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Montrose Voice, No. 173, February 17, 1984
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Montrose Voice, No. 173, February 17, 1984 - File 001. 1984-02-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/77/show/56.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1984-02-17). Montrose Voice, No. 173, February 17, 1984 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/77/show/56

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 173, February 17, 1984 - File 001, 1984-02-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/77/show/56.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 173, February 17, 1984
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 17, 1984
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Danny Villa: 'I'm Not Planning My Life Around Dying' By Billie Duncan At three-years-old, he won a Shirley Tem­ple lookalike contest. As a teenager, he was the star dancer at El Cerrito High School in Berkley, Calif. When he was in his 20s and 30s, he was on Broadway and touring with names like Ben Vereen and Katherine Hepburn. Now, at 49-years-old, he is known for dedicating his talents to all the many and various causes of the gay community. He also has AIDS. :->anny Villa was diagnosed with the condition in February oflast year. He had pneumocystis and almost died. "The doc­tor said that if I had stayed at work for another hour or so, I probably wouldn't have made it." Rut Danny quickly put that behind him and tried to find something to look for-ward to. " It's a devastasting thmg to sud­denly discover yourself in this kind of position. ''The thing that has created the positive outlook about myself and my illness and what can be done with it is the fact that I'm doing so well. And from the very beginning, I've been trying to use positive energy." Danny paused. "That's really difficult to do in light of the fact that everything that you read or see or hear about it is terminal. "I've watched my friends die, and I see other friends who are going to die because they've decided th1•y are. They find out they have AIDS, and they decide imme­diately that there's no hope, because they're told that over and over and over again. "If I can do anything at all-now, I may 1984: Another Crucial Gay Political Year be dead next week, because I can catch something that would kill me-but if there's any way of projecting a person, a personality, a somebody that is making it ... . " Danny trailed off. But his point was clear. His concern goes beyond just the fact that he has AIDS and may die from one complication or another, possibly in the near future. He is looking at the greater picture of just what the illness is and what the individual can do who has it. And what the community can and should do about it. One thing that he feels the gay commun­ity should not do is panic. "By now I would imagine there's about 3000 reponed cases of AIDS. of whom 70 percent are gay. Which gives us 2100 gay men with AIDS. That's 2100 people out of an approximate 17 million gay people, out of a total coun-try populativn of 235 million. "It's a drop m the bucket- More peoplt> die than that daily from automobile acci­dents. There are hundreds of thousands of people with cystic fibrosis, with muscular dystrophy. with other forms of cancer. with even tuberculosis. "And I'm not saying we should emphas­ize that, but I think it's important for gay people to realize the staggering difference in the actual figures and not be quite so scared." The dilemma of the individual with AIDS is also a concern for Danny. because so little is known about what will or will not affect or cause the condition. How does a person change in order to avoid or le!'sen the chances of getting AIDS? "After living with it for O\ er a year and continued pa~e ./ The Newspaper of Montrose Feb. 17, 1984 Issue ... 173 Published Every Friday Larry Bush, p.5 Guttman, Lovell to Head Gay Political Caucus By Robert Hyde Norman Guttman became the president of Houston's Gay Political Caucus Wednes· day evening (Feb. 15), and Su& Lovell was elected his vice-president. Guttman d!'feated his only opponent, former GPC board member Ray Hill, by taking 63 percent of the vote to Hill's 37 percent in what was the most publicized race of this vear's election. Lovell ran unopposed, after vacating the board scat she held last year. "We all have goals, and some of those goals are not the same," Guttman told the caucus after his election. "But the basic goal (has been) working together, being unified, spending a lot of hours in the evenings and on weekends. Those things weren't given easily by anybody here, but they have been given. We al~o have to be the spirit to take that kind of enthusiasm out into the rest of the community ... . " Lovell, in hN preelection addres8, stated, "lfo1crimination is simply not acceptabk" Sht> stated that it was the responsibility of th!' caucus to teach the system, to edu­cate it and to challenge it. "Together we will reach our hopes, our goals and our dreams," sh!' concluded. Dl'bbie Squires was elected secretary of the caucus over challenger Don Pritchard who was absent from the meeting. "I love a hard job," Squires said. "I love responsibility." Referring to the caucus as her other fam­ily, she said, "I'll appreciate a chance to give of myself to the community." Gregg Cliff, a three-year member of the caucus and also a member of various other gay community organizations, capita l· ized on his bookkeeping expertise to be elected treasurer over Chris Chiles. Jack Valensky, Eric Sarensio and Tom Coleman were elected to board seats six, five and two, respectively. Ll•slie Larson won the position-fourt1eat afu·r a runoff with Tim Hall. Dair. J.owt·nstein and Joe Thornton had competl!<I unsure ·sfully for that (·hair, as Wt•ll Hefur1• th1• balloting, both pn·sid!'ntial contPndrrs Guttman and Hill declined to address tht• raucus collC'l·rnini.: their qunli· fications. After the 1•!1•ct10n, Cuttman said that he New GP(' President Norman Guttman Ray Hill. dt'frat1·d. sa/utr., GPC Vice-Pr1·sidenl Sue L<well. unoppo~ed frlt very good obout \\inning. "It's a lot of fun towm," ht•said. " It's not a lot of fun to hent sonwone who was vour mentor ns for hack as l!li7 • "l<ny llill , along "Jth Debra O:mburg and 11 numhl·r of othl'r people, gut mt• mvolved in politll's hl're in Montrose ... In lwntmg Hnv I <lo know ... thnt Rny is going to ha\·r. n \'cry, verv important pnrt of \\hat happens in the caucus, m Montro,,e, in the city and throughout the electoral proccs,; in 1984. I'm sure of that." Addre.;sing the roles of the previous presidents of the caucus, Guttman said. ' 'These people were highly successful and brought the community from a place that was somewhat unknown politically and unknown in the context of the social demo­graphics of the city "I just hope that l can continue some of their fine work. I will feel very successful if I can do some of what they've all done." Before outgoing Preo;ident Larry Bagne­ris handed the traditional gavel to his suc­cessor, he thanked the caucus for .. therare experience of helping this caucus grow into its present position of power." Bagneris said his term as president also had led to his personal growth and devel· opment. He also pointed out that during his administration. the caucus opened up the process. developed the screening question­naire for elections and had become more controlled and more democratic. Bagneris said that the caucus now had a fully involved board, with "each member an asset in his or her field of expertise:· Also refrrrinll to hi,; term. Bagneris said. ''Our image in Houston has been raised from an uneducated concern about what we do in the privacy ofour bedrooms to an almost unammous agreement that we are worthy m~mbers of the body politic of the City of Houston." Bagneris also mentioned the need for a census for the gay commumty to deter­mine, "Who are we really?" He also mentioned the need to recruit future leaders for the caucus. "I pledge my continued support to this caucus, to this community, and to the many friends and businesses that have supported this administration," he said in his concluding remarks. "I thank you for the opportunity and the honor." Bajlneris gave special thanks to Terry Harris, political action coordinator under his administration, Marian Coleman. his vice-president who always felt ''the com­munity came first": Tony Vega, caucus · ~ecretnrv: 1'orman Guttman. treasurer for "clo-·ing out the dt•bt": Sue L vel noted for her a,sistan<.'t' to the KS fu'JS Foundnllon of Houston: and -'' -. \'alcnsky board member, for hi, udd1· ttonal \\Ork at radio KPIT 2 MONTROSE VOICE I FEB. 17, 1984 Montrose Mouth Bpm in the Rice Memorial Chapel. Don't miss this fine group's performance under the direc­tion of Gwyn Richards. Rice will also be putting on an interesting performance of the Tokyo String Quartet, sponsored by the Houston Friends of Music and the Shepherd School of Music, Sunday, March 11, at Bpm. Admission will beS10forthe public and $5 for students and senior citizens By Amanda B. Recondwith Into Heavy Drama and Art and ... the Unknown By Amanda B. Recondw1th This has been such a dramatic week for Amanda. and for a good segment of Montrose. 1f Montrose has been attending some of the fabulous events going on lately' -e-we simply must comment on the production of The Boys tn The Band at the Pink Elephant. Last Friday's opening show was full of emotion and talent; two thmgs that seem to be missing from Friday night television' There is no rea­son for sensitive, mtell1gent people to sit at home and let their minds be dulled by the con­stant dnlhng of the mass produced crap appearing on the screen, when they could be watching real drama and talent at the Pink Elephant-or even the Alley or Jone's Hall or Stages. The performance at the Pink Elephant was so very touching. The troubled gay world of the late 1960's certainly hasn't changed that much in the 1980's. sad but true. The 1dent1ty crises. the 1ealous1es, the misconceptions, the predJUd1ces are all sllll there. and so very well portrayed by the excellent cast. The Pink Elephant 1s an exhilarating place to see a play The cast IS small, the atmosphere 1s casual but very intense One can imagine what 11 must have been hke to be a beatnik 1n the Village back in the SO's-avante guard and eccentnc, smoking Camel straights and read­ing subversive material wt11le McCarthy was on the home TV, damning the world Don't mlSS an opportunity to go to the Pink Elephant to see their productions We know it's not really haute chic, but neither was New York until people opened their minds about 1t• You never know Places like this may someday be looked back upon as the cradle of some fabu­lous new talent Imagine people at the Galleria buying post cards of the Pink Elephant• -c- Amanda also was honored to attend a fabulous preview of the movie, The Dresser, sponsored by Arts For Everyone, in con1uct1on with the British Counsulate In Houston. The cham­pagne reception at Boccaccio's was a real gala affair. and the guests were some of the cream of Houston and British society Amanda func­tions so we//w1th the British. smce she learned tile language' - c - Tl'e movie was a touching story ol Biltz­ravaged England during WWII, and 11 was so much more interest ng to know that probably half the viewing audience had actually been hv1ng in England atthat time. The ending of the movie was truly sad. leaving Amanda 1n a state of depression, not just for obvious reasons (You will have to go see 1t for yourself because Amanda will not tell you how 1t ends'). but because the death at the end of the film also portrays the death of a whole way of life And the audience felt that very strongly Amanda wishes to thank Michael Serkeu, Mark Addicks. Marshall Maxwell, Paul DuprH, and Dick Dace for a wonderful evening 1,f the Dear Fans don·1 know what Arts For Everyone IS all about. but are w1lhng to know, call 522- 3744 for Information. -o-we have finally found the Widow!! She appeared at JR's, talking exclledly about her trap to Baden Baden, and how rer cure has been so good to her Then. she nearly Insti­gated a not when she was seen again at the Mining Company with what seems to have been the ghost of Grace Kelly! Perhaps she did finally get the hint and go to Monaco after all. . . Amanda has heard that the Widow 1s now holding court at Butera·s, where she says she can look at the old Plaza and detect the auras of long-dead celebrities who once lived there· but only when the sun is at a certain level on the hOflZOn Hersp1ntualexperimenta­! lon Is only a sign of the age. but we fear that she may get a httle kinky as her practices grow 1r> creat1v1ty What's this we hear about a men· age? -a- Rice Un1Verslty IS putting on a performance of the Shepherd Singers, Thursday, March 1, at -o- The Crown Jewels of Welch Street are stall 1n place. although Amanda hears that the ben&­factor has long since departed. Fear not, darling. your eyes will soon be caught by the glint of some other diamond Oh by the way, are the rumors true that a gang of pothole workers have found a strange shiny ob1ect resembling a chess piece somewhere out near Telephone Road? -c- Don't Miss the First Annual Houston Flower & Garden Show, produced by Pace Manage­ment and the Flagg Agency, March 22 to 25 at the AstroArena, Astrodome Complex. There will be hundreds of open air landscape dis­plays. booths for selling lawn and garden related products. compet1t1ve flower shows for both the professional florist and the amateur garden clubber. displays by specialized plant societies and seminars by horticulture experts. Amanda ts especially excited by the five-acre Wonderland of Flowers, Plants, Shrubbery, Trees, Landscaping Ideas, Gar­dening Supplies, Etc. (that 1s not a real !Ille. you know) Judging by the incredible things Amanda has seen displayed an dmmg rooms and llvlng rooms here In Houston. we cancer­tainly expect some real incredible creations at this show On your marks Get set . Start creating• - a- You have all heard of Duncan/Hines? Well we have received a suggestion that our editorial staff should be called Duncan/Hyde. Is 1t true that they come an 69 varieties? -O-NO, NO, NO, NO, NO!!ll! Ethel Mermon is dead! Amanda. and probably most oft he world mourns her loss. Where will we ever get a replacement for such an Incredible stage pres­ence? o- Don't Miss the wild party being given at Numbers by our own wonderful Jeff Dunn of Private Selectlon, helping to kick off the fabu­lous 212 and 713 Magazine! For those Dear Fans who are not aware. 