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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 001. 2000-12-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7332.

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(2000-12-29). Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7332

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000 - File 001, 2000-12-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7361/show/7332.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1053, December 29, 2000
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 29, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HITS & MISSES IN HOUSTON THEATER From vampire lesbians to Christmas on Mars, 2000 offered Bayou City variety of gay productions Page 15 ISSUE 1053 www.houstonvoice.com All THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 29, 2000 INSIDE Finding homes for GLBT organizations, generating political activism top e·group Han-net's list of priorities for 2001 Page 3 We've come a long way, baby. Take a look back at the first 1,000 years of queer history Page 3 Gay artists like Patricia Barber turned to the indie scene for more exposure in the year 2000 Page 18 Gay milestones reached in 2000 From sodomy law rulings to lesbian weddings, many historic landmarks noted in Texas this year by WENDY K. MOHO;\/ As we prepare to herald out the year 2000 with a chorus of" Auld Lang Syne," it's appro­pnate to note that this year was pivotal in the queer history of Texas and the nation. While the fate of the state's homosexual conduct law rest:; in the hands of the Texas 14th Court of Appeals, the fact that the three­judge panel of that court overturned the law m June was a landmark occasion. Add to that the st?ries of the state's first legal lesbian wed· dmg, plus Vermont's first avil union and you have a year for the history books. The following is a month-by-month sum· mary of some of the stories of note rovered by the Houston Voice in 2000: JANUARY Radio station quiet after alleged gay slurs: The pmducer of a local morning radio program has come under fire for allegedly using anti· gay slurs to descnbe lesbian City Councilmember Annise Parker dur­ing a broadcast last week. Keven Dorsey, producer of "The Annise Parker Dean and Rog Show" on KKRW 93.7, allegedly called Parker a "dyke" and "carpet muncher" during the morrung drive­time show on Jan. 21 during a discussion about Parker's involvement with the Westheimer Street Festival. "While it b iru;ulting to me, it is an affmnt to the lesbian community," Parker said. "11wl"l' are ('quivalent terms one would use for other minorities that no other radio station in I louston would use. We don't live in a cit} that tolerates those kind of remarks." The st.ition L~suL>d a terse on-air apok1b'Y to P.uker the following week, though station off1c1als took no action against Dorsey for call­ing Parker a "dyke" and "carpet muncher" during a Jan. 21 bniadcast. "They did what I asked," Parker said. "Thq made a public apology and they agreed that similar behavior wouldn't hap· pen in the future." Probe targets prescription fraud at AIDS clinic:. A .local and federal probe into allegro prescnphon fraud at Thomas Street Clinic has indefinitely shut down a popular volunteer program there and raised concerru; about a heavy-handed investigation. A tip from a clin­ic employee in December launched the inves­tigation, which has reulted in the arrest of a former volunteer with the People \\ith AIDS Coalition and the temporary closing of the coalihon's volunteer and child care programs at the sprawling AIDS clinic in Near Northside in Houston's Fourth Ward. . A. week later, the Harris County Hospital Distnct, which operates the clinic, ordered the PWA's volunteer program-along with it:; child care program--!-hut do\.\'Tl during the ongoing investigahon. Before his arrest, Pullam volunteered in the PWA pnigram. In March, the program was reinstated and hospital district officials ordered clinic director Carolyn Barrett reassigned. In June, three people associated with the clinic were indicted for stealing from the state by using phony prescriptions to obtain steroids and charge them to Medicaid, according to authorities. FEBRUARY State to fight order to free condemned killer: After 16 years on death mw, and endur­ing anti-gay slurs from a prosecutor and a defen~ attorney who slept thmugh much ofhc.19S4 murder trial, Cah'ln Burdine anticipated being set free. A federal judge ordered lus release in Februal}~ ruling that Calvin Burdine the state missed an earlier deadline to either ~et Burdine free or retry Burdine for killing his roommate and former boyfnend. Later, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeab true¥;' out a lower rourt's order reqwnng Burd me be released because the state mL.;:.ed a dea~line for retrying him. US. District Judge Da\·1d Hittner L'isued the order March 3 and is the same 1udge who ruled last September that Burdine's trial was unfair becau:.e his lawyer slept through much of it. The case c. still not ~ttled . !1'e full 5th US. Circuit Court of Appeab dooded to take up the case after a three-judge > Continued on Page 6 2 DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Do You Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI A Smoking Cessation Research Study that uses a hand-held computer and the nicotine patch to help people quit smoking Call today 713-792-2265 Dadd S. Genac, Ph.D. Project CASSI Researcher _ Member~ The Society for the Psychological Study TI-E lNIVERSI1Y OF TEXAS MDANJERSON CANCERCENIER .____ _...... .... . of Gay, Lesbian & B&Sexual Issues Making Cancer History™ HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 NEWS 3 INSIDE NEWS Notional News ••......•.•••...•..... 4 Police News ••••..........•...••.•.. . 5 World News •••.•••.••.••...••.•.•. 1 0 Heohh news ....................... 11 Quote/ unquote ••..••..••.••••••••• 21 VOICES & ECHOES Crain: Tune for gays to break the faith? .... 8 Murphy /Minicucci: Celebrate your neurosis .. 9 'Dykes to Watch Out For' .•........... . 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU The good, bad and ugly of theater in 2000 .. 15 Out in Musi<: Queer tunes of die year .... 18 On Sueen: Quonfily, not quality in gay film . 19 Eating Out et Marrokech .•..•..... ' ... 20 Bayou Calendar •••.•••••••••.••••.• 17 ( I ...................... .27·23 Occasions .•••••••••••••••••••••••• 26 My Stars! .......••............... ,27 CLASSIFIEDS ••••••••.••••••••••• ~ .•• 24-25 Issue 1053 I 1 id I r:1 td I I voice Al. material 111 Houston Voice is prol8cted by '9delal copyright lllw and rr.y not be repro­ducad without Ille wriftln consent of Houston Voice The sexual orlentallOn ot adwrtiHrs, photographers, wrlterS and cartoonists pub- Nshad herein Is neither Inferred or Implied The appearance ot names or plCIOrlal representa· tlon does not necessartly Indicate Iha sexual orlenlatlon ot lh8t person Of persons Houston \\:>ice acc:eptS unsoliciaed editorial mmtarlal but cannot 1•1111 responsibility for Its return The editor reserves Ille right to accept, reject or edit any submlsst011. AR rights r9Wll to authors upon publlcatlon Guidelines lor freelance contributors are 'available upon requeet. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd .. Suite 200 Houston, TX n006 713-529-8490 Han-Net establishes list of goals for 2001 Finding homes for GLBT organizations, generating political activism top the list by ELLA TYLER Han-Net, the e-group for Houston's GLBT activists, recently asked its members to vote on Community Challenges for 2001. The poll dosed Tuesday night. . "Focus on local and state political issues" was the top vote-getter, with 16 votes. The Texas legislature will be meeting from January to May of 2001, and city elections will be held in November of 2001. - '"::---"~~~~~~~~~~_J .-,......-._. ..-.... . Finding new homes for the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Cent~r an~ the Gulf Coast Archives & Museum were the next highest pnonty, with 12 votes and 10 votes respectively. -- '--............ -..-..... ..............,. ............... .................. _. - ~ --- .... ._ .n............- ................... ........... .. ...,~-·- ....._ "Exploring options for a new home is one of our primary objectives ' for the year ahead and we will soon have a second meeting open to any­one who wishes to participate in the process," Tun Brookover, HLGCC president, said. The Community Center is outgrowing it's current space, and GCAM is temporarily housed in a portion of a warehouse east of down­town that is used as a residence. --· - --....-..-..-... .--.. -.... --.---......-......-......-...... . > Continued on Page 12 Han·Net, on e-group for political activists in Houston's queer communi­ty, was estab&shed two years ago by Brandon WoH. found at www.egroups.com/11oup/han-net, tbe 1st is aot moderated 111d has nearly 250 members. Snapshots from a gay millennium As 2001 marks the real start of the new millennium, the first 1,000 years show escalating change for gays by LAURA BROWN To say that life on Earth has changed in the • last 1,000 years would be a massive under­statement- although to say that there are some for whom things haven't changed so much is also certainly true. Gay history, too, shows a pattern of escalat­ing change with a stubborn undercurrent of hostility toward gays, although gay history is much more difficult to track. Most scholars, in fact, will argue that there really is no such thing as "gay history" before the last century or so. .The id7a of a separate gay identity, they point out, L~ a very recent social phenomenon: While individuals engaged in sexual relations with members of their own sex in centuries past, and even in some cases were assigned social roles because of it, they were unlikely to have constructed their identity around their sexuality in the same way that many gay men and lesbians do today. So looking back to the beginning of the mil­lennium, the story of "gay history" is more often a story of same-sex attraction, sodomy or ~ender transgression, and how the people involved in these activities were treated by the individuals and institutions around them. It is also, very often, a tale of persecution­although there have always been cultures, many non-Western, that have accepted and even celebrated such differences-and a tale of institutions of social power and how they affect whose story gets told, then and now. Much more is known about male-male relationships, especially up until the last two centuries, as sexism and patriarchy in many societies kept women from recording their own stories and made them invisible or unin­teresting to the men who created much of the bodies of Jaw and literature that have survived until today. Most gay historical scholarship has also focused on Western cultures, to the exclusion of those in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. 1000-1100 • In his 1051 treatise "Book of Gomorrah," Saint Peter Damian wrote at length about the evil of male homosexuality, especially in the clergy, including long and very detailed accounts of what he implied were very com­mon homosexual acts. • Though not officially condoned, homo­sexual activity often was tolerated in the Catholic clergy. Pope Urban Il, who launched the first Crusade, declined to act on informa­tion from church leaders who complained about the male lover of Ralph. Archbishop of Tours, becoming Archbishop of Orleans. John, Ralph's lover, was elected in 1098. And while Ralph's homosexuality was so well known that it was described in popular songs, in later years, crackdowns on known adulterers among the clergy-who were required to be celibate-left John and Ralph alone. 11©-1200 • In 1102, the ecclesiastical Council of London sought to inform the general citizenry that "sodomy" was a sin that needed to be included in confessions, although the edict may never have been publ@led. 'This sin has Jutherto been so public that hardly anyone is embarrassed by it," wrote Saint Anselm, Archbishop of Canterbury. • In 1179, the Catholic Lateren ill council imposed sanctions against a variety of sinners, including those involved with homosexuality Relative tolerC11C1 of same-sex relations in the early part of the mlennium lllCIJ be represeated in art from the period: T1lis sculpture from the 12th century came from 111 area known for homosexualty; it could depict merely wrestlers, scholar John Boswel aotes, or muda more. in a list that also included Jews, Muslims, heretics and moneylenders. U©-1300 • Although the past century in Europe was considered fairly open to same-sex relation­ships, the next two showed increasing perse­cution, as religion and law became increasing­ly absolute. As the Crusades continued, Christian leaders tried to rally hatred against Muslims by alleging effeminacy and sodomy as charactenstics of the entire ethnic group. • The earliest and most stringent legisla­tion passed against gays came from Europeans ······~ .. ~> Continued on Pa_ge 12 4 We are a full-service law firm which has represented over 1000 clients with varied legal situations. For corporate & real estate representation, call Andrew D. H·eisblatt, ext. JO() For family law questions, call ,Uicliael Floreani, ext. 200 For debt-related questiom, call Adam Scliachter, ext. 300 DEBT CONSOLIDATION FREE CONSULTATION Through Chapter 7 or 13 of the US BankruplC) Code PAYMENT TERMS C.11.\PH.R 1--Get Rid of Debt CJIAPH ;R IJ,_ Reorganize lndhidual & Small Bu., ineM EVENING APPOINTMENTS www.weisblattlaw.com • E-mail: AGS@weisblattlaw.com 3104 Edloe, Suite 301 •Houston, TX 77027-0671 ~01 Cert11ied by The Tcxa:. Board of l.cgal Spcc1aliL.111on Forming New Groups for Gay/Bisexual en ~ Men in Transition Married or Previou1/y Married Gay/BisUMal Men ~ Men Overcoming Loss Single Gay Men \Vhn Have lost a Par1nu to Separation or Dearh TONY CARROLL, LM"SW-ACP c-.,,,,.,,.-.._ _...,.,.,,_.-w.in ~,,.,..,.,con...., .Vltl.z ear M 111r: MiuounStrcct 713-527·0000 w...w.Ho Your Community Insurance Agency! Experience. Professionalism. Courteous Service! For Home, Health & Auto Insurance DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE around the nation Scout ban for Winter Olympics not related to gay ban, organizers say SALT LAKE CITY-Both Salt Lake Olympic organizers and local leaders of the Boy Scouts of America have denied charges that Scouts are not being chosen as volunteers for the 2002 Winter Olympics because of the group's anti-gay policies, the DeseretNews reported. David M. Bresnahan, 47, a former radio talk-show host and former Utah state representative, said that "the welcome mat was rolled up and the door slammed in its face" when a Scout group responded to the Salt Lake Olympic Organizing Committee's call for volunteers. Olympic and local Scouting officials both said the boys can't be volunteers for the 2002 Winter Olympics because they don't meet the minimum age requirement of 18. "(Bresnahan's charge] happens to be 100 percent inaccurate," SLOC President Mitt Romney said. 1\No governors ban discrimination against gay state employees HELENA, Mont.