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Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 001. 2001-11-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/752.

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(2001-11-16). Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/752

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001 - File 001, 2001-11-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/781/show/752.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1099, November 16, 2001
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date November 16, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript favored felines Houston hosts an International Cat Show, and at least one gay man has entered two of his pets. Page 15 ISSUE 1099 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. NOVEMBER 16 , 2001 INSIDE Sen. Rodney Ellis, O.Mouston, is one of the award winners to be honored Saturday at the annual Houston Black Tie Dinner. Page 2 National Salvation Anny offi· cials give domestic partner benefits a thumbs down, reversing a regional board's decision. Page 8 Houston Ballet prepares for its performances of 'The Nutcracker,' as other the· aters also fill their stages for 1he holiday season. Page 17 Gay vote may be key for Brown Political observer: Current mayor likely to get support of gay voters; runoff expected to be close by PENNY WEAVER J IOUSTON - Thursday's Chris Bell endors\!mcnt of Mayor Lee Brown for re­election is likely to mean a stronger show­ing of support among gay men and lesbians for the incumbent, according to a local polit­ical expert. But the clearly pro-gay Brown still has a ttght runoff election in front of him against candidate Orlando Sanchez, a former 1 louston City Council member who has cast morl' than one anti-gay vote, notes Dr. Richard Murray. "Bell and Brown seem to have split the gay and lesbian vote in the first round," said Murray, a University of Houston political science professor and author. "I think that there is the possibility that the disappointed opponents of [the anti-gay] Prop. 2 will now try to make the mayor's race a sort of sec­ond referendum - that, 'We don't want a mayor two to six years who opposed us on Now that Houston Mayor LH Brown and mayoral candidate Orlando Sanchez are in a Dec. 1 runoff election, gay voters who split between Brown and cancfidate Clvis Bel may help make or break Brown's bid for re-election, according ta a local poGtical expert. this issue."' On the Nov. 6 ballot in competition for Houston's mayoral slot, Brown, Sanchez and Bell were the top three vote-getters. Brown did not gamer the necessary mini­mum of 51 percent of votes, however, to avoid a runoff. Bell did not earn enough > Continued on Page 8 Health experts warn Houston gay men Houston health officials have renewed warnings to gay men about the dangers of sexually transmitted diseases in tight of a continued increase in the number of cases of syphilis among men who have sex with men. Officials alarmed by continued increase in local cases of syphilis among men who have sex with men by PENNY WEA VER HOUSTON - Texas gay men may not follow a national trend that traces syphilis outbreaks to Internet chat rooms, but health officials still are alarmed at a continued increase m the number of gay men with the disease. "We're concerned about 1t," said John Paffel, sexually trans­mitted diseases (STD) pre\·ention program manager for the Houston Department of Health & Human Services. "Some of our traditional interventions don't appear to be working very well." As Houston Voice r~portcd in mid-October, health officials m San Franasco ha\·e linked Internet chat rooms frequented by gay men to an increase in STDs, particularly syphilis. Officials with America Online, the nation's largest Internet provider, at that time did not plan to post warnings in such gay chat rooms. This week, AOL officials admitted they are discussing possible online areas in which to post such warnings, but do not necessar· ily plan to do so spL'cifically in chat rooms. (See story, page 9.) > Continued on Pilge 9 2 NEWS NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE INSIDE Mayor to appear at Black lie Dinner NEWS HoustonBlock TieDinnersoldout ••..•• .J. Annual event also to honor Ellis, Local news briefs •................• 5 Davidson, and raise funds for several t-1 · Army • DPb fi a AIDS organizations .111 vot1on mxes ene ts •••••••• AOL stalls on chat room debate ...•..... 9 VOICES & ECHOES Vame : Islam's punishing trut • . . .10 letter Woclmer should apologize . ..... .11 Quote/ Unquote . . . . . . . ...••.... .17 At least o local Sol man has bigll hopes for t is weekend's International Cat Show in Houston. See Out on the Bayou, page 1 S. OUT ON THE BAYOU Weekend event celebrates feUnes ... 1 S Out on the Aisle .17 Ho efronl • • .19 Eat ng Out at Zana . 70 Community Ca ender . . 27 My Starsl • . • . ... 77 Issue 1099 All malaria n Hous on Voice protedad by ederal copYflllht law and rr.ay not be repro­duced without 1he writ:en conse: t ot Houst VOICe The one talion of advertisers pt.otographers ers and cartooniSts pub-lished t-e e is ~either el'!ed or ln1>Ded The app ance of 'lalTl8S or p;ctor: represe tiOI' does not ~ ;y tnchcate the sexua orientatiOn of e-at person or persons Hous Voce accepts unsollCl!ed ad or'.a nate but cannot take responslbillty tor Its return The editor reserves the nght to accept, reject or edit I! y submisSIOfl. All rights revert ID s~!hors upon publicatJOn. Guidef111es for freelance contributors are available upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX noos 713-529-8490 www houstonvo1ce.com by PENNY WEAVER HOUSTON-Organizers excitedly report this week that the Houston Black Tie Dinner is sold out and more than 900 people are expected to attend the charity fund·rais­er on Saturday. "The dinner is going to be beautiful - as always the decor will be fabulous,# said Gail Swinney, president of the Houston Black Tie Dinner, Inc. board of directors. "So far we have 900 people who are attending. It's going to be a grand evening." Janine Brunjes, liaison to the GLBT com­munity for Mayor Lee Brown, said this week the mayor will attend the event Swinney confirmed that Brown will take the podium during the evening also. 'The mayor's going to speak. Janine Brunjes is going to speak," Swinney said. "We'll have a lot of political people there. It's going to be fun." The dinner will be held in the grand ballroom at the George R. Brown Convention Center. Featured speaker is nation­ally known actor Alec Mapa. Also appearing will be the Houston Gay Men's Chorus and Sharon Montgomery. This year's theme is "And the Beat Goes On ... ". Among those to be hon­ored during the everung are Sen Rodney Ellis, D­Houston, who will receive Houston Mayor LH Brown wiU be among those who address the aud"1ence at Saturday's Houston Black Tie DiMer. the Hollyfield Political Award, and local res· ident Kevin DaVJdson, who will receive the humanitarian award. Among other activ1- t1es, DaVJdson is the administrator for the Greater Houston CLBT Chamber of Commerce The event includes a silent auction as part of an effort to raise funds for the many beneficiaries of the dinner. The nabonal beneficiary IS the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force Local groups who will benefit are: An Uncommon Legacy, The Assistance Fund, Assist Hers, Bering-Omega Sm. Rodney Elrrs, D·Houston. Is amo g those who will be honored at the Houston Black Tie Dinner oa Saturday. Ellis wi'D receive the Hollyfield Po&ti<al Award at the event, whi<h ls a charity fund-raiser. Community Services, Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals, Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center, Lesbian Health Initiative, Montrose Clime, People With AIDS Coalition of Houston, PFLAG­Houston, PFLAG/HATCH Youth Scholarship Foundation, Texas Human Rights Foundation, The Center for AIDS and Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. The Houston Black Tie Dinner last year distributed more than $130,000 to local and nattonal organizations that serve gay, les­bian, b1SCXual and transgender people The group states that its mission is to "fight AIDS, prejudice and dlSCrimination while serving as a'Strong advocate for men's and women's health care." The dinner has raised and distributed more than $1.2 million since 1993. GLBT Chamber selects new board members for 2001-2002 Members of the Greater Houston GlBT Gamber of Commerce this week elerttd five new board members for 2001 • 2002. They include, fro ltft: Jeff Walloce, Sheryl Parrish, Robia Robinett and Wlit Sanders. Not pictured is new &oard member Jani lopeL Chamber me s volte! to elect the ltaders at the group's Tuesday 111etf at Double Tree Hotel In Houston. HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 Think Ahead. Plan Your Future With YIRACEPT . Because it's strong and effective. Keep your viral load down with the +1 prescribed HIV medication of its kind.• VIRACEPT works with you to keep your life on track. Because it's easy to live with. VIRACEPT's easy dOSMig schedule and manageable side effects have been hetping all kinds of people continue to lead their lives on their own terms. Because it saves future options. When choosing a treatment plan, it's important to consider what options you will have m the future. Stud es show taking VIRACEPT early on leaves you with cho ces in treatment for later. Ask your doctor about your future with VIRACEPT. VIRACEPT• .n.e..l f.i n. a.v ir m.. .e.s ylate ~ ........ VIRACEPT 1s indicated in combinatton with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of HIV infection. The most common side effect of VIRACEPT 1s diarrhea, which can usually be controlled with over-the-counter treatments. Some prescription and non-prescnpt1on drugs and supplements should not be taken with VIRACEPT, so talk to your doctor first. For me people, protease inhibitors have been associated with the onset or worsening of diabetes mell1tus and hyperglycemia, changes in body fat, and increased bleeding in hemophiliacs. HIV drugs do not cure HIV infection or prevent you from spreading the virus. Refer to the important information on the next page. For more information, call toll free 1-888-VIRACEPT or visit www.viracept.com. 3 4 A ~f I• •••••J VIRACEPT9 (nelfinavlr mesytate) 1-and0ral­lnforma1ioll for Patients -VM:91'~ Gnrlc- ~......,'"all* F.-llle1-tl-h ''lejhtll'l)- Please read 11113 i1fannallon c:inUly be1or1 taki'O YIRACEPT Also. please """'hS - eadl line yru ....... Ille~ ""lltase qUlrlg -la-sy dWal1;Je1d 1T!l0lS C'"11t11Jmr rlrbayu nn ynao1r a _~_ b_ a c:arWe f\.l1A1 CEPT """"'yru strt lalung l'is naiCalm and al~ dleCloCI$. 'l!ll - ......, 111ler 1 docb"ll c..-. wtoen~ww::a>T llld-nortfaV! er Siil!> lreattnenl wttrwt lirsl tallang wtt11 ya1- Alert Find tall about medicines that - NOT be taktn wtlli VIRACE'l Please aJSa read Ille 1eCt100 "MEOICll6 YOU SHOWl NOT TAI<!: WITH ww:EPT" WHAT IS YlllACEPT AND HOW DOES IT WORX? VllW:EPT •usedin~wittlolller antiretroYlral ctugslrl Ille 1rea!menl al~ w!11l 1Unan ln1!ntl1Cdeftoe vllUS ~infection. - wilh ltV leads ti Ille desO'IJCllOn al C04 T eels. wliCll n trcxrtr'll ti the mnlJ10 sysleln MN I Wge llJmller ol C04 cells llaW been GestlO!eCl. Ille inlec18d - amq,s BaJJired mTU1B deli:ierq SJ!Dtrne (AIDS) VIWll'T 111C11<s by l*>clOng ltV~ ca~ enzyme wliCll ii ""*"' fer ltY ti llUbply VllACEl'T has bee> lllDMI ti SVifQ1lly ll!lla me wntu11 al ltV" the lllood. Al!!'cu;1I VllACEl'T •ID a an ullVer .llllS ww:EPT can help ll!lla '/fU risk fer oealn llld *1ess llSSOClaled wtth llV - wllo llOI< VlllACEPT Ibo !lid~ lnCl'ea9eS In.,. - al C04 cell auit. YlllACE'T-be talu!n t>gells ""' - .-uw.. *"Ill ILICl1 • Rellllli4D\ZDMJlft.AZTJ. ~ - 3T er Zd'ISll'AD>e d:I- r ~ VllACEl'T lrl Cllllll>lrla1lo wtth--ctugs llGlCes 1ne WlltU1I al ltV" 1ne boay ~ IOad) Nil '11SOS ":D.t cwt:.. ww::El" my be lal<fn by llUts. IOOleseentl, llld dlbS1 2 ,ears al IOI! er ollller ~" i'llns IQllglll' llm 2,ears al age n -~!Ra DOES VIRACEPT Ql!E HIV OR AIDS? VIWll'T II ID I an fer ltV lrlleclkJ1 er AllS. Pecllle ~ YRACEP" "llY stil ~ Ollll(l11nsllc inlecllorls er olher conc!llons associated - 'ti lnfecllon Some al lhese COIDUCRs are Pl*mnl. hel1'8S mis~ ~ .-CIJITil)le> (MAC) llfections, ll1d l(aj)osis samrna. ":iere 11 no prool lllat YllACEPT m ll!lla the Its!< al D'anSl1Ur.lng ltV ti • fl'Dl"'1 sexual ccntlCI er blood ccntlminallOn WHO SHOUUI OR SHOWI NOT TAKE V1RACEP'l'I li:Q!lll!rwlll yru ID:b: yruneed ti OOCD!-WWll'T BIRJqrlat loryou.111~-- .. ~-be~ A11siieS: a JOU -r...s •-dorgi:-ID VIRAC&'T, you must not tdut WlACEl'T. \W sln.t! also m.m ya1-ruse er itwmadSI al Inf_, allergles ti llbstlas ILICl1a01ner -... looa. paserva1l'9S. er cl)U a rau n PR1J10111: The et!ec!S al ww:EPT an~ Wl¥!lel1er1lieir mnn ba!lles are nor - • yru n ingra11 cr.,.,., tl­ll! Qllalll. yru-11!11 yal doc!Dr belor1 ~vrw:EPT I ]IOll n-·-.U:'tlJ llnJddscusa wilhya1doc:llrlhe be:l Wltf ti feed ya111111y lbu sln.t! be awn 11111 d ya111111y dcesnol ~ lme ltl( C.... IS I ctaaflal lcal be lr.rSni:!!ll hWl1t tnml~ --nol---dlllly-llV Cl!lldren:YIRACEl'TlsavallatJleferltelnl3lmlrllal!Mnn2fl'Dl"'113 )eaS al age wllll ltV Then! BI~ bm alWWll'f hi! 131 be nixed wllll llil<. baby rumua. er foods ~ pu1c1ng lnsCuC1xJnS an r.iw t1 tlN! 'lllACEPT powder m be bile! In a l:l:cr RC1DI Illa! lllSl:us3os,.,., 'IWoCEPT Oral Powder shoulll be prepared. l you havelhw-YIRACEl'TllasnolbeenlllUdiedllpeqilewtlll llverllSaase ayru......,tmdlsease,yru-181ya1ClllCl!lrbe!tre Wig VIRACEPT. oaw .-.,.__ Cerlain medal prc!Jlems may decl 1ne use all'IRACEl't Some~ llldng ~ rttnn haVI deVelopeCI - Cl' lllCl'll senotaclabetes .. ""' blOlxl- Some peqE wi11l le!qtila haveh:ldi'ICJ83Sed~lil1D--hl)ltlleasen-. caused l!lese proClems. Be ... ti 11!1 '{Qll - • !OU have hemol:hfa ttPesA ll1d 8,dlalleles mellilus, er an n:rease 1n 11m1 n'cr hlpr.! lmllllcn. ClaV!S " llOl1y tat haVt been seen In ..,. pate::l:I ~ pr"1Base irdlitrs. ~ d8lges may iD.D! lnatasell llllllll al la!" .. - bD. and nod< ("lilJ!lalo IU!ll1. tnast, ll1d ll'Dllll lte tnri:. loss al la! ...., lte bca. 1eQ1 ll1d sms may ~The cause ll1d ~ ,_. lll8CIS ol lh8S8CIJl1Cblr8are~"-'11 hS IJme. CAii VllACB'T BE TAml WITH OTltER llEDICATIONS? VllACEPT may illera:t wt:h-ltugs, ~ - !OU •• wll!na I pr!SCJ1IJllan. You OU!l-wi11l YQl CIOCtlr In[ drugs lhlt Y!lJ 11111 1al<l1g er n plnq ti tlN! bebt you IN ww:E!'I. _,..._l!lilllla-VllACB'T; ~ ldsa;rlde. fer nedllnlj r.a.mnoe ~. u mo-'*'1bea1l !llrlCh lb mg.Jw '-lbe8!), also - • ~. ~. Qundex9, ll1d alherS Etgoc der1VlllVes~ lflllolhor1. umlgrJinelleadaclle) ~(1rlalollrnl v.rwe~ -9~tord1lllesterol~ z.oare~fer~~ Taking 1te above drugs wtth VIRACEPT may cause semus im'er lfo. l!naleling advel1e -= Rl!ampln91for-l.alsoknown•~ RlladITT4', Rllaler•. er Rl1amaiae This drug rOlll.CeS blood - al VIRACEPl ._ ...--"'I'*" u you 1al<t YllACEPT wtth: MyaillJtin4D (rllabu1in. fer MAC); yru wlll need kl lake a - Cl:lSa al M)'CDIJuln A change al lhnpy- bl ...