Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003
File 001
File size: 21.84 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 001. 2003-06-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-06-27). Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/672

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003 - File 001, 2003-06-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/721/show/672.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1183, June 27, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 27, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 1183 Your guide to Pride Special section details complete schedule of weekend events. Inside JUNE 27, 2003 Court strikes down sodomy law On eve of Pride celebration, decision affirms privacy rights 2 JUNE 27. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE el hereandn modern life . an.d other mc..orn cmences HBS IT'S NOT TV IT'S HBO saturday, june 28, 9 pm To subscribe to HBO call 1-800-466-9800 or log on to HBO.com AOL Keyword: HBO C 2003 Home Box Office nc: All rights r.-wd 9 SIMce mal1cs of Home Box Office Inc HOUSTON VOICE www houston voice com I lo a Gays claim Montrose as their own The 1960s saw the evolution of this traditionally diverse, gay neighborhood Bditor's note: In honor of Pride Week and 25 years of pride and gay history in Houston, this story is the second in a three· part series taking a look at the changes m the Montrose neighborhood, traditionally known as the heart of gay Houston. By JOHNNY HOOKS In 1948, Houston was awarded the label "Fastest Growing City in the Nation," according to an article in the Houston Business Journal. The Saturday Evening Post described the city as in "a dazzling phase, like Chicago in the 1850s." The reason for such tremendous growth? Petroleum. The fossil fuel would propel Houston from a frontier town to the 14th largest city in the US by 1950. Betty Chapman in the Houston Busine~s Journal wrote: "Fourteen refineries m the Houston area produced more than half the nation's oil. More wealth left the ground within a 200-mile radius of Houston than in any other location in thf' world." Life magazine wrote then what many residents feel now: "I think I'll like Houston if they ever get it finished ." The 1950s and '60s saw the city through its first "boom years." To learn more about the queer emergence in Montrose, as well as in Houston itself, I went to gay activist Ray Hill. "There was always a strong gay influ­ence in [Houston) development, mortgage banking ... even, I suspect as far back as turning an old dairy farm into the first Houston subdivision," Hill said. "Gay folk were laying out streets and financing homes. "Jesse Jones had no children of his own, his fair-haired boy Bob Smith had no children, left no heirs ... of course Ms. Ima (Hogg) never married and I don't know what they paid her secretary after she died, but she's living comfortably for not writing a book," Hill said. "There have always been rumors about those relationships." Why is it no surprise that this city had such colorful (ahem) characters from its very start? · But when and, curiously, WHY did the queers arrive in the neighborhood? Again Hill remembers. "I can tell you exactly, almost to the date. I certainly know who was at the table when the gay community discovered Montrose as aeri­able soil... and that goes back to the Almeda Street era. "We had downtown [gay] bars, and the first bars to venture out of the downtown area were down Almeda road from Holman to Southmore, and it was cruismg strip," Hill said. "You know. Houston's always IJcen a cruising town." Houston gay activist Ray Hill recalls when gays m.1de Montro~e the heart of their community in the Bayou City. (Photo by Kimberly Thompson). At the time, all bars in Houston closed at midnight, but the men and women still had some tap in their shoes. The only place open was a coffeehouse on Main Street called Cokens. Apparently the owner, Bernard Coken, was rumored to be a "family member," though vf!ry clos· eted if so. Depending on his mood, Co ken would either reluctantly welcome the late-night "perverts" or force them to hit the road. In the early 1960s, the "grand dames" of that time decided they'd had enough. "Paul Stewart, Bobby Gant, J11ay BQtich. Rita W~sttum ;md that ~811 ~<tSically the Gtro''ftpup..., the les tiak were somew~-else but they ~me !Ill the way acros town to join us for Coken's," Hill said. "We got together there, after recently being let back in. and said, 'This is bullshit.' You can't plan your evening, you never know 1f Bernard is going to be on a terror, or if Helen the waitress is gonna cough on your food; it's an awful place and we're not welcome "So there was a place, Ari Wren's, where Katz's Deli is now .. that v.as only open for lunch," Hill continued. HUI and his friPnds convinced Wren to open !us restaurant 24 hours a day and from the first night. a traffic jam formed due to