-Montana Republican Go\'. Marc Racicot, who removed his name from consideration to be President-elect George W. Bush's attorney general, has issued new state guidelines barring discriminallon against state employees based on sexual onentation, the Billings Gazelle reported. Racicot asked the slate's Department of Administration to rewrite the guidelines more than a year ago, and specifically asked that sexual orientation be included in the new policy. "We don't want people making employment deci$ions based on any of these factors," said John McEwen said, state per­sonnel division administrator. In Dover, Del., outgoing Democratic Go\'. Thomas Carper also extended similar protections to Delaware state employees, the Wilmington News Journal reported .. The order applies to all state Cabmet departments and executive agenaes that fall under the governor's auth'ority, and will remain in effect unless rescinded by another governor. A bill that would have forbidden employment discrunination agarnst gays in the public and private sector was defeated in the Delaware House earlier this year. In January, Carper will be replaced by Democrat Ruth Anne Minnow. Montana Gov. Marc Racicot, at one time a leading candidate for U.S. Attorney General in a Bush administration, issued guidelines protecting gay state employees from discrimination. Aspen officials reject rainbow flags to celebrate Gay Ski Week ASPEN, Colo. (AP)-The Aspen City Council denied a request to hang rainbow flags on Main Street to mark next month's Gay Ski Week. Instead, they voted to maintain the cur­rent policy of only allowing U.S. and Colorado flags and flags marking anniversaries of local groups at least 25 years old. They also agreed to let non-profit groups fly a single flag at Paepcke Park during ski week. "Aspen has the only Gay Ski Week in the United States," resident Greg Hughes said. "It celebrates Aspen on an international stage as being open to • diversitr." But Councilman Tony Hershey argued that the city shouldn't allow exceptions to its policy. "Suppose the American Nazi Party wants to have Nazi Ski WL>ek. We'd have to have Nazi flags up and down Main Street," Hershey ~id. Mayor Rachel RiC"hards said the real issue is the commercialization of Aspen. "It's how much and how often you want to promote this week's marketing event for the town," she said. "Do you want flags on Main Street 40 to 59 weeks a year?" Gay group in N.Y. wants legislators to ban teasing based on bias ALBA:-..:Y, N.Y.-A coalition of groups lea by the sfate's largest gay righb group is push­ing the New York Legislature to enact a measure banning teasing based on bias in New York'~ public schools, the Rochester Democrat & Chronicle reported. The Dignity for All Students Act would establish statewide regulations to prevent harassment m pubhc schools against racial religious and ethnic minorities as well as gay classmates. "There's no uniform policy in the state that recognizes hara:.sment as a problem,'' said Matthew Foreman, executive director of Gay Pnde Agenda, a New York gay advocacy group. Frl~ speech advocates said the proposed legislation would inhibit the way students address each other m pubhc schools. "Whene\·er the government attempts to regulate free speech, It's a concern to us,'' said Marina Sheriff, legislative director for the New York chapter of the ACLU. Former HIV-positive court clerk sues after tennination earlier this year LITTLE ROCK (AP)-A former worker who was demoted after informing supervisors that he was infected with HIV, and later fired after missing days from work, filed a $1.2 mil­lion federal lawsuit Dec. 20. Christopher Haynes alleges wrongful discharge, discrimina­tion and infliction of emotional ~tress in the ci\'il rights lawsuit. He seeks damages, rem· statement, and back pay, and also asks that Pulaski County Clerk Carolyn Staley either be removed from office or that the court assign an officer to monitor her employment prac­tices. The lawsuit said Haynes began work for the county as a deputy clerk in April 1999 and was promoted to administrative :issistant the following August It said l layncs mfonned Staley and Janice Hay, chief deputy clerk, in October 1999 that he is HIV-positive and that lus absences from work were due to his medical cond1t1on. Haynes was demoted For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com to deputy clerk three months J,1te and fired in January after missing several days' work. -From staff and wm: reports HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 police beat Three Chicago cops placed on leave for alleged role in anti-gay beating Cl IICAGO-Three pOlice officer~ have been placed on <1dmin1strahve leave for alleged­ly beating ,1 man they thought was gay, the Chicago Free Press reported. Jeffrey Lyons, 39, was hugging a man good-bye outside a b.u filled with off-duty police officers when he was allegedly confronted by the officers. HGet that faggot shit away from my truck," one of the olficer's shouted, according to Lyons' attorney Timothy Cavenaugh. The officer then start­ed hitting Lyons, and other officers allegedly joint.>d in. The beahng ended with Lyons unconscious with a broken nose and fractured cheekbones. Cavenaugh said Lyons' long hair may have led the officers to belie\'e he was gay. Cavenaugh said Lyons is not gay and the son of n police officer who was killed in the line of duty in 1992. Vt. judge rules details of lesbian affair tainted wrongful death lawsuit BENNINCTO. , Vt. (AP)-The Vermont Supreme Court found that inflammatory testi­mony about a wife's lesbian .iffair has tainted the verdict in a trial over a man's death in a 1998 ap.irtrnent fire, .ind ordered a new In.ii. The high court agreed with the family of the late Charles Mears that a lower 'ourt judge erred when he allowed Edwin Colvin's attorney to nttack the family's moral character. The family sought $1.75 million in damages for Mears' death, charging that as landlord, Colvin should have installed hard-wired smoke detectors in 1e,1rs' apartment, as required by law. Colvin, a former state representative, argued that b.it­tery- powl•rcd smoke detectors were sufficient. Throughout the trial, defense attorney Marc Heath hammered away at Mears' widow, Shirley, depicting her as an opportunist who aban­doned, her mentally ill husband for another woman and then tried to cash in on his death. Alleged killer fit to stand trial in W.V. killing, psychologist says FAIRMONT, W.Va.-A teen charged with killing a gay black man last summer claims he was sexually abused by the Victim for more than five yeilrs, s!Mting ill age 12, the ChMleston Gillette reported. Arthur "JR." D.wid Pilrker and Jilred Wilson, both 17 ill the time, are being tried il~ adults for Warren's July 4 slay· mg. u[Warrcn] would come around when 1 was drunk. He would follow me into the basement," PMker told forensic psychologist William Fremouw. "In a way, he forced me." Parker does not consider himself to be gay, although he had sex with Warren about 30 times over five yeilrs, Frl•mouw Silid. The night of the killing, P.1rkN said he consumed 15 beers, smoked marijuana, snorted crushl>d tranquilizers and huffl.J gasoline. But Parker's intox1C.ltion didn't prevent him from knowing whnt he was doing thl• night of the murder, Fremouw said, and the teen 1s capable of standing trial on a first· degree murder charge. Prosecutors allegl'Cl Warren was ktlled bt>cause he told others about his sexual n•lation­sh1p with Parker. Parker's attorney, Stephen Fitz, has David Parker, accused of kilting a gay West Virginia man, had sex with the victim more than 30 times before the July 4 slaying, authorities said. s.1id he will argue that Warren was a "sexual predator." Also, spl'Cial pl'05Crutors have been appointed to handle the two cases, since the current district attorney is leaving office in January. Wilson's trial is set to begin Jan. 16, though a new judge who takes over the case next month said the start of the tnal could be pushed back. Hustler, transgendered partner convicted in fatal cal if. robbery SAN JOSE, Calif.-,\ hustler and his transgendered lover were both found guilty of rob­bing and fatally knifing a man last year, the San Jose Mercury News reported. Michael Yancey, 29, and Ronnie Warren Ellard, 32, were charged with first-degree murder and rob· bery in the April 13, 1999, killing of lighting consultant Kenneth Alexander, 47, who had met Yancey in a 5.ln Francisco park. The pair went to a motel and engaged in drugs and sex, police said. Alexander then in\'ited Yancey to stop by his apartment on his way home the next day. The motive for the slaying, according to prosecutors, was money. During the tnal, Ellard's attorney, David Hultgren, accused Yancey of the kiUing. Yancey, he said, wanted Ellard to take the fall for the crime because Ellard, who has AIDS, "was gomg to die anyway." Yancey testified that he was not present when Alexander was fatally knifed. The are scheduled to be sentenced Jan. 18. l\vo New Zealand men sentenced for vicious attack on gay waiter AUCKLAND-Two New Zealand men were sentenced for the beahng of a gay waiter, the New Zealand Herald reported. Andrew Andre Poki, 20, received 10 years, while Phillip Jamt•s faylor, 26, got 7-1 /2 for the March 24 beating of Stephen Byrne, who had been lured by the two men into a secluded place. When Byrne tried to kiss one of them, they vicious­ly beat him. "Mr. Byrne was the victim of a particula rly brutal attack because he was homo­sexual," Judge Nicholson said. Doctors had to n·move a blood clot in Byrne's brain, leav­mg him with short-term memory problems after the attack. "I just keep thinking they . . stuffed up my hfe and stuffed up theirs as well," For more news,,v1s1t Byrne said of his attackers. www.houstonvotee.com -From staff and wire reports , When you have issues to dea I with, being gay shouldn't be one of them. If you're struggling with addtction o depression, you need a treatment center where you can be yourself .... Where you can talk frankly and safely to people who understand you. We're Pride Institute, the nation's leader in providing treatment for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communrt1es. We have programs offering residential, outpatient and halfway house services. You have the power. Call us today. fT.lAUDUtwf t*WYOl!K Tl.,l{llJE INS'I'I'l'U'l'E 800-54-PRIDE Sellmg \'Our life imuranct• rs 011 opt1011 to consrda •Tor t!it' tfi111_qs rou want or need mo~t. J11cl1ul1119 lrnl't{ treal111t'11I. or ·'""Pl)' pt'act' of m111d. ::.- Most life 1nsuronce policies moy qualify for sole. Nearly any size. > One quick. simple application. ,.,. No cost or obligation ot any lime > HIV and other senous 1 lnesses ,.,. Your high T-cell count moy not matter! > Confidential!ty. Trust. Understanding. Compassion. _ ~BENEFITS - 1AMERICA 800· 777 -8878 404-233-5411 Circumstances change. 5 Benefits America gives you solutions. • 6 DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Landmark gay cases heard during 2000 > Continued from Page 1 panel of the court ruled 2-1 in October that the defendant's rights were not Violated. The panel said Calvin Burdine, 47, was unable to prow that !us lawyer, Joe Carmon, slept dur­mg critical parts of the trial. Cannon is now dead 1he court has scheduled oral arguments for Jan. 22 in New Orleans. AIDS Ride cuts fail to make financial dif­ference: Despite dramahc changes in the Tanqueray's Texas AIDS Ride last year, final acrounting results are expected to show that expenses for the 1999 event consumed about 85 percent of the money rai!:.ed, matching di:;­appomting returns a year earlier that prompt­ed several beneficiaries to drop out. A severe shortfall in the amount of money returned to bt'!1eficiaries of the 1998 AIDS Ride led at least IO agenaes to pull out of the 1999 event. Only $.380,000 was distributed among the 40 AIDS groups that took part in 1998, le.s than 15 per­cent of the $2.8 million raised. Organizers said in February that if more riders will partiapate m the 2<XX) event in October, the rule will be able to return more money to benefiting agencies. Unfortunately, that didn't happen. Low rider turnout and poor financial returns caused promoters of Tanqueray's Texas AIDS Ride to disband the event. Directors of the Resource Center of Dallas say they plan to cun­tmue an AIDS nde of some sort in 2001, but it 1.5 still uncertain 1f the ride will be state wide and whether Houston AIDS agency would benefit from such an event. APRIL Bobbi Whitacre (left) is hugged by partner Sandi Cote after the Vennont House gave final passage lo the civil uNon5 biD it April Vt'nnont legislature approves historic 'civil unions' bill: A bill to recognize same-sex "civil unions" won final passage in the Vermont legislature and received Go\' Howard Dean's signature a day later, brmgmg with it the creation of a new verb: "to C.U." 1he Vermont House passed the Senate ver­s10n of the bill by a nurgm of~. thn.>e votes more than it earned on first passage. An estun.ited 20 to 30 couples took ad\•an­tage of the law on July 1. the day it took effect, including out-of-state couples from Massachusetts, Louisiana and Otuo. Houston gay activist Richard Wiederholt dies: Gay activist and bu:;ines!>man Richard \\'iederholt, an tn.Spiring force to many mem­bers of Houston's gay communil)j died Apnl 28 from complications related to AIDS. He was Si. Wiederholt was best known for Basic Brothers, a gay clothing store he founded in 1982, and a laundry list of community groups he volunteered with or helped establish, including the Greater Houston Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce, the Body Positive Wellness Center and HNI AIDS Resource Group As a testament to Wiederholt's community involvement, he was selected in March as one of four grand marshals for the Pride parade June24. Hundreds of thousands march for equali­ty: Despite protests from anti·gay religious groups and some gay rights activists, hun­dreds of thousands of participants joined the Millennium March on Washington for Wrth the Capitol in the back!P'o...d. Bethany Toups (left) and Bunnie Kramer of Rochester, N. Y. hold a flog whie takitg part In the Mletium March on Washitgton for Equafity. Equality April 29-30, the fourth gay rights march on the national capital. Though the numbers are widely debated, organizers esti­mated a crowd of 700,000 to 800,000 particpated in the April 30 march and rally on the National Mall. Media reports estimated the crowd at 200,000 people. The march capped a 'week­end of gay nghts events that also included a gala dinner, a mass same-sex wed­ding ceremony, a d.splay of panels from the AIDS memonal qmlt, a rock concert and a street festival on Pennsylvania A\ enue. "Moments like Sunday are life-transfonn­mg. and we need those moments because we need more people to be involved in the les b1an, gay, bisexual lmd transgender rights mo\ ement," said an exhausted but elated Dianne Hardy-Garcia, MMOW executive director. But just a week later, MMOW organizers asked the FBI to investigate as much as a m1l­hon dollars m money mtssmg from the M11lenmum Festival, a street fair produced by M1llenmum Productions that was scheduled to donate the bulk of its proceeds to the march In mid-December, two gay media compa­nies, Cay.com and Ltberahon Publications, publishers of the Advocate and Out maga­Ltnes, and the nation's largest gay political group forga\·e hundreds of thousands of dol­lars m loans to M!v10\V, Inc. MAY Local station gives green light to 'Dr. Laura': KPRC Channel 2 won't stop Dr. Laura, but the television station's managE-ment says it will monitor the upcoming show for negative comments about gay men and lesbians. Steve Wasserman, KPRC general manager, told a group of Houston activists during a pn­vate meeting May 8 that he won't pull the plug on rontroversial talk show host Dr. Laura Schlessmger's program set to air this fall, but will personally review the show for inappro­pnate content The meeting came jw.t days before some companies---1I1duding Procter & Gamble Co., United Airlines, Xerox Corp. and the online branch of toy retail chain Toys "R" Us Inc.