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Houston Voice, No. 1097, November 2, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1097, November 2, 2001 - File 001. 2001-11-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7535/show/7506.

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(2001-11-02). Houston Voice, No. 1097, November 2, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7535/show/7506

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1097, November 2, 2001 - File 001, 2001-11-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7535/show/7506.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1097, November 2, 2001
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date November 2, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript I ce Being young and gay Gay teens speak out in new publications about and for GLBT youth. Page 15 ISSUE 1097 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. NOVEMBER 2, 2001 INSIDI A Congressional committee has approved an amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms designed to keep school districts from banning Boy Scout meetings. Page 9 Houstonian Patti A. Aldredge's lesbian-themed 'Fly Away' hits the stage at Unhinged Theatre next week. Page 20 Lanier: Vote 'no' on City Prop. 2 Former Houston mayor speaks out as 'No on City Prop. 2' campaign seeks more volunteers for effort by PENNY WEAVER HOUSTON - Less than a week before Election Day, one of Houston's most respected political figures has voiced his opposition to the anti-gay City Prop. 2 that voters will consider Tuesday. In an exclusive interview with the Houston Voice, former Mayor Bob Lanier said he supports efforts to defeat the amendment, which would prevent the city from offering health insurance and other benefits to domestic partners of city employees. As worded on the Nov. 6 ballot, a vote "against" the measure reflects a stance in favor of domestic partner benefits, while a vote "for" the amendment would deny such benefits to ~me-~ex partners. "I oppose it. I'm not for a constitutional amendment that would prohibit the city from considering [DP benefits]," Laruer said Wednesday. "I think the city's coming a Jong way in capitalizing on and respecting its diverSJty. Increasingly, it's a city that respects the individual." Lanier - a well-known local political figure for more than a decade - said Houstonians have changed since 1985, when voters overwhelmingly rejected a measure that would have banned discrimi­nation against gays. He called City Prop. 2 - proposed and backed by conservative Dave Wilson and his Houstonians For Family Values - "divi­sive." "I think it's wrong particularly at this time with the trouble going on with differ­ent ethnic groups," Lanier said. "This is a better city than that. NI think it's divisive," he added. "It > Continued on Page 8 Fonner Houston Mayor Bob laaier this week said he supports efforts to defeat the anti-gay Gty Proposition 2 that faces city voters on Tuesday's baDot. Anti-gay measure dominates pre-election furor Mort than 100 religious leaders joined Clergy for a Fair Houston last Sunday to denounce the anti-gay Gty Prop. 2. That measure has overshadowed almost aD other issues for gays on Election Day, in<luding Houston Gty Council races. Council races secondary for gays concerned about proposal that would prevent city from giving DP benefits by PEN!\'Y WEAVER HOUSTON - Opposition to the anti-gay amendment facing city voters Tuesday has held the spotlight for gays in local politics over other items on the ballot, including Houston City Council slots. But when voters go to the polls on Election Day, they will face a full slate of Council races and a list of both state and city proposals. The top issue on the list for gay city residents for Nov. 6 is City Prop. 2, backed by the conserva­tive Houstonians For Family Values. If approved, the measure would deny health insurance and other benefits for domestic partners of city employees. > Continued on Page 7 2 INSIDE EWS Redistricting goes to court .••.........• 2 Houston Blackrie Dinner set • • ••...•.. 2 Local news briefs • . . . . • • • • • ........ 4 Helms' anti-gay measure passes ••••••••• 9 OICES & ECHOES Dahir. Arabs endure undue flak •••.•.• .l 0 Letter. Too kind to Chronide? ......... .11 Letter: Unimpressed wilh Empower ..... .11 Quote/Unquote ................... 12 New pubUcations allow gay youth to speak out See Out on the Bayou, page IS. OUT ON THE BAYOU GLBT teens make their voices heard .••.• I S Eating Out at Freebirds World Bumto ••• .17 Homefroot • • . . . . . . • . • • • • • • . • • . .19 Out on the Aisle ••••••••.••••••••• 10 Community Colendar ••••••.••••••••• 22 My Stars! . • . • • • • • . • • . ........ 27 Issue 1097 All materta In Houston Voice is protected by feclera copyrlght law and may not be repro­duced wllh0u1 Ille wrl!!en corisent of Houston VOIC8 The sexual onentatlon of adVertisers photographers wrlters and cartooniSIS pl.& lished heretn is nei!!let Inferred Of lfl1llied The appearance ol 1'13mes or pictorial represe~ta· boo does not necessarily lndieafe the sexua onenta!lon ol that person or persons Houston VolCe acceptS unsofodte<I ed tooa material but cannot take responstbU ty for ts retum. The 8d tor reserves l!1e right to accept, reject or eda any submisston All rights riNert m aut!lors upon pubhcauon. Guide&nes lot freelance contributors are ava !able upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd .. Suite 200 Hous1on, TX noo6 713·529-8490 www houstonvoice com NEWS NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE State redistricting battle in court Gay-friendly local Democrat concerned about largely black district that includes many gays by PENNY WEAVER AUSTL\1-Gay-friendly U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee of Houston testified this week in federal court as the state redistricting struggle reached a new level. The area which Lee represents includes a number of gay voters as reported in Census 2000 through the amount of same-sex couples reporting as heads of household. On Monday, Lee testified that she wants to keep her congressional district and its large black voting age population largely intact. "I am here, frankly, to preserve the 18th congres­sional district because I'm troubled that it may be in as a result of the 1970 census and that Barbara Jordan was the first to run for the seat. It is a district where inner-city struggles against poverty and HIV infection persist, said Lee, who participated m the recent Empower 2001, spon· sored by the Greater Houston LGBT Chamber of Commerce. Other gay-friendly state politicians also have struggled in the redistricting process. The Republican-controlled Texas Legislative Redistricting Board in July adopted boundaries for Texas House and Senate districts designed to secure substantial Republican majorities in both chambers. doubt,'' she said. Gay-friendly U.S. Rep. Sheila :'vfinority representation is at the heart of the trial Jackson lee of Houston was in before three federal judges, who must ensure that federal court this week to The boundaries are to become effective for the elections in 2002. But lawmakers are still wrangling over the state-level district maps as well. the federal Voting Rights Act and its protection of defend her congressional mlnority dL~tricts is followed. clistrid, which indudes a The proposed new lines leave many gay-friend· ly legislators homeless. Democrats Debra Danburg and Scott Hochberg now reside in the same district as conservative Republtcan Kyle Janek. The new dis· trict is supposedly more than 60 percent Republican. Some parties to the lawsuit, including the number of local gay residents. Coalition of Black Democrats, want a third Texas dis· trict where black voters could elect their candidate of choice. It would be in Houston. Texas' population has increased to 20.8 million, and the state 1s gaining two congressional seats as a result of the 2000 census. By the new lines, Glenn Maxey of Austin, the state's only open­ly gay legislator, would be "paired" with two of his liberal col­leagues, Elliot Naishtat and Ann Kitchen. Republicans and Democrats are fighting for control of the state's congressional delegation. It is now held by Democrats, 17-13. "They split the gay community up to silence its voice," Danburg has said of the proposed new district lines. In describing District 18 - which includes Houston and the local heavily gay Montrose neighborhood - Lee said it was drawn Tile Associated Press contributed to this story Fund-raiser key for gay organizations Smaller crowd expected for annual Houston Black Tie Dinner, set for Nov. 17 byKAYDAYUS HOUSTON - "And the Beat Goes On" is the theme for this year's eighth annual Houston Black Tie Dinner, one of the biggest and most elegant local fund-raisers for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Houstonians. The gala will be Nov. 17 at the George R. Brown Convention Center, but with far fewer people expected at this year's event, the beat is not going on quite as usual. uwe're expecting around 900 to 1,000 people this year,'' said Gail Swinney, presi­dent of Houston Black Tie Board. That's considerably less than last year's 1,300 and a change overall since the num­bers have risen each year since the dinner 's inception. Last year, the event doled out more than $130,000 to local and national LGBT organi· zations, but that figu re will likely be less this year Swinney and Sandy Clough, co­chair of the dinner, said the lower numbers can be blamed the aftereffects of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on New York and Washington and the ensuing economic tumdown. uPeople have been laid off; they've lost their jobs. And a lot of activities in the city have been canceled,'' Swinney said. "We're doing well considering the economy." Still, a fu ll program is planned Actor, Actor Alec Mapa is slated to be the keynote speaker at the annual Houston Black fie DiMer on Nov. 17. writer and activist Alec Mapa is the keynote speaker. Mapa most recently appeared in the CBS comedy "Some of My Best Friends." His other television credits include "Friends," "Seinfeld," "Melrose Place" and "Murder One." The Houston Gay Men's Chorus will open the program with "a tribute to our nation." Local news weathennan Chuck George will emcee for the second year, and the Ricky Diaz Orchestra will provide music. A silent auction also will be held. Swinney said the "Beat Goes On" theme relates to the gay community and its trials "We've been through the AIDS crisis and other things and we keep on going. It's like saying, 'we will survive,"' she said. Local beneficiaries include An Uncommon Legacy, AssistHers, Bering· Omega Community Services, Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals, Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center, Lesbian Health Initiative, Montrose Clinic, People With AIDS Coalition, PFLAG· Houston, Center for AIDS and Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. The National Gay and Lesbian Task Force is the sole national beneficiary. Houston Black Tie Dinner, Inc. is a non· profit volunteer organization whose mis· sion is to fight AIDS and prejudice and dis· crimination, while serving as a strong advo­cate for men's and women's health care. The dinner has raised and distributed more than $1.2 million since 1993. Houston Black Tie Dinner 7 p.m. Nov. 17 George R. Brown Convention Center 713-523-9611 www.houstonblacktiedinner.org HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 3 4 Open Bar Silent auction 6:30 pm Seated Dinner and Dancing at 8:00 pm Valet parking available. Sr\1\URDr\Y NOV~MB~R 17, 2001 HOUSTON <i/\Y MEN'S CHORUS SH8RON MONTGOMERY MCfE CHUCK <ifOR<if TO ORDt;R TICKt;TS Cl\ 71J.S2J.96ll NEWS NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Public invited to Montrose Cinic's anniversary celebration HOUSTON - Montrose Clinic marks its 20th anniversary with an open house and award ceremony Nov. 8. The facility provides health care services including HIV I AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases testing and now is a full-service clinic offering primary and specialized HIV health care The public is invited to tour the facility and learn more about the programs offered. Refreshments will be serviced. Special awards will be presented to two individuals and one organization that have served the clinic and its patients for many years. Wayne Bockmon, M.D., will receive the Montrose Clinic Lifetime Professional Service Award. He has long been affiliated with the clinic and 1s a founder of the Body Positive Wellness Program. Sylvia Suhrland will receive the clinic's Lifetime Volunteer Service Award She worked at the facility for more than a decade, volunteering to process labs and as an HIV counselor. The Lifetime Community Service Award will be given to the Colt 45's, a groups that has raised money for the chmc smce its mception Montrose Chmc serves 14,000 men, women and teens each year In addition to free HIV tests and counseling, the facility offers testing and vac­cines for hepatitis, education and outreach. 