all the cars leaving Almeda. headmg down Montrose to Art Wren's. At the time. Montrose dead-ended at Westheimer and by the late '60s some quick-thinking queens decided to open a few bars "out Westheimer" past Montrose Boulevard. The Encore was the first Montrose "gay bar" - it was actually a private club where men could dance with men and enjoy cocktails. The second was Mary's; May Britz was the third; and fmally a bar called Numbers, located on 1004 California. The Bayou Landing was reported to be the largest gay dance hall between the East and West coasts! The sexual revolution of the times was embraced by the writers. musicians. gays and exiles that flocked to Montrose at the time. thanks to Ray Hill and his fellow queer pioneers. The early 1970s saw the lower Westheimer/ Montrose area referred to as "Houston's Left Bank," with cafcs, boutiques, antique stores and chic European·mfluenced restaurants such as Ari Grenouille's, Bacchanal, l\lichaelangelo's and Boccacio 2000. Boccacio 2000 was described by Texas Monthly as "a disco-restaurant fur nished in Modern Kubrick that's become a Jet-set pit stop for mone stars lost in Houston," The late 1970s were a testament to urban decline, and Houston's "Left Bank" was now being compared to Boston's "Combat Zone.'' "First one sex shop opened, then another ... once you go cheap, you start attracting a bad ele­ment... landlords get greedy and only the sex shop owners are willing to pay; the restaurants couldn't survive," recalls Michaelanelo owner Willie Rometsch in a Houston Post article. The early 1980s saw Montrose dissolve into its most lawless era. Cars packed with drunken (mainly straight) youth cruised bumper to bumper from South Shepherd to Elgin and back again on weekend nights. Prostitutes of every variety lined either side of lower Westheimer; side streets saw sex in alley­ways, rampant drug deals and more than the occasional assault. Numbers 2. Godfathers Pizza (soon to be La Strada), the infamous Chicken Coop, the Midnight Sun, Twins (sole lesbian bar on the strip), Tila's Restaurant (in the old An Wren's locale) with its neon clock, Rutgl~s. the Tower Theater and the Booby: Rock strip club were all fixtures 6n the famously seedy strip. How did the former jewel in Houston's crown overcome its eyesore status and Jaw· less reputation to become. yet again. the zip code to inhabit? Next we .. k: .'1ontrose faces the der:CiStat· ing effects of AIDS arul gentrifying redei·el· opmcnt, plus a determined community looks to thcfuture JUNE 27 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1183 LOCAL NEWS .... -.. .3 NATIONAL NEWL .. - ..... 6 FORUM ................... _ ...... - ....... - .......... 12 OUT ON THE BAYOU-... - .... . ___ .. .17 COMMUNITT CALENDAR.- ... - .... -25 APPOINTMENTS .. ______ .. __ .25 CLASSIFIEDS .... ______ .. ..... 26 Q PUZZLE........, _____ .. _____ .. ,_27 MY STARS---· ...... -30 LANDMARK DECISION The U.S. Supreme Court. with the 1!1aJOnty decision written by Justice Anthony M. Kemedy on Thursday struck down the anti-sodomy Texas statute. Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. Page 6 1HRJUED'. Gay Houston attomt')' Mitchell Katile said he and others l!lVOh'ed m the Lawrence v Texas case agamst the states so-called 'homosex· ual conduct' law are 'thrilled' at the Supreme Court rnrmg agamst the statute. Page 8 RAl.llES Houstonian Jom l..awrence who, along with Tyrone Gamer is at the center of the case that led tci tJie Supreme Court ruruig oo the Texas sodomy statute. participated in a Thursday rught rally at Houston CrtY Hall Page 8. CORRECTION An arts preview article in the Sept 20, 2002. issue of the Houston Voice included several passages that should have been attributed to freelance wnter D. L Groover of Outsmart Magazine. The Houston Voice regrets the error. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. TX 77006 Houston V0tee is published weekly oo Friday by Window Media lLC Subscriptt0ns are $92/year for 52 rssues (only $1 77 per issue) 4 JUNE 27 2003 'V~ ,~\ j Same Sex Marriage . • J. \ 1 (~'••• ; Legal in Ontario/Canada ~ ··~ -v..JJ ~ From $899 to S 1129 per person Depart Any Doy, No Saturday Night Stay Required Includes: Round Trip Airfare from Houston/Dallas via US Airways to Toronto, 3 nights accommodation. round trip airport transfers via private sedan. Wedding photo package. Special 3 course dinner including wine. tax. and gratuities. Breakfast Included. Champagne and fruit upon arrival at your ho•e1 (all hotels except the standard 2 star) Information package on Toronto. Not Included· $99.00 airport taxes which must accompany the final payment. Cost of the Ontario wedding license approx. $85.00 US which cannot be prepo'd. Private chapels,add1t1onal features, tours items no• show above. Medical or canceflation insurance. Port1cipat1ng Hotels: Quality Inn, Comfort Suites. Delta hotel, Marriott Yorkville. Holiday Inn on King. Fairmont Royal York, Marnett