­announced that they are pulling back on advertising support of the television or 'Dr. Laura's' daily radio talk show. On Dec. 4, KPRC downgraded the show to a 3:05 a.m. time slot. JUNE Elizabeth Toledo, a newly out mom, takes NGLTF helm: A le.bian mom who has been out less than a year started on June 1 as the new executive director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, the 27-year'{)ld group focused on state and local organizing. Ehabeth Toledo, the newly out and newly appointed exe<utive di'ector of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, and her children posed for a Human Rights Campaign catalogue. a group often pitted against NGLTf. Toledo has pledged to won with HRC. But Elizabeth Toledo, 38, stressed that while she may be new to lesbian issues per­sonally, "I'm not new to organizing on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendemf pohtical IS.5Ues." State sodomy law overturned: In a land- 111.1rk decision on June 8, the 14th Texas Court of Appeals declared the state's homosexual con­duct law unconstitutional under the Texas Equal Rights Amendment and acquitted two Hou:;ton men ronV1cted of Violating the 120-year-old Texas Mitchel Katine sodomy law. Shortly thereafter, Hams County assistant district attorney Bill Denmore asked all nine justices of the 14th Court of Appeals to n.'<Xln­sider the decision of a three-judge panel. In September 2000, a two-sentence letter sent announced that the full panel of judges of the 14th Court of Appeals would review the ruling. The lettl'r read: "The Court h.1s granted the State's Motion for Rehearing En Banc without hearing oral argument. The Court's opinion on reheanng will follow." There 15 no time frame sel on the full court review and the court has not yet issued a deci­ston. Brown rides in Pride parade: For the first time the 22-year history of Houston's Gay Pride celebration, the city's current mayor rode m the annual parade. Houston Mayor Lee P Brown participated in the June 24, 9 p.m parade down Westhctmer from Woodhead to Whitney. An estimated 100,000 people lined the parade route for the annual gay pride celebra­tion. U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, Texas Rep. Debra Danburg and Houston c1iy-cuuncil members Anni:;e Parker, Gordon Quan and Cami Mims Galloway joined the mayor in the festivities. Protesters were there too, about 16 or so, but they departed after Brown's cortege went by. Supreme Court rules Scouts can exclude gays: In a move that sparked immediate reac­tion from the gay community, the Supreme Court ruled in June that the Boy Scouts can bar homosexuals from serving as troop leader:.. The 54 decision said forcing the Scouts to accept gay troop leaders would violate the organization's rights of free expression and free association under the Constitution's First Amendment. Former Eogle S<out Jomes Dale (center) ta•s to the press at the Supreme Court it Washington it April Wednesdoy, the court ruled that the Boy Scouts can bar gays from serving as troop leaders. Also pictured are Dale's attorney Evan Wolfson and Dale's mother Daris Did. "The Boy Scouts asserts that homosexual conduct IS mconslStent with the values ti seeks to instill," Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist wrote for the court. Requiring them to accept a gay smutmaster "would significantly burden the organization's right to oppose or disfavor homosexual conduct." The ruling reversed a New Jersey Supreme Court holding that the Scouts wmngly ousted assistant scoutmaster }ltmes Dale when the organi7.ation learned he is gay. Th~state court had said the scouts' action violated a New Jersey law bannmg discnminatton in public accommodation. Dale, who was an Eagle Scuut, had sued the Scouts under the New Jersey law. But the Supreme Court said Wednesday that law must yield to the Scout organization's right of "expressive association" under the Constitution's First Amendment. ]ULY 'GVO' leaves legacy of action: Longti.me gay activtSt Gary Van Ooteghem, 58, died July 6, at Twelve Oaks hospital. He had been in the hospital with pneumonia and had a heart ,.... Continued on Page 7 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 7 First legal lesbian wedding held in Texas _. Continued from Page 6 attack following surgery to treat blood dots. Van Ooteghem was a leader in the Houston and national gay mm· munity for 25 years. In 1975, he was the first president of the (then) Gay Political Caucus, and at the hrne of his death was the retiring chair of the Ryan White Planning Council, Gary Ven Ooteghein which distributes more than 515 million annu· ally to HIV I AIDS service providers in the Harris County area. He also was serving as chair of the Scholarship Committee of the Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals and the PFLAG/H.A.T.C.H. Youth Scholarship Foundahon. Van Ooteghrm's name is on an important gay ovil rights case. In 1975, while working for Harris County as its Comptroller of the Treasury and Assbtant Treasurer, he addressed County Commissioners Court and said he was gay. His employer, Harns County Treasurer Hartsell Grey, fired him, saying he h.1d told Van Ootl>ghem not to make the speech. Following many years of litigation and appeals, the Fifth Circuit said that Van Ootl~hem's firing was illegal because it viola I· ed his Fin;t Amendment right to free speech. He was awarded back pay. AUGUST Gay guide closes its Texas·wide doors: Saddled with debt and strapped with a dwin­dling advertising base, This Week in Texas dosed its dlx>n; after 26 years of publishing the only weekly gay statewide entertainment guide, acairding to publisher Alan Gellman. The final issue of the 22,()00-circulation magazine appe.1red Aug. 10, nearly half-way through its 26th year of publication. Gellman attributed the magazine's demise to his p<x)r health, which has kept him from closely oversL-eing the publication's editorial and financial operatioru; for more than two years and kd to "frx1lish mistakes," he said. "Our staff meant well and were glxid at what they did, but they had so many extra duties out on them. There was nobody steer­ing that bus," he s.1id. Openly gay player, Richard Hatch, wins 'Survivor': He was taunted for his penchant for nudity, condemned as manipulative and even mlled a snake by a fellow castaway. Richard Hatch earned another label: million­aire. And he said that he has no regrets. The 39·year-old corporate trainer took home the cash prize and a new car on the final episode of CBS' hugely popular "Survivor," confounding those certain his scheming would cost him in the end. "I wouldn't change anything that I did," Rich told the Jury in a final statement. Heche hospitalized hours after split with DeGeneres: Actress Anne Heche was hospi­tilized after wandering up to a rural home appearing shaken and ronfused, hours after her breakup with Ellen DeGeneres became public, authorities said. Heche apparently parked her rar along a highway Saturday and then walked al:xiut a mile to the house in Cantua Creek, where she knocked on the front door at about 4:30 p.m. and m.1de strange statements to the occupants, said Fresno County Sheriff's Lt. Memll Wright. SEPTEMBER State Supreme Court to review exec order case: In a move that brings gays and lesbiaru; in Houston closer to knowing whether Mayor Lee Brown's executive order banning sexual orientation discrimination in city government is legal, the Texas Supreme Court agreed to hear aq,'Uments about whether the city coun­cilman and the busines.~man who sued to stop the order from tiking effect had a right to do so. Days after the executive order was issued in 1998, businessman Richard Hotze and City Councilman Rob Todd sued the mayor and the city to try to stop the order from taking effect. Later in 1998, District Judge Patrick Mizell stopped the order until the case could be decided and said that Hotze had no legal standing in the case-that is, he had no right to sue. The Texas Supreme Court heard argu· ments in October in the case and a ruling from the court is shll pending. Lesbian wedding held in San Antonio: When a Texas appellate court 1SSued a ruling last year that essentially said people who are born male remam legally male even if they have surgery to change their sex, it opened the .door for Jessica Wicks of Houston-who was born male-to marry her girlfriend. Jessica and Robin Wicks And in September, amid a throng of reporters, Wicks, 53, and her partner Robin, 44, got their marriage license in San Antonio. 'They were cooperative," Wicks said of the county clerk's office. "Of course, probably the fact that there were lots of television cameras there helpt.>d." They were denied a marriage license in Barris County, but the Bexar County clerk agreed to issue the license based on birth cer­tificates that show Jessica was born male and Robm was born female. Etheridge splits from girlfriend: Rocker MelL-.sa Etheridge and her girlfriend, director Julie Cypher, announced they were ending their relationship after 12 years. The couple has two small children together. ''With the utmost of love and respect for one another, we have decided to separate," the couple announced in a statement released by Etheridge' s label, Island Records. Etheridge and Cypher, together for 12 years, were one of Hollywood's most famous lesbian couples, after Ellen DeGeneres and Ann Heche, who announced their breakup in August. Ex-gay leader confronted in gay bar. A prominent ex-gay leader once featured as "going straight" on the cover of Newsweek magazine was confronted and photographed by activists Tuesday night patronizing a gay bar in Washington, D.C. John Paulk, board chair for the umbrella ex-gay group Exodus International, admitted in an interview with the Voice that he was in Mr. P's, a gay bar in Washington's DuPont Circle neighborhood, but said his only inten· hon was to use the bathroom. OCTOBER Trans teen kicked out of Covenant House: Jn February of this year, Jeff Loftin cht.'<'.ked into Covenant House Houston and was allowed to stay. He left in March. In September, Loftin checked into Covenant House as Chanel Dita, and she was ousted in no uncertain terms, even though she had nowhere to stay. And Covenant House knew it, says Dita. Dita is a 19-year-old homeless transgender. She was thrown out of her home in Pasadena, after she told her mother she was transsexual. \'\/hen Dita checked into Covenant House on Sept. 16 as a female, she says she was told she could not dress as a woman. She v. as also told she must submit to a physical within 48 hour.; of admission. The physical exam IS stan· dard practice. By the first of December, Dita was back at Covenant House, allowed to stay as long as she adhen.'CI to a few house rules. ThL~ time, Dita underwent the required physical and she sap she has been told to wear unisex clothing ("jeans and stuff," says Dita) and forego the makeup while there. Though she landed a job at Burger King in the Montrose, she has since quit and as- of presstime had left Covenant House as well. Happy birthday, Ray Hill: On Friday, Oct. 13, 2000, one of Houston's bold, brazen, and at times brash, queers celebrated his sixtieth birthday. ..........,.-4. •'· . ; ' . .. I For most of those 60 years, Ray Hill's life has been spent, in one way or another, for better or for worse, standing up for social iustice for queer folk or for folks who simply had been too beaten down to stand up for them- •;;;.·~"·:.~ .. 4 . . :.' (' ill selves. Ray H1 Hill admits that his way has always been "years ahead of my time." He backs that state­ment up by reminiscing about attending Tulane College in 1966. He enrolled in the .. graduate program there and submitted his the.is topic, "A Sissy is a Sissy, is a Sissy." NOVEMBER Houston's Black lie draws 1,200: For the second year m a row, the George R Brown Convention Center was traru;­formed from its sh1p·like appear­ance into an ele­gant dining room with subdued light mg and muted music played by the Ricky Diaz Orcht>!>tra for the Houston Black lie Steve May Dinner, the stylish fund-raising event that draws who's who in the city's LGBT commu· ruty. Houston City Councilwoman, Annise Parker, introduced the keynote speaker, Steve May, as one of only 200 openly gay or lesbian politiaaru; nationwide, and as a good friend of hers. Pointing out May's abilities as a leader in the LGBT community, Parker said, "We cannot afford mediocrity." May, the only openly gay Republican in the Arizona House of Representatives spoke aJ:x,ut his expenence as a First Lieutenant in the U.S Amly Re:.erve and about his road to politics. Deaths of transgendered commemorated in solemn ceremony outside City Hall: Two dozen transgender actJ\ists assembled on the City Hall steps in Nm•. 28 for a candlelight memorial for the 18 gender vanant people who died as a result of violence smre last year's memorial The Day of Remembrance was set aside to memorialize those who were killed due to antHransgender hatred or prejudice. The event is held on Nov. 28 to honor Rita He;ter, whose murder kicked off the "Remembenng Our Dead" project DECEMBER 'AIDS: Men Make a Difference': Candlelight vigils, toy and food drives, art shows and help for those with HIV I AIDS marked Houston's LGBT observation of the 13th World AIDS Day on Dec. 1. The event is a da}~ when people around the world join to commemorate public awareness about the disease that does not discrinunate. The united theme for this year is, "AIDS: Men Make a Difference." With nL"IY infectioru; of H1V I AIDS rising at an alarming rate worldwide, it is time for all to make a difference. According to figures from AIDS Foundation Houston (AFH), 1t is esti· mated that within the Houston/Hams County area alone, one in 90 individuals is H1V positive. 8 l\J~i~~I STAFF General Manager Mike Fleming mikeOhoustonvoice .com Editor Wendy K Mohon editorOhoustonvo1co com Production Senior Graphic Designer-Natasha Marqu~z Graphic D.signer-Deborah Ouplant Contributors Rich Arenschleldt. Kay Y D•yus, Trayce Diskin. Earl Dittman. O.L. Groover. Robert 8. Henderson. Kathreen lee, Maria E. M1mcucci. 