>528--437'1 Houston ~ ~ CU> Practicf from b:30-8;30 P1ll For more11formatior\ logon towww~~ Houston Terns WI. 7fX>-9 pm lkmorial Patt< a.t !hi! Tavis CenUr. houstoot~ Spiritual Uplift ~- 7 pm ResimctlDll MCC. 713-861-9149. Hwston GIBT Oonmnty C81ter. ~f\ 2-'1 pm• Fm HIV tes~ COll!Wllnq. 6-9 plll • S&M N9't (5nacb Ind Moviesl 7 p.m • 3400 Mol1tr!M SI te 207 7!}-524-3818 WWW houstongibUenterQr9 THURSDAY, APRIL 17 G1M Coast Ali':t;.,, · & Mu5Ml ~ 7 p.m. 71>227-5973. EVERY THURSDAY lftt Houston. GnqJ for btsoua!so Mlyone ~ 7.30 p.m. HctDt Catt 2240 Portsmouth. www.flash.neV bihouse 713-467-4380. C81ter for Spiritual ~ Medildtion (ctop-irll 11:30 a.m I p.m. 6610 Harwin. 71>339-IBOa ~Go!piS....U7JJpm.IDaK>-92li~ Fret HIVTestllg. Houston Are.1 Cormmitv Sa'lices.10a.m.·2p.m. at Josep11-HU1es Clinic. mo West 25th stAISo 11 a.m.·130 p.m. at Gallery Medical Ctmic. 5900 North Freeway, and Ckd> Toyz from 9 plll -midnight. fil52b-0555. ext 23L m or 226. Fn!e HIV Tesq Montrw Cit 4-ll pm. lll lho l).(pJlt 8 pm-niti:jt lll lh1os Rlw!-Bdlan.rd Couse; JO pm.-! a.mat qz lli>'.D. 713-IOO-XXX! Fret HIV Teslllg. 7-9 P1ll at All Star~ 3415 Katy Freeway Health clinic with Im testing for HN and sniiJis. 713-869-7878. F~ 1brrin1J db. 6.30 P1ll 713-522-8021 \'Ml site: htlirJ/honuv.!Jel~.lllmE-mait~ Gay Bowing Leagues. 9 P1ll Pal3cf Laries, B&ir! Blvd. 713-861·118l W8AL ~ l.l!!IUI er Bisealal Alam at the lmriy d Hous!m­c.. crar Ca!1'U' WiStt ~ 6p.m. EiNI ~"'ldln.llm Hip c AlaMry Stqlort !1UCJ. b:30. p.m. ~ 713-52b-1017. Ext. 211 Houston Women's~ Team. No o;>er1e1a necessary Practice. b:30-8;30. Wo!stland YMCA. Kay_ 71>208-1529. Lab Limgstan GL8T Support Groo4J 7 P1ll dinner and discussion. r.tace Assembly Oudl, 567 Cedar Gr1M. ~ Texa;, 77351 936-646-n14 E-mail: leol a.easttexroet. Lambda Sbtl1g CU>. B Plll Tradewinds Sbbng Rink. wwwneosoflOOl!Vn 713-523-9620. Montrose Cfonic. Offen weetly peer support gmips for gay and b1Stn1al men with HIV. English spealurq group meets. 6:30 p.m. 215 Westheimer 7l3·830-3050 Rarilow RMlglen. Fm C&W d.lnce ~ N<l partner ~ Brazos Rr;er Bottom 8.30 p.m. 713-528-9192 AlaMry Fnrn Food Mi:ti:l1<l"Al. l.\'etrljb12 .. JlllP!lr.i>.'11 ID il N<ml pm. st.~ fjli5cqH Oudl 1(1)5 w AJalaii:i St ~I\ 713- &73-2848.~.E-~ Sprish ctata CaMrsalion Group. Cafe ~ 1 P1ll E-mail dwlalwston@msn.com. 7l3--416-1203. Women's Cliric. Manlrost Clinic. 713-830-3000. lblllon GL8T Conmnty Cdr. llrop n 2-9 p.m. • r.tBT ~ BcmS "Orectors ~ 7 p.m. • 3400 ~ Siilf 20Z 71>524-.3Bl8 wwwJwslonglllanter~ EVERY FRIDAY Center for Spiritual~ Meditation (ctop-irll ll.30 a.m·I p.m. 6610 Haiwln. 713-339-IBOtl Fret HIV T estl1g. Moot rose Ctlllic. 10 pm ·2 a.m at The Mea!racl:; 10 pm·l il.m at EJs and at Midtownt Spa. 713-830-3000. Fret HIV Teslllg. Thomas Stnet Clnfc 9 a.m.-1p.m.2015 Thomas St OraSwe mrlhod cal for appoiltment. Sharon. 71.3-tm--4157 Frost Eye Cliric. Fm eye exams for peqile With HIV 713-830-3000 Gna Assembly Clvch Gay/gay-affirming COf9!0alion 7 p.m. aero­bics ~ 567 Cedar Gr1M. lMnQSlOI\ Texas. m51 936-646-7214 E-m.lllloolamtex.net. Houston w Teen Coaition ti lbnosmals (KA T.CJI) Meeti1Q. 7-10 p.m. 71>942-7002. 