212 is a very glossy New York magazine. kind of like a gay "W". They are now movrng Into Houston. and pub­l1Shang a section on Houston·s gay social life. called '713 • Don't miss this party at Numbers. Sunday, Feb 19. It should be the champagne and dance party of the year" -c- John Shown will be shown Thursday. Feb 23 at the Robinson Galleries, 1200 B1ssonnet The reception will be from 6 to 9pm, and his works wtll be on display unlll March 31 Mr. Shown is really something to see. His art 1s witty and creative. and he is charming Amanda will be there• c- Amanda hears that Kindred Spirits had a wonderful anniversary party on Valentine's Day Congratulations from all of us at the VOICE! -c- The Bam wdl hold their anniversary party (which started yesterday Feb. 16) through Feb 26 - c- There·s romance in the air at the VOICE Could 1t be the marriage of the sales department and the art department? Wllal would you get 1f you combined an artist with a salesman? An exacto knife that knows how to cut a deal! -c- The Wise Exhibit of Japanese contemporary art will be on display at Pearson-Falcone Int• rlor Design, 1200 Post Oak Blvd , Suite 322, March 14 to April 27. The pubhc may see it on weekdays from 10am to Spm, and on Satur­days by appointment Don't miss these extraord1nanly beautiful designs -c- Well. Dear Fans. Amanda has just about exhausted herself on gossip and events this week. Remember Houston is getting to be a more sophisticated place all the time. and as long as you continue reading HER. you may have a head start Then again, she may be leading the public down the dark alleys of 1llu· s1on• Haircutting, Permrrig. Coloring 521-1015 UNION ~ACK SPORTSWEAR/HAIRCUTTING 1212 WESTHEIMER 528-9600 Try our new professional tanning facilities $5 per 30-minute session $20 tor five 30-minute sessions WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY!! Its as American as Apple Pie Corne by and have .i slice! FREE with meal with this ad Monday, Feb 20th, only FEB. 17, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 'Quiet Riot' Describes Avondale Meeting Judge Rules Gay Games Can't Use 'Olympic' By Hollis Hood Quiet riot would be an accurate descrip­tion of the Avondale Civic Association meeting last week (Feb. 9). In an organization rift with opposing views on how to solve neighborhood prob­lems, it appeared to be business as usual at the lesH than one hour meeting. Earlier in the month, members had been notified of the gathering which urged them to attend because, "This meeting is of the utmost importance to all members interested in the quality of life in our area," stated the unsigned notice letter. However, nothing happened. The letter made reference to the removal of Rock Owens, president of Avondale, during a "special" Avondale meeting at 4 :30 a.m. at the Allen Parkway Inn during January. At that meeting, attended by only eight persons, Robert Desmond, acknowledged leader of an Avondale fac· tion which would like to see Montrose rid of gays, was elected president. However, said Owens, that entire "spe­cial" meeting was declared illegal by the Avondale board of directors. Neither Owens nor Desmond chaired the most recent meeting. Atlas Seeks Nationwide Gay Clientel "Three years ago all the big banks in San Francisco were highly skeptical about the idea of a financial institution owned and operah•d by gay men and lesbians," said John A. Schmidt, chairman of the board of Atlas SavingR and Loan Association. "Now they are frankly envious of our phenomenal success and ask us how we did it." Atlas Savings, the world's first gay and lesbian owned financial institution, has barely been open for business two years and has already seen it.8 assets grow from $2.5 million to more thn $90 million. In recent weeks, two major developments have further indicated Atlas' growth: 1) AtlaH stock, which went on the market over two years ago, will soon split three shares for two; and 2) construction has begun on a $1 million branch office located on Castro Str('l't where many gay men and women live and work. As a public corporation, stock in Atlas Savings is owned by thousands of gays with investors and depositors in 48 of the 60 statl!S and in st•vl'ral foreign countries. When Atlas stock went on the market it was sl'lling for $12.50 per share; current book value has rispn to $19 per share. Tra· ditionally when Rtock splits, the per share pri<"e goes down-Atlas will probably tht'n sdl for $11 or $12 per share. Schmidt said, "Atlas was founded by Montrose Voice 1 he NHwspnper of Montrose FlaJ1•h1p of the Voir,• Publ1~hing Co. NewapafJf'rl Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 i~l~t·:~goN MonlrOM v~ 10.000 co~ues wee\Jy o.n .. Gay Nhrt. 6.000 cop ... weekly Au•llnt5an AntontO &111. 3 .000 COptel b•w•ly total Te11.-s area, •7 !tOO l'JOP* •tetly. avg Content• copyroght c 1984 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg publt$her Robert Hyde. rn•n•omg «lllor Hollis Hood ntwf •Mor Chuc:k Meredith aporu fld1to1 B1lhe Duncan. Peter Oorkson eatert~lllMnt wrlt.,.. Jon CheetwOOd, Joe L watts. eonrrlbullng '"""" Acel Clark .,, d 1oetor Jell Bray gr• t>h•cs Sonriy Dav1SJ 1ce.oun1ing Mark Orego. Jefl Franke. Jerry ldou•. Stephen Laeot>ee._,.,,,g Founding Mtmbet Gruter Montrose Buslnea Guild. G1y Preu A11oclation Ntw• Sarvas lnternat1on11 Gay NftWa Agency. Paci he News Servk • Larry Bush (Wuhing1on, o c ) Syndte1ted Ft1tu1• S•1vice1 & Wr1ter1 (S.rt Ftlf'IC•ICO) Chromde F .. turll. United FHtur• Synd1C11te. Jeffrey Wilson, R1ndy AUrtcL Stonewell FHturu Synd1c1te. Br11n McN1ught. Joe Baker POSTMASTER Send 1ddr1n conectiona to 3317 MontroH •308. Houston, TX 77006 S"blc11pt10lf 1111 WI US in IHIMI env~ope "49 ~r year (52 tuun). $29 per1u: month• (2611av .. ).or$1 25perweek (klU t'-n 2t IUOel) Back illVff S2 00 •ch. Nitt0nal ec1v.,.1,.1ng rtpr111ritat1V1 Joe DtS.tNito, R•vrendeU Martlet•nQ. eee &th Avenue. New York 10011. ~212) 242-6863 A<PIW111ing dHdl1ne· Tuead•Y· 5:30pm, for tasw '-'-Md Ffl. day ..,.ntng NOIA to edvffflHfl Local ~ertll.11"0 fife IChedule Sb-A wa effKt1ve July 1, 1913 R.spo1t1ibllity Montrote Votee• cton l'Ot usume resp0n1t .. bU ty IOJ aav.tUMng ct1.1m1 Ruoers lh<>ukf alan Montroae Voi<'o to '1"Y deeeotN adll•/11""" the gay community because many finan· cial institutions overlooked gay people in the past. We felt the time was right for a gay savings and loan that could make feJ. low gays more comfortable." Schmidt gave the example of two gay men or two lesbians coming in to apply for a loan to buy a home. "With us, there doesn't have to be any lies about the rela· tionship and no embarrassment. We understand their lifestyle, and if they qualify for the loan, we want to give it to them. "This savings and loan not only shows the financial clout of gay people," Schmidt continuPCI, "but also destroys the myth that gays are not good managers of their money. Atlas provides many of the ~ervi· ces of other finan<'ial institutionR, but I feel we add the personal touch:' In its first two years of business, Atlas has not only enjoyed enthusiastic support from gay men and women in the San Fran· cisco Bay an•a, but also has attracted dep· ositors across the nation. "We an• so pleased that gay people cver­ywhert• are financially supporting us," Schmidt said. "Since many people bank by mail any­way, we t>nc-ourage out-of-state customers to do at IP.as! some of their banking in San Francisco. Gays want to show their pride in our institution and be part of us, even if they live in Chicago or Houston or San Diego. This gay pride is much of the key to our f;U('Ct"SS.'' More information can be obtnined from Atlas Savings and Loan Association, 1967 Market .Street, Dt·partment K. San Fran· cis<-o, CA 94103. f!'> vondale met with discern able scrutiny this past month because of a rumor that it. or some of its members, were responsible for a rash of bar raidb netting some 46 arrests in one weekend. . Repre•entatives to a community meet­ing s.tated t~at J\vondale had nothing to do with calling vice, and that the organi­zation's purpose was to subvert crime in the Westheimer area and not "run people out of business," such as bar owners. Cynthia Owens, an Avondale member and attorney, Rtated that Avondale had never portested liquor licenses at JR's and the Barn, and had no intention of doing so. The new "611" club which was to open at Hyde Park and Stanford wab not going to be protebted, said Rock Owens, simply "because it would cost too much money." But members out voted the board',; deci· sion not to protest and the matter was heard at a recent TABC hearing in Austin. The bar "was just the straw that broke the camel's back," he said. Rock Owens, according to the letter to the membership, had been removed from the presidency because he sent a letter to the TABC withdrawing Avondale's pro· test. An unlikely matter, because he was present at the Austin hearing and stated that the only problem with the bar,; some­times was parking. "Should our Association condone a pres· ident whose wife is involved in litigation for an applicant?" asked the letter refer· ring to the 611 case. The owner of the 611 allegedly threatened Robert Desmond with bodily harm ifhedidnotstopharass· ing the intended bar and Desmond took the matter to court. Cynthia Owens repre>'· ented the 611 owner a~king Rock to testify regarding the incident. The judge admon· ished both part.H's to keep thcir neighbor· hood squabhles out of his courtroom, said Cynthia Owens, but apparently the squabbling within Avondale has only begun. Avondale has som~ guidelines for memhership-for anyone who might bt' thinking of becoming a part of this troupe There are three types of members: active voting, active non-voting and associate, also non·voting. But to be an active voting member, you must be a resident of and own propery tn their designated area. An active non-voting member can be a resident of the area, property owner or bus· ine•s operator within that area. SAN FRANCISCO (IGNAl-A federal judge ha8 isbued a permanent injunction against the series of athletic events known as the Gay Game• from using the world "Olympic" to describe the competition. U.S. District Judge John P. Vukasin granted summary judgment in favor of the United States Olympic Committee, which was given exclusive u11e of the word "Olympic" by Congre"s in the Amateur Sports Act of1978. John Artman, a member of the Gay Games board, said that the decision ib "a tragedy, just another example of the homophobia that we have to live with." He added that it's still possible to see "Olym· pie Cleaners" and "Olympic Airline;;" and "Diaper Olympics," "Special Olympics," even "Oyster Olympics," but gays arc not permitted to use a word that ha.; been in the public domain for thousands of years. Last year, another federal judge granted a preliminary injunction against the Gay Games' use of the term. The U.S. Court of Appeals upheld that decision in August. When Artman was asked what would happen if the board of the Gay Game;; violated the injunction, he said he didn't know what the penalty was, but he thought "We'd go to jail. I really don't know what the penalty is and don't want to find out." Artman said that he didn't intend to let the court's decision get in the way of the goals of his board, which are to "combat discrimination and prejudice against gays and lesbians, as well as racism and nationalism" Mary Dunlop, attorney for the Gay Games, when asked if she would appeal the ruling, replied, "You bet!" The second Gav GameR is scheduled to be held in San Fr~ncisco's Kezar Stadium in the summer of 1986, " i th athletei; from many states and foreign countries com pet· ing in sports as diverse as "Testling, soccer, tennis, swimming and billiardb. 4 MONTROSE VOICE / FEB. 17, 1984 , Danny Villa: I'm Not Planning My Life Around Dying from page. living with it with my friends for two or three years, I realized the futility of chang· ing, because it may not change any thing, 1f they cannot give you u·hat to change. "Like, if you take LSD, you're going to get AIDS. If you smoke marijuana, you're going to get AIDS. Drinking too much. A combination of the above." Danny explained to his doctor that a whole Jot more people do all those things than ever contract AIDS. Or ever will. "I'm not saying, get complacent. I'm not saying life in the fast lane is the answer. All I'm trying to do is put a realism into it. The reality is that the number of people it's afflicting is almost minute compared to the overall population." Another reality is that Danny is one of that number. And that is something that all his facts and figures cannot talk away. "The thing that is so frightening abut AIDS is that the mortality rate is so high. And fllllt." Perhaps all the facts and figures that he has dredged up are a comfort to him, but the one thing that he cannot forget is that death is now part of his every day life. "It's hard to think of anything else and at the. ame time, I feel fine, I look fine. I'm not planning my life around dying of AIDS. "It's hard to talk that way and not . ound glib or ungrateful. Or stupid. But I lwe .,.; th it." He looked at his empty ch am· pagne glass i;itting on his coffee table. "No one is disallowed from dying. We all die. We die at different times. We die for differ· ent uai;ons. And we die from different cause•. But everybody die,;." In hi,; life, he has had to go through a lot ai; a gay man and as a Mexican-American, although mo:st people do not think of Danny as the stereotypical Latino. But as an actor, Danny was definitely typed because of his ethnic origins. How· ever, he couldn't get the typical Mexican roles because he didn't have the proper Mexican accent. Well, you can't win 'em all. As for being iay, he went through all the changes of the radical 60s and 70s. He explained that when he was younger, "there wun't a community. Being queer wu just being queer." It wasn't until he wu diagnosed with AIDS that he ever had any discussion with any member of his family about the fact that he was gay. "I just had my firat conversation about anything resembling gaynesa with members of my family. It had just never come up." Danny has five brothers. "My brothers are the Mexican equivalents of rednecks. You know where the word 'macho' comes from? And now, all of a sudden, their little brother hu an incurable disease." A look of astonishment came over Dan· ny's face at the memory of how they took the news. "They were really wonderful. I was really impressed with my brothers. Quite possibly for the first time in my life. Certainly for the first time in a long time. Because they didn't stress anything. They didn't push i!Uo my lifestyle. They didn't try to change me. •"J'hey wanted to find out if I was being treated. How I was. And what it was about. It (being gay) didn't come up with some of my brothers-it didn't come up at all. They knew it, and they're treatini it <AIDS> as an illne~s. "And they're not pointing any fingers or bringing anything up out of my past or anything. They're not asking for details from that part of my life. They just want to know how my health is." Perhaps because of his close family ties, Danny said that his favorite joke cur· rently is, "Theharde~tthingabouthaving AIDS is convincing your mother that you're Haitian." However, his family has always been important to him. even when he felt like the odd man out in a family of men. "We've always had differences because I was always different. I wa~ the sissy that danced. They were the jocks. "When I got to the point where I was making more money than they were from Danny Villa today Three·year·old Danny Villa as ~hirley Temple A young Dan ny Villa in his ethnic stage co~ tu me dancing, when I got to the point where they were going and telling their girl· friends, 'That's my brother up there danc· ing,' when they had something they could be proud of, that sort of changed. "But until the day he died, I think my father was waiting for me to get out of show business and settle down into a real job." (Next week. Danny Villa goes from doing the Mexican Hat Dance in California to hoofing it on Broadway.) CHE to Address Taxicab Issue The Citizens for Human Equality will con· duct a special forum concerning the Municipal Transportation Reform Ordi­nance, more popularly known as the Tax­icab Deregulation Ordinance, on Thursday, Feb. 23, at8p.m. at the Holiday Inn Central, 4640 Main Street. Stating that "CHE has, as a stated pur· pose, to demonstrate to everyone ~hat we are not interested in only gay issues," President Sam Cazoneri said, "We in CHE feel that this issue is of interest not only to the gay community, but to the city in gen· eral. Many visitors to Houston use