0 L. Murphy, Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton OeHart. Terry Sullivan Advertising Sales Ken Burd Tom Robbins Kyle Cooke-Classified & Directory Administration &. Sales Support Carolyn A Roberts National Advertising Representative R1vendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 A President- William Wayboum Editorial Director- Chris Crain Financial Director- Kelly Smink Internet Director- Joel Lawson a CHARTER MEMIU GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER Of COMMERCE Establi~d 1974 as the Montrose Star SOO Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Housto11, Texas 77006 (71)) 529-8490 (800) 729-1490 Fax: (713) 52~9531 Contents copyright 2000 Office hours 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon r~uest. but you must indude your name and phone number for verification. Please send mall to Houston Von, 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200. Houston, Texas 77006. fax (713) 52~9531 or ~•II to editorOhoustonvolco.com. Op1n1ons expressed therein do not reflect those of the HOUJUm Vorce VOICES & ECHOES DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT Time for gays to break the faith? by CHRIS CRAii\ The media frenzy this year may have focused on presidential politics and pregnant chads, but the story that most impacted gay and lesbian lives was unfolding at church, of all places. One after the other, mainstream Christian and Jewish faiths debated whether to perform weddings, or some second-tier alternative, for same-sex couples, and whether to ordain openly gay ministers or even permit the election of out lay leaders. The results were often evenly split, and in all case reflected deep divisions that sometimes threatened schism, or at least significant splintering of main­line denominations. The most important development was also the most promising: Reform Jewish rabbis overwhelmingly approved a resolution allowing ind1- v1dual congregations to perform WL-d­ding ceremonies for gay couples. The 1.8 million-member branch of Judaism-the country's largest-was by far the largest yet to embrace gay relationships as the moral equivalent of straight married couples. Conservative and orthodox Jews maintained their adamant opposition to approval of gays, joined by their more vocal brethren from Roman Catholic and Evangelical Protestant traditions, who threw their financial and political weight behind anti-gay efforts in the secular world as well. The Mormon Church, which con­siders itself Christian even as Evangelicals balk at the idea, con­tributed heavily toward passage of the Knight Initiative, a ballot measure that added California to the list of states refusing to recognize gay mar­riages. But it was the mainline Protestants where the culture wars waged the most furiously. At each successive denomination's annual convention, voices were raised and protest:. dis­rupted the proceedings. And at each gathering, the traditional church hos­tility toward gay relationships and leaders was reaffirmed in one way or another. At issue isn't just the resolution of liturgical issues like gay weddings and ordinations, but the underlying moral questions about homosexuality. Most lay Christians and plenty of religious leaders start with their own discomfort about homosexuality and work their way backward looking for ;ocnptural support. Of course, many gay and gay-friendly Christians fol­low a remarkably similar path. For many fair-minded Christians in the mushy middle, the question of homo,exuality raises basic theological issues: How literally should the Bible be taken, in its proscriptions against homosexuality and on other subiects as well? Gay Christian apologists are too quick to dismiss this dilemma as a false one, unwilling to face the uncomfortable reality that, even under the most liberal and loose inter­pretation, the Bible is at best neutral and at worst, disapproving, of gay sex acts. Of course the Bible is a product of its historical times, and as our snap­shot history of the last millennium suggests, gay people-much less gay "relationships"-<lidn't even exist in a form that could be judged fairly thou­sands of years ago. White and his Soulforce troops have done a tremendous job of rally­ing support for better treatment of gay congregants, but his call is off the mark. At this critical juncture, it is more important than ever that gays remain in their mainstream faith groups, so long as they come out and join m the struggle. Too many gays sit comfortably in church pews, pretending their signifi­cant others are only friends, following the unspoken rules of the polite Christian closet-that's especially true in the South. Every congregation, even conser­vative and evangelical ones, can claim some fair-minded members. Gay Gay Christian apologists are too quick to dismiss this dilemma as a false one, unwilling to face the uncomfortable reality that, even under the most liberal and loose interpretation, the Bible is at best neutral and at worst, disapproving, of gay sex acts. Like most divisive social issues, the church's position on homosexuality also doesn't admit easily of compro­mise or middle ground. The U.S. Catholic Conference of Bishops took a stab at finding the cen­ter: approving homosexuality as a morally neutral orientation difficult to change. But wedded to the Bib!ical condemnation of gay sex acts, the bishops insisted gay sex acts were sin­ful. · That left the bishops to conclude gay people could stay in good graces with God so long as they remain celi­bate, something the Vatican isn't par­ticularly successful at demanding of its own priests, despite their greater spiritual motivation to remain chaste. Don't expect real progress to emerge from the Catholic Church, which only recently rescinded Galileo's 15th century ex-communica­tion for insisting the earth revolved around the sun. Or from the Southern Baptists, who only months ago finally apologized to African-Americans for supporting slavery and Jim Crow as Biblically permissible. But the sleepy mainline Protestant denominations have been awakened by this debate over homosexuality and appear to be sincerely struggling with the issues. Weary with the struggle and frus­trated by the continued retrenchment, gay spiritual leader Rev. Mel White has urged gay Christians to withdraw from mainstream faiths, especially mainline Protestant denominations, until they forgo their history of "spiri­tual violence" against us. parishioners should be open about their lives with those members, even if full-throated activism is not a role they feel comfortable playing. We all know how differently peo­ple view gay issues when they know that someone close to them is gay. That's especially true of most Christians, if they remain true to Jesus' central message of love and hope. Martin Luther King, Jr. once said that Sundays are the most segregated day of the week. It's just as true that so many gays venture "out" as far as possible when socializing Saturday night, only to return to the familiar confines of the closet on Sunday morning. Even if you don't consider yourself a religious person, this spiritual debate has an important impact on your life. As more and more main­stream religious faiths permit gay marriage and alter their view on the morality of homosexuality, our .Christian-dominated culture will move accordingly. And just as important, the political and legal debate over gay civil rights will be drawn in even sharper relief. Even Americans uncomfortable with homosexuality don't like the idea of government picking and choosing among religious beliefs to enshrine into law. As the consensus over the immorality of homosexuality crum­bles, so does the fat;ade that unfair laws are anything more than the establishment of a particular religious belief, in violation of the separation between church and state. VIEWPOINT Celebrate the New Year and your own personal foibles by D.L. MURPHY and MARIA MINICUCCI Phew' Congratulations are in order for everyone whose Christmas survival kit kicked in. Regardless of whether you went home for the holidays or not, you are sane, sober and any emotional scar­ring is becoming a distant memory. Enjoy the moment, yet another holi­day hurdle is sneaking up ready to snatch away your hard-won victory. Yes, New Year's Eve is another one of those double-edged holidays. Below are our suggestions for those of us who are sin­gle, even if its just temporary because your beloved went home to his/her family. For everyone: Go to a late movie. You won't even notice midnight. If you are really lucky, that cute number in the seat next to you will notice midnight, and you'll get one very illicit kiss. • Go to a firewo rks display. I don't care how depressed you are; it will do you good. Pretend the fireworks are a metaphor for your life. Hell, understand that the fireworks are celebrating your hfe. Construct Voodoo dolls of all your exes. This should keep you very busy. For Hedonis ts: Make all your favorite goodies and indulge wi thout having to share. Or, bet­ter yet, have all your favorite goodies delivered. Sharing them with the delivery person after sex is optional. Turn the evening over to your alter ego. Go wherever s/he takes you. Invite your imaginary playmate. You may want to discuss this with your therapist later Go to bed before midnight. Take your imaginary playmate with you. For Type A personalities: Take this opportunity to catch up on your work (and steal a march on that guy in the next cubicle). Catch up on your coworkers' work. Be prepared to explain exactly why you thought that was a good idea. Beep your tax accountant so you can start obsessing about your tax return now. Fill out your Franklin-Covey planner for the next year. Do your spring-cleaning. Spend the evening browsing catalogs for your 2001 business wardrobe. Go to bed before midnight. Dream about spending your new budget. For Type B personalities: Do what you usually do. Don't do what you usually don't do. Don't care about it. Don't put it off, this year lose your new planner early. Shovel a path to the bed. Go to bed before midnight. Vow to actually change the sheets tomorrow. For introverts: Pretend your are an extrovert in your favorite chat room. Spend the evening initiating cybersex. Read your journal. Try to get your journal published. Beep your therapist. Go to bed before midnight. For extroverts: Howl at the moon. Make sure there are witnesses. I lave pizza delivered to all of your enemies. Have a pity party, invite everyone you know who is single, even if they are sin­gle- for-the-moment. Invite everyone for a birthday party. It doesn't matter if it's your birthday, so long as you get to celebrate you. Crank up the music so everyone thinks you are having a grand party. Go to bed before midnight. Celebrate yourself. For cat people: Buy your cat's favorite treat and serve it in the new dish s/he got for Christmas. Spend the evening playing an intoxi­cating game of catnip mousey. Note: it should be intoxicating for the cat, not you. Other substances should be required for your intoxication. Be smug about not having to take the cat out for a walk. Go to bed before midnight (take your lllE Y2KBU6 favorite pussy with you). For dog people: Buy you dog's favorite treat and serve it in the new dish s/he got for Christmas. Spend the e\·ening watching your companion chew up all of your Christmas presents. Be smug that you have an excuse to get out of the house, even if it is cold, raining and windy. Go to bed before midnight (take a dog with you) But really folks, there are some options for you Enjoy yourself. Happy New Year! THIS VEAR •.. 10 The AIDS Clinical Trials Unit is seeking HIV+ volunteers for a clinical research trial evaluating the safety and effectiveness of an experimental extended release formulation of Zerit® (d4T) versus the approved formulation. Study treatment (Zerit~, Epivir, and Sustiva) is provided for 56 weeks. To be eligible for this study, you must meet these basic requirements: •Viral load is 2,000 copies or more • CD4 cell count is 7 5 or more • Antiretroviral naive (30 days or less of any prior anti-HIV drug therapy) To find out more about study participation, please contact Bill Silkowski, RN .a t 409-747-0200 or toll free: 1-877-324-2288 UTMB The University of Texas Medical Branch al Galveston /; e/u1 ... eke 1/ut;w yoa're in.7 /J tt eke 1MJW !JOH Nane/ MUSCLE MECHANICS"" ... lt S ONAL TRAINING STUDIO 713.523.5330 aY A .. rO I NTMKNT. CALL NOW. 617 Rich.,,ond .Aven1<e in Montrose. CALENDAR Friday • Dec 29 Morning Prayer 1 Oom Monday • Jan 8 Eucharist 7 30pm Friday • Jan 12 e-mail: info@kolbeproject.or~ or visit our web. ite at www.kolbeproject.org Monday • Jan 1 Happy New Year Office Closed Morning Prayer 1 Oom Movie Night 7pm •Midnight tn the Gorden Good & Evil" Friday • Jan S Morning Prayer 1 Oom S~turday • Jan 13 Breakfast 9.30om PH (7131861-1800 • I030 Heights Blvd. '--------------------' Houston,~ 77008 -~"-'~"--..,..•·-~-~~~---~,~~-=--~~~--~ DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE around the world Lesbians make better parents than heterosexuals, Australian researcher says MELBOURi\iE-An Australian pioneer in in \1tro fertilization technology has published a study suggesting that lesbians make better parents than heterosexuals, the Melbourne Herald Sun reported. Carl Wood's paper, publli.hed an the ioumal Australian Med1ane, uses American research which found that the children of lesbian couples are more tolerant of diversity and more socially skilled. Children of lesbians were also found to suffer far less parental sexual and physical abuse and mcest than their peers. "Women are more verbally fluent than males, so with two women bringing up a child, it has a greater chance of developing better conversation skills," Wood said. "The children of lesbians in the studies al-a had a broader view of life." Australian Family Association national secretary Bill Muehlenberg disagreed with Wood, saying that the great weight of studies suggested any combination other than a man and woman-preferably married­harmed the child. "These children will do less well on almost every social indicator-school per­formance, suicide rates, drug involvement and criminal involvement," Muehlenberg said. Gays could benefit as U.K. looks to liberalize adoption guidelines LONDON-Tony Blair's Labor government has announced plans to liberalize adoption rules, including easing restrictions on adoptions by gay men and lesbians, in hopes of increasing the number of adoptions by 50 percent, the London Times reported "In far too many parts of the system there is .i lack of clarity, consistency and fairness. Most pressing­ly, children in an already vulnerable position are bemg badly let down," says a report the government plans to release this week. The Times reported that the changes will not hkely give gay couples full parity with married couples. Other changes in eligibility for adoption include allowing couples over 35 to adopt, allowing couples who are overweight or who smoke to adopt, and easing adoption procedures for mixed-race couples. Government offi­oals hope to increase adoptions by nearly a third, to 3,000 a year, and ease the backlog of 2,000 children who are transferred between foster homes every year. Number of gays seeking asylum in U.S. grows as qualifications broadened Ff LAUDERDALE-The number of gay men and lesbians seeking polittcal asylum is grow­ing rapidly, espeaa!Jy in the South Florida region, the South Florida Sw1 Sentinel reported. The increase U1Spired South Florida 1mm1grabon attorneys to create a chapter of the New York-based Lesbian & Gay Immigration Rights Task Force to help gays dealing with immigration matters. "These people have just been showing up on our doorsteps," said Clark Reynolds, executive dm.