-.ct U you n talUng V1RACEl'T will!: "'- PllenylOin~lflll ~ ~(T~llld~ lhese age<l1S may r1Cla 1llt - al VllACEl'T In yal - and mal<a ~ less lf!eC1lVt Oral~"'111epll" I yru are 1aklng 1ne p11 kl~ P1IJBl:Y you sin.ti use a c::imnt fype al CXll11l'aCfl)10 sn:e VIRACEPl may ll!lla Ille et!8dM!ness al oral~ Spedalcm-.atlolos lle1tn yru tlke Viagra4P (SIJdenat'l wi1ll WIACEPT ti ya1 - amJI possible drug in1erllctionl and side etteas.. !OU tll<.! Viagra ar<I VllACEPT 1Dge1her you rmy be 11 lnaasecl rlsl< Ill side lffuc1s al~ SIJCll as IOw blood p<eSSlle visual ~ lflll penile erectJan las!lrlQ lllCl'll lhan 4 ton n .. erectm las!s 00ger 1han 4 rws. yru should seek 1nUne<1ate medlcal 11SSiSt1na1 ID a'IOid -llamage ti your penis. ltU ClllCIDr m IJllll;li!i lh8S8 syrnp1QmS ti yru I IS not reccmmended ti l:IJ<e VIRAC(PT w1V1 Ille -klwering drugs~ (lovaslallnl er zoccre bocausealpossitJ!a drug - Tbe<e Is also IJl lnatasell risk al drug ln1erac!lorls belWeen YIRACEPT and UplD4D (alDrvaStallnl n ~ (CenVastat; 1alk ti yal - belor1 'jOU - - al 1h8S8 Chaleslr:ul ~ drugs wi1ll WIACEPT ~Sl.Jolll'swcrt~ perUninJ anllefllolprodllel llllda a detry llQlllfllenl. er procU:i,, contnlg St Jolll'S W!JI "'111 ww:EPT ii no1 ~ Talk wlln ya1-• yru n tlkl1U er ate pi;l'IWlg ti 1:1118 St Joll1's wat ~St ..tm's W!JI rray aiaease VllACEPf - ll1d lea! ti n:rmsed Vlral bid nl passbe '"5ISlanal ti VIRACEl'T er CltlSS resistn:e ti---$ugs. HOW SHOULD VIRAIVT BE TAKEN WITH O'lllD! ANTHW DRUGS7 Tal<mg WlACEPT tlge1ller - - d-llV drugs n:reases 1he!r 1Y ti tqll Ile WI& I also ..u:es Ile CQxrt.n1y tor l!!SISla1I maes ti"""' Based cri ya1 his1llry ol lakJng OCher ant> HIV~ '{Qll­~ you an now t1 tlke 'llWXl'T n - n.ftV madicines. These drugs should be t!k2n ll I Cfl!lal1 onfer er al Sl)ed!IC lines. This will depenl an ,.,., moor Qmes a day eadl meddle should be l:ll<cn. ft wr a&so depenl an "'1elt1er l should be 1al<en willl er wl1hou1 rooo Nucleoslde analogues: Ila drug ll1eraction prot>lems wera seen "'1en VIRACEPT was grien wtth - ,MMJch,AZ'I Ej)ivlr (1alnNldoe 3TC) Zerll~d:I".\ v.iexe(lidallOSlne ddll n,... are takJng - Vida (ddl) and YIRACEPT; Vldex should be tlkan wfthaul food. an an~ Sllll113m ~ yru should l:lk& WlACEl'T w1111 loo0one1lu l!!!er er more 1han ~ l10ln beba !OU lal<a VIOel. --_ ........,_ inhl>l1ln (NNRTl&r. 'Mlenww:EPT II tlkan ~ wl1l1 v._..e~ The 1m01111 ol l'llACEPT In - blood IS tn:IBV!d. A da9e ...­ii nol 'lleded when VIRACEPl • used - 'lhr!ule Susnva .. tmvirenzJ Tl1e lmOll'll alVllACEPT 11 yru llilod may be hnased A dme ~ is not..- when WIACEPT ii used willl SusM. Olllef NNl!lls WIACEPT tias nor been - w1111- HI.ml! Other pro*-__ , 'Mlan VIRACEPT Is taken 1cgc1ter wtth: Ct>mane (kldlnaW) The - al boll1 mugs In 'f(IJ llilod may be licn:osed Q.nenllY. there n no sa1e1y n efficacy dat! Mi!alJle lrom 1te use al Ills c:omblna1Xn Norr<'"~ The - al VllACEl'T In yal blood may be lncremed. Qmnlly. lnere n no salely n olllcacy-mllallle lrcm 1ne use ol 11115 IDIDla1lan ~~ Tbe 111101111al ~In 'f(IJ blood may be RnDed. Qmre!y, there are no~ ll1d emca:y 11a1a ..-1rom 1ne use al lllls­WHAT AAE THE SIDE EfffCTS OF WIACS'T? IJ<a an medicns. 'llRACEl'T m cause sile 11'.i!ds. Mo61al1ne sile el!9dl "'9C'1enCed - 'llRACEl'T - been mid ti moder1IB. Oim1llea Is Ille 1111111 canmon sile ll!ec1 In ~ lal<i1g VllACEPT. and rrost - pallenll IDO al least mid -al.,.,., IJ(ilt cbing hllln1mll. In dlriCll IUlles. ill>oli 1$-20% al pa!le!ts receiYlng WlACEl'T 750 mg ntne _, 11m1cmesdalyer12Sll mg (llYe -i two 11rnes daily ta1tuer1TD11txtt-1Gly lnlll!il-.-131be..._ ISirlg-meclclnes.IUC!lalnullJm9 A·D!lol>etwniclelllld olhers, w!idl are~ - a pres:r1pllan. ~ sile 11!«11 Itel ocamcl 1112% er mono Ill~ receiving l'llACEl'T iR:lude-IJI'..., rash. Thn wn Diiler.,. el!ecl:I nolld "dira - f1al ocamd In - - 2% al paller1!S recelWlg W\AClPT However, these sile el!9dl may 111ve ceen u ti o111er drugs 1l1a1 Pl1Jel1ll were lal<lng er ti h --EJtept tor dl;IT!a. lherl were ID moor dlf!oerc8s 1n.,. ofleds In patJenls wllo llOI< YIRACEPT llanQ wtlll - drugs a>mpnc1 wtll>ClOSewllOllOl<onlyllle-dnl;s.Fcra~11sta111ide ollacll. IOI< '{Qll ooct>r, ruse. er~ NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOW SHOUUI I TAKE YIRACEPT? VIRAaPT II avallab!c anly wt1n '!'Al Cloc1or's pr~ '1b.r doc1a rmy prescribe Ille li\tll blue YIRACEPT Tablet3 - as 1250 mg (fJVe tablets) 1al<a1 two 1imeS a day er as 750 mg (!!ne 1allle!sJ taken ltne llmes a day YIRACEPT llhWd alWays be taken Wl1h a meal er a 11g111 snack. WlACEPT talRls In 'llnH:oatel'.1 ID netp rr.al<a 1te 1allle1B easier ID swallDw Take Y1RACEPT exactly as - by your-· Do nor lncreaSO er doCroase any llasl! er Ile IU!ttt al m;es per dirt /IBJ, lake l'is medicile ulleexactlleli0dal11me11a1ya1doclcr11as~ 0o no11111p 1alung YIRAOO'T wlUwl flnt c:onsulllng wlllt your- .,_ N ,... .. teetlngbeller. ~lake~ lhlt has bes! presat>ed rpoclfically tor you Do '101 give YIRACEPT ti ~er-,,_ presalled u someone else The dosing al l'1RACEPT rmy be Cffennl fer you 1fa1 fir- pabenl.> -lhe-.S from ,...._,IUClly aWTllllol an 111e-. The 8ITIDlJlt alVllWVT In .. blOlxl-1!!1131n san1t!Wlla! CCJ1SISlenl - Dme ~ - cause Ille caunlralion al \'1RACEPT ti oecnas. Cl8ra1ln.,... _not miss any doses.._ "!OU 111JSS a oos. yru - lake 1ne da9e as soon as POSSlble n inen lake yal naxt adlecUeCI - .., luUe doses. ongilaly IChecMed Dosing In - (Including dllklren 14 years al age and ......, The recanmended - - al WlACEPT • 1.!50 mg (liYe l3biels tlken IWo limes a day er 750 mg (11Vee lalJle1s) l:i1<t:l llvee 1lmes a day Eacll 005e slWll be taken - I meal er ligll1 &nack. Dosing In cMdr1ft 2 ID 13,..,. al age The WIACEPT dme "cMnn del>eOOS an 119 ~ The raoonmnled oose ii 20 ID 30 ll9'l<a (er 9 ti 14 "'IVPann per OOS., lal<en 1!Yee limeS daily wtth a meal er ~snack. Tlis m be adminislered ettr>er 11 lalJlel torm or "chi1dr&n ~ ti tJble!ol as VllWVT Oral Powder Dose inSll1l:tonS Will be prOYided by 1te childl- The - .,, be grien ttvee llmeS dally USl1() 111e meas.mg rcoop provided a measi.mg 1easpOOI> er one er mono tallletl depending an 1te wel!.f11 and aoe <' CIOld. The llTilll'ltaloral pOWdererlalllelslDbe""° kltcllikl• deSalled ., 1te d1'W1 below •14 1 3!!,__ In~ oral powder 1l1e rcoop er teaspoon sin.ti be leYel • 1 love SC001> CCl'llalns 50 -ng of >'IRAC£PT IS! only Ille rcoop provided w1111IOll'WIACEPT llol1le t ' ie'lel 1easpoon canlainS 200 mg of '/lllACEPT Note: A rneasunng ..._, used '"' dlspenslng medlcation sllouJd be used la' 'T1lla5ll1ng WWVT Clrlt IWder Asl< 'f'IJ ptamadsl ti """"' ue yru have a meclc:a1:on diSpef1slng 1easpoon How - Y1RACEPT Drat ,,,,.. be prepared? The oral~ may be ..~ wl1t1 a small llTIOllll ol ..- """*-fllf- fl1f ~ doetrV llJlll)lemenls. er dairy foods lluc'I • IJUCldinO er Ice aaam. Once mixed, Ille onbr8 ......i ~be tll<on ti clltlinl!leUlctose. Do nol ITlDl 1te powder wtlll llf'f acillC lood er jlite, IUC!l as orange er iμpe!nd1 μco lljlllfe ~ er allQle auce becaUSe 1l1iS may aeall! a IJlller- Onte 1ne pOWder Is mixed n may be llD<ed 11 ream 1"tT11>m:1n or ~led tor"" t16 hOln Do no1 11ea11111 'T'Jxed oow cn:e n has been..-ed Do nol ldd """"ti boll1es al oral pOWder 'IWIACB'T powder ii IUlll>led w1111 I IJCl'JOP tor measir'lng. fer hel;> In dele:mlnlng 1l1e 8"acl - al powder tor - Clllld. plea ask - OX1Dr, ruse, er pharmacost, YIRACEPT Oral f'Owder can1ainS _,,,.,,,, a l:JW-calona SMetener, and 111ere1ore should nor be - by Cllildren w11t1 phenytl<s1aUil (!'IQJ) HOW SHOUl.D Y1RACS'T BE STORED? Keep VllACEPT aro an - medidnes 0U1 al "" reach al d1lban. Keep bollle dosed n l1D<e al nm> 1"fl'C)elllU'I ~ 59'f n B6'fJ - lrom IOlrCeS al nDslln IUCll as a sin!< er OCher llamp place. Heat ll1d - may reQa lfle tllectwness of '/IRACEI'[ Do nol kaep mediClne ht Is OU1 al dalB er 11111 !OU ro OOget' need. Be Rn Ille! w 'jOU h1l'O Inf--· tt Is OU1al1ne readl Ill ct6hn. Disam 11 IJ.esllans abOU1 YfAI lleallh wil!l - - • !OU ~ .. ~ lbOU1 W!.laPT er Inf - rnediCa1IDn !OU are lll<ilg, ISi< '{Qll Cklc:D, ru10, er ~'bl can also ca!l 11188 W!.laPT (1.888.84 7 2237) 1DI flee Cll 1 :l&YIRACS'T W!.laPT 1111~ In reglslered hdoma1<S al~ Plunnacattals, tic. ~C2001.Agoi6M~lnc.M~~ A Ptl1•r Ce•• • •• ~ Plam8CaJllC8ls tic. La lllll. catl!ooil. 92037, USA 1·V011711BG ~11'1'1 Rev 01125/Dl HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 NEWS PVA leader steps down, undecided about next move with group Alex Morua, executive diredor of Progressive Voters in Adion. has resigned his post to take some time off to 're-energize.' HOUSTON - Alex Morua, executive director of Progressive Voters in Action, a gay-friendly political group, has announced that he will resign that post in order to rest. "l am extremely proud of the accomplish­ments of PVA over the last two years, especially regard­ing the 'No on City Prop. 2' campaign and the Ada Edwards for Houston City Council District D campaign," said Morua, who is openly gay. "But after two years of 50- 60-hour weeks, I'm ready for a break." Morua will remain on the group's board of directors. He plans to take the rest of the year off before deciding his next step. "It has been inspiring to see hundreds of new LGBT and straight­allied volunteers take action," he said of his time leadmg PVA. Grant Martin, PVA board chair and a gay political consultant, said the group's members wish Morua well. "PVA and the entire progressive community owe Alex a great debt of gratitude," Martin said. "Alex is responsible for bringing PVA from an operation with one computer and one phone to an organization capable of rurming a citywide ballot measure campaign." Supporters host Saturday breakfast with mayor HOUSTON - Community leaders including Houston City Council member Annise Parker and Janine Brunjes, GLBT liaison to Mayor Lee Brown, invite gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people and supporters to a Saturday breakfast for Brown. The focus of the event is to help gather support for Brown's quest for a third term in office He faces Orlando Breakfast with Mayor Lee Brown c 0 t; ~ 0 .c -ca ~ e ns Sanchez in a Dec 1 runoff election. The reception begins at 8 a.m., and Brown will address the audience at 8:45 a.m. A breakfast buffet will be served at 9 a.m. The event will be held at the Doubletree Hotel in downtown Houston, and those who wish to attend are asked to RSVP to Grant Martin Consulting at rsvp@grantmart­inconsulting. com or 713-523-1762. 8 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 17 Doubletree Hotel 400 Dallas St. at Bagby RSVP to Grant Martin Consulting: e-mail: rsvp@grantmartincon­sulting. com 713-523-1762. Center to host Thanksgiving dinner Thursday HOUSTON - For the second year, the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center will serve dirmer for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 22. There is no charge for the meal, which will begm about noon. The center's board of directors will provide the main dishes for the meal, including turkey and holiday favorites. Individuals who plan to attend are encouraged to bring food items, potluck style, but such contributions are not required. "We invite everyone to join us, even if they want to stop in after other family celebrations," center President Tim Brookover said. "Last year, about SO people dropped by for dinner and fellowship." Those who plan to attend are asked to call the cen­ter and leave their name. - Penny Weaver Thanksgiving Day cirvlef' Noon Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center 803 Hawthorne 713-524-3818 Hiles remembered as fun-loving Houston native Perry Gorden Hiles died May 11, 2001. Mr. Hiles was born on Dec. 11, 1968. Friend Ricky L. Johnnie of Houston said Mr. Hiles will be remembered for his fun-loving nature by the many people in the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community of Houston who knew him. Mr. Hiles was an interior designer whose work includes several River Oaks homes. He is survived by his parents; two sisters; sev· era! nephews; many other relatives and a number of friends. -Prnny Wttroer Remember Our Names November 30, 2001 Candlelight March 6:00 pm 4617 Montrose, Chelsea Market, Suite Cl40 Panel Dedication Ceremony 7:00 pm The Meail Collection, 1515 Sul Ross Tree of Remembrance I 0:00 am to 6:00 pm NAMES Project Leaming Center at 4617 Montrose, Chelsea Market, Suite Cl40 NAMES PROJECT Housro~ The Menil Collection Alley Theatre Houston Ballet Houston Grand Opera 5 6 NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE In the world of politics we have many friends. In the No On City Prop 2 campaign these three leaders stood out as heroes. Mayor Lee Brown passionately articulated our message, raised over $100,000 for the campaign, and opened many doors to the corridors of establishment power not ordinaril} available on an issue of gay rights. Mayor Brown truly understands that health care for the families of gay and lesbian city employees is a family value. State Representative Garnet Coleman stepped up to the plate as Campaign Co-Chair when it mattered the most - when the fallout from the World Trade Center attacks threatened our campaign budget. He gave $5,000, and raised almost I 0 times that much in checks and in-kind donations. Garnet always took our calls and most importantly - never said the word "no." Garnet is not only a good friend, but also a leader and an inspiration when it comes to building true coalitions. Council Member Annise Parker - what is there to say that we already don't know? Annise spent $50,000 and risked her own seat on City Council to stand up for gay and lesbian families, including her own. She endured - with dignity and grace - public insults from Prop 2 proponents, political candidates, talk radio hosts and even anti-gay colleagues. Annise, you have the love, respect and admiration of your community and all of Houston. Friendship is a two-way street. When Garnet Coleman and Annise Parker are ready for higher office, we must stand up for them just as they stood up for us in this campaign. And on December I, let's all stand up for our mayor: Re-Elect Mayor Lee Brovvn Paid for by Grant M.vton Coruuhong P. 0 Box 667307, Houston, TX 77266-7307. 713-S23-1762. srant'iilarantmanonconsultons com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 v'NO DISCRIMINATION on CITY PROP 2 November 16, 2001 Dear Supporter of No on City Prop 2, This is an especially hard letter for me to write. We lost our fight last Tuesday against City Proposition 2 by 6. 