Eaton Center. Alf hotels are located in the downtown section of the city, within walking distance of City Holl, Gay & Lesbian Village,shopping,dining and more. Customtzed packages and features can be arranged upon request. extended stays to Include Montreal, Niagara Falls, Ottawa. Quebec City plus special prices for your friends or fami­lies to join in the celebration. Canadian Rainbow Weddings Is operated by Hflfcrest Vacations of Toronto, a company with 31 years of experience in arranging individual travel packages. Member of American and Canadian Society of Travel Agents and a licensed Travel Operator under Canadian Low. We also hold a Florida Seifer of Travel number. Information See our Web Site W1NW.hillcrestvactions.com JVo 1Alorries our pets relax at home so you can relax on vaoatJo I provide in-home TLC. daily walks and play for your pet· to keep them happy \\hi le you are gone. Plan ahead for a stre:ss-free summer vacation! www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I ro dh n Volunteers ready new Pride chandelier Gene Ruple (center), owner of Fashionable Events Co., and helpers Clarence .James and Billy Roberts prepare the huge chandelier that will set apart the Houston Pnde Parade this year. The chandelier is 20 feet In diame· ter and weighs almost 1,000 pounds. It has 16 arms. each with globes that, combmed, will contam lights the color of th Pnd flag. Mol1' than 500 hghts will make the chandelier stand out when it ls dis· pl~C!I Saturday night near the corner of l\lontrose and Westhe1mer The piece was build in 1986 by T Duff and M. Grant Associates for the State of Texas' sesquicentennial and hung m the Capitol building heavily decorated with floral pieces. It is bemg electrified and decorated for Pride, mcluding being palntPd silver to mark the 25th or "Silver" anmversary of Houston Pride. (Photo by Dalton Del I art) State lawmaker to speak at caucus general meeting State Rep. Syh1!Ster ....------.. Turner, a member of the Texas state Legislature since 1988 and a candidate for mayor of Houston. will be the guest speaker at the next general meet· tng of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political State Rep Sylvester Caucus on Wednesday. Turner (O·Houston) An attorney and civic 15 slated to speak to leader in the Bayou City members of the for more than two Houston Gay & decades, Turner holds Lesbian Political degrees from the caucus on University of Houston Wednesday. and Harvard Law School. He IS the Speaker Pro Tempore of the Texas House of Representatives and serves on the Regulated Industries, Calendars, and Appropriations C-0mmittee .. Wednesday night, Turner will discus,~ the challenges facing Houston and his plans for the city if he ls elected mayor. He will answer questions from HGLPC members and visitoni Th1.:.Public is invited to_attend. @MORE INFO Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus General meeting w 1th speaker Rep. Sylvester Turner • 7 p.m Wednesday Houston GlBT Community Center 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 Center 713-524·3818 • www.hglpc.com Crossdresser shot to death while driving in Houston Houston Police Department officials report that Houston police are investigating the fatal shooting of a man in the 5900 block of Antoine about 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, .June 18. According to a police report, the victim was .Michael Charles Hurd, 23, of 6101 AntoinP No. 7107. HPD Homicide Division Sergeant D.A Ferguson and Officer BC. Mc.Daniel re1JOrted that the victim had been drivmg a green four·door Saturn north· bow1d in the 5000 block of Antoine. At some point, police sairl, the vehicle was shot at and the victim died at the scene. The victim was wearing women's clothing when he was found. Police said the suspect(s) and motive in thP shooting are unknown so far. This week, officials with PFLAG (Parents Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays) decried the shooting. "PFLAG condemns the hatred and misunderstanding that leads to cnmei; against thQSe of us who don't appear to conform to society's repressive nonns," said PH.AG national president Sam Thoron. '111.ls colrl-blooded killing would appear to be a hate crtme. If so, it is yet another chilling example of the violence perpetrated against trnnsgcnder people. PFLAG extends its sym­pathy to U1e fam 1ly and loved ones of th IS vic­tim and promises that this heinous act will only serve to fw1her its commiUnent to fight· lng for justice and safety for everyone, regardless of gend r identity or snrual ori· entauon." Anyone with Information is IU'b'Cd to contact the HPD Homicide Division at 713- ;m.36()() or Crime Stoppers at 713-222-TIPS. fl'lll1 Raff reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JUNE 27. 2003 5 You know how to accessorize ... 