20th anniversary open house 5:30-7 p.m. Nov. 8 Montrose Clinic 215 Westheimer 713-830-3000 www.montroseclinic.org Annual event raises more than $20,000 HOUSTON - Leaders of The Grey Party Inc. have announced that this year's event, held m October at South Beach, raised in excess of $20,000 for three local chanties. Monies raised will be distributed among Houston's Bering/Omega Dental Clinic, Parents & Fnends of Lesbians & Gays (PFLAG) and Houston Buyers Oub, according to Grey Party President Chuck Spinks. This fall's event was the 19th annual fund·ralS{'r Humane society hosts tournament to benefit homeless animals HOUSTON - The 13th annual Par "FORE" Pets Golf Tournament will be held Nov. 5 at Sugar Creek Country Club in Sugar Land, Texas. The event is sponsored by the Houston Humane Society, a non-profit animal shelter dedicated to eliminating cruelty, abuse and overpopulation of animals. Houston's popular Grey Party this year raised more than $20,000 to assist local charities. Proceeds from the tourney support HHS programs including cat and dog adoptions, a Houston Humane Society Par "FORE" Pets Golf Tournament c .s "~' 0 .c -ca :s e "' spay/neuter clin­ic, low-cost vacci­nations and humane education. Registration begins at 9 a.m. on the day of the event, which wraps up at 4 p.m. with awards, a silent auction and dinner. Sugar Creek Country Club 420 Sugar Creek Blvd. Sugar land, TX 77478 For more information: 713-433-6421 Reading cultivates diversity among local artists HOUSTO - Voices Breaking Boundaries {VBB), a collective forum for artists from diverse perspectives, backgrounds and countries, continues its sea­son with a literary reading and open mike at Nov. 11 at DiverseWorks down­town. The series has become well known around Houston for searching out ver· satile, local musicians who are usually re-invited based on heavy audience demand. As customary, the music will be followed by young writers. The spoken part of the evening will be fol­lowed by featured writers Jane Creighton and Cedric Ary. An open mike session also will be part of the evening. The VBB monthly readings routinely draw more than 80 audience members, according to organizers. - Penny Weaver Voices Breaking Boundaries Reading and open mike session 7 p.m. Nov. 11 DiverseWorks 1117 East Freeway 713.335.3445 www.diverseworks.org HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 5 6 Mayor Lee Brown Has Done His Part • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE • • • • • Now It's Our Turn On November 6, we have to make a choice between a good friend who has delivered 14 years of leadership for our community, and a good friend who has chosen to run against him. The choice is clear. Lee Brown has earned your vote. Re-Elect Mayor Lee Brown Paid for by Gay or Lesbian Dollars PAC. Kathy Hubbard, Treasurer. HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 NEWS 7 Parker faces pair of opponents Tuesday :> Continued from Page 1 As on the ballot, the question reads: "Shall the charter of the city of Houston be amended to deny health care benefits to same sex domestic partners of city employ­ees and to address other matters of employ­ment and contracting practices based on sexual orientation?" That means that a vote "against" City Prop. 2 favors same-sex domestic partner benefits, which the city does not currently offer but which officials have discussed. Mayoral candidates include incumbent Mayor Lee Brown and City Council mem­bers Chris Bell and Orlando Sanchez. Both Brown and Bell have expressed opposition lo City Prop. 2, and both supported the city's anti-discrimination measure approved in July. Sanchez, on the other hand, supports City Prop 2 and voted against the anti-bias ordinance. But a maior attention-getter on the ballot for gays 1s the City Council race for At­Large Position 1, a post now held by Annise Parker, the Council's only openly gay mem­ber. lier opponents are James B. Neal and Sylvia Ayres. In a questionnaire distributed to candi­dates by the Houston Voice, Parker reilt•rat­ed her opposition to City Prop. 2 and noted that she co-sponsored - along with Mayor Brown - the city's non-discrimination ordinance. "I urge all Houstonians to vote against City Prop. 2," Parker said. "It would legal­ize discrimination in our City Charter by singling out the families of gay and lesbian city employees for discrimination. "Gay and lesbian city employees deserve access to health insurance for their families just like every other city employ­ee," she added. Neal could not be reached by the Voice for comment, but he is on record as rating same-sex benefits as his "top priority" on City Council. He is against the city offering such benefits, he stated in the Voters Guide published by the League of Women Voters­llouston. "Being a city employee, I feel city employees [all] were left out of the mix," Councilwoman AMise Parker, the only openly gay member of the Houston Gty Counci~ faces two opponents on Election Day: James I. Neal and Sylvia Ayres. Neal said. "One group issue for insurance benefits for the same-sex partner was unfair. Position 1 at large should represent all taxpayers and all city employees." Ayers could not be reached for com­ment She apparently supports City Prop. 2, however, as her name is on petitions requesting that the proposal be put before voters, according lo document submitted lo the city secretary. Other City Council races All City Council seats are contested except for that of incumbent Gabriel Vasquez, who represents District H. That district includes 1,000 or more same-sex couples who reported in Census 2000. Along with District A and District D, that area is home to the highest concentra­tion of gay voters in the city, as shown in the Census. Although unopposed, Vasquez returned a Houston Voice questionnaire and expressed opposition lo City Prop. 2. He voted in favor of the non-discrimination ordinance and said he also supports domes­tic partner benefits for city employees. "I support the [GLBT] community with my votes," Vasquez said. "I have hired a qualified gay man and have supported the appointment of gays and lesbians to city boards and commissions." In District A, incumbent Bruce Tatro is opposed by Toni Bracher Lawrence for that Council seat. In District D, which includes much of the heavily gay Montrose neighborhood, six candidates are on the ballot: Ada Edwards. Chris Oliver, Gerald Womack, Darryl Carter, Homer L. Clark and Ronald McKinney. Edwards has been endorsed by the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus. She returned a Houston Voice questionnaire and voiced support for the city's nondis­crimination ordinance and opposition to City Prop. 2. She also said she would sup­port domestic partner benefits for city employees. "I have long relationships with the gay and lesbian community, and a history of working together on issues that are com­mon to us," Edwards said. "I have a record that will back up my commitment to make the gay and lesbian community a working partner in governing District D." Despite repeated attempts, the other candidates for District D could not be reached by press time. Other candidates for office on Houston's Nov. 6 ballot include openly gay Mike Rogers, in competition for District E. His opponents are Bernard Manstany, Bill Jones, Darryl E. Smith, Jan Lang Kish, Addie Wiseman and Carlos Simonson Oreliana In response lo a Houston Voice question­naire, Rogers said his support for the city's non-discrimination ordinance is ongoing. "I vehemently object to both the bigotry evident in City Proposal 2 and the rhetoric spewed on its behalf; moreover, I call for the defeat of this measure based upon the com-mon- sense approach needed in city govern­ment," he said. Galvan said, "I support domestic part­ner benefits for City of Houston employees Another race notable for gay voters is for because I believe in equal rights." At Large Position 5, in which incumbent Carroll Robinson faces openly gay candi­date James Galvan. In previous campaigns, Galvan has said he is gay. Robinson pointed to "my record of fair­ness and inclusion" on the Council as set­ting him apart from his opponent. "My willingness to reach out to and involve the gay and lesbian community" also sets him apart, Robinson said. Both candidates returned Houston Voice questionnaires. Both expressed support for the city's anti-discrimination ordinance and opposition to City Prop. 2. Each also sup­ports domestic partner benefits. Galvan said his opponent "sells his votes and is constantly absent from Houston City Council public meetings on Tuesdays while I have an extremely good attendance rt>cord having missed only two meetings thi5 year." "I support a plan that would allow all city employees to cover another person regardless of sexual orientation," Robinson said. WEP OLRSELVES ON OUR SUCCESSES TPRIDE INSTITUTE 8 00- 54 -P R IDE www.pride-institute.com even the ones you never hear about. Pride lmt1tute IS the best place for gay men and lesbians to get help dealing with chemical dependency. depres s1on, anxiety or other behavioral health issues That's because many lesbians and gay mer don"t succeed in traditional straight-run treatment programs (How can you recover 1f you can't be yourselP) But most patients do succeed at Pnde Many of our graduates are eager to share the sec•et of their success. In fact, about a third of our new patients are referred to us by Pnde alumni. V1s1t www pride-1nst1tute com and find out why Pnde 1s the place to deal with chem1Cal dependency. sexual add1Ct1on or other mental health issues 1f you are gay. lesbian. bisexual or transgender Choose to recover where you can be yourself OUR choice for City Council: Houston Gay & lesbian Political Caucus • Monica Lamb • Grant Martin • Sue Lovell • John Kelle! • John Michael Gonzalez • Bill Galbraith • Bill Agosto • Alex Morua • Iris Sizemore ADA EDWARDS Houston Citv Council District D 713-528-8037 I www.adaedwards.com P.O. Box 667307, Houston. TX n266-7307 8 NEWS NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Lanier: Houston has changed since '85 anti-gay vote > Continued from Page 1 amounts to expression of charter disap­proval of one group of our citizens. I don't really see that 1t accomplishing anything" Lanier has given ht5 support to gay ovil nghts act1v1Sts in defeating City Prop. 2 both with a $2.500 personal donation and in talking with members of No on City Prop 2, the ~roup fighting the measure "I \ e met with them on a couple of occa­sions " Larner said He hopes the amendment 1s defeated at the polls Tuesday "I thmk it's going to be a dose election, but my guess would be 1t would be turned down," Lamer said "In general, the oty [should reflect) respect for everybody and try and have everybody have equal oppor­tunities and respect d1vers1ty. "I thmk all those attitudes have improved substantially in the last 20 years and I really would hope I've been able to make some contribution to that," he added Lamer has en1oyed continued popularity in the city since his first electton as mayor in 1991, according to Dr. Richard Murray, political science professor at the University of Houston. He remains an important figure in oty politics, noted Murray, co-author of "Texas Politics: An Introduction" and "Glance and Governance m Houston." Alex Morua, t1e<t1tive director of Progressive Voters in Adion, said more volunteers are needed to help defeat the anti-gay City Prop. 2. Wilson - who ran unsuccessfully for mayor against Lanier in 1995 - previously told the Vmce that he would not expect Lamer to oppose City Prop. 2. "I thought he was more pro-family than pro-homosexual," Wilson said. This week, Wilson called Lanier's com­ments on the ballot amendment "totally irrelevant." "I don't think Bob Lanier's endorsement is going to amount to changing the mind of one voter in Houston," Wilson said. But opponents of the amendment wel­come Lanier's support. "He ha~ a high level of respect in the oty. I think people listen when he has to say something,'' said Alex Morua, executive director of Progressive Voters m Action, one of the groups working to defeat the propo­sition. Leaders and volunteers with Progressive Voters in Action and People for a Fair Houston - who Jointly have formed the group "No on City Prop. 2" - are working through Election Day to defeat the HFFV amendment. Morua said this week that hundreds of volunteers continue to power the group's phone banks to reach thousands of city vot­ers - and more volunteers are needed. "We do feel good. The voters that we've been talking to have by and large been sup­portive of defeating this measure," Morua said. "The word's out there in the commu­nity. "I think we've got a good shot at defeat­ing this," he added Morua noted that assistance still is need· ed on Election Day and volunteers are we!