taxic· abs, and the performance of these cabs forms a part of the impression of our city they take home with them." Speakers at the forum will include Hous­ton City Councilmember George Greanias and Joe Chernow, representative of the Houston Taxicab Committee composed of Yellow Cab, United Cab, Sky Jack Cab and Square Deal Cab, which have 98 per­cent of the taxis in Houston. At the forum, after introductory presen· tations by both speakers, the audience will be allowed to ask questions which will be answered by either or both speakers. Chivalry Isn't Dead The feminist movement may have opened doors for some women, but others are still grateful when men open doors for them. Psychology Today reports that a Ten­nessee sociologist studied the reactions of women-and men-to having a door opened for them at a library. J .C. Ventimiclia found that plain women were more appreciative than prett­ier ones, but ordina.ry-looki11g men were markedly Jesa grateful than handsome ones. Ventimiglia thinks the plainer women were experien cin i "a lon g-awaited acknowledgement of their femininity," while the less grateful men were having their male self-confidence shaken. Reception for Montrose Clinic Physicians at Rascals A reception for the physicians ofthe_Mont· rose Clinic who donate their time m ser­vice to the community is planned for this Sunday (Feb. 19) at Rascals, 2702 Kirby, from 5 to 7 p.m. State and local politicians are also expected to attend in honor of the doctors. There will be a no-host cash bar. Blood Needed for AIDS Victim Brian Gentry, a member oftheco~munity suffering from AIDS, is urgently m need of blood donations. . Persons interested in helping may do so by donating blood at Hermann ~ospital's blood center, main floor, Fannin at Ross Sterling, in the Medic.al Center .. Donors should speetfY that their contri· butions are for Gentry. Blood type is unim· portant. FEB 17, 1984 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 The Year Ahead Will Test Gay Clout and Community By Larry Bush WASHINGTON-This city, which often catches on to things after the rest of the country, was preparing to start the 1984 year at the end of January. The President gav1• his State of the Union message on Jan. 26, and Congress had only begun the year by reconvening two days earlier on Jan. 24. The President's new budget, which will take up most of the year's debate, wasn't out until Feb. 2, and then the details probably weren't clear for two weekH after that. Even in a presidential election yl'ar that feels as though it started months earlier, the first votes by rank· and-file citizens won't hl' cast until Feb. 20 in Iowa. Most of .January was taken up. politi· cally speaking, by dress rehearsals­politicians floatl'd trial bal0<ms on new programs or approaches to win votes, reJK)rters scanned the horizon for new ways of looking at the same faees, and ordinary citiZl'ns searched for new rea sons to frl'I optimistic. Among the J11nu11rv trv·outs was the ulPu, rf·newf'CI with 11 iittle' more evidenr1• heh ind it, that gays might mnke a consid· 1·rnblt• differencP in the elections and in Am1•rican socil'ty in 1984. The Wall Strei'/ Journal ran a feature suggesting gays could he "the major factor" in the '84 elec­tions, the l,os Anl(e/1•s Times ran a mam· moth front·page article Jan. l, the Neu· fork Times began researching a second article on gay politics, the "McNeil· Lehrer Program" began interviewing gay politi· cos. NBC collected more footage at gay enrosl'ment meetings, and the Christian Right churned out new warnings about the "gay threat" for 1984. Amidst the hoopla, however, gays were given an importnt new glimpse into the way the world views their efforts. It came in the Los Anl(eles Times article, which included a major new public opinion sur· vey. Public attitudes toward homosexual· ity continued to show a large disapproval factor, and attitudeH toward civil rights ~,, .. .,RS "ow ........ ""7~713)1!&2-4266 Unique and creative flowers and plants Citywide delivery Major credit cards accepted 1305 w. 11th at N Shepherd Houston, Texas BC Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN laws showed a large approval factor, but for th<• first time, the public was surveyd on a new que"tion: "How sympathetic would you say you are to the homosexual community?" Nationwide, the American public said it was pretty unsympathetic: 63 percent to 30 percent. That compares with 52 percent opposed to homosexuality and 43 percent accepting it for themselves or others, and 52 percent favoring job protections for gays with a minority 36 percent opposing them-almost a reverse of the figures of those sympathetic to a gay community. Whilf' not l'nough information is avails· hie about how the public feels about other ~TEVED. MARTINEZ, M.D. Internal Medicine Infectious Diseases Se~uallv Tunsmitted D1~eas~ AID~ K.uposi Sarcoma D1.ign0>is AID~ KSCounseling(singlesor~roupl Nutrition Open Monday-Friday Q-Spm Mon., Wed., Fri. evenin~ & Sat. mornings by appointment. 2801 Ella Blvd., Suite G Houston, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 S.ime Day Appointment * A/C Check & Charge S2695 * Transmission Service s2495 * Oil Change and ~ C') Lube s1995 ~ ~ * Expert Automatic Q ~ Transmission Service 5z I 8 1411 TAFT -522-2190 ~ • ELECTRONIC TUNHJP • A- -- '·': . - TP. NSMISS ON minority communities, there still appears to be some thought·provoking relation· ship in these responses. The public appears increasingly acceptant of ending discrimination, uncertain on the issue of homosexualitv itself, and unhappy about the emergence of a gay community. In 1984, that may well turn out to be the cutting edge of change for gay people. There are other and even strong indica· tions that gays as individuals are winning public acceptance out in the open-the changes can almost be characterized as a " post-Harvey Fierstein" climate. Cer· tainlv one of the ironies in January was the launching of an Olympics 1984 fun· draiscr in !\ew York with George Hearn singing " I Am What I Am," now referred to as a new j!ay anthem, while the Olym­pics Committee lt.'iclf continues to argue in court that the term "Gay Olympics" demeans the sporting world. Rut there are only the stirrings of an indication that it is becoming accepted for gays to form a community, to act like a political voting bloc, and to seek to streng· then bonds that cut across regional, eco­nomic, educational and even racial and sexual lines in recognition that a sense of being gay supercedes those other identi­ties . It very likely is due to the unease of the public toward the gay community rather than l!SY nghts. that 'ome political figure• still keep away from public gay event,,; within the gay community, such distmctions seem almost dbingenuous In 191'4, with a focus on politics and a con· tinued need to respond to the AIDS crisis, the major dialoinie may be on why gays have had to form a community, and" hat that community has as its !?Qab. In the year ahead, these appear Ul be the most likely places and issues around wht!'h that debate may tnke place The Federal Gon•rnment: the Presid­ency and Congre~~. The major concrm gays will have with the Reagan Admm1'· tration "ill be over the proposab for AIDS funding m the new, fiscal 191\5 budget. That budget won't even begin until Oct. 1, but the President proposed it in Februal") Congress will begin picking it apart m March and April, major committee action will come in June (~;rtually no work will take place this summer, due to the national political conventions), and the full vote will likely come in September, just in time to ban• the greatest political mileage. In tiscal 191'4, fuoagan started the year by proposmg a $1 7 million AIDS budget; by the time Congress looked it over, and the Reagan staff saw the senti· ment for major increases. the final figure was about $42 million. The addition of One teenager in ten has a secret. One Teenager in Ten: \X'rnmgs h't CJay anJ Lesbian Youth EJ11eJ hy Ann Heron · For every gcnnat111n that comes out, the'<' l'"dY' will be invaluJhle ." Ga11 Co11muo11t_v .\Jews There " J rare 'en~ib1lity Jisplayl·J 1n many of the'e l'>"1Y' !hat " n<>th1ng short ot J~tun1 shing International (,av :-.;e"s A~1·ncv UG:'\AI Jn 1mportclnt ,1nd n£"Ce .. -..a rv hool.. pnwl'rlul and Hn p<~1~n.1nt i \'lut1anrt1'S Onl' l<'!'ndf;t'r in il·n . accnrdmi: to Km.,.·y, that s t hl' proportion of b•Y' h• 'tr.iight' m th" n>unln·. 011.- Tel'lla.~cr 111 Tl'll hn•nty eight young men anJ wnml'n Imm .ill owr the UmteJ Stall'' and Lmada, twm hlken tu twenty· l1>ur Yt.'Jr!-. of d~t·. 'Pt·,tk out dbout thc·1r u1m1n,.:-out l''-rent•nct.·o,; about ~-hat 1t 1-. to he young 4.lnd ~,1y in our ...,oc1ety tcxJay S3.QS in hool..,torl',, or U'>(' th" loupon to order by mail .................................. TO ORDER ......... ............ ........... .. f'l<·JM' "·nJ me ~nd<"('J "s_ n.iml' address nt y ~late zip ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783. Boston, MA 02208 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEB. 17, 1984 1984 Another Crucial Year from Pn!'-' ous paRe some carry-over money from 1983 means that about $47 million will be spent on AIDS in 1984. For 1985, expect the Reagan Administration to propose something between ~50 and $60 million, with inaugu­ration of some new funding for local gay groups to provide services. (in the Feb. 1 budget submitted to Congress, the Reagan Administration requested $53.9 million for AIDS funding.) Congress will likely make some increa!leS in that figure, depending on how well gays argue for additional funding. The 'cientific community already has made its arguments at every level, and so the major tinkering will come through new money for counseling programs, hot lines and the like, where gayo are now trying to document needs. In addition , expect Congress to pu11h harder for fund ­ing ofthe$30 million Public Health Emer­gency Fund, which it authorized but did not fund last year. Do not expect the Rea­gan Administration to put any money in its budget proposal for the fund, however. The Reagan Administration may also get •moked out of hiding on the immigra­tion reform i . .sue on exclui;ion of gays. Congress will take up the exclusion ques­tion in a Judiciary subcommittee hearing, perhaps in March, but even before that White House coun. elor Edwin Meese will go before the Senate Judiciary Committee for confirmation hearing,; for hi11 new post as Attorney General. That could lead to questioning on the Administration's feel­ings about reform of the antigay exclu­sion. Observors also expect Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services Edward Brandt to deliver on a commit­ment to oppo1<e the antigay exclusion's health rationale, thus adding another Admini•tration voice in favor of reform. Expect few Administration meetings with gays outside the Health and Human Services Department. The Justice Depart­ment, at least pre-Meese, was unwilling to meet with the NationalGayTaskForceon civil rights legislation or on its review of security clearance requirements: some meetings did take place with the Justice team working on immigration reform. Defense Department officials flatly refu cd to meet with the National Gay Task Force even on the humane issue of serYicemen with AIDS. The White House 1belf has remained aloof from gays, althouith representative>' of the Liaison Office have been quoted ,sev­eral times making derogatory remarks about gay civil rights and expressing hopes that Americans will tag the Demo­crat,. as the "pro-gay" political party. A.s the yenr begins, there are quiet moves among gay Republicans to begin bringing their iRsue to the White House, but the out­look for success remains uncertain. In Congress, however, there now appears to be more open doors than gay groups can handle. In addition to the AIDS concemi; and the immigration reform issue, there now are efforts to have the Government Accounting Office issue a report on how much the military spends to determine who is homo•exual and then to proces them for military service: a Con­gressional Research Service study of what antigay Jaws and regulations currently exist around the country that would be overturned by a federal gay civil rights law; and oversight hearings will continue on such topics as police responsiveness to minorities, federal security clearance requirements, even some consideration about minority participation in federal funding for the arts and humanities. The reason for this activity is clear: all 435 members of the House are up for re­election this year, and 34 members of the Senatt> as well. While no one expects major new legislative initiativeo. oversight hear­ings give-members of Congress a wonder· ful platform to raise issue11 they believe will help back home. Thi,; time, the issue increasingly will be insensitivity to minor· ities and the poor, and gays will more than ever be includro in the groups whoRe voi­ces will be invited to be heard. State and Local Developments of National Significance. Even though 1984 is a presidential election year, much that is going to be important for gay peo· pie will take place at the local level. In a number of instances, the efforts will be of importance to gays elsewhere, because they symbolize the changes taking place in the country or because they provide a new initiative that might be replicated. In San Francisco, for example, expect Mayor Dianne Feinstein's study panel on a spou11e benefits law to end up before the Board of Supervisors, where it likely will pass and become law. The national focus on San Francisco a:; the site of this year's Democratic National Convention will put even more of a spotlight on a spouse law this time around. A similar effort to pro­vide a legal b&tiio for gay spouses is also expected in Minneapolis this year, accord­ing to activists in that city. Gay civil rights laws also will go before city and county councils for vote:; in a number of cities in 1984, but the most important ones are likely to be New Orleans, Houston and Chicago. The Deep South has been undergoing remarkable changes in the patit decade, partly as the states there have brought in new employ­ers who have been in tum bringing in more highly educated and urbanized employeeA. The freeze-out of progress for gays should end this year, a historic devel­opment. Expect New Orleans to be first, probably in time for Mardi Gras in March, with Houston coming in close thereafter. There may .be a housing ordinance or may­or', order pa><Red in Birmingham, Ala., which also would be a landmark. Chicago, which has a fractious City Council, appears to have the votes for an ordinance but can't lay down fights on other issues long enough to get action. It is one of the few major cities without such a law. Gaye also will move forward on an agenda that goes beyond legislative changes in some cities. Expect that New York City, for example, where there has been nothing but turmoil over getting a city gay civil rights ordinance passed, will move to the front ranks in getting city and state funding for special Rocial services for gay people, including possibly a shelter for homeless youth:;. Other candidates for such action include Boston and Philadel· phi a . In . ome locals, simply the public emer· gence of a gay community and its ability to get major elected officials to meeting openly with them will make news. Expect that New Mexico gayo will make more and more news during the year. Look for Ohio ~ays to make 11ome strong gains in 1984, seemingly coming from no place to an effective statewide force. North Carolina gays also can be expected to emerge into visibility, possibly of national propor· tions, as a result of their involvement in the effort to defeat Sen. Jesse Helms. C"!J984 by Larry Bush EDIC * Your Neighborhood Pharmacy * Quick Service * Compeltltve Prices * Bring Us Your Next Prescription or Have Your Doctor Phone Us * Hours Mon-Fn 9-6:00, Sat 9-1 Bruce Bailine, R. Ph. 4418 Montrose-526-3233 aero s from Steak N Egg Go Skiing at Colorado's Only Gay Ski Lodge Sk t~ -prin~ di tht llnly gdy 'k l .. d, e on Colorddo '"' .1ted high on th1 centrdl mount.ins. Only 11 hour> from Denver<•tl 1-70 , The Bunkh•>U>l'"ffr r> the finest ,1:., f.iulit1es on the W1·st, w,th three ,1:., .ire•s avdddble un • free shuttle bth service; Brt'l ken ridge, Copper \1ount.11n dnd Kt'vstone. And \'ail ,. onlv 35 miles dw,1y' 1'1.i un• • rll•rmg firepldCI' "1th steaming mugs t>f rnffee 01l.1 b(•.usktn rug •tter.1 hard d.w·s skiing, surrounded bv "'me of the hottest ,i..,..rs 1n the countrv' All .it >ome of thl' lowest r.1tt•s in thl' rnuntry! THE BUNKHOUSE (303) 453-6475 POB 6, Breckenridge, CO 80424 FEB. 17, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Feature Hill Not Ready for Sunset, Despite GPC Presidential Loss By Robert Hyde This i.