6 JUNE 27 2003 www.houston voice com HOUSTON VOICE I national news Supreme Court overturns Texas sodomy law Ruling invalidates laws in 13 states By LOU CHIBBARO JR. In a sweeping victory for gay rights advocates, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursda) overturned sodomy laws in 13 states, mcludmg Virginia, declaring that gay couples, as well as heterosexuals, have a constitutional right to privacy 1n the area of "private sexual conduct." Attorneys called the 6-3 decision in the case, known as Lawrence vs. Texas, a stun· ning victory for the gay rights movement because of the specific legal changes it will bring about and because of its strongly worded declaration on behalf of privacy rights for gays. "The state cannot demean their exis­tence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime," states the majority opinion, VITitten by Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. The case stems from a decision by two gay men from a Houston suburb to chal· lenge the constitutionality of the Texas "homosexual conduct" law. The law makes it a crime for consenting adults of the same gender to have oral or anal sex in pri· vate, while allowing heterosexuals to com­mit the same acts legally. The two men, John Lawrence and Tyron Garner, were arrested by Harris County, Texas, sheriff's deputies on Sept. 17, 1998, after the deputies barged into the bedroom of Lawrence's apartment and observed the men engaging in anal intercourse. Authonties said they entered the apart· ment after receiving a call, which was later found to be false. that an armed intruder was on the premises. Both men pleaded "no contest" to the charge and were fined $200 each. The plea, which has the legal effect of a conviction, could have resulted in several states adding their names to police sex offender lists. "We are very pleased with the rul· ing," Lawrence said at a news confer· ence Thursday. "We never chose to be public figures. This ruling allows us to From right. gay attorney Mitchell Katine, gay Houstonians John Lawrence and Tyron Gamer, and Lambda Legal"s Lee Taft leave a press conference held Thursday afternoon at the Houston GLBT Commumty Center. The session was held to brief members of the me<fia on reaction to the US. Supreme Court decision striking down Texas' antiijc1y sodomy staMe. {Photo by Penny Weaver) get on with our Jives and opens the door for gay people across the country to be treated equally." Attorneys affiliated with Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, which repre· sented Lawrence and Garner before the Supreme Court, argued that the Texas homosexual conduct Jaw should be over· turned on two grounds. One - the ground that the high court invoked in yesterday's decision - holds that the law violates the Constitution's 14th Amendment due pro· cess clause, which protects an individual's privacy rights. The second ground contended that the Texas Jaw violates the 14th Amendment's equal protection clause because it singled out sodomy committed by same-sex cou­ples and not heterosexual couples. Had the court chosen the equal protec­tion clause, it would have overturned only the Texas sodomy law and sodomy laws in three other states - Kansas, Missouri and Oklahoma, all of which outlaw homosexu- Gay Houstonians John Lawrence (right) and Tyron Gamer read a state­ment dunng a Thursday press conference m reac­tion to the Supreme Court dec1S1on on the case that origmated in 1998 with the arrest of the two men. {Photo by Penny Weaver) al sodomy only. • By choosing to overturn the Texas law on the "privacy" rights ground, the Supreme Court struck down sodomy Jaws in the four states in which they apply only to gays as well as in nine more states. where the Jaws apply to both homosexuals and heterosexuals. The other states include Alabama, Florida. Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Utah. Also included in this category is Puerto Rico. Perhaps most important, the court's ruling overturns the court's own 1986 deci· sion known as Bowers v. Hardwick. That decision upheld Georgia's sodomy law on grounds that the law did not violate the Constitution's 14th Amendment assurance of privacy rights. Gay rights activist~ viewed the Bowers decision as especially harsh and onerous because it couched its reasoning for reject­ing the privacy rights argument in anti­gay rhetoric. "To hold that the act of homosexual sodomy is somehow protected as a fundamen­tal right wouid be to cast aside millennia of moral teaching," then Chief Justice Warren Burger wrote in a concurring opinion. ' It's a great victory for all Americans because now all Americans are protected from government intrusion mto their bed· rooms," sa1 Pau1 Smith, a gay Washington attorney who argued the case on Lambda Legal's behalf before the court in March. "They didn't make the 'equal protec· tion' argument because that argument did· n't need to be reached," Smith said. "They said anybody. gay or straight, has a right to make choices about their sexual partners and their sexual practices in the privacy of their homes." Joining