710 votes. While m) heart broke that night, however, my spirit did not. Before anything else, I want to say thank you. Thank you for your contribution and the role you played in standing up to discrimination and unfairness, and thank you for moving outside your comfort zone as we had a very public, honest and positive conversation with Houston voters about the value of gay and lesbian relationships and families. In any close defeat, it is tempting to start laying blame and pointing fingers. A very few things done in a slightl) different way could have affected the outcome. It is even more tempting to rage at Dave Wilson, the architect of the anti-gay ballot measure, and his merry band of cowards \\ho mask their hate in the guise of values and pervert the concept of family. But all that energy would certainly be wasted. As it turns out, we weren't really running against them - they ran next to nothing ofa campaign. We were running against a set of deeply held beliefs that take a lot of education to overcome. Even if the numbers were flipped, and we had won b) a 2-point margin, the fact would remain that roughly one-half of Houston voters still do not "get" the concept of gay and lesbian families. That said, I want to thank you specifically for what we accomplished: • Heroes: I know gay and lesbian people who came out of their closets: African American ministers who search their souls to discover their opposition to discrimination against gay and lesbian people; volunteers who took vacation days to check petitions and work polls; and staff who quit their jobs and moved to Houston just to work on the campaign. • Numbers: In 1985, we lost an election to save a nondiscrimination ordinance for gay and lesbian city employees by 64 percentage points. In 200 I, we passed a nondiscrimination ordinance for ga), lesbian and bisexual and transgender cit) emplo)ees with little controversy. We lost an election about domestic partner benefits, a much more controversial issue, by only 2.64 percentage points. • Friends: We built a coalition of leading elected officials, corporate CEOs, unions, leading African American ministers and clerg) of ever) color and denomination, social justice organizations, students, parents and grandparents, working, middle and upper class people, leaders from virtuall) every eth­nic community in Houston, and even of the Houston Chronicle and Channel Two, to stand up openly and publicly for gay and lesbian fam il1es. • Education: We raised and spent over $300,000 on a public education campaign about gay and lesbian relationships, with more than 1.500 volunteers talking one-on-one with over 50,000 voters and with television and radio spots reaching over I million people. These are the reasons that my spirit is intact and my heart will heal. While, there is no doubt that winning is better than losing, it is my hope that we will take the long view and continue a positive, open and honest dialogue with Houstonians about the value of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people and their families. Again, thank you. Sincerely, Grant Martin Campaign Manager 7 8 NEWS NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Salvation Army rescinds domestic partner benefits Decision follows uproar from anti-gay groups by LOU CHIBBARO JR. The Salvation Army on Monday, Nov. 12, resonded a decision it made less than a month earlier to allow its West Coast div1- s10n to offer health care benefits to the domestic partners of its employees. The policy reversal came after Salvation Army officials received a barrage of criti­cism from fundamentalist Christian and antt-gay groups, who complained that the popular charitable organization was bow­ing to pressure by "militant homosexuals." "There was an uproar from the public, both internally and externally," said Maj. George Wood, a spokesperson for the Salvation Army's national headquarter!:> in Alexandria, Va "We received about 20,000 e-mails in 48 hour5, nearly all of them against the policy change," Wood said. "These were written by real people. They weren't canned mes­sages." Wood said the dea:.ion to rescind the policy was made by the Salvation Anny's five-member national commission, which consists of the commander:. of the organiza­tion's four regions and a national comm1s­s10ner He said the national commission approved the earlier decision to allow the West Coast region to offer benefits to domestic partn.~rs on l\Jov 1. The policy change, Wood said, was aimed at enabling the Salvation Anny to meet equal benefits ordinances passed by various cities, such as San Franasco, which require companies and nonprofit groups providing services under city contracts to comply with those equal benefits laws. San Francisco's equal benefits law requires all firms or social services groups, such as the Salvation Anny, to provide the same domestic partner benefits to their employees that San Francisco provides to its own municipal workers. Wood said the policy change adopted by the West Coast region used the term "legal­ly domiciled member of an employee's household" rather than the term domestic partner, e\•en though offioals with the orga­nization made it clear the term would apply to domestic partners. "We wanted to reach a balance between biblical pnnciples and the people we try to serve," Wood said "But this was perceived by the public as violating biblical principles. So the comm1ss1oners met again and decid­ed we can't cross the line on domesttc part­ners." The policy adopted by the Salvation Anny on Nov. 12 prohibits the organiza­tion's regional entities from offering employee domestic partner benefits by Dis and Classified advertisin December 28 Issue 12 noon December 20 January 4 Issue 12 noon December 27 For more information call Wanda Faulkner or Carolyn Roberts 713-529-8490 restricting benefits to an employee's spouse and dependent children. Wood said the new policy makes it dear that the Salvation Anny will withdraw from or decline to enter into contracts with any city or municipality that requires a domestic partner benefits program as a condition for providing social services programs. Officials with gay civil rights groups dis­puted Wood's assessment of the bulk of the complaints came from the general public, saying the opposition e-mail messages and phone calls were driven largely by anti-gay groups. Jody Renaldo, executive director of Equality Mississippi, a gay advocacy group, said the Mississippi-based American Family Association called on its members across the country to "flood" the Salvation Army with emails, faxes, and phone calls. "The pressure put on the Salvation Anny by the AFA worked," Renaldo said. The D.C.-based Family Research Council acknowledged on its Internet site that it called on its members and supporters to demand that the Salvation Army reverse its domestic partner!:> policy. "[TJhere is no escaping the fact that the policy at issue was being driven by demands of militant homosexual actiVJsts," said FRC President Kenneth Connor. "Their goal is not simply to obtain ht?alth insur­ance, but to have their relationships treated on an equal basis with traditional heterosex· ual marriage." Gay organizations, including the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay political group, have insisted their calls for recognition of same-sex relationships are aimed at securing equal rights and benefits for gays. "We are dismayed that the Salvation Army's national leaders stepped back in time and usurped the strong leadership of a local division to include and support all families," said HRC Executive Director Elizabeth Birch. "We urge the organization to return to basing its policies on 'moral and ethical reasoning' instead of what appeases anti-gay political pressure groups." Birch added, "If this decision stands, the Salvation Army will have unambiguously identified itself as an anti-gay organiza· tion." The Salvation Army became the subject of a flurry of press reports in July when the Washington Post disclosed the contents of a controversial, internal memo from the orga­nization that discussed its views on gay civil rights issues. The memo claimed that the Bush administration had agreed to support a federal government policy exempting the Salvation Army from complying with local gay civil rights law!:> in exchange for the organization's support for President Bush's faith-based initiatives legislation. The White House denied it had entered into such an agreement. Brown~ record clearly pro-gay; Sanchez cast anti-gay votes on City Council votes to compete in the runoff, set for Dec. 1. Sanchez and Brown now face off in a runoff election that most local polihcal observers agree will be close. Brown and Bell both opposed the anti­gay City Prop. 2, which voters approved by a slim margin. The measure prevenb the City of Houston from offering same-sex domestic partner benefits to ib employees. Sanchez is on record as supporting the proposition. Bell's Thursday announcement backing Brown's re-election campaign makes the dLstinction of the incumbent as pro-gay - versus Sanchez as an anti-gay figure - more dear. "It's helpful of course," Murray said of Bell's endorsement of Brown. "If you look at the precincts where Chris was strong, he ran well in [the heavily gay neighborhood of] Montrose. "One of the clear differences between Sanchez and Bell-Brown was Prop. 2," he added. Gay supporters of Bell this week pledged their support for Brown's candida­q ·. He also has been endorsed by the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus; Gay or Lesbian Dollars Political Action Committee (GOLD PAC); and Anmse Parker, the City Council's only openly gay member, who was re-elected on Nov. 6. Brown co-sponsored an anti-discrimina­tion measure that included gays. The ordi­nance was approved by the City Council in July. Sanchez voted against that measure. In a close election, gay men and lesbians who vote can have a big impact, Murray noted. "Every vote will count. Every vote really matters here," he said Mayor Lee Brown 920 Studemont, No. 500 713-426-2001 www.brownformayor.com Orlando Sanchez 3100 Timmons Lane, Suite 100 713-871-8468 www.orlandosanchez.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 NEWS 9 AOL denies plan to post chat room warnings Internet giant is working with CDC on public service announcements for 'appropriate areas,' not necessarily chat rooms, top officials say by LAURA DOUGLAS-BROW:-.. Internet giant America Online says reports of plans to post warnmgs about sex­ually transmitted diseases in some chat rooms are "not wholly accurate," a compa­ny official said this week. AOL has not agreed to post STD infor­mation specifically in chat rooms, said Richard Socarides, a gay vice president of corporate relations for AOL/Time Warner. "We are continuing to work with the [Centers for Disease Control] on public ser­vice announcements on the issue of STDs, and we arc continumg to look at what are appropriate areas on the AOL service and elsewht•rc across our publications," said Socarides, who formerly served as White !louse gay liaison under former President Bill Clinton. Socarides said possible "appropriate areas" for STD information on AOL include the services, health, gay and lesbian, and women's channels. As for posting the information in chat rooms, "I wouldn't say we have ruled it out, but I wouldn't read anything into that," he said. Socarides' comments this week are con­sistent with information he told Houston Voice for an Oct. 12 article on concerns over gay chat rooms AOL did not have plans then to post messages in the chat rooms per se, Socarides said. But in a report published the same day, the Dallas Voice, a gay newspaper in that city not affiliated with Houston Voice, reported that AOL would post information about STDs in some gay and heterosexual chat rooms on the service. The Dallas Voice attributed the informa­tion to AOL spoke~person Andrew Weinstein. Socarides' said this week that the report was "not wholly accurate," but Dallas Voice Editor Dennis Vercher said his paper stands by the story. Weinstein "was familiar with the issue from the start and gave those responses pretty much off the cuff," Vercher said. Weinstein said Wednesday that he told the Dallas newspaper that AOL would post public service announcements, but he did­n't specify in what areas. "I didn't say they were going in the chat rooms, but I didn't say they weren't. I didn't say either way," Weinstein told Houston Voice. Concern over STD transmission through Internet chat rooms became a topic of debate after Jeffrey Klausner, a top official with San Francisco's Department of Public Health, raised concerns about an outbreak of syphilis among gay men he said has been traced to the AOL chat room SFM4M. When the outbreak first occurred in 1999, Klausner said he considered asking for a court order to force AOL to disclose names of the chat rooms users so they could be contacted The solution came in a suggestion from AOL, which put the San Francisco depart­ment in touch with PlanetOut, an online ser-vice for gays. AOL allowed PlanetOut \ ol­unteers to visit the chat rooms to pronde information to users. Klausner has continued to push AOL to post general warnings about syphihs in the SFM4:vl room, as Internet outreach has become an increasingly popular tool for safer sex outreach. HIV organizations in cities including Atlanta, Nashville, New Orleans and San Francisco say they are using screen names such as "HIV Info" to enter chat rooms and provide education to chat participants. Some activists, meanwhile, have accused the educators of privacy violations. Klausner said Monday that he continues to encourage AOL to post information in SfM4M But "there has been no speofic plans told to me by AOL to do direct notification and awareness efforts in the chat room," Klausner said. Meanwhile, a meeting between the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and other public health officials about tran.