>ctor of the Dade Human Rights Foundation. "We had no idea this was such a huge prob­lem." In 1990 Congress quietly removed sexual orientation as a disqualification for U.S. admis­s10n. In 1994, Attorney General Janet Reno clarified that pcri>t'CUhon based on sexual orientation can be considered grounds for asylum, and in August, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a ruling by the Board of Imnugration Appeal that had denied asylum to Mexican transsexual Gco\'JruU Hernandez-Montie!. But U.S. immigration law still prohibits HIV-positive murugrants from entering the country. BBC relaxes ban on discussing that former minister's sexual orientation The BBC's poli<y on not broad<asting reports that Peter Mandelson, a former government minister, is gay has been revised to account for 'changed circumstances.' _ LONDC>. -The BBC has relaxed ats ban on mentiorung the sexual onentahon of a former government minister who was outed, the Guardian reported. BBC 1ournalists were out­raged when Ann Sloman, the agency's cluef political adnser, told editorial i;taff in a September 1998 memo that "the allegation" that Peter Mandelson is gay should not be repeated dunng broadcasts. Mandelson, who was serv· mg as Northern Ireland secretary when he was outed, was openly living with a partner at the time Journalists and politicians had accused the BBC of caving in to Mandelson's demands and affording him special treatment. The revised policy says that basic guidelines-that public figures are ma special position but retain theJI right to a pnvate life-remains the same. But "sellSlble editorial 1udgments should be applied in the light of changed circumstances." African AIDS vaccine tests delayed pending government approval NAIROBI, Kenya (AP}--Trials of the first AIDS vaccine specifically designed for Afnca, slated to begtn this week, ha\'C been delayed until early next year Kenya's Health Minister Sam Ongen said the go\·ernment approval process 1s not complete, and that the trials will not begin until early next year. The International AIDS Vacane lnitiattve, which has _been work­ing on two vaccines it hopes will immunize people against I !IV, is currently testing the vac­cines on a small number of volunteers an England. None of the volunteers have displayed adverse effocts from the \'accines, said Andrew McM1chael of the Medical Research Council. In primates, the two vaccines combined have boosted the immune response. But it will take up to five years before at is known whether vaccines actually work on humans, and several more to reach the general population, McMichael For more news, visit said. "There is tremendous urgency in getting the www.houstonvoice.com. vaccine trials to go forward," he said_·~--... -From sfiiff aiia wire rqiorts HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 health nevvs Health concerns, lack of knowledge highlight 2000 Party-goers drmk to health at the dawn of the New Year, but in a review of the year's most notable health-related news, lifestyle concerns marched to the forefront of debate about the health of gay men and lesbians. From smoking to body image, from oral sex to barebacking, debates about the root of AIDS and the federal government's "Healthy People 2010" report reveal a surprising lack of conclusive evidence about health concerns specific to gay men, and especially lesbians. A smoking gun. Gay men smoke at rates nearly twice that of the general U.S. male pop­ulation, and researchers offered explanations ranging from tobacco prevention measures that fail gay men, to tobacco ad campaigns that have been successful in attracting them. A ten­dency to drink heavily and socialize frequently in bars is also believed to be a factor for gay male smokers. A lesbian health study released last year also indicated that lesbians have similar habits, including much higher rates of alcohol consumption and tobacco use for lesbians than for all women. In response, the American Legacy Foundation will spend $300 million a year over the next four years on public health education on the dangers of tobacco use, and a portion of these funds will be earmarked for gays. The gay male image. Recent studies show that gay men experience greater body-dis­satisfaction than heterosexual men, which in tum contributes to higher rates of eating dis­orders among gay men. Barriers to healthy self-image m gay men have been shown to resemble those faced bv heterosexual women. In addition to contributing to the onset of eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia, dis­torted body image can also lead to steroid use and sexual anxiety. Internalized homophobia also greatly contributes to lower self-esteem and body image, as gay men and lesbians aggres­sively act out sooety's negative messages about homosexuality upon their 0\\11 bodies. The safety in barebacking? Some sex-positive activists insist barebacking is safe when both men are seroconcordant, or have the ~ame HIV status. But medical experts beg to dif­fer, arguing that not only can HIV-positive individuals become "re-infected" through expo­sure to a more virulent strain, but that resistance to drugs may be affocted. Better-under­stood risks of engaging in unprotected sex include the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhea, herpes, hepatitis and syphilis which activate the immune system and allow the HIV virus to become more active. An African solution to AIDS. The HIV I AIDS epi­demic's epicenter, South Africa, hosted the 13th International AIDS Conference this year. Figures indicate that at least IO percent, possibly up to20 percent, of South Africa's 44 million people are HIV-positive, and the vast maionty don't know they're infected South African President Thabo Mbeki backed away from his stand that HIV didn't cause AIDS after an inter­national round of condemnation from researchers and healthcare officials. Mbeki insisted that he's looking for "an African Solution" to the question of whether AIDS is caused by'HIV or simple, extreme poverty. Some 5,000 sc1ept1sts, doctors and AIDS professionals released the "Ddrban Declaration." an unprecedented statement claiming the link between HIV and AIDS is "clear-cut, exhaustive and unamb1guou~." Judge Edwin Cameron, a gay, HIV positive high court judge in South Africa, said during an International AIDS conference that he wishes more people with HIV would be public about it, but the stigma in Africa is too great. U.S. health officials include gays. For the first time, the nation's long-range health plannmg document men­tions sexual orientation. But gay health advocates say gay concerns dt•serve more attention than thev receive m "Healthy People 2010." The ways in which health data has been gathered in the past 10 years limits the sound­ness of conclusions and projections that can be made about the health of gays, some achv1sts argue. In response, the Department of Health and Human Service's Health Resources and Sen•1ces Administration awarded the San Francisco-based Gay &: Lesbian Medical Association a $25,000 grant to publish a separate paper on gay and le!-bian issue~, the release of which will coincide with the Janu.1ry release of the government's "Healthy Peoplt•" report. GI.MA has also successfully lobbied to have questions regarding sexual orientation added to the individual academic and government research projects whose results eventu­ally m.1ke up large documents like "Healthy People 2010." HIV and oral sex. Almost eight percent of newly infected gay men contracted HIV through oral sex, according to the Centers for Oi~ease Control & Prevention. The r~>eeptive partner m oral sex is at the most rbk, and simply abstaining from ejaculating into the mouth is not sufficient to prevent transmission because pre-ejaculate also contains HIV, the CDC reported The agency did not have data confirmmg transmission of HIV through cunnilingus, though experts acknowledged that HIV can be present in vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, making transmission theoreti- ,:. cally possible. ~1{'JJ KINETIC SPORTS CLINIC ~ AN HIV Life Enhancement Center - Ed Kinser, Progressive Resistance Exercise Therapy Relzabilitation Exercise Specialists "\114 Working \Vttlz You On faery Visit ft I\ Nutritional Counseling \Vtth Easy To Follow Programs Myofascial Release For Stress I Pain Managemellt 11 12 Han-Net users aim to politically activate community in 2001 ,.. Continued from Page 3 "Roust the politically apathetic into action" was the third-runner-up, with 9 votes, followed by "Begin a community dia­logue about filling the needs of elder GLBTs," with 6 votes. Thirteen choices, nominated by Han-Net members in November and December, were presented to the membership last week. Each voter was asked to chose the three highest priorities for the upcoming year. Unlike ordi­nary elections, "something other than the above" was offered as a choice, but did not get any votes. Other topics receiving votes were "Create and publicize a community volunteer clear­inghouse," "Support HIV education and pre­vention," and "Create an Internet presence (Web site) for the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus" each with 4 votes. After establishing a volunteer clearing­house was suggested in 'ovember, Sally Huffer established one in the Han-Net data­base at http://www.egroups.com/data­base/ han-net. Community projects that need vohmteers are listed there. Other issues that received some votes were "Assist the Emergency Aid Coalition in their food/clothing/sundries pantry efforts," "Establish a community shelter, \\-ith a coun­selor, job coach, and outreach program (such asProjectTAlLfor transgenders)" and "Bring Brandon Wolf established Han-Net, 111 e-group for politi<al activists in Houston's GllT community, two years ago. T1ie unmoderated forum now has nearly 250 members. R.MCC and Bering Memorial UMC into the GLBT Rights dialogue within the religious commuruty." Han-Net was established two years ago by Brandon Wolf for political activists. Members of at least three political parties are active in the group, and often engage in live­ly discussion about current events. The list is not moderated and has nearly 250 members. Han-Net www.egroups.com/grouplhan-net DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE First-century gays often punished > Continued from Page 3 in Jerusalem trying to create an outpost in the Middle East, which was Muslim. The legislation, clearly referring to male homo­sexuality, called for burning at the stake for the sin of sodomy. • From 1250-1300, same-sex sexual Renaissance genius Midielanrlo wrote love sonnets and created sculptures to honor Ro11111n nobleman Tommaso de' Cavatieri (above). activity went from being legal in almost all of Europe to being punishable by death under most legal codes. 1300-1400 • Lesbian sexuality is included in a list of nine classifications of lustful sins formu­lated by Saint Antonius (1363-1451), who differentiated lust between women from "lusts against nature," which involved acts between men and women "outside of the natural place where children are made." • F.clward II, ruler of England from 1307- 1327, was the father of four children with Isabella of Spain. His true love, however, wa~ Piers Gaveston, who was exiled by Parliament in an attempt to end the relation­ship and was later murdered by barons. 14~1500 • In China, after 1429 when the Xuande emperor called for an end to sexual activi­ties with female courtesans, male govern­ment officials began turning to boys and young men, according to Ming writer Shen Ddu. • In the Middle F.ast, surgical removal of the clitoris was used as punishment for women hav­ing sexual relations with other women. > Continued on Page 13 Alternatives Tips on Choosing Gay Treatment Ask: .., Ar• you In a safe It ucure Goy Owned and OtHrated facllity1 from Alcohol, Drugs, Depression and Anxiety Alternatives: America's Leader in Gay and Lesbian Treatment .., Will you be treated in a Dedicated GayUnit1 .., Will you be cand for by uperlenct1d Gay Professionals and Goy Support Stoff1 .., Is your TrcatJMnt Ccntt1r dedkated to the Gay Community and supportive of 21/lwt.IU1 Beware Of: ~Treatment centers and programs that exploit the gay community. Call Today 1-800-DIAL-GAY • t Alternatives is the nation's only GAY OWNED AND OPERATED alcohol, drug and mental health program whose leadership has provided over 25 years of pride and service to the Gay, Lesbian, Bi-Sexual and Transgender Community. Alternatives specializes In treating HIV/AIDS-related grief and loss. Our HIV specialists are available to address all medlcal concerns. Medluire/Mtdluild a. most lnsuranct1 atceptt1d. JCAHO Accredited. 429 • www.alternativesinc.com HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 13 Early gay history: Tales of persecution ::-- Continued from Page 12 • Several hundrl>d men a year were proSt.'­cull> d for homosexuality in Florence, Italy, dur­ing this century. • Despite frequent persecution, male beau­ty is frequently celebrated by male RcnaJSSance artists. Michelangelo's dedication of lo\'e sonnets and sculptures to Roman nobleman Tommaso de' Cavalieri is only one notable example. 1500-1600 England's King Edward II (ruler, 1307-1327) (above), fathered four with Isabella of Spain,. but his true love was Piers Gaveston. • While lesbian relationships usually attracted less attention from men in power, in the Plymouth colony in America, two women were charged with "lewd behavior each with the other upon a bed." • In 1578, a Roman church celebrated sev­eral "marriages" between Portuguese men, but the couples are later arrest~ and execuk'<I. 1600-1700 • In 1640, Anglican bishop John Atherton is execull>d by hanging for sodomy, incest and Burning was the common punishment for ' sodomites' In Europe for several centuries. This manuscrif t illustration from 1483 depicts the burning o Richard Puller and his page, Zurich, the year before. adultery; pamphlets distributed at the time feature drawings of Atherton and his male lover, John Otilde. 1800-1900 • As physicians increase their study of mental illnesses, the medicahzation of homo­sexuality in Western society began in earnest, as those engaged in same-sex activities were labeled sick in:;tead of simply sinners-a belief that persists until the present day, although the American Psychiatric Association removed homosexuality from its official list of mental disorders in 1973. 1~2CXX) The explosion in gay culture in the last 100 years is, of course, too much to condense into a few brief words, as gays became more and more organized into distinct communities, that then began to direct their energies back outward to fight for inclusion and equality in larger society. • Dunng World War Il, gay men and les­bians joined Jews, Gypsies and others on the German hit list as Adolf Hitler attempted to control the world through a mix of military might and social cleansing. During the Holocaust, gay men were forced to wear pink triangles in the concentration camps, lt!Sbians, grouped with other "undesirables," wore black triangles. A Center for CFS& Fibromyalgia = • In 1969, patrons at the StonewaJJ Inn, a l\Jew York Gty gay bar, fought back against an all too common police raid, in what would come to be seen a:; the start of the modem gay rights mowment • By the late 1970s and the 1980s, gay activist:. found their work, and their lives, cut short by AIDS, which rapidly claimed thou­sands. But the swtft organizing to fight the dis­ea.-. e and care for the dying, often in the face of indifference or hostility from mainstream insti­tutions, helped build the community groups and organizing structures that would con­tribute to major gay rights victories for the rest of the century. • In 2CXX>, the Netherlands became the first country in the world to extend full, IL>gal mar­riage to gay couples In J- 1969, _,-y patrons fought badt after a routine porKe rcid at the Stonewal Inn,. a New York City gay bar, in what many consider the begiming of the modem gay rights movement. 14 • GAY MEN1S CHORUS OF HOUSTON SEEKING ARTISTIC DIRECTOR The Gay Men's Chorus of Houston is now accepting applications for the salaried part-time position of Artistic Director. To request an application packet, please visit www.gmch.org/adsearch Or call 713-927-3129 • • • Mail Boxes Etc. c:=!J?,ice ?»itta~e 2476 B (7 Division of Brooks Ballud DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church 6:30pm Sunday Evenings WISHING YOU AND YOURS A PROSPEROUS &. HAPPY NE.WYE.AR! Please Join Us For a Special New Year's Eve Service December 31'1 "Unswerving Hope" Rev. Janet Parker Please Join Us For E~·eni11g Services And Experience The Lo~·e That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Jlas To Offer! ................................................................................... Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more Info ... 