1b1St11n T ems WI. 7fX>.9 p.m. Memorial Pirl at the Tennis Center. HwstontemiscUJ.(119 KDlbt l'lqect. Morni1g prayer, JO a.m 713-861·1800. MislllldltAlllll WIT JlwEh~ Si&lll!ll'allll8pm.on tll!!laJll Fnlltdm ormtiat8i!br~602 r--~ltJ!r -·~Beal flr.11, 5bOON<rlhlkJ::w"1 ~ Alm\ PD Soi<ml36. tb'5bl TXTTr/18. ~ectlS>l ~ ~ .... lflf sb"'5 to""".-rtlmcm1S 'l-..lOpm CaM!ne lll camuity c8111!1-. 713-528-SAFE. E-ll'lll ~llla:llaim Houston GL8T Conmnty Center. Dnlp-il 2-9 P1ll • 3400 Molltrose. • . ' 207 fil52418!8. WWW heustonglbtante~ APRIL 11. 2003 19 ap ts a weekly guide to arts & entertilinment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL FRIDAY, APRIL 11 SirWig ~the arwwl PFLAG/HATCH Youth SchoOOhip Ruldation (PHYSf) <imer, is the ~s major arrual finkaiser. PFlAG Houston and HAT.C.H. (Houston Area~~ Clf lbrosexuals) jOOtly created PHYSF. v.iicl1 offers a sdDaMp program to~ worthy yootl1 in the Houston area 11 ptr.;1111,l a allege eciJcation. The ~ program is fur lesbiar\ gay bisexual a­transgendered students who luve demonstraled rut. 5tadng ~ while in fi!j1 school <r college. Tickets: $100 per~ or Sl.50 fur VIP tid<m 6:30 pm W;irwd Hotef. 5701 Main Sl nJ.864-3135. FRIDAY, APRIL 11 Aulhn Dst Janes il1I Gng Herren will ~ 11 txd signi1',JS. ~is manager of Milller ~the Book and a Rice l.l!iveMy ~ in addition to being a OOYetist. He is presen~ his rew murderofll'jS· tery, "Faired to Death· Herrm is a former Houston res· ident who rcN calls New Or1eiwts rome. His rM is "Bourbon Street ~" also a murder-rnystiJy 6 pm Murorr ~ the Book. 2342 86sonrel 713-524-859Z FRIDAY, APRIL 18 AA Official Easter Show will be presented by ICOH The Space City ~ and Countess l Jessica Van Shelton The show and an Easter basket auction are fund-raisers for AIDS Foundation Houston's Camp Hope, and As<;isttters. 8 p.rn. EJ's, 6501 Ralph St THEATER THIS WEEKEND "Femie & Friends" appear 111 eight scenes as a fund. raJser for Unhinged Productions, Houston's only non-profit gay theater. The production is a casual evening of comedy and drama, written by ~mando "Fernie" Dovalina, author of 'Tue Man In the Trunk." Complimentary beverages and food begin one hour before the performances. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, April 11 and 12. T ICkPts. $25. Atomic Cate, mo Nance Reservations: 713-547-0440 SPORTS SATURDAY, APRIL 12 Montrose Softbal l.ea!JJe ~ ~ first !Pf tlun.r rrent at Wah?rMlod National Resort and Golf Clti as a benefit for klc:al charities. Entry f1!e f. S65 and idde'i ~fee., sh.nd c;wts DI r.n;ie b.lls. Priz!s wil be awarded for first second il1I tm! place. 9 am 713- 867-3913 www.rrmtrosesoftb.1Bleague.oom UPCOMING Lone Sbr Volt¥lal Associ1tial ~ the Houstoo Cl1ssi: XN TOll'l\'m!lll frtrn Apri 17-19. The benefici. illy d ~ yea's twney is Houstoo Buyers CU>.~ rrust a amnt NAGVA merrbrlip to ~ and cfM. sms ~are MA. BB il1I B. Pod~ ii Frmv, April 18. ~ pl.iy IS Sallri3y. Apri 19. Al matdles wit be held at Wbibrook Sports~ Cost $29995 lanmlent fee.