Kennedy in signing on to the majority opinion to overturn the Texas statute on "privacy" grounds were Justices John Paul Stevens, David Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer. Justice Sandra Day O'Connor filed a con· curring opinion that supported overturn· ing the Texas law, but based her opinion on the "equal protection" argument. Justice Antonin Scalia wrote the dis· senting opinion, with Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justice Clarence Thomas signing on to Scalia's dissent. Thomas also filed a separate dissenting opinion. In his dissent, Scalia called the majori· ty opinion a loss of the "people's right" to make laws through their elected leaders that take stands on "moral" issues. "It is clear from this that the court has taken sides In the cultural wars," Scalia said, in a statement he delivered from the bench, a departure from usual practice. Kennedy appeared to set the stage for the majority opinion when he described in his opinion the rationale for the decision. "The present case does not involve minors. It does not involve pE'rsons who might be injured or coerced or who are sit· uated in relationsh ips where consent might not be easily refused It docs not involve public conduct or prostitution .. ThE' cas,. does involve two adults who, with full and mutual consent from each other, engaged in sexual practices common to a homosexual lifestyle. The petitioners are entitled to respect for their private lives. The State cannot demand their existence or control their destiny by making their private sexual conduct a crime." See www.houstonwlce.co for more on this story. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com 625mg • coming soon EW 6Z5M6 VIR~CEPT . nelfinavir mesylate ' • 1 • JUNE 27, 2003 7 8 JUNE 27, 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I 1oca news Attorneys, clients in sodomy case 'thrilled' Gay Houston attorney points out far-reaching implications of U.S. Supreme Court decision By PENNY WEAVER The historic t.:.S. Supreme Court decision to strike down Texas' so-called "homosexual conduct" law sent npples of joy throughout the country, but nO\\ here -..vas the excitement more palpable than in Houston, where the ca~e originated. Gay Houston attorney Mitchell Katine and others who have worked on Lawrence and Garner v. Texas for five years - and on the move to eluninate the Texas sodomy law in political arenas rejoiced at the news Thursday morning. "At first we knew we had won but we didn't know what we had won on," Katine said. "Quite frank!}; I could not imagine that the court would actually ovemtle Bowers v. Hardwick. "When I got the decision that this was an overruling of Bowers v. Hardwick, I knew this was even a further reaching decision than on the right to equal protection," Katine added. "This is a much further reaching decision than I could have unagined. We're very excited." The Supreme Court struck down the state's ban on gay sex Th~ ruling that the law was an unconstitutional violation of priva~ Gay activists and attorneys had argued that Gay Housion attorney Mitchel Katine has helped lead ihe case on behalf of J<m Lawrence and Tyron Gamer since the two were arrested in Lawrence's bedroom ITT 1998. the Texas statute was not only a violation of right to privacy but also a violation of equal protection guaranteed in the U.S. Constitution. This week's ruling reverses Bowers v. Hardwick, the infamous Supreme Court 1986 decision that upheld a Georgia anti-sodomy law similar to the Texas statute. Katine said gay Houstonians John Lawrence and Tyron Garnei; the two men arrested in 1993 in Lawrence's bedroom, originating the chal­lenge to the Te.us !av.; are amazed at the nation· wide reaction to the decision. "I called John and Tyron and congratulat· ed them and let them know that we could not have done thts without them and their willing-ness to be out in the forefront." Katine said. "John and Tyron ... ! think they truly appreciate today ... the historic significance of their contribution. "They are thrilled. They are excit­ed. They are happy," he added. "They understand the significance of this decision on the country. significant this year in light of the Lawrence v. Texas decision. •rve been telling people let's wait for this decision and thm }'Oil can go have l!l!X." Katine said with a laugh. "We are oow free and we are going to have one hell ri a Pr¥le rmade. The rally i~ going to be great. "I spoke to them this morning and I was able to give them the news. They were both thrilled. They were both just beside themselves," Katine said. "They appreciate today that the whole nation has been watching this. They know that it's because of their willingness to go forward. I thmk that they truly appreciate the significance of this." The office of Harns County District Attor­ney ctllCk Rosenthal handled the Lawrence case on behalf of the state of Texas. "Everyone needs to know that every case