- come to sign up to work that day. He said he is encouraged by the amount of response the campaign has seen. "It is historic for our community to orga­nize at this level,'' Morua said. People for a Fair Houston P.O. Box 667307 Houston, TX 77266-7307 713-523-1762 www.fa1rhouston.org Progressive Voters in Action 2700 Albany, Suite 205 Houston, TX 77006 www.votePVA.org Houstonians for Family Values 506 Melbourne Houston, TX 77022 713-699·3399 www.hffv.com 713-521-7161 W. AUllST 111cn••. kla111erafnll~•k9la~~ W&dlllt•klimt_.•*r~~ .. WlllST ai,'"' 12. ~ HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 NEWS 9 Helms' Boy Scout measure passed by panel Compromise language added as gay activists express disappointment with 'a ll ies' who supported measure An amendment by Sen. Jesse Helms designed to keep school districts from banning Boy Scout meetings was recrafted and passed by a Congressional conference committee on Tuesday. Helms said many schools had sought to penalize the Boy Scouts over the group's anti-gay pa&cies. by LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON - A House-Senate confer­ence committee on Tuesday approved a compro­mise version of an amendment to an education bill introduced by Sen. Jesse Helms (R-N.C.) ear­lier this year that would withhold millions of dollars in federal education funds from public schools that deny "equal access" to meeting space for the Boy Scouts. "The language agreed to by the conference committee has no place in the education bill.'' said Winnie Stachclberg, political director of the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay political group. "We're disappointed that a number of our allies voted for it." I !elms argued that schools throughout the country were seeking to penalize the Boy Scouts over the Boy Scouts' anti-gay admission poli­cies. He said the federal government should step in to "discourage" schools and school districts from taking such action. The House and Senate each passed the Helms amendment in the spring. Sens. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Joseph Lieberman (D-Conn.) were among the members of the conference committee that backed the compromise. "It's not okay," said U.S. Rep. Barney Frank Mayor: Lee Brown Houston City Council: At-Large 1: Annise Parker At-Large 2: Gordon Quan At-Large 3: Marc Whitehead At-Large 4: Claudia Williamson District B: Carol Galloway District D (Includes Montrose): Ada Edwards District H: Gabriel Vasquez District I: Carol Alvarado HISD Board: Ted Weisgal FOR ALL City Bonds City Propositions (Charter Amendments): FOR Charter Amendment -- Proposition 1 Support Light Rail - Keep Houston Moving AGAINST Charter Amendment - Proposition 2 Say NO to d1scriminat1on against domestJc partners of city employees Vote AGAINST this anbiJay charter amendment AGAINST Charter Amendment - Proposition 3 Say NO to cutting jobs and wasting taxpayers money (D-Mass.), who is gay. "I would have preferred not to have it at all. But it's much better than the Helms amendment." An official with Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, a gay litigation group, and the head of the D.C. office of the ACLU's gay civil rights project, said the compromise could be harmful to gays because it sets a precedent that singles out the Boy Scouts for •special treat­ment" solely because of their "discriminatory" policies against gays. The conference panel approved the compro­mise language as part of a sweeping education bill proposed by President Bush. The full House and Senate are expected to approve the compro­mise in separate votes during the next two weeks. The compromise retains Helms' language that would withhold federal funds from public schools or public school districts that deny "equal access" to meeting space for the Boy Scouts if the schools or school districts routinely offer similar space to other groups. · But the compromise language also states that schools are not required to sponsor Boy Scouts chapters, clarifying a concern by gay education groups that the original Helms amendment would blur the distinction between school spon­sorship and access to meeting space. The conference panel's compromise rejected Re-Eled Council Member ANNISE PARKER VOTE a separate amendment offered by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.), which the Senate passt!d on the same day it pas~ the Helms amendment. The Boxer amendment called for prohibiting public schools from den)ing equal access to facilities for the Boy Scouts and other groups based on those groups' "fa\·orable or unfarnrable po"i­tion concerning sexual orientation." Lnlike the Helms amendment, the Boxer amendment did not call for withholding federal education funds. Gay advocacy groups fa\ored the Boxer amendment, saying it was preferable because 11 didn't single out the Boy Scouts for what the groups say 1s "speaal treatment." Frank said an ex1stmg federal law that already bars schools from denying equal access to the Boy Scouts and all other groups, and noted that gay rights adrncates never called for deny equaling access from the Boy &out~. "From a practical point, it has no effect," Frank said. "It was a victory for us to get the sponsorship issue cleared up." But Buckel of Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund said the compromise language sets a dangerous precedent. "It is now a special rights bill for the Boy Scouts," he said. "Schools that run afoul of this law will face the prospect of taxpayer funds being used to investigate them." Re-Eled Mayor LEE BROWN AGAINST City Prop2 Say NO to Discrimination PUNCH #231 ON PAGE 9 OF THE CITY BALLOT Vote Tuesday, Nov. 6 Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus 10 STAFF Executive Editor Chns Crain Editor PennyWea~r l!d1tor0houstonvo1c' .com Production Go'aphic D .. ign..--Scooter Workin9er Contnbuton R•ch Arensch1eldt. Kay Y Dayus, Trayce Dislon. Earl Dittman. laura Dou9las-8rown. Enk Erickson, Mike Flemin!j. D.l. Groover. Robert 8 Henderson. Matthew A. Hennie, Kathrttn lee, Erm O'Bnant. Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Webmaster. Dou9las Wri9ht Photographen Dalton DeHart. Kimberly Thompson Advertising Sales Wanda Faulkner wfaulkMrOhounonvo1C• com Jim Nixon 1nixonOhounonvoice com Administration • Sales Support Carolyn A. 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VOICES & ECHOES NOVEMBER 2,2001 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT Gay Arabs find themselves rejected by their own by MUBARAK DAHIR I am sitting ma cavernous room on the second floor of the Gay & Lesbian Community Center in New York City. It is the room assigned to the evening's meeting of the Gay & Lesbian Arab Society. The room is way too big for the unusu­ally small number of members assembled ment in his neighborhood, even a physi­cal attack. He's called the police, but the last time an officer showed up, he polished the American flag lapel on his uniform instead of taking notes. Before he left, the police­man said, "You should expect this after what your people did to us." Another GLAS member, who works in run into a lesbian with a cane, her legs bandaged. I open the door for her and ask about her apparent accident. "Oh it was no accident," she retorts bit· terly, unaware of the Arab blood coursing through my vems. "A fucking Arab cab driver ran into me. It was an act of terror· ism!" In these times, even our fellow gay and lesbian citizens see in us the Arab label first. Sometimes, that is all they see. Dumbfounded, I say nothing as she blathers on about the cops promising her that the man who did this would get a par· ticularly harsh sentence because he is Arab, how none of them can be trusted, how they are all out to "get us." She passes from the stairwell into the hall and disappears here tonight. We are only six tonight, up around the comer. two from the last meeting. The group is surprisingly small dunng thlS difficult hme, 1 think to myself. Our numbers should swell from the standard core of attendees, not dwindle like this to near nothing. And then someone in the group utters the obvious explanation, the one none of us really wants to admit or say out loud; Some people are too afraid to come to a meeting right now. Too nervous to come even here, to a gay community center, symbolic as it is of the safe harbor for us as gay Arabs. But in these times, even our fellow gay and lesbian citizens see in us the Arab label first. Sometimes, that is all they see. The gay bond that I used to think was so strong - the one that can at times give me a sense of connection to a total stranger in a foreign city simply by making eye con­tact - feels broken in a way 1 never guessed imaginable I used to think of the gay community as a refuge, a place I could go and be at ease no matter what. In college, long before I was out, I used to slink away to a local gay bar as the only place where I could let down my guard. Later, the gay community was where I turned, too, when my father rejected me as his gay son. But today, as an Arab, even as a gay one, there seems nowhere to tum, no shelter in Amenca. It is from gay men m my regular local bar that I overhear the most chilling con· versahon about rounding up Arab~ in Brooklyn. It 1s m some of the gay and les­bian newspapers that I read the most 111- mformed pieces on Islam. And it is some of our most prominent gay and lesbian lead­ers and thinkers who now tell us we should go along with the administration's measures to curb public information and trample civil liberties. In our oversized room at the commu­nity center, GLAS members huddle our folding chairs into a circle and share our personal stories. At one meeting, a mem· ber who dresses in Muslim garb tells how he has been the target of constant harass- HIV prevention among Arabs, talks about hiding files and deleting contact names on his computer to protect the confidentiality of his clients, lest the FBI visit him as they have plenty of friends and acquaintances. Finally. a newcomer to the group talks about narrowly escaping with his own life from the offices where he used to work on the 103rd floor of the south tower of the World Trade Center. For the first weeks fol­lowing the attacks, he dealt mostly with death and grief. Now, he says sadly, he, too, is facing what it means to be Arab and Muslim in America - regardless of the fact he was a direct victim of the attack itself. Because of my American mother, you might not look at me and instantly know I am Arab This ability to "pass" often gives me a different experience as an Arab in America, as I am about to be reminded. I take a break from the GLAS discussion to head to the men's room. On the stairs, I For a moment I stand there motionle~s, frozen. Still standing on the landing, I let go of the door, and it swings closed in front of me. Mubarak Dahir is a syndicated columnist living zn Astoria, N. Y., and can be reached at MubarakDah@aol.com. Corrections In last week's edition, a headline in the Houston Voice erroneously stated that current Houston Mayor Lee Brown is runrung for re-election to achieve his sec­ond term In fact, Brown seeks a tlurd term on the Nov. 6 ballot. Also, a photo of Brown on Page 1 was courtesy of Houstm1 Chromcle. Housto11 Voice regrets the errors. Let us know w hat you think! Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 e-ma i I: ed itor@houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 Letters GLAAD spokesperson may have been too kind to Chronicle after story was cut To the Editor· GLAAD spokesperson Hallie Whittaker may have been too kind to the Houston Chronicle after it cut from a story two paragraphs about M.irk Bingham, the Sept. 11 hero from San Franruco ("Chronicle edits out gay references m story," news, Oct. 19), paragraphs which reveal that Bingham was openly gay. I remember J Chronicle news article from about a year ago which failed to report that one of its own writ­(' I'S, a sports v.Titcr if my memory is right, died from AIDS in J local AIDS hospice. One needs to review the Chronicle's overall record on such issues, not just one story. Tim Campbell Houston Empower 2001 lacked pizzazz, needs more community support to improve for 2002 To the Editor: I hate to say this, but Empower 2001 was dbappmnting. Since Houston 1s the fourth largest city m America, I would expect a lot more from this event. The graphics and ads for the event were mundane and unoriginal. The brochures were not something you wanted to take home. It lacks so much originality. We are gay, and many of us are good artists, if not the best. There is a lack of support from sophistic.itcd gay people who do not lend a hand to improve our community in the aspect of design. Empower 2002 should find volunteers to donate artwork for the pro­gram cover, ads, etc. In addition, I found it disappointing that the scats at the eating area near the mam stage were empty. Performers and singers were left to sing to a very few and inattentive people. It was sad to see. The place was just not exciting nor interesting, and last year was 1ust as bad. Empower has not become !-Omcthing to look forward to. I just keep hoping that every year it's going to get better, and it hasn't. Something is very wrong with Empower. It's not effective, it's not successful, and it's not c:omething I am looking forward to next year. Taylor Hackford Houston VOICES & ECHOES 11 Let us know what you think! Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com 12 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE When vou're readl for greaterac .. aaa ·Relationships ·Happiness ·Inner Peace Cal/for an appointment 713-527-0000 TONY CARROLL, LMSW-ACP C-ar.li<f&, h~. lliri.siops ''" lndinmuw au/ COllpln Tl. boaston • g ~H"uu11n ·, c., .,., LnJU1111 111era pist CommunitvSinu 191J ...,..,,.~HoustonThcrapi<t.com Houston Voice all the news for your /if c. and your style. Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church Maranatha Fellowship MCC is on the Move! Our church offices have relocated to 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, Houston, TX 77004! The anticipated move to 10:00 AM Sunday morning Worship Service at 3333 Fannin, Suite 106 is Sunday, December 2, 2001. For more information, call the church office at 713528.6756. Please Join Us For Evening Services And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! November4 "The Role of the Twelve Disciples" Rev. Janet Parker ....................................................................•........•.•.•. Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more Info •.• 7:13-528-6756 or email maranatha@ev:1.net __4 ¥? ~~\\ Marsnstha ~¥ ~! Fellowship lfffropolltlln Community Church EnJOY worship at your home church m the morning and visit us in the evening for an alternate worship experience! •• CQJM ©~®/unquote•• Mark Bingham compiled by REX WOCKNER and staff reports "He was a very masculine, crazy kid who left his dirty dishes under the bed and dirty clothes behind the door in the bathroom. There was nothing about him that fit into any stereotype of what we perceive of as a gay person, which goes to show you we cannot rely on our stereotypes." -Alice Hogland, mother of Mark Bingham, the gay rugby player who 1s believed to have been among the passengers who fought the hiiackers of United Airlines flight 93, which crashed in Pennsylvania Sept 11, to the Associated Press. Oct 22 "I am a generation that is not patriotic .... That's how I have been my whole life. Then all of a sudden in Los Angeles, I am standing in line at a flag store for two and a half hours .... My whole life if you would have ever said to me that was going to happen, I would have said you were fucking nuts." -Lesbian comic Suzanne Westenhoefer to Kansas City's Midwest Times, Oct 16 "Until America really addresses the fundamental dignity and integrity that everyone should be able to live with, the fundamental issues of human rights, then we are never going to address the root cause of the resentment that people feel. The rest of the world sees us as a country that has tremendous resources, and we only use those resources when it benefits us." -Surina Khan, executive director of the International Gay & Lesbian Human Rights Commission, to the Boston Phoenix, Oct. 18 "I practiced kissing with my make-up artist Lisa. Every Thursday night we run through the lines and rehearse them at dinner, and she said, 'Show me how you're going to kiss Denise [Richards].' But when it really hap­pened, I have never felt such beautiful soft lips in my life. I fell in love." -Actress Heather Locklear on her lesbian kiss on the TY show "Spin City,· to Hollywood.com, Oct. 19 "Donny Osmond." -Ellen DeGeneres when asked who her first celebrity crush was, to Planet Out.corn, Oct. 19 "To me, a girl who's into pleasing men her whole life, ... [my first time having sex with Ellen DeGeneres] was a great orgasm, it was beautiful, I felt like I was exploring something new, which was awesome. It was not what I always thought it would be, which was touchy-soft love. It was mas­culine and feminine. It was everything." -Actress Anne Heche to the Advocate, Nov. 6 Domy Osmond "I think she [Ellen DeGeneres] was threatened by me meeting men. I felt like I was not trusted. Which was offensive to me. I never, ever gave her reason to believe that she could not trust my love. I brought her to the premiere of 'Volcano'; I went on Oprah; I stood by her side." -Actress Anne Heche to the Advocate, Nov. 6 "You should see the hate e-mail I get. We have met the enemy, and he can't spell." -Cathy Renna of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation to the Washington Post, Oct. 27 "I don't want people to think I'm some symbol of the lesbian community, because I'm not a lesbian myself. I don't want people to think that I'm saying I know more than they do about their own lives." -Actress Michelle Clunie who plays Melanie on Showtime's "Queer As Folk,· to Curve magazine, November issue Michelle Ounie HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 STARTING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 2001 ~ - --- -- - ~ - SPECIAL HOLIDAY RATES 't - - - 1 Insertion 2-3 Insertions 4-6 Insertions Full page $868 $748 $643 Half page $456 $392 $336 Quarter page $249 $215 $199 > 1daf Square $1 $190 S1 (4. 75 x 4.375 One-eighth page $149 $140 $125 One-sixteenth page $125 $110 $75 We strongly recomment that ad space be used to illustrate gift ideas. Process color subject to availability. No other discounts apply . • THE CALENDAR ' KOLBE Friday • Nov 2 Thursday • Nov 8 PROJECT Morning Prayer lOam Under9:irdng iie lsbnic Monday • Nov 5 Foilh 7 pm (guest spec*er) e·mail· info@kolbeproject.org Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • Nov 9 or visit our Web site at Tuesday • Nov 6 Morning Proyer 1 Oom www.kolbeproject.org Don't forget to votel Saturday • Nov 10 Kolbe Breokfaxt 9:30am Pll(7D)861 ·1800• lmOHe1gh1sBlvd llousloo, TX 77008 'fPartner '.RJ"IJs" ~'lllS$~ _. ....... ~"'Y.,.ld.ill!!Jon'*'UaMdn•w A4i1llAWrn§Mr,14' YdoW cir Wt* Gdd, Of Pbllll*' Toonllf AMfld~-~.COM01 ... N7.-o»t ~~~~A"1~ THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! 13 14 $200 OFF SALE VOTED THE BEST GYM IN HOUSTON SINCE '98 4040 MILAM 77006 (713)524-9932 GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE! Mon - Fri Sam - 1 Opm Sat & Sun 8am-8pm NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Houston's largest Adult Bouuaue 100'1 If HW ll'ldueb 111'11111 neUJ. Visit us 11118" Menswear Lounge wear Tbongs C-Strings Sexy Gifts Leather Novelties Videos I DVD's Join us for fabulous drink prices! • 8-10 nightly S2 Long necks _ S1 Glow shots S2 Well drinks • Fri - Sat • Dance to the sounds of DJ Alexis & the gorgeous glow girls ~·: Re-Inventing the Goy Club Scene :-~ ~~~e,r ~.f:2~~r~,~ . • -~t. .~ wl!Pd~~Ji!l-::~~~~!th~i.'!'.e_r .~JHi.!?la!.SJ¥J A new novel by Alex Sanchez and a collection of photos and profiles by Adam Mastoon capture the face of today's gay youth by JACQUELINE DEAN "His mind was a whirlwind, while beside him his hand took on a life of its own. Slowly one fin­ger after another fell between Kyle's fingers, until all intertwined. This was surely the climax of his life. Disaster was certain to follow, but he was ready to die happy." "Rainbow Boys" by Alex Sanchez tells an achingly familiar tale of adolesrent lo\•e with a twist. This is more of a "Romeo and Julius" than 'I am not going to change for anyone because I am me. Accept me as I am!' writes ShaMy, 21, one of the young adults whose essay is included in 'The Shared Heart.' "Romeo and Juliet." A 1999 Massachusetts study of youth revealed that 5.5 percent of students in junior high and high school acknowledge themselves as gay or lesbian by self-identity or by behavior. Despite the trend, the world of young adult literature has not kept pace. Only recently has there been an increase in juvenile literature with a gay theme, targeted to gay and lesbian youth. Many early works such as "Ruby Fnnt Jungle" by Rita Mae Brov."ll were marketed to adults waxing nostalgic. Sanchez says that tide is turning. "The first gay-themed young adult books were published in 1969 after Stonewall," he explains. He notes that since that time, there have been few that did not reduce gays to secondary roles. "There has been little focus on gays as protag­onists," he says. The books that have been put out there, Sanchez says, have been aimed more at young lesbians than young gay men. "Rainbow Boys" IS targeted towards a main­stream young adult market, accordmg to Sanchez The book 1s doing well in its first weeks and is now hsted as a best-seller on ins1deout­books com and rs one of the top 25 gay books on Amazon.com. Being different and making independent choices 1s often the focus of young adult litera­ture. From the mega literary hit Harry Potter books to "Catcher in the Rye" and "To Kill a Mocking Bird," young adult literature has shov."ll the angst and tnals of growing up. One element that has been glaringly missing for many youth 1s a collechon of stones or books about what it's like to grow up gay, lesbian, bisexual or trans­gender. The Human Rights Watch reported in a 1999 mdependent poll by CBS that one third of 11th grade respondents knew of incidents of harass­ment of gay students. Sanchez believes that reading stories about queer youth creates a much more personal con­nection than does watching movies or television shows with gay themes. "A story unfolds inside us, inside our imagi­nation," he offers. "This creJtes a connection to the characters [and] an empathy among non-gay youth, parents, teachers and counselors,'' So far, says Sanchez, there has been a positive response to his book from teachers and librari­ans. "Librarians are amazing champions of free speech," he offers. "For many GI.BT youth, libranes often become sanctuaries." Houston Ballet presents the latest work by gay choreographer Domink Walsh through Nov. 4 at Cullen Theater. through ~ sunday, nov.4 Houston Ballet offers three performances this weekend of The Cullen Contemporary Series They include the third work of gay choreogra­pher Dominic Walsh, •Dolcemente. • Also on stage will be "Basics" by Damian Schwiethafe, •The Long Road Home" by Brian Enos and "Speaking in Strings" by Barbara Bears. Nov. 2-3, 8 p.m. and Nov. 4, 2:30 p m. Cullen Theater, Wortham Theater Center, downtown Houston. 713-227-ARTS. www.houstonballet.org. saturday, nov. J and sunday, nov. 4 Houston Symphony League Bay Area hosts its sec­ond annual •A Day by the Bay• home tour. Featured are six waterfront homes in Taylor Lake Estates, Taylor Lake Village and Seabrook. Tickets are S 15 in advance through Nov. 2 and $20 at the door. Shuttle leaves from Meador Park at North Myer and Hammer. 9:30 a.m. to 5 30 p.m Nov. 3 and 11 :30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m Nov. 4. Houston Symphony, 713-334-5616. wednesdav, nov. 7 The Museum of Health. a Meclcal Science hosts "The Art and Science of AIDS,• a health educa­tion class offered by the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. 7 p m at the muse um, 1515 Hermann Dr ve 409-747 8192 www utmb.edu/mrn med friday, nov. 9 and sunday, nov. 11 Houston Metropolitan Dance Co offers its f performance at the Cu len Theatre at the Wortham Center. ncluded are works by guest choreographer Liz lmperio, Art st c Director Dorrell Martin and company dancer Kourtney Owens 8 p m Nov 9 and 2 p m. Nov 1 1 Tickets range from S 18 to $35. 