~­mission of sexually transmitted diseases through encounters arranged on the Internet has been rescheduled, apparently in the wake of the nation's anthrax scare. "A new date has not been set for the meeting, however, It will be rescheduled when all key state, local and other officials can attend," said Mary McFarlane, a research behavioral scientist at CDC's National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention Amenca Online was not part of the planned meeting, Socarides said, although AOL is engaged m "active discussions" with the CDC about appropriate language for public service announcemenl~- Reports that America Ontme plcms to post STD information in diat rooms are not a<cvrate, a<corcling to Richard Socarides, vke president of corporate relations for AOL/T111e Warner. America Online PO Box 29521 New York, NY 10097 1-888-265-8003 www.aol.com People with syphilis more at risk for HIV, health experts say :> Continued from Page 1 In Texas, unlike California and other areas in the nation, health officials do not report a hnk between gay chat rooms and the increase in cases of syphilis. Paffel said that at least in Houston, it is more likely that the STD is spread by men who have sex with men after meeting in places other than a chat room, such as bars or bathhouses. "There are some pickup sites on the Internet that I think have been referenced a couple of times," Paffel said of information his office has gathered from gay patients. "I haven't seen a big relationship with that." The I louston Department of Health & Human Services (HDHHS) reported an increase in new syphilis infections among gay men early this year. That trend has con­tinued, Paffel said this week. Reported new infections between May and October this year totaled 23, compared to 28 such cases of early syphilis among gay men the first four months of the year. That contrasts with 18 such cases reported last year total between January and October, according to Paffel. "In the gay community specifically, it's been gomg kind of up and down," Paffel said. "Right now we're still at a higher level than we're comfortable with and really need to be aggressive to get the word out for peo­ple to use precautions. It's still there." Of particular concern to health officials is the rate of syphilis co-infection with HIV among gay men. Paffel said people who are infected with syphilis are at an increased risk of HIV infection. "The syphilis chancre sores make the risk of HIV infection two to five times high­er," he noted. Both diseases can be prevented through safer sex practices such as condom use, reducing the number of sexual partners and eliminating high-risk sexual practices, health experts said. Paffel encourages gay men to be mindful of symptoms of syphilis and to refer their sexual partners to health care officials if they discover they are infected. Health experts in Houston and across the state are combating the increase in STDs through traditional methods such as talking to the media and posting fliers, posters and other items in high-traffic places such as bars or book stores. "We try and get some visibility in [putting] promotional items out into the community where folks might congregate," Paffel said. "We're also trying to alert the medical providers that cater to gay men." He noted that health professionals some­times need to be reminded that patients who test positive for HIV do not necessarily abstain from having sex. A main ally for the HDHHS in the local health education campaign is the Montrose Clinic, which provides free testing for syphilis, Paffel added. Syphilis is caused by the bacterium Treponema Pallidum, and transmission occurs when the uninfected partner has con­tact with the infected partner's painless lesion, which is often located in the genital, anal or mouth area. The newly infected per­son will develop lesions about three weeks later, according to health officials. The disease is treated with antibiotics. Left untreated, however, the infection pro­gresses to the secondary phase, in which one or more areas of the skin break into a non-itchy rash. Secondary syphilis symp­toms also include fever, swollen lymph glands, headaches, weight loss, muscle aches and fatigue. If the case remains untreated, health experts caution, the patient's symptoms will dLsappear but the disease will continue to cause damage. Montrose Clinic 215 Westheimer 713-830-3000 Texas Department of Health Bureau of HIV and STD Prevention 1100 West 49th St. Austin, TX 78756 512-490-2515 www.tdh.state.tx.us 10 STAFF Executive Editor Chris Cram Editor Penny Weaver ed1torOhoustonvoice com Production Grilphic Designer-Scooter Workinger Contributors RICh Arensch1eldt. Kay Y. Dayus. Trayce Dislon. Earl Dittman, laura Douglas-Brown. Erik Eriekson, Mike Fleming. D.l. Groover. Robert B Henderson. Matthew A. Henme, Kathleen Lee, Er n O'Briant. Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Webmaster: Douglas Wright Photo9r<1phen Dalton OeHart. Kimberly Thompson Advertising S<1les Wand<! Fau!lcner wfaulkner houstonvoice com Jim Nixon Jno:onOhoustonvotee com Adm1n1stn1tion • S~lff Support Carolyn A. Roberts aobertsOhoustonvoice.com N"tionill Advertising Representiltive Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242·6863 A Publisher· Window Media LLC ..,.sicl.nt· William Waybourn Editori"I Director· Chns Crain Fin,.ncial Director· Oiris Reid Sale• Director· Peter Jackson Att Director· Rob Boeger MMl<eting Director· Eric May ra ....... =..,.,.,., Guild . MEMBER t..h _e_C_h_a_l1 ....b....r... CHARTER MEMBER EstablisMd 1974 as the Monrrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-3490 Fax: (713) 5~531 Contents copyright 2000 Office hours; 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request. but you must include your name and phone number f0< verification Please send mail to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd .. Suite 200. Houston, Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-m11J to ed1torOhoustonvoice.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect thcise of the Houston Voice VOICES & ECHOES NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT The punishing truth about Islam by PAUL VARNELL Barely two weeks before the Sept. 11 ter­rorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the 'cw York Post and Court TV both ran items about punishment meted out by Afghanistan's Taliban regime on two men convicted of homosexuality. According to those stories, the Taliban's Islamic jurists knew that homo­sexuality was reprehensible and the sen­tence should be execution, but they were genuinely puzzled by conflicting Islamic opinion on exactly how the execulton should be earned out. "We h.ive a dilemma on this," one Taliban leader explained. "One group of scholars believes you should take these people to the top of the highest building m the city, and hurl them to their deaths." The other group, he said, opted for a dif­ferent approach. "They recommend you dig a pit near a wall somewhere, put these people in it, then topple the wall so that they are buried alive." No one thought to point out that the~e approaches are atavistic survivals of options presented during the earliest days of Islam in the mid-seventh century. The idea of stoning derived from the Koran's account of the destruction of Sodom by a "rain of stones," apparently due to Mohammed's misunderstanding of the Hebrew legend of "fire and brim­stone" (sulfur), and from a supposed hadith ("saying") of Mohammed's urging stoning of both partners found engaging m homosexual sex. Mohammed's succe~sor, his father-in· law Abu Bakr (reigned 632-34), reportedly ordered a homosexual burned at the stake. The fourth caliph, Mohammed's son-in-law Ali 1bn Abi Talib (reigned 656-61) ordered a sodomite thrown from the minaret of a mosque. Others he ordered to be stoned. One of the earliest and most authorita­tive commentators on the Koran, lbn 'Abb.is (died 687) stipulated a two-step exe­cution in which "the sodomite should be thrown from the highest building in the town and then stoned." Later it was decid­ed that if no buildmg were tall enough, the sodomite could be shoved off a cliff Subsequent commentators on the Koran denounced homosexuality in what ethnologist Jim Wafer calls "extravagant" terms: " Whenever a male mounts another male, the throne of God trembles; the angels look on m loathing and say. 'Lord, why do you not command the earth to punish them and the heavens to rain stones on them.'" These early doctrines and practices were codified by the influential Hanbahte school of law. the most conservative school of Islamic 1urisprudence, named after the the­ologian Ahmad ibn Hanbal (780-855). Ibn Hanbal argued that human reason· ing was not a reliable guide to truth and that the Koran and the habitual behavior of Mohammed, literally understood, offered sufficient guidance for later practice. As a result, Hanbalites uniformly urged execu­tion, usually by stoning. There were, to be sure, other schools of thought on the subject. The Hanafites, named for Abu Hanifa (699-767), put greater emphasis on individual reasoning and local circumstances. They taught that homosexuality was wrong but did not mcnt physical punishment because another supposed hadith of Mohammed said Muslim blood should be spilled only for adultery, apostasy or murder. But some ambiguity remained. For a married man, homosexuality could be interpreted as adultery, so an individual judge might choose to impose a physical penalty anyway. Other schools of 1urisprudence urged public whipping, usually 100 lashes, so that the pain of the sodomite might serve as an exemplary warning to others. Reports of these punishments being car­ried out in early times are not abundant. Some historians think this means Islamic culture was more tolerant in prachce than Osama bin Laden, the suspected mastermind of the Sept. 11 attacks in the U.S., grew up in the state-supported Wahhabi religion,. a version of Islam that condones the stoning of gay men. 'Whenever a male mounts another male, the throne of God trembles,' or so argued an early Islamic commentator. The outlook hasn't gotten much better since then, especially in Afghanistan.' in principle. But more likely most court records have simply not survived, ~ we have no information. What may have protected some homo­sexuals, though, was the insistence by most Islamic jurists that conviction for homosex­uality required witnesses, sometimes as many as four. That meant that homosexual­ity conducted discretely and in private might survive unpunished. What does all this history have to do with us? Just this. The strict Hanbalite school of Islamic jurisprudence remains powerful to this day, and is dominant in Saudi Arabia and Syria. The distinguished Islamic schol· ar Scyyed Hossein Nasr describes the cur­rent Hanbalite school as: "The most strict m its adherence to the Koran and the Sunnah [the onginal prac· tices) and does not rely as do the other schools of law upon the other princi­ples" - such as the consensus of the learned, the welfare of the community, modern scientific knowledge, or individ­ual human reasoning - "and, in fact, rejects them." The official Saudi Arabian state religion is a puritanical branch of Islam called "Wahhabism," named for the fundamental­ist religious leader named Muhammad ibn 'Abd al-Wahhab (1703-92), who urged an anti-modem, "restorationist" or "back to the Koran" puritanism fully consistent with the Hanbalite school. It is hardly necessary to remind any­one that Osama bin Laden 1s a Saudi Arabian who grew up in the state-sup· ported fundamentalist Wahhabi religion; or that the Saudi government and royal family have channeled hundreds of mil­lions of dollars to fundamentalist Islamic groups worldwide including, according hundreds of millions of dollars to pro­mote their particularly homophobic ver­sion of Islam among U.S. Muslims. Paul Varnell is a Cl1icagcrbased ~yndiaited writer whose work can be found al the Independent (,ay Forum (www.indega:t.forum.org); he can be rcacheil at Pwrnel/@aol.com. Let us know what you think! Send the editor your letters (400 ~~rds maximum) or op-ed subm1ss1ons (800 words maxi-mum). Include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 LETIERS For Wockner to blame religion for Sept. 11 attacks no better than Falwell, Robertson blaming gays To the Editor: I read with disgust the quote by Rex Wockner blaming the Sept 11 terrorist attacks on religion (Quote/Unquote, Oct. 26). It is simply stupid and as bigotted .ls the state­ments by Revs. Jerry Falwell and Pat Robertson, who blamed gays for the same disaster. Many in the gay community have a deep religious faith. It is not religion at fault but rather human nature hiding behind the mask of religion that causes wars. Docs Wockncr honestly believe the world would be a better place without religion? Stalin was no religionist, nor was Hitler. I think Wockner owes those of us with religious faith an apology. Albert Clerc Ho11sto11 HRC defends new plan to build official headquarters in D. C. To the Editor; We are frustrated that the Houston Voice editonal of Nov. 9 ("'House poor HRC can't lead"), failed to repre­sent the facts regarding the Human Rights Campaign's plans to build a national headquarters in Washington, O.C. The plans are alive and well, and more exciting than ever. The editorial asserted, among other things, that the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 had dashed HRC's plans - nothing could be further from the truth. In fact, two days before the editorial ran, HRC concluded ncgoti,1tions for the purch.lsc of land and an existing building .lt 1640 Rhode Island Ave. for just this purpose. The editorial's ;inalysis is flawed. On the one hand, the paper has lauded the underlying fiscal motivation for this step ("anyone paymg rent down a black hole appreci- Of thee Ising VOICES & ECHOES ates the benefit of owning your own home"), but 1t does not make a case for how this is suddenly unwise and why this sensible investment in HRC's future is now detrimental. Our analysis shows this approach will save the institu­tion over $15 million in a lS·year period, and, under thLS new scenario of reno\•ating an extshng building, it may be more. Owning our own headquarters v..ill strengthen the organization by better positioning HRC to weather hard times and prosper, even in economic downturns. HRC abandoned an earlier plan in favor of a far more effective approach. As the Zoning Commission records make clear, at all hmes, development of the lot at 1616 Rhode Island Ave. for HRC'~ use was an option under consideration. The editorial completely misinterprets HRC's state­ments regarding the decision not to proceed v..ith the pur­chase of the property. Neither the Sept. 12 Jetter the edito­rial refers to or an Oct. 10 letter from HRC to the Zoning Commission indicates that a "fmal decision" had been made. ln fact, the Oct. 10 letter clearly states that HRC was "exploring other opttons including the feas1b1hty of a smaller HRC headquarters buildmg on the site." 11 All funds 111 the capital campaign are wholly separate and distinct from HRC's operatmg budget. Separate and apart from the HRC's opcratmg budget, we have already raised $15 million from a small group of Jeader~h1p donor~ and board members. Jeff Sachse, pres1de11t HRC Capital Cam11aign 12 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE JAKE PART in an impgr'511nt studv onSVPlllllS If you 've had syphilis in the past year we would like to talk lo you. The study involves one hour of time. All $15 qualified participants are paid . All information is completely confidential. For more lnfonn!~onl-800-889-0348 THE KOLBE PROJECT e-mail: info@kolbeprojectorg or v1s1t our Web site at w ww.kolbeprojecLorg PH (713)861-1800 • IOJO Hcighls Bl\'11. Housron. TX 77008 CALENDAR Friday • Nov 16 Morning Prayer 1 Oam Monday • Nov 19 Eucharist 7 :30pm Happy Thanksgiving Offioe dosed Nov. 22 & 23 Na activities on Friday, Nov. 23 Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI FREE NICOTINE PATCHES AND USE OF COMPUTER! Stop-smoking research study uses hand-held computer and nicotine patches. EARN$$$ FOR PARTICIPATING! 