~ the second in a two-part interl'iew Part I appeared last u·eek. On Wednei;day evening (Feb. 15), Ray Hill lost hiH bid to hecome president of Hous­ton':; Gay Political Caucus-a position he sought, almost hesitantly, up until the last minutl'. Outside the Holiday Inn on Main Street where the election took place, Hill's pabmino stallion was waiting. He waved one tear-streaked farewell to his staunch supporters who almost saw him achieve his goal, und rode off into the sunset. he said. "Inherently, that is one of the things th11t ii! very important to me. Mayb1• it was in my rearage. My mother is a strong civil libertarian. My father was a small·time community politician. His father was in the same thing. My roll' is the same, excl'pt I'm working in a specific community arms in Vietnam or in the streets ol Amer­i<' a. But Hill was not up in arms. he just chose a milder form of civil disobedience more closely kin to Hitchcock's cat burglar prowling the environs of the French Riviera. "I began stt>aling, really, when I was so far remov!'d from reality because of the heavy metal politics of the mid-60s-1966, 1967," he recalled matter-of-factly "I was absolutely convinc!'d that civil rights was at a dead standstill. We were unable to stop the war in \'ietnam. Gay ri,ghts wasn't ever going to gt>t anywhere. So I thought that the movement-cum civil right..~ movement cum anb·warmovemcnt <'um gay rights movement-was just not going to work out in this system. That's the way the scenario would have achievt>d the romantic ending to what some saw as Hill's campaign against almost certain odds. But ratht>r than fading into purple shad­ows. Hill i8 still around, and though not necessarily the cow boy in the white hat (losers always wear black), he is still Hous· ton's Don Quixote charging into windmills-and often the vice-a position he's maintained in this community for almost 20 yt>urs. "I don't think that anyone enters a race without the hope of winning it, and I cer­tainly fall into that category," Hill said after Wednesday night's election. "Yeah, I'm alwnys disappointed when I lose. "I feel like a gay uncle from the '50s. Everybody loves me, but they want to hide me from the public," he said. And Hill might be right. On the morning following his deft>at, GPC Pn•sident Norman Guttman asked Hill to lx·<'ome the caucus' political action coordinator, a less visible position which Hill accE'pted. He was also asked to retain his seat on the board of directors. He's thinking about that. "This is not the first GPC election that I've lost," Hill said immediately after the count, referring to failed attempts at becoming vice-president under Larry Bag­neris' first year us president and two fail­ures at obtaining board seats under Van Ooteghem and Shiflett. "As a matter of fact, I think I've lost as many GPC elec­tions as I've won. ''And this is the first time in a good many years that I will not be on the board, and I will not seek reelection to my board sent," he said. prior to Guttman 's offer. "But I'm still available to the adminis­tration to use as asked, as always. I think that I can serw a prt>tty significant role sitting on the front pew on the smoking side whert• I have been many, many times before without holding title or officl• in 'I think we have been far more generous to the politicians we have supported than they have a right to expect.' Gay PolitiC'al Caucus. "The important thing, I think, for the community to think about is that we have an ele<'tion yt>ar every year .... And we hope to accomplish something, keep the wagons reasonably near, e!"circled, fight­ing off our foes and supporting our friends and carrying on. "I am hopeful that Norman's adminis­tration will continut> the development of the caucus," he said . And with Hill as political action coordi­nator, he probably has one of th_e m.ost influenctial spots available, co~sidenng the heavy election year awaiting that organization. . , "So it's kind of in the blood, if politics is a genetically communicated disease," he said, " which it very well may be." And anyont> who has known Hill for the length of time he has been involved in gay politics can attest to some driving force inside the man. He was shouting for gay right>I to Houstonians whl'n Boys in th11 Band was an outrage on Broadway and when The Exile and the Red Room were Houston's more popular gay bars. "I've been involv!'d in Houston gay acti­vism since there was anything going on," he said, speaking of his early years in the turbulent '60s. "In '66, I helped co-found the Promethean Societv. with David Pat­tt- rson, Rita Longstrorn" and my•elf es~en­tially working 11s a troika. We us!'d to have wonderful meetings," he remembered, smiling. "We'd announce a meeting at a park or auditorium and 200 people would <'Orne. And we'd talk about the problem:; the gay community was having with the poli<"(', the city and various corporations and 1•ntiti1•s. And we'd get a good turnout and have ni<'e discussions. "We wouldn't hav<' another meeting for a month or so, nnd then we'd pass out fliers ... and another 200 people would show, but it would be 11different200 people who show!'d the fir8t time. So Uavid, Rita and I were es~mtiully lecturers to this tur­nover of Pl'°Pll'," he said fondly. Hill was perhaps too mu<'h a product of that period in this nation's history. Jane Fonda was Oijtracized from more polite so<'iety, Ri<'hard Nixon held the reins of the most powerful seat in the world, and Ray Hill orchestrated a burglary ring . Since then, the world knows where Nixon went, and Jane was forgiven by her peers and awarded a couple of Oscars. One wonders what part Hill's prison years played in the outcome of the recent GPC election. Perhaps his achieving the presidency of the caucus would have been in someway his own "Oscar" for simply having survived and fought for the gay movement for so long. Wht>n he waR at the helm of the Prome­thean Society, "which essentially died when I went to prison in 1970," Hill said, ••J thought the revolution was coming." He smiled. "And as strange as that sound• to me now, at 26 and 27 that made very good sen~e to me. ''And I was pretty heavily into politic,. I know that I had a van outfitted so that I could go to anti·war demonstrations or conferen<'es and sleep in my van relatively close to where the a<'tion was." Hill thought for a moment, then remem­bered enthusiastically, "I spent a great deal of time talking politics. I really wasn't or never have been a Marxist or a communist or that kind of thing. I've been what I would call a red-blooded American anarchist. I'd like to pre,erve the Constitu· tion, but at the time. I'd have liked for its benefitq to bt> distributed among all the people, equally, and that did not seem pos­sible when Richard Nixon was president of the United States. "Now I know that brings up a whole different mind·set about things," he said, tryi.ng to explain. "I know that a lot of people may have difficulty accepting that rrund-set, but if you look at what the '60s were to so many )>('ople, my mind-set was not all that fur out of character with the period. "So I began stealing from corpora­tions," he said. Hill forays into the world of theft saw him specializing in antiques, jewelry and art. "But art that can be stolen is art that you can't steal," he said, referring to the lei;s-than-popular pieces he did take. "I mean, what would you do with a Renoir if you stole one? "But I've never broken into anybody's home and stole their personal goodies," he Guttman is clearly pulling on.Hills pol­said nlmost apologetically. itical expt•rtise, something Hill ~ondly likes to think he inherited from his par· ents. . h ., "I'm ronccrneq 11hout p1•ople's ng ts, he was also taking advantage of a govern­mental system he thought was doom!'d, a period in his life he speaks ofunabashedly over and over again. But more often than n.ot, he views those years as an unappre­<' iotl'd intl'rruption of his work for the g~y <:11u11uwhl'n the youth of the.era were upm Also by way of explanation-and per­haps apology to those who believe in him-Hill Raid that he stole primarily for the Glorious Cause, inasmuch a .. Scarlett O'Hara toss!'d her wedding ring into the basket of gold to keep the Yankees out of Atlanta. "I had an ethical thing, and I thought that I was feathering the Cause, because what I did with the mont>y was invest in Cause-oriented things-carrying large numbers of people to anti-war conferences and/or demonstrations. "I also liv!'d 11 lot better than I do now," hl• admitted. "In that kind of thing, there is a selfish element. When you have brown paper sacks full of money hanging around in vourcloset, you don'tdo\\ithoutdinne.r. If fact, you do dinner \\ ith a little more !!'race and style than one would other wi~e" In 1969, Hill's world came crashing down. His burglanzing was on the verge 'I feel like a gay uncle from the '50s. Everybody loves me, but they want to hide me from the public.' of coming to a halt anyway, Hill said, but he had not quite stopped when the HPD busted him and the men who work!'d with him. "I stay!'d out on bond most of that year, and wound up being thl' only person to go to prii;on out of the whole bunch, which I felt was appropriate becau•e it was my responsibility to do so." Though Hill did not give the details of hts prison sentence, he did imply that he had it easier than other men, working as a mamtenan<'e and construction book­keeper and-not even resting behind bars-as a prison reformist. "The Chronide headlines pegged us as a $4 million burglary ring, and the head­lines helped with my relationship whe­never 1 got to prison. I was a successful thief. People around me were apparently unsuccessful thieveii. And so that gave me t>nough stature to make it through the pri­son experience. "I was sentenced to 20 eight-year sent­ence,, whic-h is a total of 160 year.;," he said. "I served four year, and four months. having convinced a judge that 160 years is cruel and unusual for nonviolent crimes against property." Then to underscore his more benevolent naturt>, whi<'h he feels sets him apart from the hardcore prisoner;; of this world, Hill said, "Nonviolen<'e is a part of my life. I inherited that via my parents and grand­parents. "I never owned a gun," he :-aid, adding, "That's not true They gave me a shotgun when I was 14 years-cld I cleaned it for years, then pass!'d it on to my nephews, never having fired it at a living thing. "But I just constitutionally had the mind-set of a nom;olent," Hill said, whirh helpro m gettmg his prison sentence reduced, "because nonviolence. nonjeo­pardizing of human life, were important." Hill has difficulty evaluating the effect the prison years had on him. He veils the actual experience in secrecy. Yet it is obvious that it haunts him and could pos­sibly be an albatross around his neck for the rest of his life. "The prison experience was amazing," he said, "but I survived that. "What effect it had on my thinking is difficult to imagine. I know that the only laws that I violate are those I consciously violate and am willing to take an arrest to try a case," he said of his recent civil dis­obedience work. "It took me quite a bit of time to over­come my fear of poli<'e and the criminal justice system," he went on. "And the death of Fred Paez (who was killed by a police offi<'cr) certainly didn't help that along very rapidly. That s<'ared me to 8 MONTROSE VOICE / FEB. 17, 1984 death." Hill emphasized. "I realized that they (HPD) really do kill people. and that I am a person they would probably like to kill. I've irot no time to go around being paranoid, and ifyou"re afraid of your law enforcement agencies. then what is the rationale in having them? "So the prison experience is difficult to put into context. I can talk about it, and I can say that it had an impact on me. "As a result of the prison experience, I do not seem to need the kinds of status symbols other people seem to need. Things-whatever they are-are not so damned important that I cannot do with­out them. Putting on impressions-the dre8s for succe!!. mentality, the fashiona­ble apartment mentality, the flashy car mentality-I can just ai; soon do without Cadillacs and things of that nature." Then it comes baC'k to the importance of Hill's role as an activist in Houston's gay community and the shadow that his pri­son term casts on that role-something that might have been lurking in the minds of GPC members at this week's election. "As a group, convicts are more tolerant of my being gay than gay people are of my being a convict." he said. "I think that"s literally true. I think the reason that is true b that gay people have a mentality that somehow their being gay makes their struggle for acceptance more difficult than other people face. And. therefore, any other thing added to their being gay-you can't overcome the problem you have feel ing any self-worth. And they transfer that onto me "I think that it bothers gay people a lot that I'm a former inmate of the Texas Department of Correction,,. Their being bothered bothers me a lot, because ha•.nng been there, I know that there ore a great many gay people in prison, •ome for gay· related offenses, others for trying to strug­gle against their lower social status by nccumulatmg things of worth. "I mean there's a lot of hot-check wri ters, a lot of credit card abusers. who!!e hot checks and credit card!! were used to improve their perceived status among their peers. "All you have to do is walk into any gay bar in Dallas and you know what pretense is all about. Fortunately, I'd like to think that in some small way I have made a contribution to Houston being n more real· i"tic city where impressions are not as important as substance." Today, when he', not running the vice out of Diner's :-;ews or attending meeting!! of the Gay Political Caucu,,, Hill runs the ~ orth Loop Shepherd Legal Clinic. which is affiliated with the law firm of Hopkins, Low & Young, "helping people with divor­ces, y,;l!s, getting out of jail. misdemea­nors. DWI-the kind of thing that I've done for many, many years. "I am not a lawyer," Hill emphasized. "I make no pretenses of being a lawyer. Law· yers tell me all the time I should go to law school-and become a member of the bar." He laughed. "I don't like lawyers that much. I think lawyers provide a good ser­vice. but sometimes I (o,e sight of that in ind1,;dual en. es .... " Another area Hill is involved in is y,;th radio station KPFT, 90.1 FM, which he refer to as being "one of the great loves of my life.'" The station broadcasts in nine lan- 2ua2es: has two gay-related programs, " \'hide 'n' Stein" (which Hill produce~) and "Breakthrough," a feminist/lesbian program broadcast dunng drive-time Fri· day mornings; and Hill',, prison reform show. KPIT grew out of a need for an alterna­tive radio station in the late '60s, Hill said. "In tho~e days, when you did a radio talk show about the gay community, there wba always a psychologist who thought you were sick, there was always a cop or assistant D.A. there to tell the people that you were really a criminal, and there was a lways a Baptist mini,ter there to tell the folks that you \\ere 11 smner. "It was a debate that'" what it wa!