~ 7-ll p.m on Apri 17 at Me!Ea. 2306 Genessee. ~ MUSIC EVERY THURSDAY F.O., a Hooston band, ~ open mic nqit frtrn 9 pm to l am Chances. 1100 Weslheinler. 713-52H2ll GALLERIES ONGOING QJf Coast ArdWes & MISIV!l m GIBT ltstry Salelte Ellhllition. The first ~ frtrn the GCAM collection presented at the Houston GIBT Cmmrity Ce1ter hcmrs the NAMES Pl'qect Hoostm r.onmnty Ceiter. 3400 Montrose. Slite 'lfJl. 713-524--3818. Positive Art Woricshop Photography Exhibltlon. Artists living with HIV/AIDS cruted these pictures with acaxnpanying texl Houston G1..BT Communlty Center, 3400 Montrose. Suite 'l07. 713-524-3818. 20 APRIL 11. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS I CLASSIFIEDS SALE I HOUSTON FREESTANDING TH Breathtlk.ng ~ 3 stoiy open Stal!Wily G:ass inlaid marble, wide ,:.arlk tdMls, gorgtoUS graM• & hlgtl end stainless. glass ' sha.vef. wlmlpool tub, big yard, • zoned • elev.lier eady 2 BRs CT> !st ~ Surround sound video moni ng 3 s;ate t~~ & dowr'town ~ S419 000 COll1il<T leny Jagger> '7' 3 5v • 7076 'depenc!tnt l!eal!or Exew ;e hn!n Derr • Associates Realty STAHD OUT FltOM THE CROWD your home speaal' our reader; abcut Guarantee tlley Nill~ ~with our new features. lold 'll' bOX your ad for added attract= Contact our rustomef seMa reps for more details. (87n 863-1885 WESTIURY GARDENS AL. GREATlY Ui'CRAOEDI "'2 BR, I 5 BA ' 200 sqft "'"If l'anlue~ cmnuc tile, Betbe~ blad refrigera~ glasstop stcve, r:JN. WO ccnnectJons, sec alarm. JIJ9'aded faUCl?tslfancy k.iobs etc. Courtyard locatJon. S68,000 "'2 BR 1 5 BA condo; unique floorplan i,,pgraded 2' CtJft frig, glasstcp rangt. ~ stackable WO Secunty gate to paoo, huge closets. S68 000 "2 BR, 1 llA. 850 sqft, upslalrS f..n, SIM, frig. OW, tu: SlZed WO, :iw;ive, S40, FOR LEA~E "5IMll 1 BR WO SSOO/mo -'Efficiency OV!rlook119 the pool Fantast-r BA 1llCf μc..:zi. parquet f. 450 sGft S525/mo. CaD agent at (7'3) ~9316 RENT I HOUSTON RENT IT FAST with our new fearires. Draw attenLCn to ycl'.lf ad l1t US1ng c;;: bold ~ box feature Contaet our cus· tomef Sfl'l!Cf 'fPS for 'llOl"e details. sm 863· 1885 SHARE I HOUSTON NEAR MED CENTER Priv BR/BA, kit & lainky pnv. qure1 'lfighborhood M.Jture stable F preferred Smoktr OK. (7 • 3) 29' -4255 MunelsplaceCaol com SE 610 LOOP area ~ I BR ll()w to shr, lrg swunmmg poot pad S400hno. !713) 941-4646 s .l s 3 3 11\1 MO 1 ~ I 0 11\1 1 H s 'f 'f COMMITMENT CEREMONIES TRAVEL I U.S.A. ANNOUNCE YOUR UNION The HolJston Yoke IS proud to a: iounce •he addioon of a • Convrutmert Ceremonies· cate· gory to O..ssified ~tmgS. Wher- making arrangements for your U oo don t l~t to ;dude the mo>! llllportant aspect of all announong the date Pubrish ng your UlllOO 1s my & simple Call (877) 863 '885 01 223 to put the finishmg toudl­" Oil yoo. re emony EMPLOYMENT BARBER I HAIRSTYLIST IN the Mo~trose Alea Frank (713) 522 22b3 Change for the._ ye~ DYNAMIC BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! Good Income. Hot mar1'et~ ~o dooMo-door sala Free oio oblig.ition 111fo. wwwBuildBigDreams.com (SSS) 304·'643. POSITIONS WANTED CARE GIVER Dependable & experienced GWM, 33yc ISO work as care givt1 Great