713-528-6756 or emall maranatha@ev1.net lh>/? ~~~ Maranatha ~~ t! Fellowship lhfTopolltM Community Church 'A-...,-. ...... -...GM.. Our Church Can Become Your Home! Give Us A Try! We Would Love To Have You Vi>it Anytime• HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 by D.L GROOVER The rainbow flag flew high and proud over Houston's theaters this past year. We were blessed with a surfeit of gay plays and musicals. Mercifully, it was fairly free of outright stinkers, and many productions found enthusiastic new audiences. The diversity extended to two new theater compani~vho highlighted gay-theme plays making 2CXXJ a year of thriving gay the­ter. ~Hill and Love On Valentine's day, Stages gave us that thorny bouquet, "Ray Hill and Love." Described by fnencb and foes as irascible, tactless, PQSky and gener­ous, 1 lill s.1ys he's a "cantankerous old fart." Whatever, he's a Houston institution and our own gay Foghorn Leghom preaching, hector-ing, and off(Slding. With story-telling verve, this gay Al~op spun personal fabll>s that detailed his life of love and his love of life. Along the twisted path lay shards of Houston's !;C!Y his-tory and six fonner lovers. For all his bluster, Hill'sabigol' marshmallow when it comes to love. He chases it with the passion of a union organizer, wrasslin' it to the ground and celebrating its mysteries, pains and joys with p.igan abandon. One,sided in the telling, the ornery Hill's longevity has earned him the right to tell hIS fascinating stories any way he pleases. V~re Lesbians of Sodom and Sleeping Beauty Blazing into the ultra-hip Commerce Street Artists Warehouse as if on a Bedlam Halloween float, came two one-act plays by Charles Busch, the master high dramatist of c~: "Sleepmg Beauty" and "Vampire Lesbians of Sodom " These delirious, amphetamine-induced comedies were given a spectaCularly cheesy chanri in the ~sy hands of the chicas pro­duction team. th pricked the conventions­anema, theater, society, sex-with Surgical preci­sion. They were whacked-out, loVJng versions of Republic B-pictures overlaid with a slimy sheen of sexual perversion and gender-bending. Although Anne Zimmerman, who did quadruple duty as director, costume designer and actor in two leading roles, outdid herself while wearing all four hats, the eye-opener was Walt Zipprian, as the woman-i!ating Succubus. With foghorn voice and dcidic stage presence, Zipprian overlaid the bizarre witfi comic relief. He was over the top and under control at the same time. It was perfect B1L.<rll: a gourmet can­nibal who has Julia Clilld for dinner. Nabucco Houston Grand Opera roared m during the spring with a soaring production of Verdi's first big hit, "Nabucco," which more than any other work of tis time gave a ruce big kick to the fat posterior of "be! canto." Thanks to Verdi, Italian opera was never the same again. Verdi supplies the bombastic plot with incredibly p.rofound music, and sets it all in the dazzling theatrical splendor of Nebuchadriezzar's ancient court It's quite a shov.~ and GO's superlative treabnent never flagged. Conducted in fever pitch by Patrick Summers, the Houston Symphony raised the melodrama mto the heavens. The Opera OlOl'US never sounded so beautifull} alive v. hether pravmg softly for deh\'erance or thundering out condemnation Maria Guleghina, as Abigaille, seeker of vengeance, could be heard over an earthquake Though her volume control was set a.t temple­shattering, her velvet soprano, agile enough to leap around Verdi's vocal gymnaspcs was a furce of nature, as was the consummate ~ of Samuel Rame .and Segei l.eiferJ.ius. ''• 'abucco" may not be!;feat but it's certain-; ly grand. With HGO, you couldn't have heard a finer ~uction of Verdi's stu~dous transla­tion of this Bible story. Even the mans were smiling. As Bees In Honey Drown Uke a spring breeze, Douglas Carter Beane's "As Bees m Honey Drown" wafted in dur­mg late Ma). In the Alley' polished pro­duction, •Bees" was a bright, frothy boule­vard comedy, whose intersecting streets are Melrose Place, Rodeo Drive and the Yellow Brick Road. It told the fairy tale nse (and rise) of the consummate con artist, the mysterious Alexa \'ere de Vere, international glitterati priestess. Lighter than a fine souffle and as insubstantial as cotton candy, melting in your mind as soon as it was over, this comedy of manners was 5lick and enormously entertaining. Carol Linnea Johnson portrayed Alexa with lacquered sophistication. In her helmet ot je!­black hair, tailored suits, jungle red fingemailS, > Continued on Page 16 16 DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Mostly hits, Jew misses marked Houston theater in 2000 > Continued from Page 15 studied hyper atttude, and a pronunciation gwde stolen from past d vas, Alexa's velvet spider ensnared up-and-coming wanna-bes behind her entiang. seductive smoke screen. Her latest conquest is a hot gay writer on the nse. With his dark matinee idol looks and four-star physique, Ty Mayberry was the per· feet naive fly caught in Alexa's seducti\·e web "Bees" pncked the balloon of "sticky sweet success" with sass, and the Alley mounted it in a setting of flashy rhinestones. A genuine theatrical cubic zirconium. Zombies From The Beyond Silly and inane, this cheesy re-nux of '50s sa-fi B-movies made you laugh out loud. Part homage, part vaudeville, Theater LaB's paro­dy was wonderfully goofy. In James Valcq's loving satire, the surprise was the addition of a musical score that's a clever parody of times past. The death ray of the evil Zombina, the alien aVJatrtx, earth's pneumatic nemeSlS, IS her voice Like a demented Norma, her stratospheric coloratu­ra drives men mad. The septet of talented performers handled thru stock characters with infectious high jinks, over-the-top zaniness, and rumble high· kicking supplied in spades by director and choreographer Jun Phillips. ThlS was the type of show that can't be played straJght, not when the young loveIS whistle their love song, or the illustnous sky· line of downtown Milwaukee IS knocked senseless by the malevolent alien. Earthhngs, beware! Fat Men In Skirts icky Silver s "Fat Men m Skirts," wntten m sulfunc aad, was a mordant, blacker than black, comedy. You were likely to gag on your laughter, as if gargl.:ng blood. Flawlessly acted at Ashland St. Theatre Co., 1t docwnented the dulling fall of Bishop Hogan, plane crash survivor and ultimate psycho, whose insatiable taste for human sushi matches his unholv desire for his moth· er. There was no redeemmg SOC1al value in this saline amoral tale, whose progerutors are Jonathan Swift, John Webster and John Waters. The play took the human condition and whacked the stuffing out of it. Veering wildly between biting satire and homd melodrama, it was like a highway accident: fascinated, we had to look. TraVIS Ammons inhabited the mad Bishop Hogan Lke a second skin. Blood-drenched from d.:nner, he sank deeper into psychosis and resembled a dangerous medieval icon. Hannibal Lector meets Norman Bates. Therese Katara, as BLshop's out-of-touch mother, matched his intensity every mad step. This sit-com from Hell was laced with enough tasty laughs to make it potable. On a shoestring budget, director Chris Jimmerson managed this bitter comedy with imagina· tion, keeping us sated all the way to its bloody conclusion. Fairy Tales As the inaugural production of Houston's newest theater venture, Theatre New West, "Fairy Tales" was a jubilant, radiant, enlight· erung gay mUSJcal revue. With mUSJc and lyrics by Eric Lane Barnes, 11 was required viewing for anyone who adored theater, musicals, or just an exceptional evening out on the town. With wit and great charm, this bedtime­story- for-adults revue celebrated the ordinary life and times of a gay man who grows up in a dysfunctional conservative family, comes out, meets a lover, and eventually succumbs to AIDS. Although solemnity runs under the story like a riptide, this production rejoiced in the delicious diversity of gay life. It reveled in camp, yet glorified remembrance and human· 1ty. Alex Stutler, firm of voice and body, made a strtkmgly good :Matthew, all wide-eyed comic innocence, longing for the complacency and normal ex!Stence of his favonte TV fanu· ly, the Partndges. Keith Caldwell as Matthew's lover had the best voice of the five, and his twang rendition of "Illinois Fred" gave a wcll-heeled boot to the conventions of masculine role playing. With its sublime mix of laughter and tears, "Fairy Tales" gave us a needed boost of humaruty and pride, ending m a stirring mes­sage of empowerment and hope. Rent Jonathan Larson's exuberant rock paean to life has become a pop culture phenomenon. In a decade or so of really egregious muS1cal the-ater, "Rent" deserved all its awards. Spinning its "Boheme"-inspired tale in contemporary hues of AIDS, sexual nonconformity, drug addiction, and multiculturalism, the musical took the verities of poverty, homelessness, and illness and transformed them with splen· d.d affirmation. Larson's heartfelt empathy for his altema· tive commuruty could be as sappy as a Hallmark card (a chorus line of homeless JUnldes seemed just as imreal as a conwnt of singing nuns) but his passion packed a mighty wallop. His pop and rock score, a melange oi styles borrowing tangos, blues, gospel, reggae, funk, and MTY, is still rooted on firm Broadway stock. The love ballads are haunting, and the up-tempo pieces, feisty and energetic, are filled with sophisticated rhythms that keep us off balance. His dramat­ic lyrics, agile and propulsive, shift m off-kil­ter ways, too; sometimes comic, sometimes heartbreaking, yet always right. Bar none, this was the finest touring pro­d uction of a Broadway musical last year. An amazingly theatrical show, it used all the high-tech smoke and mirrors that money could buy. Grunge never looked so high gloss. Bruiser When Houston Ballet opened its 2000-2001 season m September, it did so with a knock­out: Stanton Welch's "Brwser." With a company of eighteen, "Bruiser'' was a tongue-in-cheek, v..;tty look at modem relationships, using all manner of sports refer· ences. Wearing skin-tight abbreVJated shorts and midriff revealing tops, the danccrs-Wr1Sts bandaged and cheeks blackened-feinted and jabbed, performed tac bo, jumped hur· dies, skipped imaginary rope, power walked, even egged us on to fight. One of the guys flexed like a muscleman upstage m silhouette The women, all on pointe and just as sea­soned and strong as the men, fought back • a contemporary Gen·X take that was Jrughty refreslung. The guys were butch; the girls were butch. A perpetual mobile of off-kilter clas.s1cal steps, big sweeping arabesques m hfts, sexy duets, expressive solos, "Brwscr" was mod· em ballet with vengeance and a laugh. As the preeminent tomboy, Britain Werkhe!SCr exuded stage presence with a feisty powerhouse performance The intense and razor sharp Joel Prouty was a perfect f01I to the leggy and athletic Lauren Anderson; while the very blond and beefed-up Ian Casady complemented Sarah Webb's bcauti· ful !me At the end of their pas de deux, he pinned her down, but not for long There's no entry in the Olympics for ballet, but 1f there were, Mr Welch and his brill ant danceIS would've shared top spot: gold. Naked Boys Singing The title said it all Unfortunately, there wasn't much else to this musical presented by Bienvenue Theatre Once the revelatory shock of being up close and personal faded, our gazes glazed over. This was a musical revue wntten by com· mittee: 24 hands to be precise. Too many cooks and no chef. This gay mUSJcal mean-dered without much thought in its head. It was well-scrubbed and sex-free, non-prurient and G-rated. Why did they bother to remove their clothes? For a musical that paraded its gmmuck in our face, it's troruc that the best number, the most erotically charged, was the love song where Augustin Paz slowly donned his clothes, until by song's end he was fully dressed. If only the rest of the show would've been so charged. This was a sex musical v.1th­out a nse. Jeff Stryker Does Hard Time In his first venture into live theatrical per· formance, the world's most famous male porn star had the savvy to fashion himseU a vanity production. For what it was, this star vehicle served him well. Everyone else got the shaft. He and his un-credited co-writers crafted a soft-core showcase, where Stryker is swathed in '40s film noir glamour with inky shadows and wet reflections. On display, his body became his own fetish. To be fair, you didn't go to this expecting "Hamlet." But after scores of performances in !YC and San Francisco, the eponymous star and his tailor-made "hilanous, erotic come­dy" should have had more pi1.z.iiz and pol:sh than this lumbering, limp effort. As a live porn movie, this sad little affair moved with the speed of a lump of Crisco. For all its X·rated trash sex talk, the porn was JruSSmg. Discreet and hidmg belund veils, the play cried out for Viagra. The evening ended with a mim·scx show, as Stryker doused himself with baby oil and danced nude among the audience. It's one exotic dance where he brought his own pole. The curtain call had him patting his large fnend m appreo.ition of a 1ob well done. It's the only part of him that could act. Kiki and Herb If you d.dn't experience this demonic dys­functional duo at Theater LaB, you nussed one of the truly theatncal events of the season. Frightening and funny, this psychotic lounge act was post-modem drag and per· formance art mixed with a full fist of barbitu­rates. Kiki Uustin Bond) IS a washed-up, never­has ·been boozy cabaret singer whose grotesque life story is the patter that drives the rock and alternative grunge song cycle Herb (Kenny Mell man) is her .iutistic co-dependent pianist who bangs out the ;iccomparument and adds his wails to Kiki's vodka-tinged > Continued on Page 17 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 Plentiful gay productions in 2000 > Continued from Page 16 song stylings. Between the laughs, they made you weep with their neurotic showbiz long­ing. After thrashing herself into a frenzy with Butt Trumpet's "You're Ugly.'' Kiki lay sprawled on the floor. "Mommy's all right. We just get a little weird sometimes." Then it was off on a Shakepearean soWo­quy or a scorching rendition of Patti Smith's "Horses." Scary and fascinating. And unfor­gettable. Christmas On Mars To say that a staging of a Harry Kondoloon drama is rare would be an understatement, so we were exceedingly grateful for Ashland St. Theatre Co.'s winter mounting of this blister­ing play. That this production was a riveting, sterling powerhouse account was also some­thing for which to be grateful. "Christmas" is, at all times, unreal yet truthful, perverse yet sane, sadistic yet tender. Distinctive in its bending of theatrical conven­tions, the spellbinding characters held us enthralled throughout. It veered from searing dramatic outburst to luminous insight to laugh-out-loud comedy schtick, thoroughly engrossing, or grossing us out. It was a bizarre human comedy of ill manners. Forcefully directed by Travis Ammons, this dark and poignant tale of four intercon­nected poople who can't really connect is afire with humanity: the egotistic bisexual male model manque (Tim Wrobel); his fiercely neu­rotic gay lover (Byron Norton); the pregnant wife-to-be (Adrianne Kipp}; and her mother (Cheryl Croix) whose unending search for low unravels her life. At the end, the stage i:; littered with v.Tap­ping paper, a beat-up Christmas tree, the lover who finds solace inside a baby's crib, self­deluded Mother weeping and laughing on the floor, a headless doll, and a puddle of amniotic fluid. How the detritus got there rep­resents Kondoleon's brilliant map of the human heart. All we had to do was follow his trail of blood, tears, and laughter. This is a "must check ti/ ou venue ... -Mark Goebel, Eclipse Magazine 924 Congress Downtown Houston Reservations: 713.227.2200 FATIER TUESDAYS $3.50 HURRICANES $2.50 SHINER BOCK WYLDE WEDNESDAYS $2.50 MARGARITAS & CORONAS 7PM TO l lPM GOSPEL SUNDAY BRUNCH Sl .00 VODKA DRINKS Sl 0.00 BOTIOMLESS BLOODY MARY'S $2.50 MIMOSAS, $2.50 BELLINIS HAPPY HOUR 4PM TO 7PM MON-FRI S2.50 DOMfmCS/$2.50 