is important and we all have civil rights that can be protected. We can actually win," Katine said. The office of Harris C.Ounty District Attorney Chuck Rosenthal represented the state of Texas in the Lawrence and Garner v. Texas case. Katine actually first heard the news from his mother. At 9:12 a.m. Thursday, as members of the media and fellow attorneys surrounded Katine's desk, awaiting the official decision, the phone rang. It was Katine's mother. "(She said] 'Congratulations, son - you won!"' Katine said. "I said, 'Mom, that's fant&1ic.'" He emphasized the potentially far-reach· ing effects of the Supreme Court ruling. ·~ I'm saying is that what this decision has done JS 1t puts me and my partner on the same grounds as our heterosexual neighbors," Katine said. "We nil have the right to privacy in this country. We all have the right to not have the government telling us what we can do and what we can't do in our bedrooms as adults." On a lighter note, Katine is ready for Saturday's Houston Pride Parade particular Ro6enthal. who initially argued the case for the state, rould not be reached by press time Thursday But Rosenthal said last fall that hi:; office was prepared to vigorously defend the Texas law "One of the things that we've done is we've sworn to uphold the Constitution of the State of Texas and of the United States. and we're fulfilling our oath," Rosenthal said. Bill Delmore, the Harris County assistant prosecutor who also worked on the case, in the past has said that the Legislature should throw out the sodomy Jaw if that's what Texans want. "My concern was primarily that the deci­sion be made in the Legislature so we could protect the people's right through their elect· ed representatives to determine what con­duct they believe to be immoral and ought to be against the law," Delmore has ~aid. Gay Houstonians celebrate court ruling Pro-gay decision in time for Pride; celebration rallies held across the state By PEMIY WEAVER Pride 2003 bas taken on a whole new meaning this week for gays across the nation and partictilarly in Houston. The Thursday decision by the U.S. Supreme Court that effectively strikes down anti.,gay sodomy laws across the nation came in time for Pride Week. The case that ra~ the challenge to Texas' so­called "homosexual conduct" law originat­ed in Houston. So gay Houstonians prepared for an even more raucous Pride Parade on Saturday night. Following the Supreme Court announcement of its decision, gay activists and ~upporters across the nation planned celebrations Thursday night. In Houston, the rally was held on the steps of city hall, and speakers included Mayor Lee Brown and gay attorney Mitchell Katine, who was involm in the case of Lawrence and Garner~ ~ns since it 9egu in 1998. Joiul ~ llOd Tyrone Gani.er, the two men whose arrests in Lawrence's Houston bedroom led to the sodomy law chal­lenge, also were to be present at the Thursday rally at city hall. Across the nation, gay activists planned celebrations after the ruling. Cities in Texas that planned rallies, in addi­tion to Houston, included Galveston, Austin, Dallas legalized marriage, we in the USA are still fighting for what should be the basic human right of equal protection under the law." Tyler added. Guided in part by the National Supreme Court Civil Rights Rally, activists also were to gather in Allilnta, Boston, Cleveland, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, Milwaukee, San Francisco, Philadephia, Seattle and Washington, D.C., among others. PflAG-Houston Secretary Slit ,.., ~ the mother Sue Null, secretary for PFLAG-Houston (Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays), was sched· uled to speak at the Thursday night rally at Houston City Hall. Her comments included the following. of a gay 50l1 and daughter, saidln~to Tlusday's Supreme Court dectslOfl. 'No longer will my chikh n be selectivelv brallded <IS crinlinals sim­ply for loving someone of the same gender.' "I feel like I've been bounc­ing all day on one of those children's moon walks. No longer will my children be selectively branded as crimi­nal6 simply for loving some­one of the same gender. "I come before you today as "Local organizers around the country are sti>pping up to the plate and taking the lead in defending their com· munities," said Robin Tyler, co-coordina­tor of the civil rights rally group, of the inde1>4'ndently organized rallies. "Each community controls the event in their town and most oC the 29 have reached out to us to help publicize and gain national visibility for ~ir efforts. ~While Canada, wbere I was born, just a member of PFt.AG and as a loving mom of a lesbian daughter and gay son." Null said. "No mother, cradling her new baby in her arms, expects this child to grow up to be gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender. But every mother wants her children to have equal opportunity in the world. to find someone to love, and to be safe. And