persona 11Y & very caring COllt.l<t at randyntexOyahoo.ccm. PERFORMING ARTS HILDEGARD VON BINGEN Medieval chant perfcrmed for your Ctr!lllOll'f or cele!::;ltc" A ca>Ptlla soprano also s.ngs classical & Celtic 'l\WC. .ersa McCord (713) 899-2814 or leisaClei~d com LOCAL ACCOMMODATIONS MONTROSE INN :>n your next "'51t to >!ouston stay wl us We offer a 1 room B&B nd queen bed~ CATV & phone Con­venient to 15 gay bars. (7'3) 520-0206 or (800) 357 1228 Vis t our weMite c www montrose in.com THE LOVETT INN Dislinctrle lodging & catering accommoda· t10nS. Corporate 'lltttlllg ~ banquet fao ties. JaCUZZJ Mel. pool & hot tubs. t~ar downtoWn, mwums & 'lledical center (713) 522 5224 or (800) 779·5224 Vlf'N our website at WWW -l!lM ccm. 3 a .l 0 ~ .l n ~ 'f 'f N 0 GOING ON VACATION? CHECK THE VOICE 1ST for~ best spots & dea s• Ca lave , to place your ad! (877) 863· 1885 ext 260. HILTON HEAD, SC Planning !O relocate' ~ed a vacatJOnl Ma~e your plans now to come to beautiful beaches of H1~on Head, South Carolina. Lang tenn rentals or timned short term rentals. See some of our property IJSbngs at hnpJ/hornelistmgS.tripod.com/ Feel free to send '1lqUllles to MelroselongtermCdol.com. MARDI GRAS HiStonc Garden District '1orrlo •UXllY & pr1V3C)' 1 blod< from parades & easy access· to Frend! Quarter Hot tub & all amerutJtSI Sleeps 6-10. (888) 903-0925 WWW Mal10n(arcndelet com NEARBY GETAWAYS DC GuestHouse opening S/1103. Washington DCs newest gay owned & occupied guest house. Lo­uted in the heart of the Washington DCs gay neighborhoods. Mins to all pride activities & tourist attractions. Accepting reservations now II (202) 332-2502 / www.dcguesthouse.com TRAVEL TICKETS MEXICO CARIBBEAN VEGAS & the World Great packages ASAP C'Use & !ravel book-onl ne www.travelASAPnet WWW funjetASAPcom (866) 858·ASAP (2727). VEHICLES 2001 VW JETTA GLS VR6 5 spd, snrl pw/pl. bit. OUISe, alloy w111s. tl•. on1y m ""·Asking s 13,400. Jeff (713) 562·5396. 2001 HONDA S2000 Less than fft 8001(, garage kept, t'lek with blad leathet eXC£ ent condit10n. S27,000 OBO (102) 27' 3842 or (54. • 1969 RUN IT 'Till YOU SELL IT. Take ..clvantage of our new "Run it 'till you sell it" promotional. Place an ad to sen your ar and email a photo of the car and run the ad until it sells lh only SJ9.99. ull oar friendly ruff toll frtt today! (Sn) 161·1885. OPPORTUNITIES EARN EXTRA INCOME For sweet profits & delicious financ.31 freedom send SASE to 1251IN/4th Blvd PMB #78, Ga nesville, ~la; 3l607 c: ~ www ca1:Jnc:Our1tJyeandies.nel/corneandge~t Ans"'eT5 to this \\Cek's Q pu::zle on Page 21 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE NETWORK MARKETING New Health & Wellness diet patch, Distributors needed to open Texasl Please call for info & meeting arrangements. (888) 745·0192 / nexagenusaOneo.rr.com. HOME IMPROVEMENT CREATIVE LIGHTING For au of )'OUf ;ghting needs! ndoo'. outdcc accen~ .hande!!er> & secmty. SeMng both •eSJdentJal & ccmrneroal C"~ (832) 274 714 or via rna professor_busaCmsn com YOU BUILD HOMES ... BUILD ADS FOR YOUR SUCCESS! Ca me, llodney, to place your Home Improvement ad