Wfll DRIJIKS • $1.00 on PlflUUM Alt au DRlllKS The Nutty Nutcracker Houston Ballet's take-off on its own classic holiday production has become one of the hottest tickets during the post-Christmas sea­son. It's everything you'd wish the "Nutcracker' would be if someone only had the nerve to do it. Well, the comic zanies at the Ballet do it rightl Past shows have been set on the Titanic (with dancing penguins for the Snow Scene) or in the West Wing (with Monica and Bill cavorting under the executive desk in the Land of the Sweeties). Ribald and exceedingly funny, this R-rated retelling ends the year with smirking glee. The day after, you will be sore from laughing so hard. Dec. 30 Wortham Theater Center 713·227-ARTS Dirty Little Showtunes If you think gay life is a "Cabaret' or a Broadway musical with better lyrics, then Tom Orr's delicious parody 1s a must-see Using tunes we can hum in our sleep from Sondheim, ""'.,ebber, Richard Rodgers. Gilbert & Sullivan, Harold Ar1en, et al., this wicked spoof skewers GLBT living with delightful zest cm irreverence by supplying new lyrics to Broadway standards. Funny, movihg, it might even make you think. Now that's a novel concept for a musical. Jan. 5 through Feb. 24 Theatre New West 1415 California 713-394-0464 A Tuna Chrlsbnas 17 Without the help of digital effects, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams portray all the loony beloved characters ofTuna, Texas. the second­smallest town m state, in this warm and cozy parody of contemporary American life. Consummate actors. these two will make you believe that the entire stage is ablaze with life. lt is, JUst not at the same time. A memorable night m the theater for any season. Jan. 9 through 14 The Grand 1894 Opera House, Galvestbn 409-765-1894 Walker Evans: A Retrospective In a magnificent oew exhibition, MFAH salutes and glorifies the artistry of photographer Walker Evans. Quintessentially American, his black and white eye focused on hard truths with unflinching documentary-like detail, such as the Great Depression, tenant farmers in Alabama or New York City subway nders. By re1ectlng artifice and artiness in his spare, elegantly framed pictures, he nevertheless created photography as an art form. He was the ultimate photographer: he makes the view­er see anew. Continuing through March 4 MFAH, 1001 Bissonnet r. · 1· . &._ ~~nc.•-tOMOR~ .... "': !! Clf directed by PiRTY ~ ~~~c~!f!. LiTTLe <UARLf 5 &AJ(fR Jan. 5 - Feb. 24 8HOWIUll88! ~·--~ Frt. & s.t 8 p.m. 11t£ATRE NEW WEST 1415 Callfomla st. ('--'9donthe~ftocwef the Sarau R81tMarMt ...... ) RMel i'lltlolis: 713-394-0464 11dl.ets: $20.00 18 A queer year in music With big name labels practically void of queer music-gay and lesbian artists turned to the indie scene by MARGARET COBLE Y2k was not a big year for queer music, at least not 1f you're looking at the major record labels. The trend of coming out as a promotional boost seems to have faded (the exception being Sinead O'Connor, who amid a whJrlwind of publicity came out a~ both a lesbian and a pnest upon the release of the cnllcally praised Faith and Courage). 1 cw, live, and greatest hits albums by out artists like k.d lang, Elton John, and the Indigo Girb, respectively, plea~ed their die­hard fans but were not particularly note­worthy additions to their oeuvres, and gay­ba1tmg artists hke Ricky Martin, the BJckstrcet Boys Jnd other boy-bands were happy to take their queer fans' money, but 'g.ive them httle but something pleasant to look at m return The real story of gay and lesbian music in the year 2000 came from the independent labels, where a new crop of talented oul­queer artists directed their own career paths and expressed themselves honestly without the fear of homophobic conse­quence associated with a major record label contract. Though these artists often struggle for recognition beyond their own geographic region, due to lack of resources available to their often self-run labels, the quality and importance of their work should not be overlooked. That having been said, here's the best of 20001 VARIOUS ARTISTS Forever Dusty (R&:D Records) Truly one of the most under-apprecial· ed compilations of the year, this 17-track trib­ute to Dusty Springfield featured a ventable who's-who of out-queer female performers donating their efforts to a breast cancer benefit CD. From The Butchies, Indigo Girls, Jill Sobulc, ;md Zrazy to Michelle Malone, DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Sonia Rutstein, and Gretchen Phillips, the track listing is a star-studded lesbian affair, and the material covered is simply stun­ning. (www.ladyslipper.org) MARK WEIGLE All That Matters (Pet-A­luma Music) California-based, out-gay singer song­writer Mark Weigle is the queer indie underground's best kept secret-though not too much of a secret, as Weigle has con­sistently lopped the charts for two years at Outvoice.com, a website and mailing list which celebrates out-queer music and the artists who make it. With his acoustic-pop sophomore album All That Matters, Weigle matched the critical success of his 1997 debut Trμth Is while continuing to broaden jus fanbase and commercial appeal. (http:/ /songs.com/markwe1gle/) ~ELISSA FERRICK Freedom (WAR.) With her aggres­sive blend of con­fessional and politi­cal lyrics, this alt­folk- rock smger­songwriter has become the new Am Difranco. 2000 was a year of much momentum for the fast· nsing lesbian star, with a hectic tour sched­ule which included a remarkable perform­ance at this year':; Michigan Women's Music Festival, the release of Freedom in the spnng and more recently Skinruer and Faster Lh·e (Right On Records). (www.melissafcmck.com) LARRY LEVAN Live At The Paradise Garage {West End/Strut UK) This posthumously released 1979 mix· tape by the New York DJ who st;irted it all 1s an essential disc for anyone who loves dance music. The deluxe liner notes of this two disc box set, and an accompanying book by West End Record chief Mel Cheren Keep On Dancin': My Life and the Paradise Garage, serve as some of the best gay-per­spective documentation of the early days of disco. (wv.wwestendrecords.com) SLEATER-KINNEY All Hands on the Bad BU!AT One(Kill Rock Stars) These Pacific northwest dyke punk rockers con­tinued lo maintain their widespread popularity both within and outside the queer community with thcu fifth full length release, a full throttled party record full of three chord fun and smart lyrics. (WW\\ .k11lrockstars.com) MADOSNA \fosic (Maverick Records) Though the degree of her queerness MUSIC REVIEWS may be debatable, her widespread appeal in both the gay male and lesbian communi­ties is not. The title track of the long-await­ed Music was a global radio and club phe­nomenon, ·with its stylish retro-electro beats and sexy lesbian-tinged video, and now, thanks to some clever remixes, the second single "Don't Tell Me" looks to keep Music throbbmg well into 2001. VARIOUS ARTISTS Queer As Folk Soundtrack (Nettwerk) Whether it's the two-disc import version from the UK h1 t sen es or the newly released sin­gle- disc American compilation, the hiNRG-filled Queer As Folk soundtrack has created almost as much of a stir as its TV counterpart. (wwwnet· twerk.com) PATRICIA BARBER (Premonition/Blue Note) This eccentric jazz pianist has proven to the notoriously homophobic jazz world that being openly queer won't rum your career; in fact, hers has only soared. This 12-track collec­tion of vocal standards will no doubt show up on countless critics' year-end lists. (www.patnaabarbercom) TRACY CHAP~AN Telling Stones {Elektra Entertainment) TELLING , STORIES;. ~-~. ·~. , ......·,.,. , ~,. ·~.·- ~-.' The ever-e n i gm at 1 c Chapman had somewhat of a. comeback with this 11-track release. Though criticallv laud· ed, it was rather under-appreci­ated, commercfally, but if her tour perform­ances were any indication, she still has a lot of fans, both m and out of the queer com­munity. THE 6THS Hyacinths and Thistles (Merge) Stephin .\1emtt is the openly gay gem us behind The 6th:;, The Magnetic Fields, Future Bible Heroes, and The Gothic Archies. One of the pop music world's most prolific and iconoclastic of composers, this latest offering from hiin only served to drive home that point, with its odd assort­ment of guest vocalists and bubblegum pop lyncs. (www.houseoftomorrow.com) HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 19 On·Screen MOVIE REVIEWS The state of qUeer film in 2000 Quantity-not quality­was the key word for films with gay and lesbian content th is year by STEVE WARREN At this time last year much of the awards buzz was focused on films with strong queer components: AMERICAN BEAUTY, BOYS DON'T CRY, BEING JOHN MALKOVICH, ELECTION and THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY. This year's counterparts are fewer and weaker-witness BEFORE NIGHT FALLS, BEST IN SHOW, BILLY ELLIOT and WONDER BOYS. They're clearly not as queer. For example-GLADIATOR, where the mam kink is brother-:;1ster incest, QUILLS, m which the Marquis De Sade will screw anything but has a strong hetero preference and SHADOW OF A VAMPIRE, with F.W. Murnau implied to be bisexual, but his only identified sexual partner is a woman. It':; not that there weren't plenty of queer and near-queer films out there, just that they weren't as good this year. But nei­ther were the straight ones. The o\·erall output of the movie indus­try may have reached an all-time low in quality, or at least in the lack of really high­quality films-including queer ones. We wanted equality and we got it, damn it! The queerer the movie the fewer screens it opens on, as a general rule. We got crumbs in a few wide releases: a gay male cheerleader in BRING IT ON; Kip Pardue (who was way out m "But I'm a Cheerleader") letting hlS teammates think he's gay alter kissing one of them in REMEMBER THE TITANS; and Ashton Kutcher and Scann William Scott wrestling shirtless rind locking lips in DUDE, WHERE'S MY CAR? Queer directors working in the main· stream also made us settle for less. Don Roos put a gay supporting character Oohnny Galecki) in BOUNCE, as did Stephen Daldry m BILLY ELLIOT. Gus Van Sant savs Sean Connery's character in FINDING FORRESTER is a closet case, if you read between the lines. (Why else b he watching those boys through binoculars?) Joel Schumacher threw some nice butt shots into TIGERLAND, and if Terrence Davies stayed faithful to Edith Wharton there's naught but a gay sensibility in THE HOUSE OF MIRTH. That left John Waters to carry the rain­bow flag in the disappointing CECIL B. DEMENTED, in which a diverse group of radicals kidnapped a fading movie queen to strike a blow for independent cinema. Before you get too depressed let me give you the good news. Four queer filmmakers got at least mixed-to-good reviews for their debut fea­tures, which received decent distrtbution and did some crosso,·er business: GREG BERLANTI for THE BROKEN HEARTS CLUB, JAMIE BABBIT for BUT I'M A CHEERLEADER, JON SHEAR for URBA­N IA and NISHA GANATRA for CHUT­NEY POPCORN. Overseas our newest greatest hope is FRANCOIS OZON, who had two good films in limited U.S. release this year, the twisted fairy tale CRIMINAL LOVERS and the filmed Fassbinder play WATER DROPS ON BURNING ROCKS. He's building quite a body of work but not much of an American following. Gay Canadian JEREMY PODESWA fol­lowed ECLIPSE with THE FIVE SENSES,. in which the character representing smell was gay. Longtime favorite documentarians ROB EPSTEIN and JEFFREY FRIEDMAN had a fine new entry, PARAGRAPH 175, about queers m the Holocaust. Another personal-and-professional cou­ple, FENTON BAILEY and RANDY BAR­BATO scored a one-two punch with THE EYES OF TAMMY FAYE and 101 RENT BOYS. Our favorite fag hag. MARGARET CHO scored with her San Francisco-filmed concert, I'M THE ONE THAT I WANT. If you've never heard of, let alone seen some of the films I mention it may be because they haven't been shown here, or have had a festival or campus screening or an unpublicized we<>k at an art house. Many will yet show up-in a theater, on cable or in the video store. As usual there wasn't much for ksbians, besides CHUTNEY POPCORN and BUT I'M A CHEERLEADER. The German docudrama AIMEE & JAGUAR was tops in that limited field, and then? was cause for at least some rejoicing in DR. T AND THE WOMEN when (spoiler ahead, if you haven't seen it) KATE HUD­SON ended up with LIV TYLER. There's a lesbian moment in REQUIEM FOR A DREA\1 but it's degrading. not romantic Mike Figgis' failed experiment TIME CODE gave us JEANNE TRIPPLEHORN ("Basic Instinct") and SALMA HAYEK as lovers, but Hayek was having an affair with a man-the slut! JULIANNA MARGULIES and KYRA SEDGWICK were happier together in WHAT'S COOKING? as they endured a family dinner. Yet another lesbian couple, CALISTA FLOCKHART and VALERIA GOLINA, didn't make it to theaters this year because MGM stupidly sold THINGS YOU CAN TELL JUST BY LOOKING AT HER to Showtime instead. Watch for 11 next spring. Stage fare didn't translate too well to the screen. David Drake's THE NIGHT LARRY KRAMER KISSED ME, directed by Tim Kirkman ("Dear Jessen), though well done was too late to be topical and too early for nostalgia. Charles Busch's PSY­CHO BEACH PARTY, as directed by Robert I .ee King, was a thorough disap­pointment. How about novels? Marcel Proust's life and work got an interesting going-over by Raul Ruiz in TIME REGAINED. Julian Schnabel took ·an alme:>t equally oblique approach to the autobiography of gay Cuban poet-novelist Reinaldo Arenas in ''Before Night Falls." Peter Cameron's THE WEEKEND was poorly adapted by drrector Bnan Skeet, despite some bright moments m the mother-daughter bitch fights between GENA ROWLANDS and BROOKE SHIELDS. Shields also turned up a' a beard for ROBERT DOWNEY, JR. in James Toback's BLACK AND WHITE. Downey abo played gay m WONDER BOYS, where he (here's another spoiler) brought out "Spider-Man"-elect TOBEY MAGUIRE. MICHAEL CAINE was gay in M"'S CCNe!!Nlm; .MICHAEL MCKEAN and JOHN MICHAEL HIGGINS in BEST Ir\' SHOW, which abo finally got JENNIFER COOLIDGE and JANE LYNCH to act on their ob\'ious mutual attraction. CRAIG FERGUSON wasn't very funny as a gay Scottish hairdresser in THE BIG TEASE. HAROLD PERRINEAU, JR. was more entertaining as the drag comic relief m WOMAN ON TOP, certainly better than WING CHEN as the transgendered butt of questionable humor m CATFISH IN BLACK BEAN SAUCE. Some highly anticipated films were early-year di!>appointments. Just the idea or NATHAN LANE playing BETIE MIDLER's (as Jacqueline Suo;ann) husband should ha\•e been enough to make ISN'T SHE GREAT funny, but nothing could Bette bombed .igam a few weeks later m DROW!':ING \10NA. which opened the same day as the ~tADONNA muddle THE NEXT BEST THING. m which she had a baby with best fnend RUPERT EVERElT No wonder he's gomg back to Oscar Wilde' Two queer fantasies about gays in the military came from different parts or the world. Each received some praise from knee-jerkers who cream over subtitles, but I didn't like Oaire Denis' BEAU TRAVAIL or agisa Osh1ma's TABOO Less arty but guiltily pleasurable was BURLESK KING, the latest "macho dancer" mO\'le from the Pluhppmcs. Even more dreadful by onematic standards but a big crowd-pleaser m its native Thailand was THE IRON LADIES, the fact-based story of a queer team that won the national volleyball champmnship It could attract fans of feel good movies if 1t reaches our shores next year GUINE­VERE TURNER (~ Go fohn) co-wrote MARY HARRO~'s adaptation of AMERI­CAN PSYCHO, gm.ng herself a sex scene with Christian Bale and another woman. Other edgy films v.1th more queer con· tent were Miguel Arleta's CHUCK & BUCK. wntten by and starrmg Mel White's son, MIKE WHITE, as the childlike gay protagorust; BE:-.;JAMI1'.'