<," Hill said. "There was no open, unre.s· trained di cussion of gay rights as we now understand it. In the late '60s, it was a struggle" Hill SCP KPI-'T, despite its small audience as b<>ing very instrumental in relieving gay people of the guilt and fear heaped upon them by a non-gay society. "There ha!! been a whole generation of gay people who have heard over the radio in private that their gay attraction is nothing to be ashamed of, nothing to be afraid of. nothing to feel guilty about," he said quietly. "And that is a real pheno­menon. I can really, in my own mind, think of the real value of that whenever I am flashed back to my high school years and going to college libraries and taking book after book off the shelf and finding out how sick, perverted, twisted, sick and criminal I was. There was simply, to a young man growing up in Houston in the late '50s and early '60s, no positive infor­mation about my identity. But we have people who have grown up having heard frequently in this voice that it's okay to be gay.'' And this positive affirmation of homo­sexuality is something Hill continues to blast, whether on radio or not. His "we're-fine-get-off-our-backs" philo­sophy came to the attention of the gay community most recently when he con· fronted the vice squad and Police Chief Lee Brown with an alleged existence of a "faggot file."' And although that issue has been shoved to a back burner for many in the community, Hill sees it as an ongoing sore in his hide, indicative of another disease Hill would probably label the vice. "Brown said in the meeting (with repre­sentatives from the gay community on Jan. 23 following a series ofraids)that he would look at it (the file), then out of the meeting he encountered the media. and he said that it didn't exist. That"s a stone· wall. " I think his plan here i~ the expected response of a police chief-his first respon­sibility. The rPason Brown was hired to be our police chief was to get the police 'The prison experience was amazing, but I survived that.' department off the front page of the news­paper in a negative way. And that's why he"s police chief-not to clean it up-not to run the bigots out-but to get it off the front page of the newspaper. "And Brown has got to, by virtue of his job description, defend his officers, I sus­pect, though his public stance is, 'Oh, gosh, all these raids in four to six days; and. gosh, 46 arrest,; and, gosh, we have a faggot file that they've been keeping over there for at least a decade.' All of this is business as usual," Hill said, "except the file, which doesn't exist at all. "I think that that should have been our expected public stance from the police chief. I think that privately-and proba· bly of more importance to UR-is that he's willing to dump !!Orne of tho,;e people from the vice squad down to the Port of Houston patrol. I think he will really do that."' Hill is very concerned that those in the community who have been subjected to police ahuse participate in Project Docu· mentation, the giant effort currently underway to prove abusive treatment by the HPD. "The burden of proof is on us,"' Hill said, referring to Brown's stance that he had not received one complaint, and also to the need for gay citizens to complain. "If we can prove that (abuse), those suckers are going to find .,omething else to do. "I think that there's an enormous psy­chological victory in documentation . If the vice department knows that there is a means within the gay community to docu· ment their bullshit arrest11, their verbal and physical abu. e. to gay people, they will 11imply stop doing it. "I think that it will Cl'rtainly alter the behavior of vice officers right away. And I think that as long as we do that, as long os we ore willing to do that. the vice officers are going to be much better behaved."' Heyond problems with the vice squad, Hill secs a fostering problem with the mayor and City Council-a problem that nnsl's from their unwillingness to docu ment gay rights in this city. "They're politically ambitious," Hill said, "and we are a resource that they will vie with one another for. "And we have been more predictable than I am comfortable with. We've just been following along and being used with­out any fight back. And I think this is incredible. This is 1984. This will be the ninth year since the founding of Gay Polit­ical Caucus, yet every mayor who has been elected for the past eight years has had some form or another of Gay Political Caucus support. We have supported a clear majority of City Council for five years, yet we do not have one word in writ­ing to protect the rights of gay men and lesbians in this city. I think that's abso­lutely incredible. "I think we have been far more generous to the politicians we have supported than they have a right to expect," Hill added. "Now to accomplish getting that in writ­ing is not going to require a fight attitude. There's no need to go around and insult people we"ve elected. We just need to con­stantly and gently remind them that it's our turn. Now. Move ahead. "Anthony Hall's policy reforms-or maybe even a city ordinance-is not untimely. "First, when we ask for a city ordinance. they throw back to us, 'By God. are you ready to fight a referendum?' I do not think that those who oppose the rights of gny men and lesbians bt·ing legislated constitute a large enough number of peo· pie to draw the petitions nece1<sary to have a recall election. And if they can somehow hoodwink enough people to sign the god­damn petition, I absolutely know that there"s not a large enough number of Houstonians to vote for it. So I'm not afraid of referendum. "It's the politicians who are afraid of rl'ferl'ndum," Hill ~aid quietly. "Not gay people. We simply know better. We get along far bettPr with our neighbors. In every poll that ever has been done in the City of Houston for its attitudes on gay and lesbian rights. we've steadily out· paced the whole ccuntry, so that now some 70 percent of Houstonians think that we should hove equal rights. Thirty percent think we alreadv do." Before Hill is finished, he will probably see that ordinance-he will probably see it statewide. It is difficult to see him writing his memoirs when he is not yet 50. He might even be president of the organiza· lion he helped found, along with Robert Schwab and Gary Van Ooteghem back in 1975. "It started small and quickly grew," he said of the GPC. "So I was there for the founding of Gay Political Caucus, and I've stuck it out." He paused, shook his head, then said, "None of the other folks pic­tured as founders are still around." Where would Houston's gay community be today without Ray Hill? There have been others who have pushed the community forward, but with as much force-with as much hell-hath­no- fury persuasiveness-which as much sheer determination-and duration? Hill says hl' calming down now. He'd like to see major inroads made in Austin, but beyond that, he's folding in his wings. "I'm getting too old."' J. Brian vvonnacott. M.D. sexually Transmitted · Diseases oruq and Alcohol Abuse General Practice Appointments Preferred (7131 869·0115 MC VISA AM ex WELCOME 1740 W. 27th St SlJlte 21 Houston 77008 W IPJll.AYI New York Construction Co. ROUGH CUT To us, you're a person. General dentistry with a concern for the patient as a whole. HOLISTIC DENTISTRY Christy Esmond, O.D.S. Evelyn Allinger, D.D.S. 660·6155 4150 Bellaire Blvd. (between Stella Link and Loop 610) Evening appointments available, insurance accepted. FEB 17, 1984 MONTROSE VOICE 9 1983 Frisky Awards, Part II By Randy Alfred Dateline S.F. f Part I appeared last week.) BUSINESS: Heart of Gold award to the three West German doctors convicted of removing heart pacemakers from corpses and implanting them into their patients, who were charged for new ones. Banker's Heart award to Chicago's Con· tinental Bank, which denied a $2,500 home·repair loan to a woman who had returned $500,000 to the bank in 1981. Sound As A Dollar award to U.S. Steel, whose South San Francisco plant lost a bid to provide steel to rebuild an overpai;s just outside its gates to a Japanese firm that had to ship the steel across the Pacific. Career Counseling award to Greg Jae· obs, the Australian real·estate agent who won the World Monopoly Championship in Palm Beach, Fla. CRIME, PUNISHMENT, AND THE LAW: Stop the Movie Cruising First Amendment award to the Michigan mother-son minister team and the Ku Klux Klan leader who joined forces to rid their local library of books with gay and feminist subject matter. Wishful Thinking First Amendment award to Mayor Dianne Feinstein, who said of the upcoming Democratic National Convention here: "There is no reason to believe there will be demonstrations of any kind." Joe McCarthy Memorial First Amend· ment award to the U.S. Justice Depart· ment, which labelled three Canadian documentaries on nuclear war and acid rain as "political propaganda" which could not be shown without a disclaimer that the U.S. government does not approve of them. One film, If You Loue This Planet, won an Oscar. Quality of Mercy award to the two Pen· nsylvania physicians who saved the life of the attorney who was suing them formal­practice, when the lawyer collapsed from a heart attack in the courtroom. Catch 22 award to the INS and the U.S. Bunkruptcy Court. In 1982, the lmmigra· tion and Naturalization Service deported a European· born woman because she was running a legal brothel in Nevada. In 19&1, a bankruptcy examiner criticized another brothel for inefficient operation. He thought it needed time clocks for the prostitutes and receiptR for the customers. Letter Of The Law award to Virgil Ever· hart, the Kentucky man who split his house in two with a <-hainsaw rathc>r than sell it to give his wife half the proceeds in a divorce settlement. Music Hath Charms award to the West German man who was granted a divorce on the groundi; that his wife played the piano or listened to music morning, noon and night. K-Mart Justice award to the East Los Angeles judge removed from the bench by the California Supreme Court because he offered criminal-defense lawyers a bar· gain day on which he would impose only one-half of hie customary sentence or tine when the defendant pleaded guilty. Things Are Tough All Over award to the mob, which FBI Director William Webster told Congress had to impose a hiring freeze because business was so bad. There Go The Ratings award to attorney F Lee B&iley who was unable to obtain convicted Atl~nta child killer Wayne Wil· Iiams for Bailt>y's syndicated TV pro· gram, "Lie Detector." Sharp Eye award to t.he Bo~ton mett·r· maid who foiled to notJC'C that thP man who apJlP!lrf'd to he slN•ping. hehind th!' wht·t·I in the <'llr ~ht> wae llck!'ting for ovt•r· pnrking had nctunlly hem shot in the huck of tht' neck. Seat of Intl'lligmre award to th~ ~00· pound San ,Jo~e woman acrused o~k1lhng ht·r 9·year·old son by sitting on h_1m: Sh_e suPd a local c·ounsding center, cla1min.g it rl!<'ommt·ndl'd the technique as d1s<·1phne. I .ust C'onqut•rs All award to the !w<> Rt'C! Brigade dl'fendunts who engaged ma sex· ual net whill' an Italian court was in ses· 11ion. Othrr defendants in the case .stood close to the hars of a se1:urity cage in thfl courtroom to hid1• the couple. Spoilsport award to the Alameda County sheriff, who cracked down on the use of sanitary napkins, sheets, toilet paper, and cups for other than their intended use. when imprisoned anti· nuclear demonstrators used those items to stage an impromptu Lesbian /Gay Free· dom Day parade at the Santa Rita jail. Chutzpah award to the wife of the San Francisco man who injured her and seven others and killed two when he shot up the office at which she worked. Erlinda Con· ta we sued the building owners for not pro­viding adequate Sl'Curity. Her attorney ncknowlf'dged, "I personally don't think we have much of a case." Runner-up for the Chutzpah award is the Nebraska man convicted of mans· laughter who petitioned the court to get the weapon back. He claimed the 12-gauge shotgun was a family heirloom with "a Jot of emotional value." Don't Raise The Bridge, Lower The River award to the Louisiana con man who claimed he was former pro-basketball star Bill Russell. Aurther Lee Trotter said he'd had 10 inches of leg bone removed by surgeons so he could fit into his Mercedes Benz. Exporter Of The Year award to the Iowa judge who "punished" a man convicted of showing obscene material to a child by giving the man a one-way bus ticket to Los Angeles. Naked Truth award to the Israeli judge who ordered a 16-year-old girl to stop walk· ing around her house without any clothe .. on. Her 80-year-old stepfather had claimed she was trying to cau,e him to have a heart attack 1;0 she could inherit his wealth. Use The Small Fork For The Twinkies award to the Menlo Park woman who slashed her boyfriend to death in an argu· ment that started because he was "eating like a pig." Win Some, Lose Some award to Donald Praska, who was busted for possession of marijuana with intent to deliver on the same day voters elected him to the Jack· son Junction, Iowa, City Council. Jerk Of The Year award to the New York otate man who hired another man to rob his girlfriend, so he could rescue her and be a hero. The "boyfriend" got then• late and failed to prevent not only her robbery but her rape as well. ~~~~~~~~~ Alfred's cn/umn originates at the "Sen· tine/, .. a San Francisco gay neu·spaper. 1984 Randy Alfred, all rights resen·ed Your eyes say a lot about you-don't let them tell your age! White Swallow eye cream iS for the man Who deres to are about hlS appear a ice. Because the crea d"OUfld the eyf3 has few Oil glands, ttlis a-ea rs the fi'"st to srow Signs of aging White Swc/lcw eye cream rs pertiaps the finest eye cream ever made It restores moisnre d'ld !Jves the eye crea that youthful <jCIN Retail inquiries contact Stephen Lacobee. vice-president, Marketing •Credit card or money order 10 day dellvery1 Nan1e Address Coty MONEY ORDER C'1re1 ff SICJl'lature M~l•I to VISA White swallow Cosmetic Company PO Box 73448, Dept F•260 Houston. TX 77273 state MASTER CARO Zip Exp o.ire Order Tot:al s in Texas. aad 6% sales tax S Postage & Handling s Total Enc1osed s ... 1 50 Order before March 15 and receive a FREE travel size eye cream Ask for White Swallow In your favorite men·s store ."".''