with Houston VoJce Class.fieds (877) 863· 1885 ext 247 RECONSTRUCT Call for a free estnnate for all your remodel· tng needs. (713) 545· 7452 ~jab too sma CLEANING TERRY'S HOME SERVICES Clean 'N' buff 'bll n shines' Weekly/bi-weekly deanlng SfMCes. (281) 894-6639 or (713) 200-3125 MOVING FRENCH'S MOVING SERVICE local & Sate Wide. www.ahoustonmover.com. (713) 861·1212, MASSAGE MASSAGE IY KEN Experience StreSS relief. Cooveruent Mon­trose IOcatJOn. By appt only. 1 lam-8pm. RM' 10285'9 KEN CLAUDE (713) 240-9598 MASSAG~ THERAPEUTIC. SWEDISH, sports. deep t:ssue, myotherapy, relatatJOn therapy Jason. college rp;. Memorial Park & Montrose Studios. (713) 524·5400. www.slZZfmgmassage corn BODY MAGIC Swedlsh. sports, deep tissue Montrose In/out 10am-10pm. Dan (713) 529-8787 or (7'3) 857·1009. AIKI YOGA MASSAGE Come and relax with me. (832) 687· 5786 or Visit me on the "'b www.a1kryoga.com. RYAN FUGATE lhffilpeutic Massage & llOdywork. RM I, NMT. Gift certificates avadl (713) 269·7926. DEEP TISSUE I SPORTS MASSAGE David C'3Wford RMl tOCated 111 ~ ~eights. professional Ollly. Pager (28') 262· 1)'9' MASSAGE BY Bill ~ Knotted ~P Massago lncallsloutca Bam-!Opm 7~ Excellent rates. Ca Bill (713) 283 8378 BODY & SOUL SWIMSUIT SEASON IS COMING! lose up to Ofbs "' the next 30 ~I (888) 373 6760 MEN'S BODY GROOMING Wax ng & c ppmg Dale PrlV Jo. catJOn ·~ Montr= Call (713) 529 5952 for appt PERSONALS I WOMEN 150 SKINNY GWM • II *rlends or love'1 ~meet Must ~JM! traftSl>Ol1atJOn to oneet In Galveston, "X HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com Across 1 Sign JI Frasier's booth, peffiops 6' Plecrued fl bed 10. Merit hodge locale for the • mormly stroight' 14 Type of triangle 15. Ingrid's role in "Cosoblooco• 16. M~t pa of Rosie 17. Chorocter whose first wife left him for o women 19. Drag queoo's leg need 20. ROOerl Reed's • _ lleoth Figit' 21. Sexual ending 22. Coin toss preference for tops? 23. Places for Sue Wicks' nets 25. Actress Cox who's the sisleri!l' low of Alexis Arquette 28 Rubberneck 30. Soroh JessKo's "Sex and the Gty" role 31 Fmth m fllUSIC 32. What you shake when you come quck~ 33. He hod o threesome with lorry and o bold guy 36. Jen111fer of "Obtect of My Affection" 38. Mott of "All the Queen's Men" 41 Org. thot uses bol~ 4 2. Peter and more 44. Like some Greek coloovis 45. Ploin in N11eyev's cOUlltry 47 Tennessee, for one 48. Chorocter Bing whose father is o drag queen 51. TV prRu;!1 ci Rolii's okler prmr 52. Prote<flon 53. Hattie 54. Very lxiry swinger 57. Bitch 58. Actress who stnned in 1he Opposite of Sex" 62. Forni~ diogrom 63. "American Beouty" screenwriter Boa 64 Singing Monn 65. Dote for Neto 66. Gets herd 67 sto ys hard Down I. They move yotJ dinghy 2 Sgts., e.g 3. Peter Allen's CO\Jlltry 4 ·_ De-lovely" 5. Pnvotes stonding ot attention, perOOps 6. "Celluloid Ooset" norrotor Tom~n 7 "I Cix.ld HM llmced _ Ni\lit' 8. Verb suffix for Rupert Everett 9. Folksmger W~iOlllS 10. Wheie they stuck it in Coesor 11 Pliilosopher Locke 12. Word from Torn Bioochi, perflops Answers on Pa e 20 13. WelHulg. e.g 18. They cWd come from Umnus 22. Pirt angle front 24.Concems of gin.corn CLASSIFIEDS 25. Janes Oeoo's "East ri Eden" role 26. llveot finale 27. Sexual d9Slfe, e.g. 28. r.k Rds 1b¥ I l.IOTal ~ 29 Holl of o poir for grabbing 30. Porty tidbit 33. The guy you're hugging' 34. KOO 8. te ~·s "Gel lk7Ml _ • 3 5. lotin homo leoder? 