713-792-2265 TI-E lNIVER511Y OF TEXAS MDANJERSON CANCER CENTER Making Cancer History"' 11 ~llil@~®/unquote., compiled by REX WOCKNER and staff reports "It's such a great thing that I'm gay because I could not stand to put up with a crying woman now. I couldn't do it." -Contestant Brandon Quinton on CBS TV's "Survivor," Nov. 8 "I thought that I was just like everybody else, that I'd grow up and get married and have kids, but that everybody else must have these feelings, too. I thought that other boys must find that guy cute, and that guy hot, and they must all think Brandon Quinton that way but just date women and then maybe get turned on by them later. This was going on in my head and I believed it, and so all through high school I dated girls." -"Sul'VIVOf" winner Richard Hatch to the Idaho gay newspaper Diversity. November issue "It was difficult getting back into the groove this time around because we have changed in many ways. Five years later, I found that I didn't have the desire to smoke as much, for example. Last time, I was always desperate for a smoke and now I just can't be bothered to smoke. But these characters aren't tired or anything like that. I think that their worse vice now, more than ever, is selfishness. They don't think about anyone but themselves, and I love that!" -"Absolutely Fabulous" creator/co-star Jennifer Saunders (Edina) to San Diego's Gay & Lesbian Times. Nov. 1 "I think gay people were important to the show's initial success, especially in America. It was a gay cult hit well before the mainstream got on to it. I love that gay men love the show." -"Absolutely Fabulous" creator/co-star Jennifer Saunders (Edina) to San Diego's Gay & Lesbian Times, Nov. 1 "My gay friends tell me that in a lot of gay relation­ships, it's OK to bring in a third party, as long as every­one's in agreement. It seems to me that this is a more open sexual thing than in a straight relationship." -Author Jackie Collins to London!> Gay Times, Na.tember issue "I think there is a difference between the English and the American gay scene. In Los Angeles in particular, they are much more into the body beautiful and everyone is oiled, suntanned and worked out to within an inch of their life. In England, it's more of an at-home thing, where the Jackie Colils body is not so important, unless it's being shown off in private." - Author Jackie Collins to London's Gay Times, November issue "Our basic perspective is that Hollywood is a lost cause when it comes to promoting traditional views of marriage and sexuality." - American Family Association spokesman Ed Vitagliano, to the Associated Press, Nov. 7 "The narrow view is that a transgender woman looks like a man in a dress, but that's not true. Yes, there are some transgender women who look like men in dresses, but that's just a tiny, tiny part of the whole community." -Helen Shaver who plays the tranny character on CBS' "The Education of Max Bickford," to the Associated Press. Nov. 7 "There isn't any [after life], you dingbat! Ahhha ... Ha ... Ha ... Ha ... Haaah. This is it, baby! Enjoy, carefully! Religion is such a medieval idea. Don't get me started .... I can't buy any of it. So God made man in His own image? It's just the other way around .... It's all about money." -Comedian Phyllis Diller to the AIDS magazine A&U, November issue HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 16, 2001 Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church Maranatha Fellowship MCC is on the Move! Our church offices haH rdocated to 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, Houston, TX 77004! The anticipated move to 10:00 A'.\I Sunday mornin~ Worship Service at 3333 Fannin, Suite 106 is Sunday, December 2, 2001. For more information, call the church office at 713.528.6756. Plea.1e Join Us For Evening Sen·ices And Experience The Lm·e That Marmwtha Fdlmnhip MCC Has To Offer! November 18 "How Can I Say Thanks?" Rev. Janet Parker November 25 "Overflowing With Thankfulness" Rev. Janet Parker Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more Info ... 71.3-528-6756 or email maranatha@ev1..net ~-I.I~ ~~\\ Maranatha ~.rt , ~! Fellowship lfftropoltt.n Community Chuteh EnJOY worship at your home church in the morning and visit us in the evening for an altl·mate worship experience! OLRSFL\ES 01\J OUR SUCCESSES - TPRIDE INSTITUTE 800-54-PRIDE even the ones you never hear about. Pnde Institute 1s t'le best p1ace for gay l"len and lesbians to get help dealing with chemical dependency, depres· s.on, anxiety or other behavioral health 1ssi.es Tl\at's because rnany lesbians and gay men dor't succeed 1n trad1t onat, stra1ght-r.in treatment programs (How can you recover 1' you can't be yourse n) But rnost patents do succeed at Pride Many of our graduates are eager to share the secret of the r success In fact. about a th rd of our new pat1erts are referred to us by Pnde a i.rnn1 Vis t wwwpnde-instJtute com and find out why p.,de is the p ·ce to dea w:t'l chemical dependercy sex 31 add ction or other mental heattl- ssues f you are gay. es­b an. bisexual or transge'lder www.pride-institute.com Choose to recover wt-ere you can be yo1.orself Minneapolis - Fort Lauderdale - Chicaco - New Jersey - New York City - Dallas/Fort Worth 13 14 ·Relationships ·Happiness ·Inner Peace ·Love ·Sex ·Career Call/or an appointment 713-527-0000 TONY CARROLL, LMSW-ACP Cnrunutf, hfClt.otJuropJ, Vtarhlwpf0< lrulividuab tDUI Coup1#1 Sc !: lltnnton '• G.,· .,,, l~bU.11 Tue"'r:iiist wm Co,,.,,..nity Smu 1911 www.Hou.<tonTh,rapi.>l.com 'Slll-•lhHI ... , 2•1 ........... JleJJBWear l..npwear Benp G-Striap SexyGiftB Latlier JfoyeJties J'ide. /BYD'• NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Build Your Business. DIRECTORY Jay Marks Toyota a Champion dealership Debblle .lohns • Sales Consultant • @TOYOT Jay Maries Toyota 11711 Gulf Freeway Houston, TX 77034 (71 3) 943-9900 o..:Ji~a:;.l!JI~~· (713) 910-4335 fax www.jaymarkstoyoa..com www.champoondealers.com r I Don't be Alone for the Holidays! Stress Management for Women Only! ATALIHA 113-545-5411 Targeting the expansion readership of the Houston Voice ... Houston's only GLBT newspaper. CALL TODAY FOR DETAILS: Wanda Faulkner • sales Manager 713-529-8490 or pager 281-722-3403. WFaulkner@houstonvoice.com r - ~ : ~' ' . ,I j i . r -. r i1< ,. - . .i !: .. 1· J •I, - ~ ~ - --- ~ - HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 Local gay man among those to show felines at this weekend's International yELLA 1YLER Cat Show in "I became addicted the first time my child won," laughs Wil Johnson, he confesses ho\\~ 15 years ago, he joined the world of cat shows. The openly gay Johnson is a bartender at Ej's and a sometime cat breeder. Two ofhIS cats, Elusions Black Pearl and Elusions Enchantres.s, will be shown at this weekend's Cat Fanciers' Association, Inc. International Cat Show at the Brown Convention Center. The highlight of the show will be the naming of the "World's Most Beautiful Cat" on Sunday afternoon. 'This show," Johnson says, "has only pcdign'Cd cats, unlike many shows that have a household pets category." There will be more than 1,CKXJ cats, representing 40 different breeds, being hown, he says. Each cat entered in this show qualified at one of 11 regional shows hdd last month. ''When cats get to this show, they compete as equals," J~ notes. 'They don't have any points and previous wins don't matter." Black Pearl is a part of the Championship Class for adult un-neutered cats. Enchantress is a kitten and competes in the Kitten Class, of coor.ie. Cats that have been neutered compete in a separate class, called Premiership. Johnson is excited about the event. "This is the best part of the year because people come from all over the world to this show. You don't get to see them any other place," he says. Black Pearl and Enchantres.s are Comish Rex, a breed that attracted Johnson because their unusual coat did not set off his allergies. "Most cats have three kinds of hair:;, but these don't have the co.me guard hairs. They only have the short, fine undercoat," he offrrs. The cat's unusual coat attracts attention, and makes getting thrm ready for a show relatively easy. "Some breeds can be work, but these are self-maintaining," Johnson says. ''You can wash them ii you want, or put on some powder so the white stands out, but gl'nerally all you need to do IS comb them and maybe add some lex· tunzer." Pifte e n years of Cat-lover .ltlmn admits that he lets his cats - ilductmg Elusions Grtat bptdatlons or 'Hcmdsome' - lian free run of his house. Continued on Page 16 > friday, nov. 16 Design Industries Foundation Fl~ AIDS (DIFFA) presents the sixth annual Wreath Collection and auction benefitting DIFFA/Houston, one of the largest sources of private funds for HIV/AIDS care in this area. The collection features a number of one-of-a-kind wreaths aeated by notable talents from the areas of interior and flo­ral design, art. and local celebrities: A c reception, buffet and auctiOn of ....... is inOID. ed. 7 10 p.m. Hotel Derek,. 252S'We« 713-840-0555 ~Houlton .........-.. a... iiff ,., season with a musical feast featunng pt jocaf works sung in Hebrew, English and ~ -the Promise of Living. A Concert for ~ and Unity• benefits sever.t arts organizations dam­aged by flooding from Tropical stQltn AHl$on Worts to be performed include thosebv l.eoNrd Bernstein and Aaron Copland. Joitung the Houston Masterworks Chorus are 'Grammy Award winner Cynthia Oawson and .Houston musical colleagues Joby Ben and Wendy Wentland. 8 p m., First Presbyterian Church, 5300 Main St. 713-529-8900. c1m1:~=• --•'tw• brings its big to Houston from Friday, Nov. 16, through Sunday, Nov. 18. Entertainment includes aerial contortion. juggling. tumbling, flying trapeze. theater and more 1402 Spencer Highway, adjacent to Storage USA and Fiesta Mart in South Houston. 1-888-0NE-RtNG. Several artists WIH pres­ent displays at the sixth annual FlrehouM Art ShaW from NOv. 16-18, hosted by White oak Artists Collective. Master potter Vorakit Chmookoswong of Seabrook wiU be on hand with examples of h s porcelam vessels and stoneware pieces Painters, photographers, Jewelers and mixed media artists will join the show. AdmlSSIOn IS free. 6-9 p.m. Friday, 10 a m.-6 pm. Saturday, 10 a.m.·5 p.m. Sunday Firehouse Community Center, Houston Heights. 12th and Yale streets. 713-869-0441. =~Asaoc1811Dn: Haultan is kicking off its annual toy drive to bring holiday joy to children affected by HIV/AIDS. The NLA:H partners with AIDS Foundation Houston and the Red Ribbon TCJ'/ Drive to collect toys and distribute them at Sites including the Texas Children's Hospital. "Thomas Street Oinic and UT Health Science. Monies collected during the toy drive help send HIV-positive children to camp Hope, an AIDS Foundation Houston program that Includes a vveek-long camping getaway for youth ages 7-17. Contact: Dennis R. Watson, NLA:H toy drive CO<hair, 713-741-2273, ext. 1873; or C. Brian Keever, NLA:H tO'/ drive co-chair, 713·5»5126. www.nlah.org 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Introducing Our Newest Associate Jason Garcia our Communi"ty Insurance Agency! For Auto, Home & Health 713.661. 7700 Buslnrn lnsurnnc• "' WorJ:er.s Comprn1ation Group ll•alth • LI/• lnrnronco & muth mor< 6575 W. Loo South, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 Jay Marks Toyota a C ham pion dealership Debbie .Johns - Sales Consultant - j ay Marks Toyota 11711 Gulf Freeway Houston, TX nOH TOYOTA (713) 943-9900 ......a .;;;:.-._ __ .__..:;_.;;s (713) 910-433S r.x www.~ymari<Stoyou.com www.champ1ondealers.com Show lasts through Sunday Continued from Page 15 > competition have made Johnson a relaxed competitor. "The cat has to enjoy 11. Some cats don't like going to shows and you might as well take them home," he says. "Some cats Jove shows, but others are scared and cower an their cage." Johnson says he has traveled all over the country showing cats. "It's a lot of fun and very social. I meet people from all over the world; people who I would never meet otherwise," he relates. "Everyone enjoys showing cal~ and our cats are like our children and have lots to talk aboul" He used to go to as many a~ 10 shows a year, but heart surgery slowed him down. "I go to maybe one show a year, but Cynthia Rigoni, who is my vet and best friend, also shows my cats," he says. Johnson also breeds Corrush Rex, but pro­duces just a few kittens each year. He has eight cats, including a 17-year-old. "I.Dis of people m Montrose have one of my cats," he says. He treats his cats like more than just pets, and admits the cats have the run of the house. "They run me; they're my children," he says cheerfully. The fact that he is a gay man doesn't nec­essarily dictate his love for felines, according to Johnson. He doesn't think that gay men arc any more likely to have cats as pets than any other group of people. "All the men I know have dogs. I don't know why, but they do," he says. People who own his cats seem to be equally likely to be men or women, he notes. In addition to the cat exhibition and judg­ing, the weekend feline show features a Judg­ing school, exhibits and information about various cat breeds, performances by the Friskies performing cats and the opportunity to meet a live cougar. Proceeds from the everit benefit the Winn Feline Foundation, which studies feline heath, and the Houston SPCA, the Houston Humane Soaety, Citizens for Animal Protection and the Spray-Neuter As.~istance program. The "World's Most Beautiful Cat" award will be handed out Sunday at 3 p.m. CFA International Cat Show George R. Brown Convention Center, Hall C 9 a .m.-6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 16, and Saturday, Nov. 17 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday Admission: S7 for adults, SS for seniors and children under 12, children 5 and under admitted free Pets are not allowed ON YOUR NEXI VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAV B&B w e•re right INthe neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars . 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 out on the aisle by PENNY WEAVER "She Loves Me" The Country Playhouse presents a holi­day musical with "She Loves Me," a love story based on the classic film "Uttle Shop Around the Comer." This unconventional love story is set m a European "parfumerie" in the 1930s and tells the tale of two co-work­ers who each fall in love by correspondence - without knowing that it is to each other. The recent film, ''You've Got Mail," is loosely based on the same story. Director is Christopher Ayres, and Claudia Dyle is musi­cal director. The show opens at 8 p.m. today and runs weekends through Dec. 15, with two Sunday matinees, Dec. 2 and 9, at 2 p.m. "She Loves Me" Nov. 16-Dec. 15 Tickets: $19 or $17 for seniors/students The Country Playhouse 12802 Queensbury 713-467-4497 Mezza.5oprano Denyce Graves Known across the globe as one of today's premiere vocal stars, mezza·sopra· no Denyce Graves will appear at Galveston's Grand 1894 Opera House this Sunday in a performance sponsored in part by Diane and Marion Duzich, The Trube Foundation and The Galveston Musical Club. USA Today calls Graves "one of the singers most likely to be an operatic super· star in the 21st century." She has performed throughout the world since her debut at the Metropolitan Opera during its 1995-96 sea· son. Sht• probably is best known for her title roles in "Carmen" and "Samson et Dalila." She has partnered with Placido Domingo in both performances. Special discounts are offered for group and senior citizen tickets. Mezza-soprano Denyce Graves 3 p.m. Nov. 18 Tickets: $16.50 to $55 The Grand 1894 Opera House 2020 Postoffice Galveston Island, TX 77550 409-765-1894 www.thegrand.com THEATER CALENDAR "The Nutcracker" Houston Ballet presents Ben Stevenson's holiday production of "The Nutcracker" in both 2 and 7:30 p.m. performances on vari­ous days from Nov. 23 through Dec. 30. The opening night cast features Lauren Anderson as the Sugar Plum Fairy, Zdenek Konvalina as the Nutcracker Pnnce and Sara Webb as the Snow Queen. For more than 100 years, the story of this ballet has proven irresistible to both children and adults. A little girl named Clara receives a magical nutcracker on Christmas Eve and sets off on a wondrous journey to the Land of Snow and Kingdom of Sweets. Housont Ballet's production includes a Christmas tree that grows to a towering 40 feet and a winter snow scene complete with falling snowflakes. The production will include 10 separate casts throughout its run, and includes the debuts of five Houston Ballet dancers. Artistic Director is Ben Stevenson, designs are by Desmond Heeley and light­ing is by Duane Schuler. ''The Nutcracker" Nov. 23-Dec. 30 Tickets: $11.50 to $76.50 Houston Ballet Wortham Theater Center, Brown Theater Texas at Smith streets, downtown Houston 713-227-ARTS www.houstonballet.org "Buddy ••• The Buddy Holly Story" In three concerts over Thanksgiving weekend, Galveston's Grand 1894 Opera House presents "Buddy ... The Buddy Holly Story." The musical celebrates the life and legacy of the singer/songwriter who changed popular music forever. Favorite songs such as "Peggy Sue" and "That'll Be the Day" add to the performance. "Buddy ... The Buddy Holly Story 8 p.m. Nov. 23, 3 and 8 p.m. Nov. 24 Tickets: $16.50 to $65 The Grand 1894 Opera House 2020 Postoffice Galveston Island, TX 77550 409-765-1894 www.thegrand.com Mmbne llonbonan en! her Clowns tcaeov•the stage as pcl'f of "The Nutaadiet" offend by the Houston Balet from Nov. 23- Dec. 30 tlis yt111. Vtvtthv6tP P~OPQ(liOtvS presents Opens Friday November 9 at 8 p.m. Plays Thurs. - Sat at 8 p.m. Through December 15 Tickets $15 Call 713-524-8707 Unhinged Theatre 3304 la Branch So 1 Met This Guy • • Two very funny, oriqina! plays about modern lesbian and qay relationships. 'tI'artner <Rjngs" custom rings· inavailable ln stores Female Version Male Version Prices vary depending on ring size and material Available in Silver, 141< Yellow or White Gold, or Platinum To order contact Marty at AGoldenGuy@AOL.COM or call 847-635-0261 Copyright 2001 Marty Sherman Gay Owned and Operated Proudly Serving "Our" Community. 2318 S. Shepherd• 713-528-9080 AMERICAN PRIDEDry Cleaners • Store Hours: 7am to 7pm (Mon-Fri)• 8am to Jpm (Sat) 18 • • .Announcing Our~re -f.-foLicLay Sa Lei SHOP EARLY AND SAVE From 20010 to 50010 Loose Diamonds, Diamond Rings, Diamond Earnngs, Diamond Bracelets, Diamond Pendants and More! 'Some watch and JOW•lry br•nds excluded This is how you say it ... Fine Folhlon Je- lry OlomondJ. BrldOI J-tty and Bolter Swiss Watches HOl.rs: Mon·Sol 10.0 • lhJ 10-Q • 3841 Beldre lllvd • 7l~5COO ;-.\ cingular\Y WIRELESS FREE Nights and Weekends with any Home Plan of $29.99 or higher NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE • • Uncensored Visions· I.a. E ye1Norks ~t~. 3988 Weathelmer, Highland VIiiage •Houston, TX 77027 • 713·822·44t1 SAVE $100 on the NEW i50sx Now Only $4999 Authorized Deal FREE PHONE Save $79 Motorola 2282 75 WhtntYtr Minutn 600 Whenever Minutes 500 Weekend Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes ==:* 1199.!. ::f:* s399i 1000 Whenever Minutes 2000 Whenever Minute$ 2000 Weekend Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes ===-~ s6ru9 ::::~ s9999 "':o=:c:=· ;,;.,,,. '"Mi=-c:=· - HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 homefront Tropicals off er winter beauty As annual Cow Parade cows retire to pasture, a tour of the city offers colorful indoor, outdoor foliage by ELLA TYLER The Cow Parade cows are now on their way to the last round up, but they were fun while they lasted. In the course of checking out the cows, I visited several places that I don't visit often. I saw some very pretty public spaces and got new ideas for big and small gardens. Sam l louston Park, downtown at Lamar and Bagby, has some unusual plants in the gardms around its houses. It is worth a visit for a lei:.urely stroll or for inspiration if you arc trymg to landscape an old house. I found a pretty little park on the other side of downtown, at Austin and Lamar, that I hadn't seen before My quest for cows took me to the Galleria. I rarely go there, but the stores were closed, and except for the contractors remodeling, the place was empty. Its interi­orxaping is scattered pots planted with fems and orchids. They make a striking dis· play. In this kind of display, each plant usu· ally has its own pot. The pots can be changed out when the flowers fade. Each plant can have the kind of soil it likes but the plants should have similar require­ments for heat, light and humidity. In this case, both fems and orchids like humidity. Sec-mg these pots reminded me of the first time I saw bromeliads. It is also the first time I remember seeing plants in a commercial mtenor, except for the philo­dendron at the dentist's office. It was when I was a teenager, and they were at Ne1man's, when it was still downtown. There was a planter of them at the top of the escalator. They had a silvery-green leaf and , pink bract with tiny blue flowers. Bromeliads and orchids are worth using more often both inside and outside. Since many of the varieties derive nourishment from the air or have cups that hold water, they need less space for roots and can be planted in relatively small containers. Some can be even be wifl'<i to a board. They have long lasting flowers or bracts that are eye­catching. I continued onward to Uptown Park, which I hadn't visited before. Its outdoor planters have interesting and 1magmative plant combinations. I saw one with loropetalum and caladium, and the spots on the caladium were the same color bur­gundy as the new growth on the loropetalum. It is also called Chinese witch hazel or frmge flower, and blooms in the winter and early spring. One planter has druanta, which gets one of its common names, sky flower, from Its blue flowers, and il-; other, golden dew­drop, from its small fruits. One pot includ­ed jewels of Omar, which is rarely seen. Its botanical name is talinum paniclatum. It has spikes with lots of tiny bright red and yellow flowers in late summer. Some of these plants are tropical, but they might survive the winter outdoors. They are on concrete walks, which retain heat, and are sheltered. Many tropicals, however, begin to lose leaves when temper­atures fall below 40. Chinese evergreens and peace lilies are notorious examples. Speaking of tropicals. many people have bananas now. The fruit stalk can be cut from the tree when the edges of the bananas begin to get rounded. The stalk can be hung in a cool place and hands can be brought inside to ripen. A friend gave me some, and though they don't taste quite like Chiquita, l found them to be edible. They are sweeter and have a slight citrus undercurrent. If you have them, put some chunks out for the birds. Drag out a Cuban cookbook and fry them like plantains or make banana bread. One of the things that occurred to me on this mission was that I could have more fun with my garden. I don't think I'm ready for a painted cow, but my pots and birdbaths and patio furniture are all very tasteful and classic. My rore; are colorful, but only in one area of the garden. Rainbow Moosaic, at Sam Houston Park, reminded me of the mir· rored Mexican flowerpots that were all over the place a few years ago. 1 wanted one, but couldn't find one that wasn't too gaudy. I've decid­ed to make my own. And it might not be white. I might even plant a hot pink hibis­cus by the front door. L0<al gay stist Kennit Eisenhut de<orated tlis and several other boviH for tht Houston Cow P•ade, whidi is about to read! its Hd for tlis year. But, if you're ready for a cow, 60 of them will be auc­tioned off at Wortham Center on Dec. 6. You can get all the details from www.cowparadehous­ton. com. professional cabinetry • closet systems bu i lt if yOlTR CLOSET HJlD LOOkED THiS GOOD ... for a free desr~n consultatro!l, call (113) 688-8808 closet• home office • garage • pantry We also feature dramatic residential & commercial fountains and accessories. Business Highway 290 Ea.st in Hempstead Open every day but Wcdnc.Jays from 9 to 6 409-826-6760 frazier's J~l4 Ornamental and Archit«tural Concrete 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE New South Kitchen & Bar Sunday Famous Gospel Brunch Thursday Fried Chicken s3, 75 Foxmopolitans 2S15 S. SHEPHERD HOUSTON, TX 7709S 713.523.SFOX WWW.FOX DINER.COM Cafe Zorro· 905 Taft· 713.528.9691 Nuevo Wava Latino Cuisine Lunch only M-F 11am-2pm Available for private parties & events, evenings & weekends HOURS Monday-Thursday 11am-10pm 11am-11pm 11am-9pm Friday -Saturday Sunday The~~ Mellin~ Pot. ~ a fondue restaurant Dip into something diff erenr~ Tht Mtltlog Poe, HomcN\1 ooly fondue "'suur.an1 lw tie... -cd 01>< of H_,,,,,·, "Mast Romannc Dining &pcncu.:o • ~ joan os (or J. uruqur and inunu1r cfaud& ftpcrk.na to ;1 asuJI bu1 comforr;.ahk environ· ~ Wt' olfet a wUk Y'1Kty of e:ntttu .u wt'll ;u our ~I ~lJu>< •ppniuri. but don'1 forgtl our ~i. ~ 1ba1 i..., mack w &m-1 We •1< - ~ tla. u!nm.tt •n cllnmg p!=u"" 6100 Westheimer 713-532-5011 A four coun.r fr.uurr du1 1ndv comrltus dv fo~ O:f!ricnet. CHEESE FO:-;DUE COURSE Sww or Oicddar Ch<cac Fondue, Seuon<d To l'<rf<e1ion Ta bk-Sid< SALAD COL'RSE B"m Sw«t.C.liforn1> S.l•d. Clicrs ~lad or Mwhroom S.lad MAIS COURSE DESSERT Twm M.unt: Lobsttr T.uls, Ccnrcr-C:.u F1lc1 Mognon, )•panes< 1igrr Shrimp. Choice Sulom Tcrsy.1lc.1, 8rC21t Of O.idcn. ' Aa:ompanocd By An Exouc Assonmrn1 afVq;cuhks •nd S•U<cs. Milk. W1ur~ or ButC'r-Swm O;irk Oioc:obrr Fondue! Aa:ompanocd By Fresh Fru1u and Cahs for D1pp1ng s6700 fl',_. coup/I ('33 .. ('4> ('4._,. ~W.~# .. J eating out RESTAURANT REVIEW Dining at Zana a real treat Despite one pretentious waiter, restaurant shines with creative foods, unique atmosphere by TRAYCE DISK!:--: Are we Houstonians really that provin­cial when it comes to global cuisine? Or did our waiter at Zana (the downtown Mediterranean Cafe owned by the talented and savvy folks of Mi Luna and Mia Bella) just have a bit of an inferiority complex? Soon after sealing us at one of the cozy yet sleek black \'inyl booths, he brought us the starter of sliced pita and charmoula, a spicy tomato sauce. "You know how you guys eat tortilla chips and salsa? Well." he coached, ''this is what we eat instead in Morocco. This is pita bread." Well, thanks for clueing us in. Our amusement, howev­er, would have been sweeter if this exotic and obscure invention was actually fresh. Unfortunately, the chilly, thin triangles were chewy and decidedly stale. The sauce, however, redeemed our friend quite a bit. The deep tomato flavor and smoky, gar­licky seasonings made it easy to disguise the texture of the bread The waiter's overbearing and preten­tious manner continued this way through­out the evening, as he reminded us more than once that he was the artist behind the minimalist, industrial-looking creations on the walls, and questioned us as to various items on the menu, to "test" our knowl­edge. There's a fine line, we learned, between the entertaining and downright imtating. Thankfully, Zana offers some sumptu­ously good food to counteract its seeming­ly needy staff. The charmoula sauce makes another fortuitous appearance with the Fried Calamari ($5.95), which features lightly battered meaty rings of squid. The Steamed Mussels ($6.95) in a zesty tomato, cilantro and roasted jalapeno cream sauce is a welcome south-of-the-border addition to the menu. The Moroccan Blackened Tuna ($8.95), on its bed of leafy sauteed spinach sauce and drizzled with harissa sauce, is not to be missed. Although one expects lamb and cous­cous, feta and olives to make star appear­ances on the menu, the crepes caught our attention immediately. The Veggie Crepe ($8.95) features sauteed spinach, mush­rooms, roasted red peppers, zucchini and cheese stuffed into a thin crepe. Although the veggies were tender and fresh, the real flavor comes from the generous heaping of basil cream sauce, which lends a rich and piquant kick to the otherwise somewhat bland dish. Perhaps it was just an over­sight, but we found it odd that the cheese wasn't listed as one of the ingredients. The Chicken Zana ($11.95) is topped with a festive confetti of sundried toma- Zana Mediterranean Cafe 401 Louisiana 222-1822 Food: fel fel fel fel Service: fel fe l Value: fel fel fel fe l Scene; fel fel fel ft **** Worth the drive. so live a little ***** As good as it gets toes, artichoke hearts and goal cheese, and the white wine sauce deliciously enhances this mingling of flavors. The chicken itself was tender and moist, and the side of cous­cous was light and unburdened by heavy spices or drowning sauces. The side of veg· etables is a healthy and pleasingly ungreasy medley. The Grilled Eggplant with Goat Cheese ($8.95) features eggplant that manages to be beautifully grilled while still maintain­ing its succulence. The layering of moz· zarella, parmesan and goat cheese over· whelm the dish a bit, but the resulting taste is rich, smoky, and decadent. For those interested in something a little more spare, try the Whole Wheat Fettuccine ($12.95), with mushrooms, peas, spinach, roasted peppers and an exquisite wild mushroom pesto sauce. The Grilled Lamb Chop ($14.95) with its tapanade of sundried tomatoes and braised leeks fea­tures a gorgeous saffron rice and pinot noir sauce. Salads also illustrate the creative and tasteful touch of many of Zana's dishes. Try the Roasted Eggplant Salad ($6.95) and Rosemary Chicken Salad ($7.95), where toasty walnuts and juicy tomatoes soak up a delicate pommery mustard vinaigrette. The lunch menu doesn't scale back in terms of quality, but features more on-the-go items such as wraps, burgers and an end· less array of sandwiches. Located one block from the heart of the Theater District, Zana is a welcome, casual alternative to many of the cavernous and loud new restaurants in the area. Other than an obnoxious waiter or two, Zana's staff is efficient and friendly, and allows the food lo speak for itself. HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 16, 2001 Thank you to all my loyal supporters and friends. You have stood by me thoughout my career in politics, and your votes, volunteer time and money are the reasons we won this election. The outcome was closer than I was comfortable with, in large part because of my active and public involvement in the No on City Prop 2 campaign. I am proud of that effort, and would do it again without hesitation. Although this was my last campaign for Houston City C:Ouncil, it is certainly not my last election. I look forward to calling on you for support in 2 years. Thankyou! ~ Non-discrimination Ordinance Domestic Partnership Benefits Metro Rail 21 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE community calendar saturday, nov 17 After Hours. KPFT 90 1 FM 12 a.m. to 3 am 713-526-5738. Dignity mass. 