. SMOKE. a docu­mentary about a queer (in more ways than one) Atlanta poet/ musician, and Constantine Giannans' FR0\1 THE EDGE OF THE CITY, ~howcasmg the body (and incidentally the actmg ability) of STATHIS PAPADOPOULOS as a Greek hustler of Russian descent. At the end of the year Strand released another terrific package of shorts, BOYS LIFE 3. One of tho~e shorts, Lane ]anger's comedy JUST o:-;E TIME, has already been expanded into a feature, which began lutting theaters a few weeks earlier. All mall-and that's far from all-there was nothing on theater screens this year as good as QUEER AS FOLK-either version, even though Showbme betrayed us by cut- I Experience the Art of Dining "If my husband would ever meet a woman on the street who looked like the women in his paintings, he would fall over in a dead faint" -Mrs. Pablo Picasso Mon-Thu Friday Saturday Hours lunch 11 :00am until 2 OOpm Dinner 5.00pm untll 1000pm lunch 11 OOam until 2 OOpm Dinner 5.00pm until 11·00pm Dinner 5 30pm until 11.00pm Sunday Brunch Buffet 10 30am unt112 30pm 905 TAFT HOUSTON, TEXAS 77019-2613 713.523.5FOX Proudly serving all hur)gry Houstonians! Crad Duren, M.D. Internal medical practice offering discreet confidental care to the community, including HIV/AIDS diagnostics & therapeutics Healthcare from the Heart Anonymous Testing and Counseling Ma1or Credit Cards Accepted· Personal checks Accepted Insurance with Qualificat1011 ·Medicare ... Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW Sinfully good Marrakech offers delectable food, lush atmosphere, entertaining 'eye candy' by KATHREEN LEE Stepping into the traditional dining room at MARRAKECH is like being sucked into a magical Gerue bottle where one leaves the plain and ordinary "real world" to a richly and lavishly decorated fantasy where you have suddenly become the master (or mistress). Plush sofas with luxurious pillows, vel­vety carpeted walls with exquisite designs and silken sheets billowing out from the ce1hng create a hedonistic atmosphere reserved for only the most self-indulgent and decadent of dmers. On Friday and Saturday evenings, Marrakech only opens their traditional din· ing room where diners can lounge in the lavish setting and choose from several dif· ferent mulhple-course meals. While one cannot order a la carte, the diversity m their multi-course offerings should satfsfy even the pickiest of eaters. My friends and I ordered the Family Style Dinner ($29.50 per person), a seven-course meal rl•commended for parties of four or more. Each main course is presented in tra­ditional large platters with a wide variety of offenng5. The first course was Harrira Soup-a tomato and lentil soup rich in tex· ture and very mildly spicy. After thls initial tantalizing offering, the anticipation for the next ~1x courses was almost unbearable The second course was a Moroccan Salad with the three main ingredients of eggplant garnished with cumin and garlic, chopped cucumbers flavored with rosewa­ter (water in which the petals of roses have been steeped) and a mixture of cooked car­rots, tomatoes and bell peppers. The third course was Bastilla, which Marrakech touts as its house specialty. Similar to the samosa often found in Indian cuisine, a Bastilla is phyllo dough filled with diced chicken, almonds and egg cus­tard. For those vegetarians out there, Marrakech can substitute the chicken with eggplant The stuffed dough IS then baked until it's a cnspy brown carapace and then dusted with powdered cinnamon and sugar. Your mouth watenng, yet? The fourth course was Corrush hen served on a bed of couscous mixed with duck peas, raisms and vanety of vegetables. The incredibly tender meat slid effortlessly off of the bones and the sweet couscous nux­ture perfectly enhanced its savory fl,wor The fifth course combrned a variety of lamb dishes, includIDg lamb kabobs, Taime of Lamb and Lamb ~1rouzia. The tender meat of the grilled lamb chucks rn the laibob were served on a bed of saffron rice, wluch was a perfect complement to the succulent lamb. The Lamb Mrouzia are chunks of lamb deliciously caramelized in a sweet honey ~ ) . sauce and further seasoned with a sprinkle of saffron, sliced almonds and sesame seeds. Unlike the other Jamb dishes, the Taiine lamb was stewed with an assortment of carrots, sweet peas and artichokes. Each delectable bite of the stew diffused to every comer of your mouth and stirred every remaining dormant taste bud. Baklava, vour standard Middle Eastern nch dessert "was offered as a sixth course and our gluttonous endeavor was capped off with a Moroccan Hot Mint Tea which served to cleanse our insatiable palates. As if th is seven-course gastro­nomical gratification is not enough to serve your decadent desires, a tra ined belly dancer sashays around the dining lounge and jiggles her exposed abdomen for your viewing and donating pleasure. As if this seven-course gastronomical gratification is not enough to serve your decadent desires, a trained belly dancer sashays around the dining lounge and jig­gles her exposed abdomen for your view­ing and donating pleasure. Enchanting her audience with the rhythmic striking of her zills-a form of wooden castanets-and the flourishing of her vivid and diaphanous robes, the belly dancer's sensual dance added yet another layer of debauchery onto the already self-indulgent evening. Marrakcch's orgy of food and entertain­ment is best when relished with a group of friends who are in the mood for a gluttony of mouth-watering cuisine, conversation and eye-candy entertainment. "Sinful" would be the best description of such an evening and I encourage every­one to partake in the sensory delights that Marrakech has to offer MARRAKECH 416 Main Street 713.228.7222, 713.228.7224 Food: S> S> S> S> S> Service: '!;:> S> ~ S> t Value:S>S>S>~ Scene:SS>~~~ Opt for bread, water at home ~ S-oK, 1f you really must &8-t:> Worth the dn_.., so live a little B>S>S>t.,; As good as rt gets t HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 29, 2000 january "I didn't know if [the scene] was going to be appropriate or not, but it turned out to be so beautifully done." -Actress Sharon Stone on her nude love scene with Ellen DeGeneres in HBO's "If These Walls Could Talk II," which was directed by DeGeneres' partner Anne Heche, as reported in the New York Post on Jan. 20 "Am I anti-gay? ... I've spoken out against gay marriage, am on record as describing homosexuality as a deviant sexual orientation and have spoken favorably about reparative therapy for gays who wish to change their sexual orien­tation. Well, the truth is, I'm not [anti-gay]. What I am is a serious Jew who has consistently stated my belief that same-sex sexual activity is incompatible with Biblical scripture and, in the same breath, that homosexuals are as entitled to love and respect as all other human beings." -Dr Laura Schlessinger writing in the Los Angeles Times, Jan. 17. february ''I've gone out with some nuts. When I first met them, they seemed decent and regular and said they weren't big fans, but then they turn out to be crazy-mad, insane Madonna fans. Looking back, it's pretty funny. Nobody's ever caused any harm. Let's just say it was bad judg­ment on my part." -Madonna's brother Christopher Ciccone to the Advocate, Feb. 15 march "His legacy lives on through our movie to remind us to always be ourselves, to follow our hearts, to not conform. I pray for the day when we not only accept our differences but we actually celebrate our diversity." -Hilary Swank, in her Oscar acceptance speech for Best Adress. thank­ing Brandon Teena, who passed as a man and was murdered in 1996 "Thank you so much for giving me the opportunity to express, the rumors. But, Barbara, for some reason, I just don't feel like it. You know, it's, it's something so mine. I give it all when I'm on stage. I give it all in inter­views, but you've got to keep something for yourself sometimes, and that's for me." -Singer Ricky Martin when asked if he's gay by Barbara Walters on her March 26 Oscar night special april "Who are now the most square people on Earth? Who are the only people left who want to go into the Army and get married? Homosexuals." -Humorist Fran Lebowitz "A sports stadium full of queers-how fuckin' brilliant!" -Singer George Michael at the Equality Rocks concert during the Millennium March festivities in Washington, D.C .. Apn 29. "The best thing that's happened about it [my coming out] is nothing. The world didn't end, my career didn't come to a complete halt, I didn't get ridiculed, I didn't get yelled at. Life went on just as I'd hoped it would." -Actor B:!I Brochtrup of TV's • "Slue," to Portland, Oregon's Just Out. April 7 21 may "I had no trouble kissing Valeria [Galina in the movie 'Things You Can Tell Just By Looking at Her']. We had chemistry. And I've kissed Courtney [Thorne-Smith], Jane [Krakowski] and Lucy Liu on 'Ally McBeal.' It's more about whether they have bad breath or not. There are guys who come on Ally McBeal whom I have to kiss, and I'd rather kiss my dog." -Actress Calista Flockhart to the New York Post, May 15 june "I'm a lesbian ... although I haven't been very open about that and throughout most of my life I've gone out with blokes because I haven't necessarily been terribly comfortable about being a lesbian. But I actually am a les­bian." -Singer Smead O'Connor in an interview with Curve magazine in the June 27 issue "I've cried more at times than I would like to admit because to see my name, my character, my person come under attack. It's astonishing to have your name smeared with such vitriol. I wouldn't wish it on people I dislike. It's been agonizing." - "Dr. Laura" Schlessinger, m an interview with Time magazine, June 24 issue "What a fucking idiot!" -Bryant Gumbel, host of CBS' ·Early Show,· after mterv1ewmg Robert Knight of the Family Research Council, who defended the Boy Scouts' ban on gays. The FRC demanded Gumbel's res1gnat1on after the remark was picked up by a studio microphone and b·oadcast "Hundreds of my friends have died before their time [of AIDS]. The most profound effect it's had on me is that when I heard that some­one had died from a heart attack it was almost like an elation. I was like, 'Oh, okay.' Because you just got to the point where you couldn't take one more [death]. Couldn't take one more." -Actress Whoop1 Goldberg to the AIDS magazines A&U, June issue july "I'm not aware of myself as a sex symbol-I wouldn't object if I were. It's one of the functions of actors to let people fantasize." -Actor Sir Ian McKellen, who is openly gay, to Chicago's Outlines, July 19 august "My goal is to be in a committed relationship in the future with the right man .... The prize may complicate that." l:'..lr:!ll..._ -"Survivor" winner Richard Hatch in an Aug. 24 september conference call with reporters "Everyone says to me, 'Your mother being who she is, it must have been easy [coming out to her].' But she had more difficulty with it than my dad." -Christopher Rice, 22, son of novelist Anne Rice, to the Advocate, Aug. 29 "[My lover Jim Bridges and I] never made a fuss about being gay, but we never hid anything. Maybe I was naive, but I never felt oppres­sion." -Jack Larson, who played Jimmy Olsen on the classic "Superman· TV series, to the Advocate, Sept. 12 novernber "Anne Heche has signed a deal to write her autobiography. It'll be the classic tale of a small-town girl who goes to Hollywood and becomes a lesbian to help her career." 22 Mirror, mirror, on the wall. Who's the funnest matchmaker of all? Not listings, but a real online dating service! "Fun'' • The Advocate "Cool Site" • Yahoo "Best online matchmaker" • HX Magazine J_ESUl~J_ECTION METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH ~ St!tiptuUJ fart 'Pa..;itwe.faith wor~hop Led b!f Rev. !J r. Rem\Jert Tr~Lt1ck, cu\thor of ~tepg to Recover~ from r.3ible .A\Jtige Jctntl0.1"!1 ~. 2~~1. l~o.m-~pm in the seminar room HM OMigUm. f~? semino.r presented b!:f !Jr. TrHL«ck 1i1esdo.!f.elo.n«o.r!f '3. 2~~1. 7pm in the seminctrroom Or. Truluck's workshop and seminar will kick off a year long program designed lo heal our spirits and help us become tfie free people God has created us lo tie. II you can't attend the workshop or seminar, please join us for any or all of the following programs: Slep oae to red•ation: Hove YM Beet Htr1 ly Reigioa? Tuesday, Februcry 6, 2001 7pm-UOpm Step two to redtmatioa: Tim To God As Yo.r Glide Tuesday, Mach 6. 2001 7pm-8:30pm Step three lo redtmalion: h•ile YMr Faith Tuesday, Ap~ 3, 2001 7pm-UOpm 2025 W. 11th St. 713-861-9149 ~ www.resurrectionmcc.org DECEMBER 29, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE community saturday, december 30 Aher Houn. KPfT 90.1 FM- 12 un to 3 a.m. 713-526-5731 ()-Patrol w• h the ltrtets 145 pm 713-52&-SAFE Oigt1lty"""' IJO pm for gay C.11\o ocs. 713.U0-2172. St Stephen's Epucapal Chutch. Rosary & o.m 1805 W Alaboma 71J.52U665 Houston Cha n Ging Bocyde Oub. C. for ride lo<abons 713· 863-•800 Certif><d Amtncan Heart Anoe at•on CPI! ci.sses. noon /1].607 noo Houston \"/Ttltl ng Oub Pra<Uct I 30 p.m. /l~SJ.7406 ll>inbcw fishing Oub flee~ng 7'3-526-7070 Houston F1tne Circlo Meet ng 2 p.m 713 533-0150 Northwoods ArOS Coa 1t1on food Pantry Southwest Center. 10 am to2p'11 211·63J.2555&Conroe936-441·16,. Houston G1y & Lnbian Community Cent~ Oro~1n hours noon to • p m. • Montro .. Wnton ProJtCI. 3 to HO p.m • I03 ~ ... 713-521-31"& sunday, december 31 Common Group (formerly New Hope Chmtian Center) Wonh1p Strvitt. 11 am. I03 Hawthorne. 7•3-524-38'8 Houston Aru Teen Coaht1on of Homosex~ts meeb. 71 J-942· 7002 Rainbow Riden. A bicycle dub for women. 713-169-1686. St Stephen'S Episcapal Churm Holy Rite Eucharist I NS 1 m; Holy Rte Eucti.ru.t a & 55 a.m. Education hour 10 am.; Choral Eucl..rist 'I am. 713-528-6665. ~ranatlw Fellow1h p Metropolitan Church. SeMct 6 30 p.m. 7'3-521-6756. Rewrrt<tion MCC. S.mcts. 9 a.m. ind 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10 a.m. Youth Sunday School 11.15 a.m. HM.d~H Choir rehearsal 1.30 p.m. 713-86' 9149. Gra<t Lutheran Church. Sundoy school for an ages 9 a m SeMce 10:30 a.m. 713-521-3269 Community Gospel s.r.ict 1t 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Sun<Uy School for childron 10 a m. 713-881).92 35 or www.communltyljospel.org Houston M ss•on Church. Servlce 10:30 am 713-529-8225 eo .. nam Church, Ecumtniul, Liberal Baptist. Service !l'JO a m. & educlbon hour II 1 m. 7 H-663-8830 :"~o1o~·.:;~;=·~~~n,,::~~2~~0~~ at I 30 1.m. Th< Women's Group. Mett•ng & DoSCUSSion. 10:45 a.m. 713-529- 157• Unitarian fellowshop of Galvtston County. S02 Church St StM<t 10 30 • m 409·76S.8ll0 . • First Congregati.enal Church (Memonal). Service at 11 1 m. Chriruan EducabOn. 11:30 pm. 71l-468-9S43 or fee houston org Urutarlan ftllow-sh1p .. f Houston Adult forum 10 a.m. Service- 11 1 m 713-616-5176 Thoreau Unttanan Unrver~!rst Congregation: Ad1.tlt d1scuss1on 9451 m. 5eMCe 111 m. 281·277·8812. www.tuuc.org. f rst Umur .. n Unrwsal st Church. Services at 9:30 & 11 lO 1 m. Brune~ 1va bble 10:30 am. 713-526-5200. churchttf1ntuu org Houston TenrMS Oub 9 un Memonat P,u1t at the leMn Center 713-692-2703 Houston Gay & .. ntmn Commun ty Ctnter Drop-in houn 2 to 4 pm 803 H•wthome. 713-524-34 '8. monday, january 1 Gay Fathers/1•thers First. Suppcrt group. g pm. wwwGoyfathers-Hou>ton.org or 21' 50>1788 Frost Eye 01n1t. frtt eye txams for people with HIV 713-130- 3000. Hr!/ testing STD Exams & tre-atmtnt Free. AVES. 1 p.m to 6:'5 p.m. 713-626-2137, Kolbe PrQJe<t. Eucharist 7 30pm.713·861·1800 Northwood• AIDS eoar.tion Food Pantry Open. 10 a.m. to 6 pm. 936-44
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