37. Artist Robert 39. Swinging either W!1f 40. Wheie they yeB "Cut!" 43. David Sedoris' home on the mr 4 5. Wr&ey ri 1o W011Q Foo, llmks for Everytling I Jme Newma" 46. Scores by Oovid KOIXIY 48. Pricks cover them 49. Ile JilOfle sex 50. Corne to terms 51. Moo goo goi pon pon 53. lots of lesOOis. to kd long 5 5. longston tlljies or OalS8 leYer1oY 56. Props for frot hozing 58. Sixth notes in "llo-RtMi" 5 9 lslond 111 goy Polee 60. Posed for Cathenne Opie 61 Arts center in NYC's Chelsea neiglixxhood APRIL 11. 2003 21 22 APRIL ll, 2003 Great Car Insurance! 713.661. 7700 For Aura, Home, RmterJ Ufe. H..Wh, Business Insurance and nwch mo,..., 6575'1'.'.LoopSouth,Ste.185 lkllai,..., TX 77401 wwwSchnu!rlerAgency.com www.houston voice.corn HOUSTON VOICE SMYAL Seeks Executive Director The Sexual Minority Youth Assistance League (SMYAL)-· a 501c3 youth center offering support and coaching to gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, intersex and questioning youth in Washington DC metro area is seeking an executive director to assume overall financial and opera· tional management of the organization and is responsibile for implementing the strategic plan developed by the Board. ED will be strong and collaborative leader with a proven track record in staff supervision, budgeting and financial management and fundraising. Resumes due by May 6, 2003. Competitive salary and benefits. Email edsearch@smyal.org for position decrip· lion and applicatio~ guidelines. Your Online GLBT Wedding Resource R£"i~tbowweddingnetwork.com ' 866·.ISl·ISM (( Some Answers You can find the Q Puzzle each week in the Classifieds sections r--------------------------------------------------------------, . I 1 f • l I ( 4 t I j I ' ; OUR RATES HAVE CHANGED voice, Classified Order Form • www.houstonvoice.com • Phone 877 .863.1885 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring COf11>1e!ed lorn with payment to the Hooston Voice offices (M-F, 9am-Spm) 500 Loven Blvd, SUlte 200 BY MAIL: Mail CO"l'leted fonn with payment ID Houston Voice Classlfiedl,, ~Lovett Blvd. Suite 200, Houston, TX. 77006 BY PHONE: Call In with COl'!l>leted fonn to 877.863.1885. BY FAX: Fax ~leted form and credit card lnklrmaUon 1D AnN CLAS· SIFIEDS 888 409 6768 BY EMAIL; Visit houstonv01ce.com to place your order onllne AD POLICY: The Houston Voice reseives the t to edit. reclassify or reject ads not meeting Houston VoKe stmdards. No refunds for early cancellation. M15prints TM Hous1Dn Voice is not responsible for nusprlnts appearing alter the fi151 week Check ads proJllllty. DEADLINE FOR AD SUBMISSION • MONDAY AT 5:30PM FOR FRIDAY'S PUBLICATION PICK YOUR CATEGORY RATE S17.5D WRITE YOUR AD PLEASE PRINT a.EARLY Legal~ Graphic Design TEXT: Annou~!I General Sfr(l(eS 1nMemorian Funeral . lostlfoond -~ Resumes - Catering ~I _ Ardu!ectural Se!Vlces Dcxnestic~ _ Home 1~ovemen1 ~ Palnlif9't'la~ PositlOllS Vianted flooring VOOn!fflS Electrical GIOl4ll l.aldsc.aping l'tfbmingAllS Cleaning Spats Haul'~ ·~Ion Local Aa:omodarlOllS MJling T....r International Ph<ltography TIMIUSA ~· NEdlty~ H)pnosls Trawll'lclw Dating Travel Con;::antons Counselin~ BU)&I Body& Soul Aris.' Antiques Coaching VoNdes Real ulalo Selvla!s Sales Open House PW Sale (Real Est.It•) PIHocatJons Wanted to Buy Mall Older Rental 5elvkes Phone Se<vices To Reril (Real Estate) ORnluMJos Win!ed to Rent hland:ll Roo!M'late Setvtces ..ega!S.Mels To 511.n (Real Eslaie) c~ Parbig TOTAL YOUR COST AD RATES Up to2Swords IOI St 7 50 per lssuo. AddrttOMlwords are 7S'8ath por Issue. This tndldos W4bsM posting ADDITIONAL FEATIJRES: Phot~ S3S addrtlOllal, Boxed ad Is SS addrttOMt Bolded ad Is SS addrt1011al; H)llflltnk Is S2 addrtlOllal. UP TO 25 WORDS: S17.50 ADDITIONAL WORDS C 75¢ NAME PHOTOll.OGO S3Sl!s.sue: BOXED AD SSAssue: BOlDED AD S Sllssue: HYPERUNIC S2Jlssue· SUBTOTAL lOTAI.. x#Qf issues Your classified ad will be posted at www.nyb!ade com ADORESS: --------------- CITY: STATE ZIP-PHONE. CHECK ENCLOSED ___ CHARGE TO MY OAMEX OVISA ClMC CARDI-----~------~-~ EXP. L--------------------------------------------------------------~ HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com APRIL 11. 2003 23 Your better If exists. + ++ + ++ PlanetOut + PersonalsPlus ~ 24 APRIL 11. 2003 Carpentry • Repairs • Remodeling • 936.563.5180 / 936.760.5531 Lawrence Gilstrap Servltlg Houston's Gay _~~It[.~-'_ 1s. .y..e a_rs_---""--'-'-'~ SpecialiLing in relationships. both personal and professional. and in transitions in lire. Helping you find your passion is my purpose._ -I040 Milam, Suite 310 71l46i.8-48 or 832.283.7390 E-m:ul· donrue@;donnicdaycom wv.·w. donmcday.com llnldY 11lmJpy < mif1'J DIRECTORIES MIT Maids In Trousers Cleaning with a Gentlemanly Flair Edwin Chovanec 713.868.1148 Home 713.498.2359 Cell www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE Massage TheraP.ist attorney at law 713-227-1717 Legal Protection for GLBT Families Houston, Tew l••-6'1mon .. au,..«-o• If your hair isn't BECOMING to you, then you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY Al'POINTMENT OHIJ' HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com APRIL II. 2003 25 26 APRIL 11. 2003 ISN'T IT TIME? GET TESTED FREE ANONYMOUS HIV /STD TESTING Houston Area Community Services 3730 Kirby Dr. Suite 1165 •Houston, TX 77098 713-526-0555 ext. 226 6 monfhg: 04550 1 yoar: 091 To subscribe. call 713.529.8490 or fax 713.529.9531 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE astrology JILL DEARMAN My Stars! April 11-17 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) This looks like a festive week for you, Aries dearest. The Sun is in your sign, and the full moon falls in your house cL Jove on April 16, which suggests that you can switch from top to bottan and back again quite SIOOOthl): A Gemini is just as versatile as you are. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) AL. in all it looks like a jolly week for you, Taurus. Eat. drink, and get wild wtth the Sagittarius of your choice. Choose joy over guilt, but make sure you live your life v.ith integrity, sweetie. If you can balance decadence with diligence, you'll be on par with your greatest heroes and heroines. GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Romantic relationships are super intense this week, Gemini. You could come to a realization about yourself as a lover. Perhaps you are finally ready for a change - or a total transformation. You've coasted by, always giving other people what they want. Now it's time to listen to your own libido. A Leo is all ears. CANCER (June 22 to July 22) This 1s a sweet and significant week for you, deane. Mars in your opposite sign of Capricorn may be making you feel a bit oppressed, as if the world is ganging up on you. It's not. But the full moon on April 16 could make you feel both powerful and paranoid. Express your every feeling in bed with a V"rrgo. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) .Mars is making an intense transit through the health and fitness sector of your chart, so you may suddenly feel very in touch with your body. Don't get scared get active. It's a good time to get a Virgo to touch your body, sweetie. Your nerve endings are screaming out for constant attention. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) @ Mars is sitting pretty in your passionate fifth house. This means you might , experience a breakthrough in your love life, which begins in your bedroom. Another Virgo could have a deep and important effect on your soul. The shallow and the deep come together in the days ahead. And you two may come together. too. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) The key to happiness this week is to surround yourself with people you can trust. You know how to charm all sorts of dangerous types, but I'd recommend sticking close to folks (especially of the same sex) who are pure of heart. An Aries wants to spend the full moon (April 16) with you. You're in for a howl. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Spread joy wherever you go, and don't forget to turn your flirt-o-meter to over· drive. A Pisces Y.il! be lured by your not·so-subtle charm. You're able to get what you want by being yourself to the highest degree. Even your family is easy to deal with this wer·k. Your enthusiasm really is infectious, sweetie. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) This is a sexy, sassy, and psychotic week for you, Sag. The pressure is on for you to be all that you can be- and do all that you can do - with many suitors or just one. Let the full moon on April 16 completely pass before you decide whether to be com­pletely monogamous or completely a whore. A Pisces may convince you to do both. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your power time is beginning, Capricorn. Get over your melancholy ways and start acting out, sweetie ... preferably in a construct
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1172.pdf