all children deserve their moth­er's unconditional love, regardlesi of the getlder Q/. ta.e persca ttlley love. "How could any mother tell her GLBT children that they don't deserve the same opportunities as their straight siblings?," Null said. "How could any mother tell her GLBT children that they don't deserve the same rights? Equal respect? How could any mother have the arrogance to deny her children the right to love whom they love? "Not all of us have the privilege of learning to embrace a son or daughter who is a sexual minority," Null said. "I am grateful to my own children who have opened doors to a whole new community of people whom I wouldn't otherwise know if it were not for them. They, and all of you, have offered my husband and me an opportunity to grow in sensitivity, compassion, and admiration for your great courage and strength, often in the face of fear and adversity "Hopefully, [Thursday's] decision will lead to a change in the putllic's percept.ion of sexual minorities, which in turn will lead to greater safety, safety on the streets, safety in the job market, and safety in all aspects of life," Null said. "Misguided reli· gious, social and political forces will con· tinue to rail against sexual m1noritie:s, and we have a long way to co before our loved ones achieve true equality, but PFLAG is with you all the way! Justice will tr~!" HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JUNE 27 2003 9 I ne s analysis Ruling may impact sex laws, sets stage for marriage fight By CHRIS CRAIN Jn sweeping language, the Supreme Court struck clown the Texas sodomy law, and with it similar laws m 12 other states. as violating gay Americans' right to due process, but the rlebate among the justices was far broarler, and In many ways set the stage for the court to arldress the issue of marriage, the next looming battle in the "culture wars," In Justice Antonin Scalia's parlance. Even on the issue of sodomy laws, the justices were expansive in their reason· ing. The Supreme Court typically decides only the question before it, but the majority opinion in Lawrence vs. Texas went further than it neerled to, tacklmg not just Jaws like the one in Texas and three other states that crimi· nalize only homosexual sodomy. Instead, the court reached out to effectively rule unconstitutional the sodomy laws of nine other states - including Virginia that apply to homosexual and hetero· sexual couplings. The case was decided 6-3, but only a bare majority of five were willing to take the extra step of effectively striking down all 13 sodomy statutes as contrary to the Constitution's Due Process Clause. In doing so, these five justices overruled the court's 1986 decision in Bowers vs. Hardwick, which upheld Georgia's gen- Supreme Court Justices Anthony Kennedy and SalKh Day O'Comor voted with the majonty in striking down the sodomy laws. era! sodomy law. The sixth Justice in the majority, Sanrlra Day O'Connor, voted with the majority in Bowers and was unwilling to revisit her thinking in that case. Instead, she agreed that the Texas Jaw was uncon· stitutional, but limited her analysis to the fact that the law applies only to homosexu­al and not heterosexual conduct. That dis· linction violates the Equal Protection Clause. which like the Due Process Clause is contained in the 14th Amendment to the Constitution. The other five justices in the majority acknowledged that the equal protection challenge "is a tenable argument," but they nonetheless went on to overrule Bowers and face the broader question of the government's ability to legislate sexual morality. ,Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote for the majonty, "Were we to hold the statute invalid under the Equal Protection Clause" as O'Connor suggest ed, "some might question whether a pro· hibit1on woulrl be valid if drawn differ­ently, say, to prohibit the conduct both between same-sex and different sex participants." The five-justice majortty answered that question loud and clear: "Liberty pre­sumes an autonomy of self that includes freedom of thought, belief, expression, and certain intimate conduct." Private and consensual sexual conduct between adulL~ even homosexual adults qualifies as protected "intimate conduct," the court concluded. and the government cannot regulate it. The impact of that ruling could be far· reaching. Jn his dissent. Justice Scalia cited a number of laws that may collapse in its wake: those prohibiting the sale of sex toys, adultery. fornication (sex outside marriage}, adult incest. public indecency, bigam}; masturbation. bestiality. obsc-enlty and same-sex marriage. But the majority opinion was not simply a treatise on how individual freedom to engage in sexual acts must not be infringed upon by the govern· ment. Although the five-justice majori­ty was not deciding the case based on the fact that the Texas sodomy law was hmited to homosexual conduct, Justice Kennedy's opinion