. :c 0" ii 10 MONTROSE VOICE I FEB. 17, 1984 Gleanings from the Non-Gay Press Commentary By Jim Kepner Via Gay Press Auociation Wire Service Hope all of you saw the excellent features on Gay Community progress in the Jan. 1 and 2 Los Angeles Times. Some readers felt they skimped on some sectors of our community, but what was covered was done excellently. Dan White's surprise parole to L.A., thanks to Chief Gates, produced a flurry of articles. on gay community response, the best bemg in the Jan. 8 Herald. Initial press coverage here and elsewhere reported L.A. gays as not much disturbed by Dan White's presence (a Jan. 9 Times editorial approvingly quoted Morris Kight's advice to stay home with a friend and ''.go into a period of recollection"), but by midweek the press had noticed that not all L.A. gays felt that passive. It was his­toric for a leading gay activist to be quoted approvingly in a Times editorial. Other California papers ali>O editorialized that gay• should be good boys about the mat­ter. After all, justice has been done, even if 1t wa.s a grand mistake. Guy Wright, a rarely pro-gay San Fran­cisco Examiner columnist, said on Jan. 2 in response to a reader's query about Rich­mond and two other cities nixing Dan White as a resident, "Maybe White should settle down at Soledad. They say he was a good citizen thl're." The Jan. 10 San Francisco Chronicle briefly reported new Iv reelected Houston Mayor Kathy Whitm'ire', tour of 10 gay bar~. with a doubll'deck bu.sloadofsuppor­ters, including three city councilmen-to heal the Gay Political Caucus' gripe that at mauguration time she'd ignorl'd major gay •upport that twice put her in City Hall. tJP THE CENSORS. TheJ an. 6 Minnea­polis Star Tribune gave a full report on Minneapolis Mayor Don Fraser's veto of the unique anti-porn law passed by the lame duck city council Dec. 30. The ordi­nance, drafted largely by N.Y.C. lesbian separatist writer Andrea Dworkin declarl'd that pornography per se violated women'< right.". It would have permittl'd any woman who felt that she'd been attacked or coerced or had her rights vio­lated as a result of pornography lo file a claim with the city Civil Rightb Depart­ment v. hich would have 45 days to award her damages against tho~e who producl'd or distributed the materials, and then would permit her to take the matter to court. The ordinance wa.• vague at defining pornography, vague a.s to how specific damages might be charted or how blame might be assigned to a particular producer or seller of materials alleged to be pornog­rphic. Mayor Fraser said he agreed that porno­graphy degrades women and is legiti­mately a social threat, but felt the law was unconstitutionally vague and a serious threat to First Amendment rights. Gay activist Tim Campbell, editor of the GLC Voice, joined the ACLU and moderate feminist,; in opposing the bill, pointing out that no ont could tell in advance what book, magazine or film could be so chargl'd, but Dworkin and right-wing mor· nlist allie .. srornl'd the critics and prom· ised to float similar ordinances countrywide. Fraser suggested they draft a more moderate bill. Running contrary to several previous studies, a report in January's Psychology Today noted that a study by psychologists Donnerstein and Linz said that men who repeatedly watched X· or R-rated films tended to become desensitized to rape. (USA Today, Jan. 4). A New York Times report was picked up by the Jan. 3 Los Angeles Herald on the growing threat of hysterical groups trying to cenkor books in the public schools. One list of 600 books which has been pin· pointed include!' Make It u·ith Mademoi· selle (actually a sewing guide published by Mademoiselle magazine) and the Ameri· can Heritage Dictionary, said to contain 36 dirty words. Objections center on The Diary of Anne Frank, To Kill a Mocking· bird, Hucklebe"y Finn, The Scarlett Let· ter, etc., but range from alleged obscenity, to unfairness to minorities, to books con· taining unbiblical or unpatriotic opinions (Darwinism, Robin Hood, reports on Viet­nam, Watergate, slavery, unions or women's rights). And we know where any mention of gays stands with the censors. The Los Angeles Daily News on Jan. 4 also had a similar strong feature on the spread of censorship pressure as part of the spurt of articles on George Orwell, the political sci fi writer who made this year famous. PROGRESS AND PROBLEMS. Law· rence Biemiller in the San Franc1Sco Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 4., gave a full account of the struggle of the Gay & Lesbian Student Association at Southern Methodist University to achieve student senate backing, and of the bar­rage of homophobia they still meet, launching a debate as acrimonious "as any since the student senate invited Mar­tin Luther King to speak on campus in 1964." Co-chair Robert Rios has been the chief target of the vicious attacks and has been interviewed widely in Dallas media. Methodist Rev. William Finnin, SMU's chaplain, described the culture of Texas as " stridently heterosexual," willing to define in theological and moral terms any difference from the norm. "We were seeing some students m pain and trauma, struggling with the issue of their own sexual identity." Several gay and anti-gay students and faculty members were quoted at length. SophO. more William KO<'h calll'd the move to legi· timize the GLSSO part of a plot by the national political gay movement "which is very strong in Dallas." ' The Jan. 5 Kansas City Times reported the spectacular recovery of Eddie Liedtke who has celebrated a 32nd birthday he did not expect to reach. Liedtke, hospitalized 18 months ago with "an amazing range of diseases," has been a mainstay of the AIDS Project Hotline during his periods out of bed. Doctors now say he has "what we call a severe case of pre-AIDS." The Jan. 8 San Francisco Examiner des­cribed Val·Kill, the home and factory at Hyde Park which Eleanor Roosevelt built and shared with close fril'nds Nancy Cook and Marion Dickerman (described else­where by Elliot Roosevelt as "masculine appearing"), as now being readil'd for sev­eral months of activities commemorating her life and work. After son John lived there a while and divided and sold off the property and furnishings, the government bought it in 1977 and began restoration as a historic site. You're Reading the MONTROSE VOICE One of Amertca·s Ma1or Gay Community Newspapers Lesbian comic and mu~ic festival pro­ducer Robin Tyler got burned badly for her offer to provide housing and support for quadriplegic Elizabeth Bouvia so she could die in peace and not be subjected to force-feeding. Bouvia's angry rejection was reported in papers all over the U.S. m the first days of '84. Popular female impersonator Danny La Rue got heavy pans from London critics in a prod~ction of Hello, Dolly! Only John Barber m the Telegraph approved, calling the show a "ritual celebration." Carol McAfee gave a fine review in the Jan 8 San Francisco Chronicle to Joseph Hansen"s latest excellent novel, Job's Year, about a man who confronts himself honeotly for the first time while his sister is dying of leukemia. LEGALITIES. The Jan. 5 San Franc15co Chronicle reportl'd that the Massachu· setL• Supreme Court had given a gay rights bill the green light. State senate opponents had sought a constitutionality ruling. The Jan. 8 Los Angeles Daily News print~d ~ UPI evaluation by Penny Spar of D1stnct Attorney Philibosian's prop­osal to revamp the court system. The initi­ative, co-sponsored by ex-State Attorney General Younger, would change many court procedures, permitting convictions by a 1().2 jury vote, preventing attorneys !Yorn questioning prospective jurors, cut into grand jury safeguards, etc. Philibo­sian recently told L.A.'s mostly gay Log Cabin Republican Club that the proposal would speed up trials but would probably not re8ult in more convictions. Last time we mentioned New York Gov­ernor Cuomo's talk at the Episcopal Cathedral of St. John the Divine. A bit more from the Dec. 23 Boston Globe sum· marizing the shift in popular Catholic thinking from "peasant roots" to post· Vatican II concerns: " I don'tmean to be lit· tie the Church of that time ... (but) in our preoccupation w!th evil and temptation, we often put guilt before responsibility, and we obRcured a central Christian truth: that God did not intend this world as a test of our purity, but as an expression of his love .... The8e exciting new articulations of the world's beauty helped a generation of Catholics to realize that salvation con· sisted of something more than simply escaping the pains of hell .. .. My politicM ... (iR) an extl'nsion of this faith. There is a pradox here... It would be impossible to stand here as governor, as an official elected by Moslems and Sikhs and Deists ... and atheists-and talk about politics and Christian stewardship without addreesing this paradox. ''The paradox was recently raised in a letter received on an executive order I issued banning discrimination against homosexuals in state government." The writer had asked "how can you claim to be a Christian when you go out of your way to proclaim the right of people to be what is an abomination in the sight of God? ... The answer drives to the heart of the ques· tion of where private morality ends and public policy begins ... . How I involve myself in a world broad enough to include people who don't believe all the things I believe about God and conduct. . .. To secure religious peace, the Constitution demanded toleration; it said no group, not even a majority, has the right to force its religious views on any part of the com· munity .. .. " He associated the concept of protected freedoms with that of stewardship, "reaching out to include those once excluded-women, blacks, minorities." Kepner is director of the National Gay Archives, Los Angeles, and has been clip· ping and filing articles of interest to gay people for 42 years. €'\MUTUAL ~Of OMAHA NEED Hospitalization Insurance to meet the high cost of medical care Life Insurance CALL 977-6909 ASK FOR JIM McKEE Steak Dinner Benefit MCCRCHOIR Tuesday,Feb.21, 1984 at the ""'ol'I 1 Texas Tumbleweeds 4030 Westheimer Performance by Montrose Cloggers $15.00 Donation u;: f!:f (Cash Bar Available) Tickets Available by: Grabbing a Choir Member Call the Church - 861-9149 or At the door Letters Atheist Attacks Churches' Strings-Attached Mercy From Don Sanders In last week's VOICE (Feb. 10), SH claims that my criticism of churches is unfounded. He claims there are a number of mainline churches friendly to gays and which offer their services to our community in one way or another. I am aware of these churches. and I am knowledgeable of their outreach pro­grams. My avocation, being national director of American Gay Atheists, requires that I keep abreast of what churches are involved in. Covenant House on Lovett at Yoakum does offer shelter and food for young runaways and outcasts. However, there are strings attached to its mercy If a young gay teenager comes to this shelter, he must denounce his homosexu· ality and be sub1ected to the teachings (brain­washing) of the homophobic Catholic church Many teenage runaways are victims of mental and/or physical abuse by their parents. Upon entering Covenant House, they are again sub­jected to mental torture and are encouraged to denounce their natural feelings. Some hospi­tal environment• I am also aware of several churches offering prayer services for victims of AIDS Little good prayer has done AIDS v1ct1ms, since praying amounts to nothing more than a local agitation of the atmosphere. Giving funds collected from a special offering (collected at the lime of the AIDS prayer vigil) was the least the 'charit­able" church should have done. At least the entire effort was not totally in vain. Churches are usually always lauded for their charitable work but are never chastised for dishing out propaganda to those 1n need of their few meager handouts ... Under the religious exemption category under IRS rules, churches do not have to make financial reports to anyone-not the govern­ment or their members. Other agencies of charity which are listed under the categories of health, education or welfare are required to file FORM 990 each year and must disclose their earnings Because of this favorable status given to churches, countless persons have lost millions in old age home schemes, insurance schemes, bonding schemes, feed-the-hungry­schemes. etc The IRS has estimated that the churches of the nation spend "only 41 cents a month for everyone who belongs to a church in America" on services to those outside the church, but within the church's own denomi­nation or sect Again, according to the IRS, churches own approximately 25 percent of all the privately owned land in this country. This means that approximately $50 billion of real estate 1s off the tax roles. If churches were taxed on their real estate holdings, their revenue from stocks and bonds. their sales, inheritances. and other non-related eclesiasti­cal earnings, every one of us would benefit greatly So. when you talk about the "charitable" churches. please know what you are talking about These institutions are a burden on the pocketbooks of every American. religious or not Chief Brown Should Remember His Past From the Martha Mitchell of Montrose The proposal made by Police Chief Lee Brown necessitating documentation of cases of police misconduct before any change can be implemented virtually guarantees that no reforms in the vice operations of the HPD will be made. How does Chief Brown expect bankers, law­yers, business owners. students whose educa­tion is parent financed, etc., to file charges against an officer who violated their civil liber­ties without exposing their private, homosex­ual lives? Such expectations are, 1n my view, tanta­mount to asking a black person in Vidor, Texas (the largest city in the U S. without a black resident), to file a complaint ag1nst the Ku Klux Klan Perhaps Chief Brown should remember back a few years into his own life and the lives of his family in order to understand our dilemma. FEB 17, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 -rkQ; JY\T'"c. or ~!\ a$~Ve.Y'C\Ot ~o~~~ M-.,..d' 9t-e..c; ·· C.o..c\«.\v~L·· l>~"\\. .. $~~{.\~\., ~\£~1'<.\~~ s t()ct\"VN\Q~ ,. ?a....-""t\~ ~ .• our FINISH l·s the Are you thinK1ng about teanng out your Cll1pped or sta1nea sink or tile? Well don t .. Because you can now Redecorate your old bathroom without the cost or mess of removing Begl· n ni· ng and replaang your Old plumbing and fixtures This can be ac:cor"lphShea by resu~acmg your present bathroom fixtures Of Your New withourexClusive syntMtic porceJa r Ne can even resurface Bath I ::i e walls E•ery Decorator room Colar to crioose from and • they re alt Guaranteea .. 'Nhy not ~ c.an new for your free estiriate7 [f)~OOGYAJ& ~ ~~~!;oht· GULF COAST PERMA CERAM • 863·7072 12 MONTROSE VOICE FEB. 17, 1984 Sports MSA Softball Series 8 Committee to Host NAGAAA Spring Meetings The Greater Houston MSA Softball Series 8 Committee will be hosting the spring meetings of the North American Gay AmaU-ur Athletic Alliance Council on March 1-3, according to its press release. NAG AAA is the international organiza­tion of gay .. oftball leagues across the U.S. and Canada, v.;th its prime functions being the coordination of information among its member leagues, the encourage­ment of new leagues to form and join the Alliance, and to oversee the tournament plans of the annual Gay Softball World Series. Also during the meetings, applications from potential new member leagues will be considered. Houston is glad to announce that one of the applications to be considered will be Dallas' Oak Lawn Softball Association. While the delegate,; are in Houston, the Series 8 committee will be doing its best to show true Houston ho1Spitality. During the meetings on Friday, the Series 8 commit­tee will present an update on current plans for Series !I and then treat the delegates to a double-decker bu:. tour of the city, the playing fields at Memorial Park. and a luncheon at Baja Sam's. On Saturday, the delegates will adjourn to Levy Field for a fun ,oftball game followed by a Texas bar­becue. In all, we w;u be hosting about 50 dele­gates for a weekend of long meetings and evenings of fun. We hope to make a favora­ble impression on the delegates to build enthusiasm for Series 8. We hope that by doing thi;, we can attract many addi­tional fans to Houston for Series 8 on August 25-Sept. 1. Montrose Tennis Action Continues By Rich Corder The "Ram Gods" smiled on Montrose Ten­nis this past weekend as the clouds parted and the courts were 'unny and dry for ome late Sunday matches. Donny Kelley made the biggest jump, coming from behind to defeat hio doubles partner (moi!) 6-4, 6-2. He thereby 'tepped up four notches onto the .So. 8 rank in the Top Ten Ladder. He later played membership chairman Randell Dickerson for the r-:o. 4 rank, hut Randell held him off (quick & ea.