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Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003
File 013
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Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 013. 2003-06-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-06-27). Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/684

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 013, 2003-06-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 27, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor PENNY WEAVER editor. Qjhonstonvoice.com Production BONNIE NAUGLE JOEY CAROUNO CotT-s-wtdents: LOU CH1BBAR0 JR., JOE CREA, LAURA DOUGLAS-BROWN, MIKE FLEMING, MATTHEW HENNIE, BRIAN MOYLAN, KEVIN NAFF, KEN SAIN, JENNIFER SMITH, RHONDA SMITH, STEVE WEINSTEIN ConWxitrirs JOHNNY HOOKS, ELLA TYLER Ftlrtragraphen DALTON DEHART, KIMBERLY THOMPSON Webmaster ARAMVARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANIEL EMER1CH demerictKaJhoustonvoicecom Account Executives BRETT CULLUM - kullum(a:lw,istorivoice.crjm BRIAN MARTIN - bmartrrtriliTOtrjrrvoicecrjm Administrative Assistant USA GALLARDO - Igallard&d houstonvoice.com National Advertising Representative Rivendeli Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 AWinJ tion PubSsher- WINDOW MEDIA LLC President- WILLIAM WAYBOURN Editorial Director-CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNETTE HOUSTON Art Director- ROB BOEGER General Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Marteting Manager- DAN GARRIOTT -=■» ihediaiiijer W XTmUm" haamaon -pMcnCTDor oar canarrmnii CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713)529-6490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 wwwJioustonvotce.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 am to 530 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request but you must include your name and phone number for verification Please send mail to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett BM. Suite 200, Houston .Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-matf to edJtorayhoustonvrice.com. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. AD material in Houston Voice a protected by federal copyngM law apd auy not be reproduced without the written consent it Houston Voce. The sexual orientation of advertisers. rtotoqrMhers. »rrters and cartoonrsts fished hereiri is neither inferred or imp-hed. The appearance of names or pictorial represent j two does not necessarily Indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return. The edrtor reserves the right to accept, reject or edit any '-jJmtsstori All rights revert to authors upon publication Guideliries for freelance corrtroutors are avartaole upon request Issue 1183 Forum HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 27, 2003 PAGE 12 editorial Blind justice Bush style The president says he dreams of a 'color-blind' America, and apparently a 'gay-blind' society, too. But our victories in the courthouse won't be so easily ignored in the White House. By CHRIS CRAIN n EORGEW. BUSH HAS SAID precious little during his political career about his views on homosexuality and gay rights. Those who know him — especially family friend Charles Francis, the gay Texan who organized the meeting Bush had with 12 gay supporters after he clinched the GOP presidential nomination — say that our president is personally comfortable around people he knows to be gay Other gay Republicans argue that Bush is at least a "compassionate conservative" on our issues; in other words, don't look for him to stick his neck out in favor of gay rights, but at the same time don't worry about the type of anti-gay wedge politics practiced by the right wing of his party All this is probably true enough, but the record of his administration so far suggests a worldview that is a little more nuanced, and more than a little bit troublesome, for gay Americans — and for Bush's political future. COMMENTATORS HAVE LONG NOTED this president's sunny view of human nature; he is a likable guy who is prepared to enjoy the company of most of those he encounters. A classic example surfaced just this month, when Bush played host at the White House to a college reunion of his fellow Yale alums. As the San Francisco Chronicle reports it, one woman told a surprised Bush, "You might remember me as Peter when we left Yale." Bush didn't miss a beat, according to those present. He grabbed her hand and responded, "Now you've come back as yourself." Of course, that doesn't mean the president will be lobbying Congress to add "gender identity" to gay rights legislation — he hasn't.even said he supports gay rights legislation —but it does suggest a welcome personal acceptance. That sunny disposition, and its disconnect from public policy, was also on display this week after the Supreme Court announced its split ruling on the affirmative action policies used in admissions at the University of Michigan. The court approved of affirmative action in principle, citing "diversity" as a com pelling government interest that justifies treating different races differently The White House responded with a statement from the president praising the court "for recognizing the value of diversity on our nation's campuses." The statement neglected to mention that Bush had personally approved a Justice Department brief that urged the court to strike down affirmative action entirely Even more telling was the portion of Bush's statement in which the president added, "Like the court, I look forward to the day when America will truly be a color-blind society." If "diversity" really is a compelling interest, of course, then America will never truly be "color-blind," and shouldn't be. Race neutrality is not the same thing as color-blindness, but that difference appears lost on the president. THE SAME MAY WELL BE TRUE ON GAY issues. The president's personal acceptance of gay people has made possible the appointment of a number of White House staffers who were known to be gay, even if they are "private" about it. But in none of these cases does the president appear to see his gay appointments as proof of his commitment to "diversity," or as his predecessor put it, putting into place a government that "looks like America." In fact, as far as homosexuality goes, the White House "line" is that it is a non-issue, irrelevant in every way. The Bush administration's position on our issues is roughly the same, "gay-blind" approach: Homosexuality is private, a non- issue, and has no role in setting public policy The number of closeted Republicans in the Bush administration, and on Capitol Hill, only reinforces that sentiment. A "gay-blind" government is better, of course, than one outwardly hostile to us and our interests. But we are constituents as well, and ignoring us comes at a cost. Take the president's AIDS policies, for example. Bush has consecutively named two gay men to be his AIDS czar, but the stark contrast between the two — Scott Evertz played a loud and visible role but was removed in favor of Joseph Phillips, has been missing in action — suggests that the position is to be neither seen nor heard. The primary AIDS focus of the White House has been on the global epidemic, which is largely heterosexual, probably because it is viewed though the prism of our national security The president's only real contribution to addressing domestic HIV and AIDS has been increased funding and favoritism toward "abstinence-only-until-marriage" as a prevention policy. That approach only makes since if the administration is blind to gays, since marriage is not an option for us. When AIDS groups have tried aggressive marketing to get gay men interested again in HIV prevention — using sex as a lure, just like Madison Avenue and Hollywood would — the Bush administration warns against "encouraging sex." Absent an effective alternative, the message again appears to ignore the gays. The New York Times has even reported that AIDS groups fearing cuts in funding are avoiding use of words like "homosexual" and "anal sex" in their grant applications. Hear no gays, see no gays. PUTTING ON THE GAY BUNDERS HAS ITS downside, and it is not all ours. A number of cities are reporting an increase in HIV and STD rates among gay men, and if that trend continues it will be our president who must answer for it. (Presuming, of course, that our AIDS organizations overcome their bloodhist for federal funding long enough to rediscover their activist voice.) Even more daunting are some pending gay rights victories in the courthouse that won't be easily ignored in the White House. If. as expected, the Supreme Court this week strikes down the Texas sodomy law, how will the president respond? George W Bush was governor of that state, after all, when Tyron Gardner and John Lawrence were arrested, convicted and first challenged the "homosexual conduct law." Gov. Bush swore back then to uphold and defend the Constitution, but our Supreme Court will be saying that he failed to do that. Will he find away to again praise the justices, as he did on affirmative action? The real challenge, however, is coming from the north. First Canada will legalize gay marriage, and then (according to many court observers) so will the Massachusetts state supreme court. Conservatives are already planning a constitutional amendment to block forced recognition of gay marriages in other states, and perhaps even forbid them outright. President Bush is on record opposing gay marriage, but how far will a president who wants our lives kept private go to squelch this issue? Chris Crain is exec utive editor of Southern Voice and can be reached at ccraln@sovoxoni __________________
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