713-522-6375. saturday, nov. 10 and sunday, nov. 11 Galveston's GrMd 1894 Opera House hosts Emmy Award-winner Bea Arthur for two per­formances of "And Then There's Bea,• her one­woman show. Known for her career stints on tel­evisions "The Golden Girls" and "Maude,• among others, Arthur as jOined by composer Billy Goldenberg at the piano for the shows Performance times are 8 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Ttcket prices range from $37 to $85 2020 Postoffice, Galveston 1-800-821-1894. www thegrand com. ,£,.-,,.. A. w..n.w.i.w.r. .... . A..r." - 'AMI n.. 11iert's ._,•Nev. 10 .. 11 tit Galnsta 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE ~ 2815 S. Shepherd • 713.523.5FOX • www. foxdiner.com New South Kitchen & Bar r. f\ ' WHERE LOW COUNTRY MEETS HIGH COTTON! In our historic 1936 Art Deco Location. Fried Green Tomatoes, Daily Blue Plate Specials, Houston's Best Fried Chicken Thursdays & Sunday Brunch! Open 7 Days from 11 am More variations than the Kama Sutra. Join u for Saturday and Sun~ay brunch with creatr-your-own !pancake and om el rt bar featuring unlimited trip , the 1'iorld feast experience, and liottom]e_.;~ peach bellini and mimo a all for only 818.95. Located at 2801 Kirby between Westheimer and West Alabama next to the Page Parkes building. For reservations call 7 I 3·522-4500. Free Uonuts and Kolachesl • Buy 1/2 dozen Donuts, get 2 Free! • Buy 1/ 2 dozen New books offer words for and from gay teens Continued from Page 15 > "Rainbow Boys" is an excellent first novel. Sanchez, a tramed counselor who has worked with youth and their families, says the story chose him. He refers to his characters as bemg like his children. When asked to reflect on his characters, he notes that people seem to either love or hate Nelson, the so-out-he's­never- been-in, finger-snapping, wild­haired boy tom by unrequited love. He also notes that most people pick up easily on the love story between Jason and Kyle. He's right. The blossoming romance between the closeted high school jock Jason and the sweet boy next door Kyle does catch the reader up. Gender, age and sexu­al orientation slip into the background as the reader is treated to a narrative of events from each character's point of view. But Sanchez, who will be at Outwrite Bookstore & Coffeehouse in Atlanta on Nov. 8, hasn't cornered the market on gay young adult literature. In addition to an increase in fiction for gay youth, Adam Mastoon has recently published the non­fiction paperback version of "The Shared Heart: Portraits and Stories Celebrating Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Young People." The cover of the book bears a quote from Indigo Girl Emily Saliers: "This book will save lives," she says. She's dead on. "The Shared Heart" is a poignant com­pilation of stories and portraits of young people who bear a burden beyond the basic growing pains suffered by all adolescents. Th~ courageous young folk are strug­gling through this time of identity develop­ment, while wading through the minefield of society's prejudices about sexual orienta­tion. Mastoon's photographs in uThe Shared Heart~ are brilliant and insightful. They have the candid quality that allows the per­son behind the image being photographed to peer through. The rich diversity of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender fam­ily is reflected beautifully in the young of our community. In these pages we see the baby butch, the sweet young femme, the jock, the future circuit boy and the future drag queen. The expression, "out of the mouths of babes," applies here with stunning clarity. The young people in this book do more than pose for pictures or complain of ill treatment. With all they have to face in the world, it would be easy for them to become mired in anger, resentment and even hatred. But that 1s the last message that comes from this book. In the no-holds-barred way of the young, they lay forth their claim on the future. They let the eternal optimism of youth shine through. The older set can learn a lot from these young people. The ease and comfort most of them have with who they are, and their conviction that they just are, is a lesson we could all learn. Their deceptively simplistic approaches to living out of the closet speak volumes. Among those profiled in the book is 22 year-old Salua. "I'm just Myself," she says. "Unwilling to hide, though I don't wear 'freedom rings' or pink/black triangles. I just am." The hope that reading about someone different from ourselves can create an empathy that destroys hate resonates throughout literature for young gay adults. The hope that these books will save lives is echoed in the faces of our young. Shanny, age 21, says it best. "What's most important for people to know is that I'm Shanny, an Amerasian proud bisexual woman. I'm not going to change for anyone because I'm me. Accept me as I am!" 'The Shared Heart' http://world.std.com/-shheartJ sh_index2.html ~Cafe Zorro · 905 Taft Cocina Nuevo WavoLatino \; located In the Original Dlnerl Original Mexican Food with the Creativity you expect from the Foxl Recreate the fun of the orlglnal Fox years by visiting our newest member of the Fox famlly,Cafe Zorro .... the Mexican Fox! Lunch: Mon-Fri 11am to 2pm HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU eating out RESTAURANT REVIEW Burritos fill any appetite College Station eatery excels with menu that concentrates on burritos, quesadillas, tacos by TRAYCE DISKIN Mild, llot, Death, Bad Ass, or llabanero? At Freebirds World Burrito, these are just a few of the many choices cus· tomers have in creating the true, corporate burrito experience. A sacred College Station institution by many accounts, Freebirds World Burrito offers 0.1.Y. burritos, quesadillas and tacos. With fresh, trendy ingredients (cayenne and spinach tortillas), and an upbeat, if hopelessly contrived scene, Freebirds will no doubt avoid the ill fate of many of Shepard Plaza's other casualties. With garage-band funky metal tables and decor, Freebirds encourages a bustling, fast·food atmosphere built around the con· cept of healthy, fun community food. In theory, that means young, hip counter staff efficiently constructing lard-free burritos for a seamlessly moving line of customers. In practice, however, that often trans· lates to several staff members standing around by the cash registers chatting while customers wait for the ultimate burrito assembly line to acknowledge customers' presence. And while Freebirds also makes the effort to showcase local artists, more wall space is devoted to restaurant mer· chandisc such as hats and T-shirts. But for those who don't mind swallow· ing a little corporate culture and mediocre service with an entree, Freebirds makes a good choice for a quick, fuss-free meal. Burritos feature chicken and steak that's moist, well-cooked and carefully seasoned, but the meat fillings pale in comparison to the slightly jazzier condiments. Rice is fluffy and well seasoned with tomatoes and a generous sprinkling of chili powder. The Pico de Gallo is juicy and bursting with zest. The guacamole, roasted garlic, onions, tomatoes and roasted peppers are all exceedingly fresh and make essential sides to an already overstuffed burrito. Even the spinach and cayenne tortillas add a little kick. It seems a oversight not to have a fish option. For quasi-vegetarians, this may be a reason to head down the street to the competition at Mission Burrito for the flaky, delicate beer-battered cod. Burritos come in Super Monster ($11.00), Monster ($6.50) and the already monstrous Regular ($5.25). For the intimidated and messy, Frecbirds offers Little Mo sized ($4.50) and the Exposed ($5.00), or burrito­in- a·bowl. Quesadillas ($5.25-$4.75) are a bit of sur· prise with the thick bread standing in for Freebirds World Burrito 3745 Greenbriar 713·524-0495 www.freebirds.com Food: fel fel fel M Service: fel fel ft Value: felfelfelfelM Scene: fel fel fel fel **** Worth the dr111e, so live a little the reliable tortilla. The cheese oozes little oil and grease, however, and is well blend­ed with the steak or chicken. Tacos ($5.50) are especially delicious, either in the grilled variety, where the corn tortillas become deliciously smoky, or in the soft steamed option. The Avo-Taco, with sliced avocado, rice, sour cream and cheese, will keep veg· etarians satiated with every calone. The sauces are abundant and there's nary a weak one in the bunch. The fresh lime juice is also an added plus. Although it would be nice to see an expanded menu to include a few soups or salads, chips, sides and desserts, dearly Freebirds' mission is to tum its global attention to the might bur­rito itself. A liquor license might help out those who crave a cold Corona with their 1alapenos. But the array of fresh juices and sodas is reasonable, and the next-door con­venience of Amy's Ice Cream is always there to oblige if patrons still have room for more food. While Freebirds' may not usurp world order when it comes to decor or a varied menu, it does give hungry and health-conscious Houstonians a reason to indulge. New South Kitchen & Bar Sunday Famous Gospel Brunch Thursday Fried Chicken s3. 75 Foxmopolitans 2$15 S. SHEPHERD HOUSTON, TX 7709$ 713.523.5FOX WWW.FOXDlNER.COM Cafe Zorro • 905 Taft · 713.528.9691 Nuevo Wava Latino Cuisine Lunch only M-F 11am-2pm Available for private parties & events, evenings & weekends HOURS Monday-Thursday 11am-10pm 11am-11pm 11am-9pm Friday -Saturday Sunday A four course farutt that rrufy completes lhc fondue cx~ncnc.c CltEESE FO~DUE COURSE s6700 Swiss or O>cdd.u Ch<csc Fondue, Scasor>«I To l'<rfcctK>n Tabk-Sidc SAIAD COURSE Bnrcr SWttt.C.lifomg s.Jad, O.d"s Salad or Mushroom s.Jad MAIN COURSE DESSERT Twm M.a1nc Lobster Tu.ls. Center-Cut f'Jn Moll""n. Japan<"' T.gcr Shrimp. Choice SLrloin Tcny.a.k1. Breast Of Chichn. A.xompamcd By An F.xouc Assonmcn1 of Vq;cubles 1nd Sauces. Mdk. \l'lmc or Bmcr-~,.... Dul: Chocobtc Fondue! A.xomparucd By Frah Fruiu and Cales for Dipping 9h ~ ('33'" P"' P"""" lkua/u•J 17 18 Introducing Our Newest Associate Your Community Insurance Jason Garcia Agency! For Auto, Home & Health 713.661. 7700 BuJ.lnru /nsurnncr • Workers ComprnJation Group Jlralth • Llfr Jn1ur11ncr It much rnorr 6575 m l.oo 1 South, Suite 185 Bellaire. TX 77401 1111§§§3 Gay Owned and Operated Proudly Serving "Our" Community. 2318 S. Shepherd• 713-528-9080 AMERICAN PRIDEDry Cleaners Store Hours: 7am to 7pm (Mon-Fri)• IOam to 3pm (Sat) Houston Voice all the news for your life. and your style. NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 homefront Get ready for winter Keep warm and save money, too, with a few simple ideas by ELLA TYLER My definition of winter is that it begins when you tum the heat on. So, at my house, it is now winter. The problem with turning on the heat m October, besides the vague feeling of eco­logical immorality, is that the heating sys­tem hasn't been inspected yet. This should be done immediately, both for safety and energy efficiency. Our winters are often so mild that we don't pay a lot of attention to how much heat costs, but I suspect that this winter will be long and cold. Unless you want to pay a lot for heat or be humidifier. House plants help, especially if they sit on trays of pebbles covered with water. Set a pot of water on a gas space heaters. Dry clothes inside, either on a rack or hanging from the shower curtain rod. Leave the shower door ajar to let steam escape and open the dishwasher door before the dry cycle begins. Don't ignore other sources of heat or humidity. Leave the drapes open if you have a sunny window, but be sure to close them when the sun goes down. After you use the oven, leave the door open if you can until it gets cool. Using ovens as a source of heat is dangerous, but there is no harm m leaving the oven door open when the oven is turned off. Warm air rises, and a ceiling fan set to move air downward can be very helpful. You might be able to save on electric bills by getting a new electnc provider. Businesses have been chilly all the time, some energy conser­vation 1s m order. Some of these ideas will also reduce the cost of air condi­tioning. for example, insulation, caulking and weather strip· pmg keep your artifi­cially warmed or cooled air inside Changing the air fil­ter every month will help both the heating Each degree that you lower the thermostat between 60 able to choose their elec­tric company for more than a year, and a pilot program for residential users has been in effect since June. In January 2002, the program will be