~y) 6-1, 6-0. You would have thought Randell would be rusty for having spent the last week on the ;ki .<lopes in Colorado-but Donny wasn't lucky enough for that! Top Ten No. 5 Jim Kitch defended his ranking against yours truly 6-3, 6-1. As you can see, our top players are indeed a step or two (at least) better than the next level of us. We'll keep trying , though. Good competition-lots of fun! Top Ten No. 7 Don Smith was not quite so fortunate in his defense. Ron Bell is returning to hin former crispness and jumped from No. 1 on the B Ladder to the No. 7 spot on the Top Ten with a long, split-set victory over Don 4-6. 6-4, 6-2. MSA Volleyball Begins Season The MSA Volleyball League will begin its indoor season this coming Tuesday, Feb. 21, at Hamilton ,Jr. High, 20th and Heights Blvd. Faced with playing out· doors for the first time in six years, League officers were delighted when HISD offered Hamilton as a replacement for Gregory­Lincoln, which is under repair. This past Saturday, several players assembled on the tennis courts in Cherry· hurst Park for some "half-hearted" prac­tice, and they plan to practice again this Sunday at 2. weather permitting. The first two weeks of play will be dues­free, and basic skills clinics are planned by older members for all who attend. New­comPrs are strongly encouraged to at least show up and see what MSA Volleyball is all about. Play is continuous from 7-10 p.m., and refreshments are provided, so come on out and get some exercise and learn a new sport while meeting some new faces! Women's Softball League Forming The MSA Wom~n s Softball Slow-Pitch League 1;; currently forming for its 1984 March-August season, and newcomers are welcome. The League, which will have two div­isions. will sponsor three tournaments during the year, and an all-star team will be selected to play exhibition games dur­ing Gay Pride Week. Team registration is encouraged by the next council meeting March 5. Call Linda at 688-7193 or Carolyn at 868-6256 for more information. MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Follow1~g Feb 9 compc11110~ 1 Single Services 2 Kauflman"1 Kook1es 3 Goog1es 4 Adam's Apple HIGH GAMES HIGH SERIES Richard Daucfly 22• Louis Schneider 574 Louis Scllnetder 224 Lynn Ke'ley 515 Steve McConaughy 207 Mike Linder 'V'I• Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Followong Feb 12 competi11on A LADDER 1 Tim Calhoun 2 Rich Ryan 3 Jan Mauldin 4 Randell Dickerson 5 Jim K1lch 6 Don Kessler 7 Ron Bell 8 Don Smith 9 Donny Kelley 10 Rich Corder RESTAURANT & VIDEO CABARET NOW ENTERTAINMENT 4 EVENINGS A WEEK With Luisa Amaral­Smith & Clay Holland 4n2 t 0.\/8T HOUSTON 527-9866 e e Geot Allen Trio Feb. 23-26 & March 1-4 Where the World Meets Houston £l£h. PIS)~' :.H liJ[f~f lil E.Ac;LECR..EST f,,r Ultimate Act...onr,od._,tio11"'- ,,..., 106 Avondale Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 520-9767 lt..-.1tco-d Pool * Ja<:uzzi * <.. ont. Breakf.1 .. t Weekend .. 104 Avondale. HC>USTON (713) sz ~ - 9004 DJ NIGHTLY HAPPY HOUR . s100 Eye Afternoonl NOTICE! I SUNDAY Wayne 10pm till 12:30am O~eners,& Barton , 1022 Westheimer-528-8851 ~ Mimosa s .ai <ururmmmm1mummu rilJlllllzllU1Ll011l.f.aDrrmtJ71lllln~eutntI.n:1mlllJwtm:SS!;~ FEB. 17, 1984 MONTROSE VOICE 13 The Baths Are Getting a Bum Rap Commentary By Joe Baker I went to the baths for the first time back in 1972. Hard to believe it was 11 years ago. The place was called Dave's, and it was in the North Beach area of San Francisco. If you are going to make your virgin appearance at the bath, I guess there's no better place to do it than in the gay capital of the United States. I was visiting San Francisco with a non­gay friend of mine. I was just starting to come out. The whole gay scene was new and fascinating to me. I had read and heard a lot about gay life m San Francisco and was more than eager-and ready-to sample it. But I wasn't ready to share that fact with my friend, so I was pretty much stuck playing the straight tourist. One night, however, my friend decided he waR tired from the heavy dose of sight­seeing I had dished him that day. He said he didn't ft"t•I like going out and would prefer to stay in our hotel room and watch a football game that was being televised. My henrtjumped. Of cours!', I pretended to be very disappointl'd and disgusted. Why would nnyonecome to San Francisco and stay in a hotel room at night and watch a football game'' But I wns out the door of the hotel in no time flat. I had my treasured gay guide to San Fnmci1<co and started to hi tall the hot spots. Th1•re were so many bars to explore that I probably only spl'nt 10 minut!'s in each plac1•. Towards har dosing time, however, I noticed the ad for Daw's in my gay guide. I rnallv didn't know what the baths were but I .figun·d they wen• probably some' thing like a snunn for gay men. I decided to C'ht·ck it out. It took me a long time to find the place, and I was quite nervous as I walked in. Th!' attmdnnt took my money, gave me a room kPy and a towel and buzzed me in. Thi• lock1•d door with the buzzer fasci· nntt-d me "This must be some kind of s1'{·n·tive place," I thought. I had no idea what th!' towel was for-or even th1• room. I had no idea what was waiting for mt• once I got inside. Tht• first thing I notir!'d was the men walking around wenring towels. Not being a complete dummy, I figured out real fast that I was expected to shed my clothes. A~ I explon-d tht• facility, I was amazed at the numherofgood looking men and th!' various offerings of the club. I also won dered why so many of the men were lying in thl'ir little rooms with their doors opl'ned. Then I i;tumbled into a dimly-lit room-and C'ouldn•t helieve what I was S!'eing. To muke n long story short. I learned very qukkly that night what the baths were all about. I was in the candy store of my drNtms. I couldn't believe such a place existed for gn:v men. And I couldn't wait until I i:ot hark home to s1•e if Detroit had gay hnths. Sure enough, it did. Two of them, in fact. As I continued my comini:out proressov!'r the next g(•verul years, the Detroit baths and I got to know each other quite well The) wer<' extremely popular. Mkh1gan hars do~ed nt 2:00 11.m., and on we.·kend nights guys would stand in line waiting to get in. Oh. how I remember those long, slow lines on h(•low·zero winter nights. When I moved to Fort Lauderdale in 1972, the bnths no long(•r fascinated meas much. It wns easy to meet people in the bars nnd th1• baths were starting to hore m1•. Hut I still went ocrnsionally. Somtim1•s I hnd a good time; other times I didn't. You know thl' story. Anvway hPr<• I nm in Texas now. Dur­ing the pn~t C'ouplt• of yt>ars, I've ventured over to thl' hath~ t•v!'ry once ma whilt'. A stl'ltdv n1stom1·r, I haven't heen. Hut th1• Umt•s. I went, I usually 1•njoyed my1wlf \\"h('ll tht• hnthi; storied l((•(tmg all th1• had pn·s.• around the countr~· hecaust• of AIDS e11rlin thts .war. 1-hh a lot of pc·opl1'~dropped thcm from my social ruli•ndar 'J'hl' tnp wasn't worth the alll'g1'<1 n k But lately, I've been doing some rethink­ing on the subject. I think the baths have gotten a bum rap. I'm not saying this because of any urge or need being resur­rected to frequent the baths regularly again. They are still only an occasional outlet for me. But I don't think the baths are anymore to blame for the number of AIDS cases than are the bars-or your own bedroom. From everything I've read about AIDS, there is still no known cause. The only advice we are being given is to limit the number of our sex partners, because the medical world believes that the disease is transmitted through intercourse-the the­ory being that the fewer number of con­tacts one has. the chances are fewer for being exposed to someone with AIDS. Of course, that makes sense-just as it always has in relation to various kinds of veneral diseases. So are the baths to blame for spreading AIDS? Certainly not; neither are the bars to blame. The baths are an easy target, however, because of their openness regarding sexual activity. Obviously, there is less game playing there than in the bars. And-if one should be so inclined­there are multiple opportunities for sev­eral sexual contacts. But the bars also provide opportunities for several sexual contacts. What is the difference between having sex with three different guys in the baths one night or bringing home three different guys from the ban; three nights in a row? The score is the same. Your chances of meeting someone with AIDS io three times as great. My point is that we have to become responsible for our acllons and conduct. If sexual moderation is the name of the game today, we have to accept the respon · siblity that goes ... ~th it. Those are the rules. We either decide to play by them, or not. If we don't, then we have to be pre· pared to accept-and be responsible for­whatever may result. A trip to the baths today still is-and should be-an enjoyable option for a lot of gay men. But responsibility for our health and our partners' health goes with it. The baths can still be a sexual play ground with fewer or a limited number of activities and playmates. For now. the sexual excessiveness of the 1960s and 1970s is not wise. Let's not blame the baths or the bars if we choose not to curtail ourselves. Let'' put the blame-rather, the responsbilit~ - where it belongs On ourselves. Alexandra Haas appearing thru March 25!! GO TEXAN Saturday, Feb. 18 "The Black stallion" -Guadalix-in our parking lot 4-8pm Monday Nights Sing-a-Long with Linda Hefner - .•.•.•. ...... .•...•._~ ,•.•.•. ~ii r ""~ ~•r --..,~ 41~ .. ., •• r ,.r- --~1 1•1 1•r t 1•• ••ti.. 1 ,.. , I 11• '1=1· 1•• I ••• -;•r L "'•••ll ~!.•* .. ii ••• I I •~ • , ...... . Ill :a. -, •••• ~ ~ -•l,.~11 1 1 •,•.•. 1,•.•. . ~••••• 1•1 ••I J 1 • , ••• ~ J , •• I 1•• ,~ .. ~~=· __l~l- •!~~ -~~!~'--~ ~-~~~- _lllJ~IL~~'•,_ ~•· 2702 Kirby- 524-6272 Dinner Mon·Thurs 7 11 Fr 1 & Sat 7·12 r(><.Prvat1ons reque~ted Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 Happy Hour Mon-Sat 4-8pm ·.· .·:·:·:·:·:·:·:·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·. .·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·..·. .. .. . . ....... ... .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..· ..·. .·. .· ..· ..· .·.. ·.. .·. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·.. ·. .·. . 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEB. 17, 1984 Montrose Live 'The Boys in the Band' Another Hit for Diversity Theatre By Billie Duncan Diversity Theatre Group has done it again! Their second show, The Boys in the Band, is going to be as big a hit as their first. Mart Crowley'N big "gay" play waR given what was ·ailed a "new approach" by director Joe Watts, but the script did not seem to be much tampered with Instead, there were some different choi ces in how some of the characters were played. That's not so new. Actors do it all the time. What director Joe Watts did was cast the perfect people to carry out his VlSlon. In the play, a group of gay men ha• assembled to celebrate the birthday of one Bruce Herlmg as Emory m "The &ys m the Band" of them, Harold. The host of the party i~ Michael, who is working on staying on the wagon. However, when his non-gay college chum Alan calls needing to speak to him immediately, Michael winds up falling off the wagon with a vengeance. The play speaks not only of the prob­lems and lonelinesi; of being gay, but also of the love between gay friend,; and the network of support that they build despite the tiffs, the drugs, the alcohol and the various guilt trips. This feeling of support was clearer in Watts' production than in the productions I had seen of the play many years ago. Incredibly, with the strong individual members of the cast, capable each one of scene-stealing, the feeling of community and ensemble work on the tiny Pink Ele­phant stage was superb. Of course, the character of Emory is written to steal a scene or two, and Bruce Herling does it nicely, -..rithout ever losing sight of the fact that he is in a play with other characters and other act.ors. Actually, Bruce is achingly funny as he prances and snips his way through the dishy parts and completely touching when the sad little secret of his first love is brought out. Each actor has his moment. And each is up to it. At the top of the laurels list, though, is Calvin Mitchell as Bernard. When he finally letB loose, it ii; oneofthao<e magic momenta in theatre that fit in the unfor1retable file. Next, there is Tye Randall Jobe as Harold. He plays the part a~ a combina­tion of molasses and Randpaper, with a voice and manner that are howlingl_y undereiated. Malissa Fenley "'ACK Mf''CHElL PHOTO A scme from "Olwer." now playing at t~e Tower Theatre Kenny Joe Spivey as Larry pulls off one honesty. Jack Presley as Donald, of the better "new" feelings. His character Michael's friend, and Rod Williams as the is usually played as a cold person, the guy non·gay who enters Michael's world are who ha~ a lover, but likes to screw around both good, if lacking some of the depth of and doesn't care who he hurts. the other actors. In Spivey'• beautifully crafted charac- As far as Joe Watts is concerned in the terization, Larry is not a hateful person, role of Michael. he is a very good director but a loving man who can'tseem to fit into of the other act.ori;, but he needed someo~e a monogamous role, even though he loves to look in on his own performance. He 18 the man with whgm he live ... Hank. not bad, but he hammers the part a bit Hank is {>Ortrayed l;)y Ian J'anna .,."Ith much and plnys at Mich_a_ e_,l ratdh edr t~an ~cellent ri:straint e.nd a perfoct iiense of playing the charactt'r's n.,._-us an e..1res. However the entire show is held together with tons of love and talent and should not be missed. It will play at the Pink Elephant on Mondays and Tuesdays through March 6. with a final performance on Friday, March 9. o Duncan's Quick Notes To do JUNtlce to Olwer! a company needs to have a completely adorable little boy who can sing exceptionaly well, a multi· talented back-up cast and s group of superb character actors who can really The creators of "M<HJn/ake Casino" sit 011 the set sell a 1;ong. The current touring company from Cin· cinnati that is performing at the Tower does not quite mensure up. It's not the fault oflittle Zachary Stier, who is totally captivating in the title role. Stier haR the face and voice of an angel and can be best described by that over­worked adjective "adorable." But he is, he is. In fact, he is so delightful in the role that he is worth sitting through the rest of the cast wandering about the stage, mugging and sweating. A great deal of the trouble with the pro· duction is the direction, which pits the characters againRt the audience like a bunch of rabid cartoonR. The only person escaping the pit of over· worked musicnl-comedy "style" (besides the children, of course) is Elizabeth Van Den Berg a11 Nancy. For some reason. ~he has not forgotten that her character 1s a pPrson first of all. F.ven she, however, looks gauky in some s«eneR where she has totally unbelievable blocking with which to contend. If vou have children, go ahead and sl'C it. Ho_.; many live stage productions can you take the kids to nowadays, anyhow? Actually, if you can afford it. go ahead and see it. The more things we support at the Tower, the longl'r it will be around in our very own neighborhood. Don't forg1•t, they ju Rt brought us Agne' of God last week. Oh, by the way, Maryann Plunkett, who so beautifully played the part of Agnes gave the VOICE un exclusive interview which will run probably m·xt we1•k. In it, she talks about tht> problt>mR of the remote-controll1>d blood gushing device that was hidd1·n in her costume. It's quite intt>resting. And talking about gushing, the High School of the P erforming a nd Visual Arts was full of gush last Monday when the group Duran Duran paid a visit to the school. Eight of the students had col­lected over 36,000 aluminum cans to win a contest, the prize of which was a visit by the group. My kids asked me for cane, also, but all I had was beer cans, no Coke. It just goes to show what a bad pffect drinking beer can have on vour childr!'n. Tonight at HSPVA, tht> snazzy musical Guys and Doll.