Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, June 25, 2004
File 014
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, June 25, 2004 - File 014. 2004-06-25. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7279/show/7243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2004-06-25). Houston Voice, June 25, 2004 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7279/show/7243

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 25, 2004 - File 014, 2004-06-25, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7279/show/7243.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, June 25, 2004
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 25, 2004
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houslonvoice.com JUNE 25. 2004 13 Oillt STEPHEN FALLON Despite new oral tests and rapid results, HIV testing is still a horrible experience full of fear and shame. As well it should be. Why it's OK to hate HIV tests OLD-TIME HIV TESTERS LIKE ME TELL war stories about the bad old days. Back then getting a test meant scheduling an appointment weeks in advance, driving to some musty facility far away, getting grilled by overworked counselors, and ringing the clinic's phones for weeks trying to pick up lab results that were almost always late, lost, or unavailable. These days, with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention pushing to ft MORE INFO HIV National Testing Day June 27 To find a testing site: www.hivtest.org get all at-risk people tested, it's a whole different scene. But the experience of going through HIV testing is still pretty horrible, just as it should be. The government has managed to shake free a bit of money, so now most testing sites have enough staff members to handle walk-ins. The tests have improved, too. Alarming false-positive results, once common, only occur in 0.0000005 percent of tests, and the Western Blot rules out even those few mistakes. The newer tests have also shortened the "window period," that lag time when a recently infected person might get a false HIV-negative test result. Generally, a test conducted three to four weeks after taking a risk gives you good idea of your status, while a test conducted at least three months after your last risk behavior approaches 100-percent accuracy. EVEN BETTER, THESE DAYS YOU CAN customize your HIV testing experience. Scared of needles? A special oral swab is just as reliable as a blood draw test, and available at most clinics. Can't wait weeks for results? Last year's new rapid test yields very accurate results from a finger prick in just 20-40 minutes. Some clinics even offer this test in an oral form. While convenience and technology have lowered some barriers to testing, there's still no escaping the gut-churning anxiety that an HIV test triggers. Don't let any cheerful slogans convince you that testing isn't scary During the time it takes you to drive to your rapid test appointment, or to wait for your standard HIV test results, you will almost certainly feel each of these emotions: Scared: Even though medications have helped positive people live longer, HIV is still a serious condition. People living with HIV suffer a variety of ills caused by the virus and the meds that fight it. Ailments include fatigue, diarrhea, nausea, high cholesterol, depression, vomiting, loss of sex drive, liver problems, nerve problems, muscle loss, fat loss or fat build up in strange places, and more. Worse yet, nearly 17,000 people still die each year of AIDS related conditions in the United States. Ashamed: We spent the 1980s and 1990s educating ignorant politicians and ministers that HIV is not "God's judg ment." It's just a stupid virus that will invade anyone if the opportunity is there. While there's no moral shame in becoming HIV infected, most everyone feels hugely embarrassed when they think they might have caught HIV. Angry: Your mind will faithfully replay scenes of every risky fling or impulsive night of unprotected sex you've had since your last test. If you fear that one of these encounters might have infected you, you'll quickly conclude that the sex wasn't worth the possible outcome. You might become angry with the other guy for coercing you into risky sex, or mad at yourself for allowing it. SO WHY WOULD ANYONE PUT HIMSELF through that experience of HIV testing? The enemy is invisible and persistent. HIV sneaks in when we let our guard down. It's easy to discount your own personal risk of infection, or the seriousness of HIV disease that could await you. That is, it's easy until the cold certainty of a lab result hangs over your head, and you find yourself whirling through the abyss of horrible emotions I just described. HIV testing is supposed to be horrifting. In the old movie "A League of Their Own." Tom Hanks played an irascible baseball coach. When a player whined that the game was too hard. Hanks snapped back. "It's supposed to be hard. It's the hard that makes it good." Stephen Fallon, Ph.D., runs a Florida-based consulting firm and can be reached at sfallon@skills4.org Oillt ANGELA MOFFITT I am happily single with no plans to marry, and I see issues more important to black gays. Why should I care about same-sex marriage? Picking sides on gay marriage AS A SAME-GENDER-LOVING WOMAN OF African descent, who is proud of my African heritage and unapologetic about my sexual orientation, I Find that sometimes these two categories of identity clash. If ever there were an issue that so powerfully probed the intersection of the multiple identities of race, class, gender and sexual orientation, it has been the recent controversy over same-sex marriage. When the issue of same-sex marriage dominated the media, my reaction has been that this is nol my issue. This is a fight primarily led by gay, upper class white men. The masses of black people are forced to negotiate basic survival needs before we can address the issue of gay marriage. How dare they attempt to equate gay rights with civil rights. I was happily single with no intentions of marrying in the foreseeable future. More importantly, as a conscious African clear that combating black racism is a categorically different animal than combating homophobia, I was deeply i iffended at the attempted equation of the two struggles. I WAS BORN BLACK. I CHOOSE TO BE lesbian. My beautiful black skin is an immutable characteristic, over which I had no control. My sexual orientation is a sexual preference, which I may elect to conceal when it suits me. Racism attempts to posit that I am an inferior human being. Homophobia seeks to posit that I am an immoral human being. I was elected in March co-president of a New York-based political club of gay people of color that had recently signed on to co-sponsor a news conference where black LGBT leaders would affirm their support for same-sex marriage, despite polls that found the overwhelming majority of black Americans were opposed. On the night of my election, I fully intended to assert some reason not to attend that news conference. Our guest speaker for the evening was Phil Reed, the only openly gay male on the New York City Council and an African American. He had been expected to talk about his run for Manhattan borough president, but as one of the lead sponsors of the imminent news conference, he opted to speak primarily on same-sex marriage. He asked us on what side of history do we, as LGBT people of color, want to be on the issue'of same-sex marriage. That question gave me pause. SIX DAYS LATER, ON A SUNDAY afternoon, I was standing on the steps of City Hall at the news conference. Among the speakers, the one who had the greatest impact upon me did not have a marquee name. Regrettably, I don't remember her name. She was a butch-looking lesbian accom panied by her femme-looking lover, who lovingly stroked her back as she addressed the crowd. She introduced herself and her "wife," which drew a cheer. I was nearly moved to tears. Later I heard a radio commentary by noted civil rights attorney Connie Rice on the subject of same-sex marriage. She argued that black Americans, rather than demand a monopoly on the term "civil rights," should take pride that oppressed peoples all over the world look upon our civil rights struggles as a model to be emulated. What an empowering way to approach the subject. I now embrace the growing trend to use terms such as "black civil rights" or "black civil rights struggle," so as to acknowledge the uniqueness of the struggle for equal rights by black Americans, but to concede the point that African Americans do not have a monopoly on "civil rights." I have undergone a transformation on the issue of same-sex marriage. While 1 am still not inclined to equate the struggle for gay rights with the struggle for black civil rights, I no longer take the position that same-sex marriage is not my issue. Angela J. Moffitt is an attorney living in New York and co-president of the Out People of Color Political Action Club and a board member of Black Pride NYC, Inc. She can be reached at anwffitt@earthlink.net
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1235_013.jpg