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics. 713·88<>-2872 Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club 930 a m 281-437-0636. Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club. Call for nde locations. 713-863-1860. Houston Wrestling Club Practice. 1:30 p.m. 713-453-7406. Q-Patrol walks the streets 8:45 p.m. 713-52!!-SAFE. Rainbow Fishing Club Meeting. 713-526· 7070.713-88().9235. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W Alabama. 713-528-6665. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center Drop-in noon-4 p.m. • Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Houston volunteer appreciation reception. 1-4 p.m. •Texas Association for Transsexual Support, 3 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818 Asians & Friends Houston. Dining wrth fnends at West Gray Cafe Express. wwwAsiansAndFriendsHouston.com. 713-626-6300. Houston H Friends Support group for peo­ple with HSV or HPV (herpes or genital warts). Meeting. www.HoustonHFriends.org. 713-595· 2100, ext. 3821 (24-hour voice mail system). Confidential and anonymous. sunday, nov 18 Anarchist Black Cross Federation/ Anarchist Reading Group 1 p.m. www.houstonabc.org. 713-595·2103 Bering Memorial United Methodist Church Services at 8:30 & 10:50 am. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 713-526-1017 Community Gospel. Service at 11 a.m. & 7 p.rn. Sunday School for children 10 a.m. 713·88(). 9235 or www.commumtygospel.org. Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Uberal Baptist. Service 9:30 a.m. & education hour 11 a.m. 713-668-8830. First Congregational Church (Memorial) Service at 10 a.m. Christian Education. 11 :30 p.m. 713-468-9543 or fcc·houston.org. First Unitarian Universalist Church. Services at 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Brunch available 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion. 1 :30 p.m. 713-526· 5200. church@f1rstuu.org. Gay Catholics of St. Anne's-Houston. 5 p.m worship service. Dinner and social. alex­cam@ wt.net. 713-623-0930 Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 am. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-528-3269. Houston Mission Church. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-529-8225 Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m to noon. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclb@aol com Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church Service. 6:30 p.m. 713-528-6756. Rainbow Riders A bicycle club for women. 713-869-1686. Resurrection MCC Services. 9 and 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10 a m. Youth Sunday School 11 :15 a.m. Hand bell Choir rehearsal 1:30 p.m. 713-861-9149. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rite Eucharist I 7:45 a . m~ Holy Rite Eucharist II 8 55 a.m .• Education hour 10 a.m.; Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 713-528-6665. The Women's Group Meeting & Discussion 10:45 a.m. 713-529-8571 Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Adult discussion 9:45 a.m. Service 11 a.m. 281 -277-8882. www.tuuc.org. :Jfo(itfay :Jfeartli :Fest - :Hea{tli :Fair # Syonsorea Gy ~- .£es6zan :Heaun Initiative • & 'Resurrection 5-vtetr~po{itan Community Cllurcn tt':Jf'E:N: Saturaay, 'DecemGer 1, 2001 71:M'E: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm tt':J·fi.E'R'E: 2025 W. 11 tfi. Street ('R.J'vtCC <gym WJ{..'A.'J: •:free Mammograms ,. J-fea{tli Screening • ,. $pea~ers on 3fea{tfi. Issues • -venaors ~ *Live .:Music antf Vancing ~ ~1 PO Box 130158, Houston, TX 77219 713.603.0023 LHIHoustonOO@aol.com Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Service 10:30 a.m. 409-765-8330. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston Adult forum 1 O a.m. Service 11 a m. 713-686-5876. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Drop-in 2- 5 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. • 713-524-3818. Classic Chassis Car Club. Progressive Dinner. Three locations for coordinated potluck. www.ClassicChassisCarClub.org. 713· 797 ·8615. PFLAG-Oalveston Meeting. 2 p.m. 713.a67·9020. monday, nov 19 AIDS Mastery 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV 713-830-3000. gayDAR Wellness Community. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-526-1017, Ext. 211. Gay Fathers/Fathers First. Support group. 8 p.m. Grace Lutheran Church. Tom: 713-726-8736. Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsals. 7 p.m. 713-521-7464. Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, Ext. 208. HIV testing STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 1 to 6;15 p.m. 713-626-2837. Houston Tennis Club 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713-692·2703. Kolbe Project Eucharist 7:30 p.m 713-861-1800. Lesbian & Gay Voices Radio Show. 8 to 10 p.m. KPFT 90.1 . 713-529-1223. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713- 524-3818. Integrity /Houston Guest speaker Rev. Elizabeth Carl 6:30 p.m .• Autry House. 713-622-2255. tuesday, nov 20 Bering Support Network Lunch Bunch Gang 11 a.m. 713-526-1017 CPR Classes 3 p.m. 713-607-7700. For Mature Audiences Only. Support group. 7 p.m. Bering Memorial UMC. 713-526·1017 Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m. to midnight. Club Houston. 713-830-3000. Gay Men's Process Group 7 p.m 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713-526-8390. Gay youth. New program for young gay males. ages 18-29. 7 p.m. 614 Avondale. 713-533-9786. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous Support group. 7 p.m 713-524-0439. HTGA. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-520-0439. Men's Network. Discussion group for social. educational development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 281·633·2555. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. Two-hour free dance work· shops. No partner needed. Beginner. _2 Step, Waltz, Shuffle & Swing. Drop in anytime. 8:30 p.m. 713-528-9192. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Noon, Thanksgiving dinner potluck. • Drop-in 6·9 p.m. • Lesbian Coming-Out Group, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. wednesday, nov 21 Bering Memorial United Methodist Churcn. Dinner at 6:30 p.m Various Support Groups 7 p.m. 713-526-1017. Bible Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m. St. Stephen's Episcopal. 713-526-6665. Blessed Sacrament Church. Workshop Series for Christian Faith and Ecumenical Old Catholicism. 713-476-9776. Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 a.m.·1 p.m. 2015 Thomas Street 713-793·4026. Freelance Art Classes. By Kermit E1senhut for HIV+ individuals. 1 ·4 p.m. Lunch provided. 713-523-9530. Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal. 1307 Yale. 713-527-0931 www.houstonprideband.org. Houston Tennis Chlb. 7:30 -9 p.m. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclb@aol.com Lesbian Uterature Discussion Group 7 p.m. Meets every other Wednesday. 713-383-6738. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a.m.·6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Spiritual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861-9149. Women's Network. Montrose Counseling Center discussion group for social, educational development of gay and bisexual women. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6·9 p.m • Free HIV testing, counseling, 6· 9 p.m. • Houston Committee for People's Radio, 6:30 p.m. • Bi-Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. 713-524-3818. thursday, nov 22 Community Gospel. Service. 7:30 p.m. 713- 880-9235. www.communitygospel.org. Free HIV Testing. By the Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m. to midnight. Toyz Disco. 713-830-3000. FrontRunners. Running club. 6:30 p.m. 713· 522-8021. Gay Houston New social group for all ages. 7 p.m. 713-526-9318. Hep C Recovery. Support group. 6:30 p.m. Bering. 713·526·1017, Ext. 211 . HIV Art Therapy Program. 1-4 p.m. Kermit Eisenhut. 713-523-9530. Lambda Skating Club. 8 p.m. Tradewinds. Skating Rink. www.lambdaroll.org. 713-410-7215. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry 10 a.m. ·6 p.m. 281-633-2555. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Two hours free line dance instruction. No part· ner required. Drop in anytime. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 p.m. 713·528·9192. STD exams & treatment Free. AVES. 713· 626·2837. Spanish Charla Conversation Group. 7 p.m., Empire Cafe. Email charlahouston@msn.com. 713-416-7203. Women's Clinic. Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop in 6-9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713· 524-3818. friday, nov 23 Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000. Govlnda Yoga Club. Free yoga classes at 3115 West Loop South, No 21 713.439.0455_ Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homo­sexuals (H.A. T.C.H.) Meeting. 713-942-7002. Houston Tennis Chlb. 7:30-9 p.m. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclbOaol.com Kolbe Project. Morning prayer. 10 a.m. • Movie night, "Much Ado About Nothing.• 7 p.m. 713-861-1800. Lesbian & Gay Voices. KPFT 90.1 FM. 7 p.m. 713-526-5738. Q-Patrol Walks the streets. 9 p.m. 713-528-SAFE. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • Lesbian Film Night, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. Trip to AutoRama. Classic Chassis Car Club travels to world's largest indoor car show. Meet at The 59 Diner, 3801 Farnham, 10:30 a.m. brunch/gathering. www.ClassicChassisCarClub.org. 713-797-8615. To list an event, ca/1713-529-8490, fax at 713· 529-9531, or e-mail editorOhoustonvoice.com. Deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. NOVEMBER 16, 2001 •HOUSTON VOICE DIRECTORY 23 American & Foreign TAFT STREET AUTO Auto Repair & Service 113-526-3123 1411 Tan Houston.TX. 11019 Uinlilllllily l~t Btst 713.861.6181 ADA!\IS COlUPl.ETE t'l .. 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Gain 1-3". Permanent & safe. Enhance erection. FREE Brochures! Latest enlargement info: (619)295-HUNG or 900-976-PUMP ($2.95/min.) The House Company DAVID BOWERS Off••· 40976J.1030 fa 40976J.29SS tt- 409·76>113D Realtor 2615 Broadway Galveston. Texas nsso Col 409 m-4637 ,.,. 409 no.1016 W fne I00.76S-OS76 ild~ 81, UNUMITm I Photography I Picture your home BEFORE disaster stnkes. Photographic documentation of your insured, personal possessions will insure your receiving a fair price for replacement. Including Portrait Pets & Chat Room Photos Kathy "Kat• Frazer 713-981-8958 Kat2tra~sn.com BONDED If your hair Isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 IY APPOOCnEIT ONLY 24 CLASSIFIEDS NOVEMBER 16, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE houston classifieds Houston Classifieds deadline is Monday at noon OCCASIONS Fabulous wordsmith and Editor Matt Hennie celebrates hos birth­day on Nov 17 Tony T. & Ted P. celebrate birthdays with a little left over turkey on Nov 23. Ai'T~'OUNCEMENTS BUTCH-FEM Starting Butch-fem group for Lesbians • If interested call 713- 917-8987 Press 4 to leave a mes­sage for us. EMPLOYMENT INSURANCE OFFICE Insurance agency needs part-tome customer service assistant • Must be proficient with Microsoft Word • Responsfb:l1ties tnclude corre­spondence, filing, and general cler­ical duties • Good job for college student • We are looking for strong written and verbal commu­nications plus a stable background and good references • Please call Rob 0 713-661-7700 or www.schmerferagency.com Guaranteed Money • We are look­ing for young (18-25 preferred malelshemale) attractive upbeat escorts • All-American, Latin and Asian a plus• Must be reliable and ready to make money in a sage professional environment • No e•penence necessary • tf you are ready for financial security call us today and start today • 11 am to 9 pm 7 days a week• 713-526-1531 RYAN WHITE PLANNING COUNCIL seeks a highly organized individual with excellent telephone. writing and computer skills to fill position of Support Staff secretary/recep- 11onist • Must be fluent in English/Spanish • Requirements: Knowledge in MJCrosoft Office and typing 45wpm • Startmg salary S 1900 per month • View job description at www.rwpc.org • Apply al 1310 Prairie, Suite 240 • Reference #7982-C COUNTER HELP DELI Gay owner and operated deli in the Heights seeks counter help. Call Doug 0 713-864-3354 STEVEN'S HOUSE S"kong cook • Responsible for preparation of nutritional meals for program participants • Meal planning • Prepare grocery list • Clean kitchen and utensils after use • Call Taylor 0 713-SU-5757 SOUTH BEACH JR'S MINE 800 PACIFIC AVE Taking applications for all positions • High Volume • Gay night club • Group health insurance offered • Apply in person Wednesday thru Friday • 1 to 4 pm. Recent photo is required. FREE EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE Offering free employment assis­tance fo HIV+ individuals Including job preparedness. train­ing. resume development. and job searching assistance. For more info call 713-981-1543 PWA COALITION PART-TIME Warehouse Assistant • Clean driv­ing record required • fax resume to 713-522-2674 MONTROSE House help wanted • Yard • House • Pool • Maintenance work • 713-5~ 5993 STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregiver for HIV+ adults • Part-time overnight and weekend staff • Minimum requirements include high school diploma and at least 3 years prior work experience in caregiving • light duties include cooking, cleaning, administration of medications and crisis interven­tion• Call Taylor 0 713-522·5757 Resurrection MCC is seeking a maintenance specialist/caretaker • Individual will clean and main­tain interior and exterior of church properties • Qualification: High School diploma/equivalent • Salary & benefits • Send cover letter with resume 10· Resurrection MCC • 2025 West 11th Street • Houston, Texas 77008 • Attn Maintenance/Caretaker SEEKI!