~ will open for a three-day run These young people are super tal· ented. You'd better go see what they are doing, right here m the ht>art of Montrose. For res1•rvationR, call n22-7811. If you want to b<• in a play, go and tryout Maryann Plunkett in a Tou·er Theater dressing room for the Diversity Theatre Group's las· te~t effort, Lovers, which will have audi· tions on Sat. and Sun. Feb. 18 and 19 from 3 to 6 p. m. They didn't give me the location, but if you call the Pink Elephant, I'm sure they will find out where it will be. Come to think of it, the auditions just might be at the Pink Elephant. One never knows. Around the corner and down the street from the PE is the Exile, which had its big Miss Sweetheart Contest on Tuesday. The $200 first prize went to Tommie Ross, the second prize of$100 was won by Ramona Sims and Tina Renee walked away with $50 in third prize money. Owner Doug Bone said, "I never saw so many pretty girls. Each one was good. I would have hated to be a judge." Well, it's a dirty job, but someone has to do it. Con· gratulations to the winners and to all the contestants who did such a fine job. And if you haven't made it downtown to Stages to see Moonlake Casirw and Sud· denly Last Summer, better get a move on. It closes on the Feb. 26. But before you do anything, start get· ting out the silks, satins and sequins. SumArts is sponsoring the largest con· temporary arts festival in the world start· ing on Feb. 24. And on that very day will be the Sumfest Beaux Arts Ball with music by Buckwheat Zydeco and Dr. Rockit and the Sisters of Mercy. That would be reason enough to go, but there's more! They are giving away a prize for the most outrageous costume. The prize is $1,000. How are those cookies? Lanny Steele of SumArts said that it is the perfect occasion for the creative and colorful minds of the gay community to come up with something great. I agree. Go get 'em! Actually, the entire festival should be exceptional. It will run through April 4, and every week, we'll let you know what is happening. One great person who is com· ing to town for this series of events is Molissa Fenley, who is an international dance star. She was just recently featured in Vogue , and in People (how's that for covering the bases?), as well as being on the cover of Dance. For further info, call 526-8309. And for goodness' sake, let's win that $1,000! HAPPY HOUR: 5 - 7 P.M. TUES. - FRI. HOURS: 5 PM - 2 AM TUES.-FRI. 6 PM - 2 AM SAT. 2 PM - 2 AM SUN. CLOSED MON. FEB. 17, 1984 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 MARILYN MAYE IS "Glorious" Hollywood Reporter "Infectious" Chicago Argus Leader "SJHlr!~l!!ln "A National Treasure" Jerry Hermon's high-kicking score and the spectacular sets and costumes from the latest Broadway production will dazzle you os you visit America's dar­ling, Auntie Mame. Best Seats Prevl-- Wed Feb 22. Performances Thu-Sot eve· nings ot 8pm, Sundays ot 2pm. Special Family Discount Perform· once Sun Mor 4 at 7:30pm. Houston Chronicle Tickets $6-$25 available at TUTS' Galleria-area Box Office 4235 Son Felipe ot Mid Lone (inside Loop 610), 10-6, M·F. Free Pork· ing ovoiloble. Tickets also ot Ticketron, Joske's, Ticket Moster ond the Downtown Ticket Center in 1100 Milam. Charge By Phone 622-TUTS In the Musk Hall • February 22-March 4 TIBATRE UNDER TIE Sf ARS • • 16 MONTROSE VOICE I FEB. 17, 1984 Films Albert Frnncy (center/ and Tom Courtenay (right; prepare for a scene u·hile producrr d1rertor Peter Yates looh on during thr shooting of " The Dres.,er," u•hich rentrrs on a traditional English touring sta;:e company during the 1940., Finney Impeccable in 'Dresser' By Steve Warren As the radio reports the progres,; of World War II nnd Tom Courtenay takes his first mincing step,., we wonder whether The Dresser is "to be or not to be." echoing Mel Brook. ' recent veroion of that Ernst Lubitsch comedy, another story of"Mary :-.i'oble. Backstage Fag.'' Well, it is and it isn't. Courtrnay'R title character is more central to this story of a Recond·rate theatrical troupe making the show go on through wartime than James Haake's was to To Be •..• but his gayness is less important. The Dresser is the story of every su bordi­nate, be it secretary, sergeant or what have you, who was ever responsible for the success of hb "superior." Norman (Cour­tenay) serves Sir I Albert Finney) not only as dresser, but everything from adminis­trative assistant to wet nurse. He's had the job for 16 years and still gets neither respect nor reward, just the satisfaction of knowing he deo;erves the credit every time Sir gets through a performance. Despite its universal theme, The Dres.•er will have limited appeal outside of Anglo­philes with greaRepaint in their veins. Critics, masochistic by nature, are prais­ing it because it contains a scathing a n ti· critic remark. By that standard, gays should love it­there muot be a dozen digs at us. Sir puts down everything and everyone-from another actor'R Lear ("I was pleasantly disappointed") to the meager company that's been left him during the war· •• .. naught but old men, cripples and nancy·boys." Hecrocksaboutgaysto:-O'or· man are mode "'ith unthinking but unin· tentionol cruelty, like o housewife talking to her maid about blacks. Write at len~t some of it off to "the good old days." The war not only make, it difficult to get good help, but results in theatres being bombed and air raids threatening to inter· rupt performances. Sir has a strong survi· val instinct, despite his failing health and spirit, that takes over once Norman is able to get him on stage, and doesn't let up until the curtain i~ down and he's taken his bow• in the manner of the "Dying Swan" of Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo. The Dresser is an actors' picture and impeccable from that ~andpoint. Fin· ney's ham is the kind the Old Testament warned us against. He leavh no scenery unchewed; and submerged in costume and makeup that would allow most actors to coast, he proceeds to overv.helm them. Courtenay';; role is more subtle (World \\ ar II was more subtle!). Ht. ~tereotypical gay mannerisms irritated me, JX'rhaps because of their accuracy, to the point where I didn't enjoy watching him; but that's not to. ay he doesn't do an excellent job with the part as written (by Ronald Harwood from his play) and directed (by Peter Yate~). Although I was disappointed in The Dre.sser overall, I have to recommend it for Finney and dozens of delicious bits of dia· lo101e Danger Enhances Sex in 'Restless' By Ste ve Warren Tea room sex between a man and a woman? It happens in Reckless, yet another teenage drama of escape from Steeltown, U.S.A There's a lso boiler room sex-wh ich get.; pretty steamy-following swimming pool foreplay. I gue. s it was Freud or somebody who said that danger enhances sex. Now some­one's ~et that theory to music and made a movie of it. Daryl Hannah plays Tracey, high school senior and head cheerleader, who is tired of being "perfect. ... I've never had an abortion . I've never even had the men· sles." What she has is a boring middle class family, a boring quarterback boy· friend (Adam Baldwin) and a boring future. The excitement she seeks takes the form of Aidan Quinn, the latest selection from the New .Jamei< Dean of the Month Club. He's not quite handsome despite blue eyes; but he's sexy and, if he';; got more than this one role on him, he's going to be an important star. Quinn's character, ,Johnny Rourke, i;; described in the ;;chool record~ as "poten­tially dangerOUb nnd destructive." Like Tom Cruise m All the Ril{ht Mol'e.<, he geL' thrown off the football team; but while Cruitie was a good boy, the kindest thing you can call Johnny is me~sed up. A whirling camera-director James Foley's most creative touch-heightens the mating dance Johnny and Tracey do to Romeo Void's "Never Say Never" ("I might like you lwtter if we slept together"). Not knowing what he wants to do with his life, ,Johnny is offended when Tracey hesitates before chucking everything to share his uncertain future. I know the romantic solution would be to tell her to go for it, and it made me feel very old when I couldn't think of a single reason whv she should. · I don't like movies that mnke me feel old. JO HN SHOWN Exhibition OPENING Thursday February 23, 1984 Reception for the Artist 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Exhibition Dates February 23 to March 31 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday thru Saturday Open until 9:00 p.m. Saturday, February 25th Robinson Galleries 1:1\h II ~»lh ( t IW".\ l'alllllf't! & ~~un .. J\J•~-r10unl~\llf' 1•ft~ l'ni""'" Mutt.,*"' 121.111 KL"\....;c:JSSET Hot ~,·os i7m:1 (i1:11 :~Hr~1 Have a V.D. Problem? Worried about A.l.D.S.? OUR community has a great Sexually Transmitted Disease clinic which does STD screenings. and has an AIDS program at an affordable price Most of our services are reimbursable through your medical insurance plan. STD screening (including most med1c1ne) Tests of cure PA C.E (Program for AIDS Counseling & Evaluation) STD & PAC.E Screening together Hepatitis "B ' Prescreenong Hepatitis ··a· Vaccine and follow-up testing THE MONTROSE a.NC Clonoc Hours Monday 6-9 30pm, Tuesday 6-9 30pm Thursday 6-9 30pm Sunday 1·4 30pm 104 Westheimer at Bagby-528-5531 MJC and Visa Accepted M<!mber tho Texas Hosp11a1 Assoc, hon Member me Grea1er Montrose Busoness Gullcl $ 15.00 FREE $ 25.00 $ 30.00 $ 30.00 $15000 VISA Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat FEB. FEB. 17 18 Fl!B. FEB. FEB. FEB. FEB. 19 20 21 22 23 For add1l+onat information or phone numbe!'1 for events I led blttow look for the aponsonng organ1z1t1on unde r ·organ1Z1t1ons· tn the Montrose Classified Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Baytown Lambda meets 7:30pm Feb. 17 mFRIDA Y: Committee for Public Health Awareness's "Sharing Group for the Worried Well," 7·8pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett llSUNDA Y: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park llSUNDA Y: Choices meets 12:30pm Feb. 19 flSUNDA Y: Unitarian I Universalist Gay Caucus meets Feb. 19, 1st Unitarian Church, 1>210 Fannin •SUNDAY: Reception for staff of Montrose Clinic at Rascals, 2702 Kirby, 5·7pm flSUNDA Y: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold rlMONDA Y: Washington's birthday, Feb. 20 rlMONDA Y: AIDS victim support group meets 6:30pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 UIONDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain ANNOUNCEMENTS • BUSINESS OWNERS We hst free Heh week 1n 1h11 d1tectory Montroae community org1n111• ~:.~~,Sth':'~~~oS-e,...~'<Jica~ distnbutt0n iind1C.ielui:& 11111ng ,. , MONTROSE vOiCe d11tnt>u11on point ACCOMODATIONS iHouston Guett ..;;;:;-oi~s»" 1787 e EagSecreat lno-104 AvondM-Sl0-9787 COMMERCIAL SPACE for t1le or lease W"e"l"l· Nlabhshed, doing medium volume $6000 cash required Call 5~69 •nd leave message ---FRENCH OUAIUEll W­New Orleans. established. 3!>-years on busy street, excellent locat1on,. lucratwe. low down with some owner financing Contact Fanguy and Associates, (713) •39-1334 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES - A PT FOR RENT Three large rooms. hv1ng room, kitchen. bedroom and bath, new panehng. w•ter paid hell and aor Near 500 block Rich­mond, three blocks west of Main 52•· 9092 NICE 2 Bl!DROOM Garage apartment Carpet. new appllan· ces. 1100 sq tt convenient East Heights locatoon $375• ut1ht'es 862·4070 - SLEEPY HOLLOW APARTMENTS Tired ot those large. noisy. over-crowded comple•es where every apertment looks the same? Try our small. quiet, secluded adult apartment community with 65 ond1· vidually de51gned floor plans featuring fireplaces. wet bars. large garden patios. built·in chests. etc Other amenities include covered parking, laundry tac1h· ties. pool. 24-hOur securoty From $295 Current rental rebate special Call 7131520-8383 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED HELP WANTED TST Co 527-8251 •TUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 • THURSDAY: CHE forum on "Taxi Deregulation Ordinance," 8pm Feb. 23, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 Main •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Lesbian Gay Resource Service, Univ. of Houston, meets 2:30pm Feb. 28, Spindletop Room, Univ. Center, Umv. Park m/N 1 WEEK: Lutherans Concerned meets Feb. 28, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh mIN 1 WEEK: Integrity meets Feb. 28, Autry House, 6265 Main • IN 1 WEEK: Houston Area Gay & Lesbian Engineers & Scientists meet 7pm Feb. 28 TEXHOSTS WANTS YOU Earn additional income by becoming a representative tor TexHosts I will be interv1ew1ng m Houston soon. Wnte John. Box 815748. Dallas 75381 for details or call 214/484-4940 OFFICE POSITION WANTED By mature male, experienced in all office functions except accounting Please con­tact Mac Straub. 528-3140 -- ACTORS/STUDENTS_ __ Earn excellent money FulVpart-11me reprasenhng Alley Theatre Call Mr Wiide II 228-9341. FOR SALE, MISC. NEED N«W FUllNITURE? Sota loveseat, chair, beautiful earth­tonea. $195 Smok .. glass and chrome dinette, styl11h can1H1acked chairs, $295 Oueensiz.e mattreu tel. unused. 1n plaal. $150 Freme, $35 Fullsize mallrest tel, firm, new, $95 Coffee tabla and two end tables. $95. Beauhful lamps, $40 541 • 6616. VCR, VIDEOS, BICYCLES -­RCA VCR •nd 8 gay videos, $300 \would separate). Sears Bet•max. $180. 19 'color TV. $85 1 C>-speed bicycle. SSO S.speect, $35 Old·lash1oned $40 Other good""' 2711 Yupon. Weekends 2·7pm 7131526- 9112 FORECLOSED PROPERTIES SALE - Foreclosure and distress property oppor­lunit1es are at an all· tome high Learn how to buy thlS property at IO'!lo to 3°' below market value The U S government gives away $2 bilhon worth of real Mtate lo1ns every year Investors Dehght• Learn how to find and buy choice property 1n 1ny kind of market C1ll now for information 43~1334 GAY BARS HOUSTON-e Al'a-2212 Con ... erse- 522·7361 i' B1cc:hu1 ... $23 "LC);eu 523--3396 • Ba11·1- 402 LO\l'ett -527·9666 dintng _ i'eem- 110 P1c1hc-528--9'27 country _ • Bruos R1..,8r Bottom- 2400 Brazos- 528· 9192 country - i'enar Patch :n94 W Holcombe-- &&S-9678 • Catch-1- •~5 Mart'" luther King -. 641-25'21 disco Chicken Coop ... 535 Westtie1mer- ~26-2240 • Copa 2631 Richm
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