extended to everyone who gets electricity from an investor owned utili­ty. Like deregulation of long distance and local telephone seMce, elec-and 70 degrees saves between 2 to 5 percent on your heating bill, but 60 degrees is cold unless you're bundled up. and cooling system run more efficiently. A programmable thermostat helps con­serve energy when it's hot or when it's cold. If you can do simple wiring, you can mstall one yourself. These automatically tum the heat or air conditioning up or down at spe­cific times, so you can tum the heat down at night but have a warm house when you wake up. Sleeping in a 60 degrees is cozy if you have an electric mattress pad, cotton flannel sheets and a few of your grand­mother's quilts (or a hot blooded compan­ion), but it is an unpleasant awakening. Each degree that you lower the thermo­stat between 60 and 70 degrees saves between 2 to 5 percent on your heating bill, but 60 degrees is cold unless you're bun­dled up. However, I object to bundling up almost as much as I object to being cold. Silk thermal underwear and the new polar fleeces add warmth without bulk. Look at a mail order catalogue from someplace fur­ther north than Dallas, and look at all the things there are to keep people warm. Up north they wear sweaters inside! They use afghans, throws, warm robes and slippers. Cold air is also dry air. It is unpleasant to breathe, dries your skin, and causes shocks from static electricity. Warm air holds more moisture, but most heating systems do not add moisture. If the air is very dry, get a tric deregulation increases customer choice. The Public Utility Commission has a web site, www.powcrtochoo~.org, which explains deregulation and lists each Retail Electric Provider (REP) that serves a partic­ular area. Each REP must produce an Electricity Facts Label showing information about the price, source of power genera­tion, emissions and contracts. So if renew­able energy is most important to you, chose the REP that gets more of its power from renewable sources. The Web site contains each company's facl~ label, making it possi­ble to compare companies. Transmission and distribution will con­tinue to be provided by the existing local utility company, now called a Local Distribution Utility. Each LOU has a retail provider also. Unless you select a provider, you will get power from your LDU's REP. In addition to coming up with new names for all these components of your electric service, the Public Utility Commission (PUC) is conducting an exten­sive public education campaign with bill­boards, brochures and a toll free number, 866-7797-4839. The PUC will handle con­sumer complaints and maintenance of a "Do Not Call List." If you don't want elec­tnc providers calling you, add your name to this list. professional cabinetry • closet systems built if yOlTR CLOSET HJlD LOOkED THiS GOOD ... For a free des1~n consultat1on. call (113) 688-8808 closet• home office •garage • pantry We also feature dramatic residential & commercial fountains and accessories. Bwincss Highway 290 Ease in Hempstead Open every day hue Wednesdays from 9 co 6 409-826-6760 frazier's ~1~ Ornam.cataJ and Architcctu.ra.I C..onc.tttc 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Vtvttftv6tP PROPU(liOtvS presents Opens Friday November 9 at 8 p.m. Plays Thurs. - Sat at 8 p.m. Through December 15 Tickets $15 Call 713-524-8707 Unhinged Theatre 3304 la Branch So 1 Met This Guy • • Two very funnx oriqinal plays about modern lesbian and qay relationships. Theater LaB Houston presents Direct from her recent Off Broadway sold-out engagement ... SHUT UP and LOVE ME written and performed by KA R E N F I N L E Y 4 Performances onfyf Opens Wednesday, November 7th at Spm Friday, November 9th & Saturday, November 10th at Spm Sunday November 11th at 6:00pm out on the aisle THEATER CALENDAR Pair of plays debut locally Two writers offer new one-act productions through Houston theater by PE.\.'~'Y WEAVER "Mud" Infernal Bridegroom Produchons pres­ent!> "Mud" as part of IBP's Greatest !lits series this fall. First produced by IBP in 1995, Maria Irene Fornes' "Mud" takes place in the heart of backwoods America and follows the simple, good, hard-work­ing Mae as she struggles to make a decent life for herself Peppered v.1th hilarious scenes, the play nonetheless offers a pro­foundly tragic storyline, showcased by Fornes' simple, funny, poetic writing. IBP company member Amy Bruce will reprise her performance as Mae. Artistic director Jason Nodler will direct the production. Actors Troy Schulze and Charlie Scott join Bruce on stage. Ticket prices for the open­ing weekend are $5.99, and for the remain­der of the play's run are $10 on Thursdays, $12 on Fridays and $15 on Saturdays. Nov. 8-Dec. 1 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays Atomic Cafe 1320 Nance 713-522-8443 www.infernalbridegroom.com "Shut Up and Love ~e" Nationally known performance artist Karen Finley- whose pieces have sparked both controversy and acclaim - brings her new show to Theater LaB Houston. Finley's work explores the darker elements of sexu­ality, shocking audiences into examining their own attitudes toward sexual taboos. For adult audiences only. 8 p.m. NO\._ 7, 9, 10 6 p.m. Nov. 11 Theater LaB Houston 1706 Alamo St. 713-868-7516 "Fly Away" "So, I Met This Guy" Two one-act plays - one that focuses on lesbians, the other on gay men - take to the stage of Unhinged Productions starting Nov. 8. "Fly Away" by Houstoman Patti A. Aldredge tells the story of the surviving East Texas relatives and lesbian friends and lovers of a woman who has just died. The deeply religious and largely rural cul~re of the two relatives inevitably clashes with the urban sexual landscape in which Belinda Marie lived and died. The result is a free­wheeling, irreverent but touching comedy The lesbian-themed 'Fly Away' by Houstonian Patti A. Aldredge hits the stage at Unhinged Theatre next week. of misunderstandings and heavily guarded secrets that threaten to blossom at any moment. The romantic gay comedy by playwright David Alan Morrison, "So, I Met This Guy," looks at gay relationships among men through the lives of two men who meet and begin a romance. What the pair of characters do not know is that they have a best friend in common - a woman who is writing a romance novel. The play examines the intricacies and mysteries of love, the ways in which people in love sab­otage that love and also learn to accept it. Performances for both productions begm with a half-price preview Nov. 8. Nov. 8-Dec. 15 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays Tickets: $15 adults, $12 seniors and students Unhinged Theatre 3304 La Branch 713-524-8707 "The Little Witch of Wichita" Gay and lesbian parents may be inter­ested in a family outing to see "The Little Witch of Wichita," playing through Nov. 10 at the EarlyStages Children's Theater of Stages Repertory Theatre in Houston. The "bewitching" modern musical follows "Little Witch" (she prefers Katrina) as she longs for the respect of her pC('rS and tries to impress them by accepting the challenge of finding the final ingredients for the Halloween Happening stew. Little Witch's adventures not only bring her new friends including Armando, a Mayorcan mambo mouse, and the shy Peek-a-Boo tree, but also teach her that self-respect starts on the inside. 11:30 am. & 2 p.m. Saturdays, through Nov. 10 Tickets: $8 Stages Repertorv Theatre 713-527-0123 • www stages theatre.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 21 We are proud to offer S300ff' Any Complete Tuxedo Rental ---or--- 150/oOff Your Retail Purchase m.alaformalwear.cem 24 HOUSTOll AIU LOCATIOIS F« tht locatloo nramr yoo. dial your area ~ lDI no.tALI <r call t-177.uis.nl ·o. ........... , .. g•st!S.95 ··~•-6-'ltJCJ "'""""""""""" s ..... , ....... biw•1111i'?Cll1 Holy Union Rings •Holy Union Rings and Loose diamonds our specialty •Custom jewelry designers •Appraisals by on-staff GIA Gemologists •Certified Swiss watchmaker on premises •World famous brand watches 1wmark1 Ask for Cass our Holy Union Jewlery Specialist Houston's Bridal & Diamond Headquarters Hours: Mon.-Sat. 1G-6. Thu. 10-9 3841 Bellaire- Bl-vd.- • 71~68-5000 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE community calendar saturday. nov 3 After Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM. 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713-526-5738. ~atrol walks the streets 8:45 p.m. 713-528-SAFE. Dignity mass. 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics. 713-880-2872. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W. Alabama 713-528-6665 Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club Call for nde locations. 713-863-1860. Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club 9:30 a.m. 281 -437 -0636. Rainbow Fishing Club Meeting 713-526- 7070.713-880-9235. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Drop-in noon-4 p.m. • Gay & lesbian Switchboard Houston volunteer apprecia­t ion reception. 1-4 p.m. • Texas Association for Transsexual Support. 1 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. Rummage-A-Rama AIDS Housing Coalition Houston. Rummage sale with rented booths; rental proceeds benefit local charities. 8 a.m .• first Saturday of each month. 202 Tuam Ave . Midtown/Montrose 713-521 -1613. Houston Outdoor Group Breakfast at lePeep. David, 713-868-7991. sunday. nov 4 Rainbow Riders A b1cyde club for women 713-869-1686. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church Holy Rite Eucharist I 7:45 a.m., Holy Rite Eucharist II 8:55 a.m.; Education hour 10 a.m.; Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 713-528-6665. Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. Service. 6:30 p.m. 713-528-6756 Resurrection MCC. Services. 9 and 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10 a.m. Youth Sunday School 11 ;15 a.m Handbell Choir rehearsal 1:30 p.m. 713-861-9149 Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-528-3269. Community Gospel. Service at 11 a m. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children 10 a m. 713-880- 9235 or www.communitygospel.org. Houston Mission Church Service 10:30 a.m. 713-529-8225. Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist Service 9:30 a.m. & education hour 11 a.m. 713-668-8830 Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 8:30 & 10:50 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 713-526-1017. The Women's Group Meeting & Discussion. 10:45 a.m. 713-529-8571 Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County 502 Church St. Service 10:30 a.m. 409· 765·8330. First Congregational Church (Memorial) Service at 10 a.m. Chnstian Education. 11 :30 p.m. 713-468-9543 or fcc-houston.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum 10 a.m Service 11 a.m. 713-686-5876. Gay Catholics of St. Anne's-Houston 5 p.m. worship service Dinner and social. alex· cam@wt.net. 713-623-0930 Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Adult discussion 9:45 a.m. Service 11 am. 281·277-8882. www.tuuc.org. First Unitarian Universalist Church Services at 9:30 & 11 :30 a.m. Brunch available 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion. 1:30 p.m. 713-526- 5200. church@firstuu.org Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m to noon. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houston-tennisclbOaol. com Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Drop-in 2- 5 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. • 713-524-3818 Blessed Sacrament Church. Unity Mass. 12:30 p.m. 4606 Mangum Road. 713-476-9776. PRAG-Houston. Meeting. 2 p.m. 713-867 9020. www.pflaghouston.org/meetings.htm monday. nov 5 Gay Fathers/ Fathers First Support group. 8 p.m www.Gayfathers-Houston.org or 713-782-5414. Frost Eye Clinic Free eye exams for people with HIV 713-830-3000. HIV testing. STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 1 to 6:15 p.m. 713-626-2837. Kolbe Project Eucharist 7:30 p.m. 713-861-1800. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713-692-2703. Lesbian & Gay Voices Radio Show. 8 to 10 p.m. KPFT90.1. 713-529-1223. AIDS Mastery. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017. Ext. 208. gayDAR. Wellness Community. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-526-1017, Ext. 211. Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsals. 7 p.m. 713-521-7464. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713- 524-3818. tuesday. nov 6 For Mature Audiences Only Support group. 7 p.m. Bering Memorial UMC. 713-52&-1017 HTGA. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-520-0439. Free HIV Testing Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m. to mid· night. Club Houston. 713-830-3000. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous. Support group. 7 p.m 713-524-0439. Bering Support Network Lunch Bunch Gang 11 a.m. 713-526-1017. Gay Men's Process Group 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713-526-8390. Men's Network. Discussion group for social, educational development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713·529-0037. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 1 O a.m. to 6 p.m. 281-633-2555. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. Two-hour free dance work­shops. No partner needed Beginner. 2 Step, Waltz, Shuffle & Swing Drop in anytime. 8:30 p.m. 713-528-9192. CPR Classes. 3 p.m. 713-607-7700. El-Net Houston Men's Social. 7 p.m. 713-467-4380. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • lesbian Coming-Out Group, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. PRAG-Houston Meeting. 713-867-9020. wednesday. nov 7 Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 a.m.·1p.m. 2015 Thomas Street 713-793-4026. Women's Network. Montrose Counseling Center discussion group for social, educational development of gay and bisexual women. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a.m.·6 p.m. 936-441 ·1614. Project: Caesar. Workshops. AFH 3203 Weslayan. 713-623-6796. Bible Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m. St. Stephen's Ep1SCopal. 713-526-6665. Spiritual Uplift service 7 p.m. Bible Study 7'30 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861-9149. Freelance Art Classes. By Kermit Eisenhut for HIV+ individuals. 1-4 p.m. lunch provided 713-523-9530. Houston Tennis Club. 7:30 -9 p.m. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstontennisdbOaol.com Lesbian Literature Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Meets f!!Very other Wednesday. 713-383-6738 Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal. 1307 Yale. 713-527-0931. www.houstonprideband.org. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Dinner at 6:30 p.m Various Support Groups 7 p.m. 713-526-1017 Blessed Sacrament Church. Workshop Series for Christian Faith and Ecumenical Old Catholimm. 713-476-9776. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • Free HIV testing, counseling, 6- 9 p.m. • Houston Committee for People's Radio, 6:30 p.m. • Bi-Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. 713-524-3818. thursday. nov 8 Rainbow Ranglers Free C&W dance lessons. Two hours free line dance instruction. No part­ner required. Drop in anytime. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 p.m. 713-528-9192. Hep C Recovery Support group. 6:30 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, Ext. 211. STD exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 713- 626-2837. Free HIV Testing. By the Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m. to midnight. Toyz Disco. 713-830-3000. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a.m. -6 p.m. 281-633-2555. Lambda Skating Club. 8 p.m. Tradewinds. Skating Rink. www.lamb<iaroll.org. 713-410-7215. FrontRunners. Running club. 6:30 p.m. 713- 522-8021. HIV Art Therapy Program. 1-4 p.m. Kermit Eisenhut. 713-523-9530. Women's Clinlc. Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Community Gospel. Service. 7:30 p.m. 713- 880-9235. www.communitygospel.org.' Gay Houston. New social group for all ages. 7 p.m 713-526-9318. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop in 6-9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713· 524-3818. Bl-Net Houston Women's group meeting. 7 p.m. 713-467-4380. Lesbian & Gay Immigration Rights Task Force-Houston. Meeting. 8 p.m. Chris. 713- 426-3128. lgirtf-houston@egroups.com. Kolbe Project. Presentation on the Islamic faith. 7 p.m. 1030 Heights Blvd. 713-861 -1800. www.kolbeproject.org. friday. nov 9 Houston Area Teen Coalition of Hom~ sexuals (H.A.T.C.H.) Meeting. 713-942-7002. Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000. ~atrol. Walks the streets. 9 p.m. 713-528-SAFE. Kolbe Project. Morning prayer. 10 a.m. • Movie night, "Much Ado About Nothing." 7 p.m. 713-861-1800. Houston Tennis Club. 7:30-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclbOaol.com Lesbian & Gay Voices. KPFT 90.1 FM. 7 p.m. 713-526-5738. Govlnda Yoga Club. Free yoga classes at 3115 West Loop South, No. 21. 713-439-0455. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • l esbian Film Night, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. Garden and Yard Society. 713-661 -6378 or 713-863-1066. Kolbe Project. Movie night: •Along Came a Spider." 7 p.m. 1030 Heights Blvd. 713-861· 1800. www.kolbeproject.org. To list an event. call 713-519-8490, fax at 713· 519·9531, or e-mail editorOhoustonvoice com. Deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI FREE NICOTINE PATCHES AND USE OF COMPUTER! Stop-smoking research study uses hand-held computer and nicotine patches. EARN$$$ FOR PARTICIPATING! 713-792-2265 TI-E lNIVERSffi' OF TEXAS MDAWERSON CANCER CENTER Making Cancer History"' ON YOUR NEXI VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAY B&B We•re right INthe neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars. 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com 23 l~U~1~1JlGE-Jl-f{Jl~1Jl 1000' s of Bar51ins to the Pu~lic Rental Proceeds Benefit local Charities $ Clear Out Your G1r15e or Stor15e $ au.&ttl~.A.&.lll 202 TUAM -- Concession Game Room Restrooms Free Parkin5 Security ATM Inside *Booths A\'aila~le lnsi4e or Outsi4e Hosted fifll $<¢Ml'ddJ4 of Edeh Month ~«ttrrd«!J 8Jl~1 Fat cash & great ptiyl calltolf.frM -8M-9SMIODEL y0tr voi•c e on the web lit 24 CLASSIFIEDS NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE houston classifieds Houston Classifieds deadline is Monday at noon OCCASIONS Happy belated 25th birthday wish­es to Ovin P (above. 10/06) from his partner John Handsome cowboy and Outpost owner Michael celebrates his birth· day on Nov 1. Happy birthday to Maranatha MCC member Dale 0 Nov S CCCC members Bruce H (11J'OS) and Art G. (11/06) dnve away another birthday this week Misfit Rocky S. warts to sneak 1n a b1thday on Nov 7. ANNOUNCEMENTS BUTCH-FEM Starting Butch-Fem group for Lesbians • If interested call 713- 917-8987 Press 4 to leave a mes­sage for us. HOUSTON HUMANE SOCIETY NO ANIMAt. TURNED AWAY'! lhe HHS relies solely on donations They receive NO local, state or fed­eral government fund1rg Call 713· 434-5555 to find out the many ways YOU can help. EMPLOYMENT FREE EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE Offering free employment assis­tance to HIV+ ind1v1duals. lnduoing 1ob preparedness, training. resume development. and 1ob searching assistance For more info call 713· 981-1543 SHEETROCK $8 PER HOUR Exp"ienced with paint. sheet rock, and flooring • Must have own tools and work references • AIDS Housing Coalition Houston AHCH • 713-521·1613 PWA COALITION PART-TIME STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking cook • Responsible for preparation of nutritional meals for program participants • Meal planning • Prepare grocery list • Clean kitchen and utensils after use •Call Taylor 0 713-522-5757 Home repair helper needed • Montrose • S10 per hour• 713-521·3359 STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregiver for HIV+ adults • Part-time overnight and weekend staff • Minimum requirements include high school diploma and at least 3 years prior work experience in careg1V1ng • Light duties include cooking. cleaning. administration of medications and crisis interven­tion• Call Taylor 0 713-522-5757 RYAN WHITE PLANNING COUNCIL seeks a highly organized indivtdual with excellent telephone, writing and computer skills to fill position of Support Staff secretarylrecep· t1onist • Must be fluent in English/Spanish • Requirements: Knowledge in Microsoft Office and typing 4Swpm • Starting salary S 1900 per month • View job descnpt1on at www.rwpc.org • Apply at 1310 Prairie, Suite 240 • Reference #7982·C Resurrection MCC is seeking a maintenance spec1al11t/caretaker • lnd1v1dual w1 clean and main­tain interior and exterior of church properties• Quahficat1on: High School d1ploma/equ1valent • Salary & benefits • Send cover letter with resume to· Resurrection MCC • 2025 West 1 lth Street • Houstofl, Texas 77008 • Attn: Maintenance/Caretaker FOR SALFJREflw'T OFFICE FOR REITT Second floor off1Ce available at Houston lesbian & Gay Community Center • 803 Hawthorne • 14' X 12'6" • Nonprofit GLBT organ1za­t1ons preferred as tenant partners. but all inqu1ne1 welcomed Call Tim Brookover 0 713·524-3818 WESIBURY GARDENS 2bJI 5ba Townhomes • 1200 SF • Westbury Garden Townhomes • Picturesque courtyard • One end unit • Beautifully restored • S47,000 to S60.000. 2b/1 ba upstairs flat • Lots of improvements • S33.000. For lease 1 b upstairs flat 1n the Chateau • Hardwood floors • WIO Warehouse Assistant • Clean dnv· 'Quiet cul-de-sac • S610/mo. 1ng record required • fax resume to Westbury Gardens Townhomes • 713-522-2674 Lyn Robertson• 713-729-9316 GALVES1DN 3 story corner building with deck on top for panoramic views of the East End & the Gulf • 4 bedrooms • Fully furnished • Hot tub • S168,500 • David Bowers/Agent • 409-765-8830 1 b • Quiet duplex • Hardwoods • Central AC/Heat • Laundry room • Great location • 1239 W. Bell •S650/mo + gas & electric • 713- 527-8026 Westbury Square Townhomes. 2/1.5 • 1300sf • New caarpet. floor· ing & paint • CAC/Heat • W/D • large rooms • Gated complex • Utilities included • S900/mo + deposit • Available fmmediatly • 713-SO 1-6229 Furnished efficiency apartment • Bills paid • Precious country setting • 10 minutes from Med Center • S550 +deposit• 713-667-9281 Furnished rooms in Montrose from S295/week • For single, quiet per­son • Free cable tv. breakfast. park· ing. maid service • With queen bed, kitchen, & laundry access Montrose Inn • 408 Avondale 713·520-0206 Large 1 b Bungalow • WID • Utilities included • West End • Security Gate • S600 • Joe • 713· 861·1181 MONTROSE COTIAGES 111 Garden Cottage • S300 and up • Reserved for People l1v1ng with AIDS • 90 day MAX • Phone, fur· nished.AC • Maid paid • No deposit • Sliding scale fee • No drugs or Alcohol on property • AIDS Housing Coalition AHCH • 713-521·1613 I b Condo for rent • W/O • Cable • Pool • 1 b & 2b condos for sale •Pool • Cable • W/O connections • 713· 942-7520 PRIDEREALTY.COM SALES/RELOCATION HEALTH IBEE YOGA Cl.As.5ES FREE yoga classes every FridJy 0630 p.m. • 3115 West loop South #21 • No restrictions • No reserva­t10~, needed • 713-439-0455 MASSAGE TilERAPY MASSAGE Absolute Let-Go Houston Metro 713.942.2399 • Montr- Location • 7 days/ev~s • Visa/Mastetcard • Outcalt- MASSAGE BY KEN PffS Experience stress "I ef Conven1er-t Montrose locat1of' • By appointment only • 11 am to 8pll' • RMT#028519 •KEN CLAUDE• 713· 524-4759 FOR ACTIVE MEN Your time for personal attention • Full Body Swedish Massage • Jose • RMT#17316 • 713-397-8286 FULL BODY RELAXATION by Young Athletic Male • RMT#016479 •Tim• 713-876-3811 A BODY 1DUCH 24/7 Experienced man4man massage • Sports • Swedish • Deep Tissue • Erotic • Mature, strong & tanned IN/OUT • Galleria area • Mature clients welcomed • S65 to S 125 • 713-504-1055. Massage by David Rangel • Swedish • Neuro Muscular Therapy • Montrose area • MCNISA/AMEX welcomed • RMT #8069 • Appointments 713-523-0738 MASSAGE Therapeutic • Deep tissue • Jason • College guy • 713-863-8888 • 713- 908-8020 SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK • Relaxation • Myotherapy • Deep tissue • (RMT#024589) 713-807· 7109 • 713-501-9852. • 1 1/2 hours for S50. 1 Hr. S40 PRO-THERAPY Professional Therapy for men and women • legit therapy for those searching for quality body work • Evenings and weekends • Timothy • 832·687-5786 MASSAGE THERAPY AT IT'S FINEST Swedish • Deep tissue • Sports • Reflexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out • Hotels • 7 day • Nationally certified# 016074 • r..tf • 71J..82S.4:)62. MASSAGE Treat sort, .tiff mLscles, tension and stress • Renewed flex1b1lity and wellness • RMT #016479 •Tom • 713-520-6018 JOB STRESS? TOUGH WORKOUTS? Call now for a relaxing therapeutic Swedish l'lassage • Body builder & licensed therapist • RMT#005930 • Randal • 713-529-3348 MOVING SERVICE PLANNING TO MOVE? We'll move you in the right direc· tion • American Movers • Experienced • Trusted • Insured • Tx Dot # 5282035C • 713-522· 1717 • www amencanmovers.org • 800- 522-2670 • PET OF THE WEEK This is Mister Cat Don't ya just love him already. As you can tell he is a laid back cat loved to be cud­dled. but not too much and of course does not need too much exercise! He is about 2 years old and 1ust waiting for a big, fluffy pillow to lay on! AFGHAN HOUND PUPPIES Cyan and Devashunii Kennels • AKC Black • Black & tan • Cream • Blue • Blue & Cream • White • Hand raised • Championship lines • Starting at S 1500 • www.devashu­ni ,.com • 202-546-0854 PETSiillNG BOOK FOR YOUR VACATION PLAN YOUR FALL GETAWAY NOWll "Pets love their own home even when you can't be there• Established 1995. Book your vacation now E·mail: loyal9890aol.com Call Loyal at 713-942-8816 PRODUCTS & SERVICES KINGSIZE MATIRESS NEW IN PLASTIC 20 year warranty• Must sell S250 • 713 560-7108 QUEEN PILLOW TOP MATIRESS SET Brand new • List S699 • Sell S200 • 832-435-2677 • Cao Deliver PROFF.SSIONAL SERVICF.S M2M BODY GROOMING Body Waxing • Clippings • Coloring • Personal grooming by Dale. Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist. Private location in Montrose. Call 713-529-5952 for appointment PSYQilC EDUCATION PSYCHIC READING BY GINA Spiritual reader and advisor • advises on love, health, and marriage • Unfold the mystery of your past life and interpret your dreams• S10 Taro card reading • 713-524-1298 LEARN REIKI COMPL.ElRY 2 1(2 DAYS NOV If>. l 8 ONLY S425 • Gift certificates av.111able for this and many other intrigung (and cheaper) services • 0etans at rainbow­prod. conVbil bo • Reiki Master Bill O'Rolrl.e ROOMMATES GW Couple seeking roommate to share 3/1 in NW Houston • 314 acre overlooking Cole Creek and forest • (Tidwell & 290) • S400/mo and 112 elec • References required • 713· 462-8511 Share 212 remodeled home in the Heights area with 30's WM • Non· smoker • Hardwoods • S425 + util· 1ties • 832·309-0822 GWM traveling executive to share Midtown 212 loft with professional GM • Private bath • WID • M1Crowave • Direct TV • Weekly cleaning service • Secure parking • Pool • Full gym• Downtown trolley service • Courtyard view • Excellent location • Utilities shared • Background check required• Leave message at 713-528-0371 SGWM seeks nonsmoking room­mate to share 212 condo • New kitchen & bath • Pool • Security • 1 block from River Oaks shopping center next to Barnaby's • 713·520· 7662 TRAVEL IF YOU LIKE KEY WEST OR HAWAII, YOU'LL "LOVE" PARADISE • Accepting reservations • 409-762· 6677 • Toll Free 877-919-6677 • 2317 Ave. P • Galveston • www.galveston.com/paradise paradise@galveston.com. VOLUNTEERS STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregivers for transitional housing program for HIV+ adults • Must have high school diploma and experience as a caregiver • Contact Ms. Straham 0 713-522· 5757 or fax resume to 713-522· 1910 FOR INFORMATION ON PUTTING YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TO WORK FOR YOU, GIVE CAROLYN A CALL AT 713/529-8490 HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 >\ cingularSM [F ~L~ ~ WI RELE SS ~[f{] (Q) [M ~ FREE Nights and Weekends with any Home Plan of $29.99 or higher 200 Ct u~ 450 ttotorota 2282 =~OIVM; 129! ~=°'- 149! usiness gets done: SAVE s100 on the NEW i50sx Now Only $4999 Authorized FREE PHONE Save $79 Motorola 2282 75 Whenever Minutes 600 Whenever Minutes 500 Weekend Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes :-~ 119! ~=~~ 1399.! 1000 Whenever Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes r.~w $61\99 ~l()m-ltA--= :1-- 2000 WheneYer Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes :.."..~..°..r. ,:.*.. .s 999.9. Mlma.ICIMIZ! 25 r---------------------------------------------------------------------~ PICK YOUR CATEGORY FREE': Call for guidelines HIV Services & tducation - Volunteers :_Non-Profit Organizations 'first 20 words INDIVIDUAL RATE $10: Announcements Auditions = Employment-Seeking PetrFree or Lost & Found Roommates Personal Web sites BUSINESS RATE $18: _ Auto Repair Business Opportunities - Entertainment - Help Wanted = Help Wanted-Seeking Home Improvement - Items For Sale - Licensed Massage = Moving Services Professional Services Real Estate For Rent - Real Estate For Sale Call 713-519-8490 for other categories ----------- Classified Order Form Fax: 713-529-9531, Phone: 713-529-8490 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring completed order form with payment to Houston Voice offices (M-f. ~5:30 pm) 500 Lovett, suite 200. llY MAIL: Mail completed order form with payment to Houston Voice Classifieds. 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX., 7700f> llY PHONE! Call in with completed order form to 713-529-8490. llY FAX: Fax completed order form and credit card information to Classifieds 713-5~9531 . BY E-MAIL: crobertsOhoustonvoice.com AD POLICY: Houston Voice reserves the right to edrt. reclassify or reiect ads not meeting Houston VoKe standards. No refunds for early cancellation. Misprints: Houston Voice is not responsible for misprints appearing after first week.. Check. ads promptly. Deadline for ad submission is: MONDAY at 12 NOON WRITE YOUR AD Please print clearly CATEGORY: ___________ # OF ISSUES: ___ _ Giant or Bold Headline - Not to exceed 14 characters and spaces ; I I I I I I I I I I I I I I TEXT: _ _ ________________ _ ------------------------------ TOTAL YOUR COST CALL FOR DIRECTORY AD RATES INDMDUAL RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 10.00 per week.. Additional words at 50( each per week.. Up to 20 words: $10.00 Additional words __ x 50': ___ _ Bold headline; 5.00 (per week) ___ _ Subtoul: x t of issues Total· s _ _ _ BUSINESS RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 1B.OO per week.. Additional words __ x 75( per word ~ we6): ___ _ Bold headline: 5.00 (per week) ___ _ Subtoul: x r of issues Total: s _ _ _ Name: ------------------- Address: ------------------ City ___________ State _ Zip _ _ f'hone __________________ _ Check Endosed __ Charge to my 0 AMEX ::I MC Q VISA Card# Exp._J_ Signature _________________ _ -------------------------- . I 26 DIRECTORY NOVEMBER 2, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE American & Fo1e111n TAFT STREET AUTO : Auto Repair & Service 713-526-3723 1411 Tift IHSIH,11. 11019 Mru 1ni1y. Rtsidrlllial • C.Ouarial I C".allilllllly,_Bot 713.861.6181 .\D \\IS ('0\IPl.E'I'•: . . .-:::--~ ,"":I~- . .. I ;....._t). 1 __ •· ~ .. 1 . Specializin~ in carpet & Hardwood floor care 713-545-3226 CALL NOW FOR Al'li ESTI'1ATE Evening & weekend appointments available •••• • M111a1 P&AC •Alignment •Brakes • Inc. 1307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 In Business Since 1989 Perfection Plus Domestic Services Specialists in Detail Cleaning FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED BONDED FOR YOUR PROTECTION MOVE·INS/1.IOVE·OUTS •SPECIAL PROJECTS WEEKLY · BIMONTHLY IN BUSINESS SINCE 1989 ---------------· $10°0 0FF First Cleaning We Supply All Cleanlnf Products & Equipmen rRH ES fl\IATES B\ l'honf (7U) 8'>5-2766 Call Carolyn at 713-529-8490 or fax 713-529-9531 to place ~ur directory or classified ad in the Houston Voice today! 24-HOUR SERV ICE 6,8&10 P.mmgcr Ekpit~ limousines • <7•3>6 86-3337 20% o ff When You Mentl;; T hi e A di • AUTO • HOME • LIFE • LOW COST AUTOS LOW COST RENTERS MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS TONY MAY INSURANCE AGENCY NATIONWIDE INSURANCE 713-807-8264 Professional Massage In M1mtrose Swedisk massage by Thom Loch 113.256.9490 RMTI026584 MOLITOR GLASS & MIRROR MIRRORED WALLS • WET BARS • SUNSCREENS HEAVY GLASS SHOWER ENCLOSURES BODIE MOLITOR 713.880.0309 713.304.9890 cell Penis-Enlargement.net FDA Approved vacuum pumps/surgical. Gain 1-3". Permanent & saf e. Enhance erection. FREE Brochures! Latest enlargement info: (619)295-HUNG or 900-976-PUMP ($2.95/min.) .__---:--} ~ The House Company DAVID BOWERS Realtor 2615 Broadway Galveston, Texas n 550 Don't lose your valuable investments. Photographic documentation of your insured, personal possessions will afford your receiving a fair price for replacement. ¢11 pidai& i4' ~ Q. tlwuMmJ, WOJUJ&,, atula. ~calf;~~ 'l.000 l'f d~ •FJRE •THEFT •FLOOD Wild Kat Unlimited • Kathy "Kat" Frazer 713-981-8958 • Kat2travel@msn.com Photographer • BONDED If your hair Isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY Al't'OINTMEHT ONLY HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 2, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU Stars' by JILL DEARMAN YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE Nov. 2-8 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) When Mercury moves into your house of other people's money on Nov. 7 you should consider writing a story with a colleague. Collaborations are fruitful. A Cancer is more than 1ust the flavor of the month for you, babe. TAURUS {April 21 to May 20) Work 1s distracting you from your love life, isn't it? A Libra will wait by the phone for your call, but sadly, sweetie, your boss won't. While Mercury and your ruler Venus are conjunct in your day job house, make the most of your talents, and not just the ones that involve your body, baby. GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Things are more complicated than they appear on the work front, but you can han­dle it. In fact, as your ruler Mercury transits your day job sector, you can make hay while the rest of your colleagues are hiding. A Capricorn gives good pillow talk. CANCER (June 22 to July 221 The moon in your house of money on Nov. 7 brings you a chance to make extra cash for the holidays. Your charm is what sells so tum it on. You have already turned on a Sagittarius beyond belief! LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) Fake friends have taken their toll on you, Loo, so it's hme to extricate yourself from their shackles. You hold the key, and a quick-footed Gemini can help you to flee - to a series of new relahon.~hips that are much more ronstructive and po:;itive. Jupiter in your house of endings and new beginnings is demanding that you move on with your life! VIRGO {Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) You know what you have to do to get your career back on track, and you know that it's going to take a lot of fast moves. While the Sun and your ruler Mercury hook up in your house of communication (from Nov. 7-21) you can move at the speed of light, with the help of a Gemini. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Don't even bother trying to fool your.;elf, darling. If you are longing to get in touch with someone you ended "on a bad note" with, then do. The anxiety of not knowing isn't worth the time and energy. Mercury conjunct Venus in your sign are on your side. An Aries will give you extra back up. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Outward acts of revenge may be sweet, but hving well is sweeter. A Taurus is shll mooning over you, and the best way to get him back is to be truly fabulous. The Sun is shining on you, so put your dark fantasies aside· for five minutes' SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) There is a feeling of power and accomplishment you will experience if you stop com­peting with idiots and start challenging yourself! Jupiter in your house of long-term relationships would rather you cut your kisses with moronic rivals, and start some­thing slow and simmering with a worthy Virgo. 1 CAPRICORN {Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Your love life 1s moving slowly, but 1t is moving, darling. Friends are matchmaking for you behind your back as the Sun and Mercury tran.~it your house of friends. A Libra wants to be more than friends. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You may have a hard time reading people during this cycle, so tum your attention inward instead. What is motivating you? Why are you spinning your wheels? A Virgo wants you in the driver's seat. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Venus bnngs you more adventurL'S beginning Nov. 8. Be careful if you're having sex in a public place with a Scorpio • nothing is private or hidden right now! You can h.we fun but just wear a d1sgu1se, doll. /1/1 Dearman is tlrea11tl1orofllre besl-sellmg "Queer Astrology for Men" and "Queer Astrology for Wommn (botli from St. Mart m's Griffin). For rnfom1at1on on clrarls and cons11/tat1011s, cnll 212-841-0177 ore-marl QScopes®aol com • Spectacular Cityscape Views • 24-Hour Front Desk Security • Concierge I Valet Services • 1 O Foot Ceilings • Slate Kitchen Floors • Granite Countertops EADY FO OV · I $£ l _I tOOU F M l t '1 'S lO ltlt l O'S THE MARK CONDOMINIUM 3505 Sage Houston, Texas 77056 Sales Center Open Mon-Sat 10·6, Sun 11·6 www.TheMarkCondo.com 27
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