\G EMPLOYMENT New to area Gay barber seeks man's styles barber job in gay friendly shop • 14 years experience • 713-957·1078 FOR SALFJRENT MONTROSE COITAGES 1/1 Garden Cottage • S300 and up • Reserved for People l1v1ng with AIDS • 90 day MAX • Phone. fur· nished,AC • Maid paid • No depos1t • Sliding scale fee • No drugs or Alcohol on property • AIDS Housing Coalition AHCH • 713·521·1613. Garage Apartment • Eastwood • Neat U of H & bus bne •One peoon •No pets • ms deposit & utilities • ean Moctiael 713-923-2473 OffiCE FOR REl'ff Second floor office available at Houston lesbian & Gay Community Center • 803 Hawthorne • 14' X 12'6" • Nonprofit GL8T organiza­tions preferred as tenant partners. but all inquiries welcomed. Call Tim Brookover 0 713-524-3818 Furnished rooms in Montrose from S2951week • For single. quiet per· son • Free cable tv. breakfast. park· ong. maid service • With queen bed, kitchen, & laundry access Montrose Inn • 408 Avondale 713-52M206 PRIDE REALTY. COM SALES/RELOCATION HEALTH ffiEE YOGA ClA5SfB FREE yoga classes every Friday 06:30 p.m. • 3115 West loop South #21 • No restrictions • No reserva· tions needed • 713-439-0455 MASSAGE THERAPY MASSAGE BY KEN Experience stress relief Convenient Montrose location • By appointment only • 11 am to 8pm • RMT#028519 • KEN CLAUDE • 713· 524-4759 MASSAGE Therapeutic • Deep tissue • Jason • College guy • 713-863-8888 • 713- 908-8020. FOR ACTIVE MEN Your time for personal attention • Full Body Swedish Massage • Jose • RMT#17316 • 713-397-8286 FULL BODY RELAXATION by Young Athletic Male RMT#016479 • Tim • 713-876·3811 MASSAGE Absolute Let-Go Hou1ton Metro 713.942.2399 • Montrose Locauon • 7 dayS/IM!l1l~S • Vlsa/Masterc1rd ._ ....... Massage by David Rangel • Swedish • Neuro Muscular Therapy • Montrose area • MCNISA/AMEX welcomed RMT #8069 Appointments 713-523-0738 1 Porn star Stryker 5 Place for oral gratification 9 Strip for perking? 14 Largest continent 15 "The Spell" author Hollinghurst 16 Filmmaker James 17 Argument in favor of male gay sex? 20 Poet Griffin 21 "No" to Dietrich 22 Keanu's "Matrix" cyber-ID 23 It can be pulled 25 Noisy hammer target 27 Have a one-nighter? 32 Hardtop, maybe 36 Sexual preference determiner, some say 37 Motorists' org. 38 Boat basin 39 Shakespeare title starter 41 With 64 Across, premature ejaculation? 43 Slumps 44 Minuses on the ledger 46 _ & Jerry's 47 Wishy-washy Mapplethorpe supporter (abbr.) 48 Former gay mag "Men's _ 49 Result of agressive sex? 52 'Hmanty• Clinton 54 Cold porter 55 • _ Pleasures· (Pansy Division song) 57 Porn film ·_Riders' 60 • .• 9" cut, smooth" 64 See 41 Across 67 Composer Copland 68 Fremont's gay and lesbian center, with "The" 69 _St. Vincent Millay 70 Piece played by Liberace, perhaps 71 The Red and the Dead 72 Grating sound DOWN 3 Missile stabilizers 4 Description for a butch's deadly girlfriend? 5 Result of beaver nibbling 6 Enthusiasm 7 Nathan of "The Birdcage• 8 The-Girls link 9 Part of an AOL chat room's name 10 Direct-action lesbian group 11 Costume prop from Madonna tour 12 Approximately 13 TV's "Science Guy' 18 Prime draft classification 19 Ambient music pioneer 24 Flying pests 26 Govt. intelligence org. 27 Larry Kramer and George Bush, to Yale 28 Tongue of water 29 GLAMA Award winner Elaine 30 long, in Morse code 31 Greta of "Ninotchka" 33 Princess and icon to many gays 34 Melissa Etheridge's "Talking to My_· 35 like Fran Drescher's voice 38 Brainy bunch 40 Movie in which Cher played a lesbian 42 Want ad abbr. 45 Room opening? 49 Whitman's •_of Grass· 50 Poet Gidlow 51 _half (partner) 53 "Bill and _'s Homosexual Adventure• 55 like Seinfeld, though he's straight 56 Stocking shade 58 Verel's "The Dark_ of Venus• 59 Madonna's discipline in "The Nel1t Best Thing• 61 Heroine of Verdi or John 62 Quite a bit 63 "Thumbs up• on "Men on Films" 64 Kind of enc. 65 U-turn from SSW 1 Fruit preserves 66 Cukor's •_Girls" Answers on Pa e 27 HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 16, 2001 25 SWEDISH MA5SAGE BY PATRICK • Relaxation• Myotherapy • Deep tissue • (RMT#024589) 713-807- 7109 • 713-501-9852. • 1 1/2 hours for S50. 1 Hr. $40. PRO-THERAPY Professional Therapy for men and women • legit therapy for those searching for Quality body work • Evenings and weekends • Timothy • 832-687-5786 MASSAGE THERAPY AT IT'S FINEST Swedish • Deep tissue • Sports • Reflexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out • Hotels • 7 day • Nationally certified# 016074 •Jeff• 713-825-4062. MASSAGE Treat sore, stiff muscles. tension and stress • Renewed flexibility and wellness • RMT #016479 • Tom• 713 520-6018 JOB STRESS? TOUGH WORKOUTS? Call now for a relaxing therapeu­ttC Swedlsl> r.'assage • Body bu1 der & licensed therapist • RMT#005930 • Randal • 713-529· 3348 MOVING SERVICE PLANNING TO MOVE? We'll move you in the right direc­tion • American Movers • Experienced • Trusted • Insured • Tx Dot# 5282035C • 713-522-1717 • www.americanmovers.org • 800-522-2670 • PETS PET OF THE WEEK Sweet • Breed: Domestic Medium Hair • Sex: Female • Age: 15 months • Facts: I am the one "' front and YES I know I am a cam­era hog but maybe It'll help me (well. us) get adopted • Toto • Breed· Siamese Mix • Sex Male • Age· 8 months • Facts: I am the one behind the camera hog• I am not related but might as well bel I am de-clawed, so definitely NO outside for me' E-mail the Houston Humane Society at prOhoustonhumane.org for adoption information. AFGHAN HOUND PUPPIES Cyan and Devashunii Kennels • AKC Black • Black & tan • Cream • Blue • Blue & Cream • White • Hand raised • Championship lines Starting at S 1500 www.devashunii.com • 202-546- 0854 HOUSTON HUMANE SOCIETY NO ANIMAL TURNED AWAY!! The HHS relies solely on donations. They receive NO local, state. or federal government funding Call 713-434-5555 to find out the many ways YOU can help. PET SIITING BOOK FOR YOUR VACATION PLAN YOUR FALL GETAWAY NOW!! • Pets love their own home even when you can't be there• Established 1995. Book your vacation now E-mail: loyal9890aol.com Cal loyal at 713-942-8816 PRODUCTS & SER\1CES ORiliOPEDIC QUEEN MATTRESS SET Brand new• List S699 • Sell S99 • 832-435-2677 • Can Deliver. Rent-To-Own computers! Starting at S 19.95 a week • 1-800-422· 3368 Rent-To-Own SO" Big Screen TVs! • Starting at $29.99 a week • 800- 774-4553 KINGSIZE MATTRESS NEW IN PLASTIC 20 year warranty • Must se1 S 199 • 713 560-7108 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES M2M BODY GROOMING Body Waxing • Clippings • Coloring • Personal grooming by Dale. Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist. Private location in Montrose. Call 713-529-5952 for appointment PSYQilC EDUCATION IBARN REIKI COMPLETELY 2 1/2 DAYS NOV 16-18 ONLY $425 • Gift certificates available for this and mart; other intriguing (and cheaper) seMc:es • Details at ran­bowprod. comtxlbo. Reiki ~Bill O'Rou'ke ROOMMATES GW Couple seeking roommate to share 3/1 in NW Houston • 314 acre overlooking Cole Creek and forest • (ndwell & 290) • S400imo and 112 elec • Re~erences reQutred • 713-462-8511 SGWM seeks nonsmoking room­mate to share 212 condo • New kitchen & bath • Pool • Secunty • 1 block from River Oaks shopping center next to Barnaby's • 713- 520-7662 Share 212 remodeled home in the Heights area with 30's WM • Non­smoker • Hardwoods • $425 + utilities • 832-309-0822 TRAVEL IF YOU LIKE KEY WEST OR HAWAII, YOU'LL "LOVE" PAR­ADISE • Accepting reservations • 409-762-6677 •Toll Free 877-919· 6677 • 2317 Ave. P • Galveston • www.galveston.com/parad1se • paradiseOgalveston.com. VOLUI\TEERS STEVEN'S HOUSE See mg caregivers for transitional housing program for HIV+ adults • Must have high school diploma and experience as a caregiver • Contact Ms. StrahaM 0 713-522- 5757 or fax resume to 713-522· 1910 Houston Voice r---------------------------------------------------------------------~ PICK YOUR CATEGORY FREE': Call for guidelines HIV Services & Education =Volunteers Non-Profit Organizations - 'first 20 WO<dS INDIVIDUAL RATE $10: Announcements =Auditions _Employment-Seeking _ Pets-Free or lost & Found _ Roommates . Personal Web sites BUSINESS RATE $18: _ Auto Repair _Business Opportunities _ Entertainment _ Help Wanted _Help Wanted-Seeking _Home Improvement _Items For Sale _Licensed Massage _ Moving Services _ Professional Services Real Estate For Rent - Real Estate For Sale Call 113-529-8490 for other utegories Classified Order Form Fax: 713-529-9531, Phone: 713-529-8490 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring completed order form wrth payment to Houston VoKe off'Kes (M-F. ~5 30 pm) 500 Lovett, suite 200. BY MAA.: Mail completed order form with payment to Houston Vo1Ce Classifieds, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston. TX.. nOOG. BY PHONE: Call in with completed order form to 713-529-8490. BY FAX: Fax completed order form and credit card information to Oassifieds 713-529-9531. BY E-MAIL: aobertsOhoustonvotCe com AD POLICY: Houston Voice reserves the right to edrt. r«lassify or re1ect ads not meeting Houston VOtCe standards. No refunds for early cancellatlOfl. Misprints: Houston Voice IS not responsible for mospnnts appearing after first week. Check ads promptly. Deadline for ad submission is: MONDAY at 12 NOON WRITE YOUR AD Please print clearly CATEGORY:, ___________ ·# OF ISSUES: ___ _ Giant or Bold Headline - Not to exceed 14 characters and spaces I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TEXT: ______________________ _ ------------------------------ TOTAL YOUR COST CALL FOR DIRECTORY AD RATES INDIVIDUAL RATE ADS Up to 20 words for $10.00 per week. Additional words at SO( each per week. Up to 20 words. $10.00 Additional words __ x 50(: ___ _ Bold headline: S 00 (per week) ___ _ SUbtotll: x I of issues 'IOUI S __ _ BUSINESS RATE ADS Up to 20 words for $18.00 per week. Additional words __ x 75( per word (per~: __ _ Bold headline: 5.00 (per week) ___ _ SUbtotal x __ I of issues roi.1 s __ _ Name: -------------------~ Address: ~------------------ City ___________ State _ Zip. __ _ Phone __________________ _ Check Endosed __ Charge to my 0 AMEX 0 MC 0 VISA Card# Exp.___) __ Signature __________________ _ -------------------------- 26 THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! - NOVEMBER 16, 2001 •HOUSTON VOICE •·•..•.....•.. c·..7_. ...•. ._7. .s. To.-now..to~ loftr, friendll. ..... 1-800-GAY-ROSE or On-line at .... ....,n.ee.- HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 16, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU Starsl by JILL DEARMAN YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE Nov. 16-22 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) The Sun moves into your adventurous ninth house on Nov. 22. Leap into a new phase of life and stop hanging back to see what others do. You need to remind your­self that you are the bravest of all sigru;. A Leo wants to look up to you. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) A radical shift in your career is about to happen. You can resist it and ensure a tor­tuous experience for yourself and others, or embrace it and en1oy the good things to come. Adjustments are always tough, but an Aries can work all the stress out of your body. GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You want to live m the past, and you can't wait for your future to begin. You may feel like you are straddling two worlds this week, dear Gemiru A Cancer wants to straddle both of your twm personalities. CANCER Uune 22 to July 22) Thanksgiving brings you an opporturuty to show off a few your hidden talents. Mercury and Venus are grooving together in your house of performing. so make tlus holiday a memorable one. A Capricorn helps you to move beyond your own cyni­CISm. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 221 It's hard to keep your life m perspective during this time, dear Leo. But when the Sun shifts mto a fellow fire sign on Thanksgiving, you'll feel more like your old, free-spir­ited self. Fun with a Gemini solves half your problems. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Jupiter m your friendship house could brmg you out-of-town guests and make your place a mess. Deal with it, darling. You need to be dragged kicking and screaming out of your rigid routine A Pisces will do the dragging. LIBRA <Sept. 23 to Oct. 221 There's no reason to get nervous about a change m your day-to-day work schedule. You need some new stimuh, anyway. A Sag can teach you a few new tricks of the trade SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) You are about to dlSCover 1ust how versatile you can be, in life and m bed. AU things familiar are about to morph into the area we mystical types like to call "the unknown." A Gemini wants to swim in your (under)world. SAGITIARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You can make nice with sumeone who formerly hated you or vice versa. The Sun's movement into your sign gives you a free pass for four weeks. Don't blow it. A Capricorn wants to like you - really like you - agam. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) You can't be sure what a Leo wants from you till you ask. Stop projecting your para­noia onto others. You're making me and everyone around you nervous! Spend time practicing a craft that calms you down. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) Mercury and Venus at the top of your chart make you a very hot and commercial property in the business world. Who' da thunk it' Use your street smarts to dose the deal with a fellow Aquarius. You know how wily your kind can be. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Something strange 1s gomg on between you and a Cancer. Strange good, not strange bad. Push the limits a bit and see what you can find out. Your ability to elicit trust is strong. Just make sure you don't betray anyone's trust without meaning to. ft1/ Deamzan is tht author of tht best·stllmg •Qum Astrology for Mmn and ·Qum Astrology for Wommn (botlt from St. Martin's Griffin I. For 1nformDt1011 on cltarts and con· sultallons, call 212-841-0177 or e-mail QSco,,es@aol com. Don't be Alone for t e Holidays! Stress Management for Women Only! 713-545-5471 Call today for details! Wanda Faulkner 713-529-8490 pager 281-722-3403 • wfaulkner@houstonvoice.com Answer to Puzzle on Page 24 d A ~ 0 I\ s "fJ .:1 3 r 27 VOTED BEST GYi LAST 5 YEARS! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524--9932 PERSQ ~L TRAINING NOW AVAILABLE! Mon - Fri 5am-1 Opn Sat & Sun 8am-8pm PERSONAL TRAINER CLAY MAXWELL 7'8; .. ,....ld AIDS Day H LT H F'A IR Saturday December 1, 2001 ·9:30 am-2:30 pm Bering Memorial United Methodist Church 11440 Harold FREE Body Composition Measurement FREE Food FREE Door Prizes ITV or Gym Membership) FREE Back Adjustments FREE Giveaways from Houston Buyers Club Lark Lands, PhD, Keynote Spea er 10 a.m POZMagazine Science Editor and internationally respected treatment expert Also presenting are Patricia Salvato, M.D. and Nelson Vergel RSVP REQUIRED for FREE Lunch and/or FREE Child Care. Please call Houston Buyers Club for more information. ...________. 713-520.5288 I hbc@neosoft.com I houstonbuyersclub.com VVlroLogk CSLTE I NY RO OU ENTER? iarrhea got you on the run(s)? lipodystrophy making your face old and your belly big? Se drive down the tubes? Nerves shot by neuropathy? Sky-high blood fats making you heartsick? Come he f answ rs for lJreventmg or el 1 atmg these and many other HIV re t d pto and drug 1de effects
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