dealt directly with how apphcation of the law was used to discriminate agamst gay men and les­bians. (Though it is noteworthy that "homosexual" remains the preferred descriptor for gays at the highest court in the land ) "When homosexual conduct is made criminal by the law of the state," wrote Justice Kennedy, "that declaration m and of itself is an mvitation to subject homosexual persons to discrimination both in the public and in the private spheres." The Lawrence case, according to Justice Kennedy, "involves two adults who. with full and mutual consent from each other, engaged m sexual practices common to a homosexual lifestyle. The [two men] are entitled to respect for their private lives. The state cannot demean their existence or control their destiny by making their private ~exual conduct a crime." ft MOREINFO See www.houstonvoice.c fw more awerage of the listoric U.S. Supreme Court decision on the Texas sodomy statute. GoGirlsMusic.coJR presents 2.nd Annual Gir s oc. ffousf ort Pride Friday, June 27th Rhythm Room, 1815 Washington Ave. music starts at 9pm, $8 cover I • ic by Sarah Golden, Elizabeth White, n Wiggins, Nancy Ford, Carol Plunk more info at www.gogirlsrock.com, promoting women in music sponsored by Girlfriends Magazine, Houston Voice, Premier Paging & Wireless, Continental Valet Cleaners / 10 JUNE 27, 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I ews 'Sleeping lawyer' case ends for gay defendant Burdine trades new trial for life in prison in plea deal By PENNY WEAVER A gay Texan and former death row inmate who won a new trial because his lawyer allegedly slept through parts of his first trial pleaded guilty last week to capital murder and will spend life in prison. Calvin Burdine, 50, was convicted in 1984 of capital murder and given the death penal­ty for the 1983 stabbing death of his lover and roommate, WT. "Dub" WJSe. A federal judge reversed the conviction and granted a new trial because evidence showed his trial attor­ney, Joe Cannon, slept for up to 10 minutes at a time during crucial phases of testimony. Cannon, who has since died, denied ever falling asleep during the trial. Burdine's Decatur. Ga., attorney, Robert McGlasson, argued in appealing the death penalty case that Cannon was sleeping instead of object­ing to the prosecutions repeated references to ~urdine's homosexuality. In arguing for the death penalty and against life in prison for Burdine following his convic­tion, the prosecutor told the jury, "Sending a homosexual to the penitentiary [for life] cer­tainly isn't a very bad punishment for a homo­sexual, and that's what he's asking you to do." Gay and civil liberties groups, in a 1995 brief asking that Burdine's conviction be overturned, said, "The prosecution clearly implied that... life behind bars would be pleasant for a gay person - in effect portray­ing the gay inmate as a 'kid in a candy store."' The prosecutor also said that Burdine's 1971 Texas conviction for sodomy, a consensu- Gay Texan Calvin Burdine, formerly on death row in a capital murder case, last week entered a guilty plea and likely will spend the rest of his life in prison. (Photo from AP) al offense, was evidence of his "likeliness to commit criminal violent acts in the future." Cannon also was found to have used anti­gay slurs during the trial. According to McGlasson. Cannon was homophobic and did not challenge the prosecutor's biased state­ments to the jury, as well as prospective jurors who exhibited anti-gay bias. In Burdine's appeal, the higher courts did not address what McGlasson, gay rights activists and death penalty opponents have said was homophobia on the part of both the prosecutor and defense attorneys during the original trial. A year ago, the U.S. Supreme Court declined a state request to reinstate Burdine's conviction and death sentence, sending the case back to Texas, where authorities either had to retry him or set him free. On June 19, Burdine pleaded guilty to cap­ital murder, aggravated assault and felony possession of a weapon in exchange for life in prison, and state District Judge Joan Huffman levied consecutive life sentences for the crimes. The punishment virtually assures he will spend the rest of his life in prison. When Huffman asked Burdine if he under­stood the deal, witnesses said Burdi.Ile replied, "It means we're going to do a lot of time." Prosecutors agreed to the deal because of "the guarantee that he would die in prison," if not by injection then by old age, Harris County District Attorney Chuck Rosenthal said. Also, potential trial evidence available to prosecu­tors had deteriorated with age had they gone for another death case, Rosenthal said. Burdine survived six execution dates before a federal court agreed that Cannon's performance violated Burdine's constitution­al right to an effective lawyer. Houston lawyer Danalynn Recer, one of Burdine's attorneys, said last week that Burdine under­stood that prison will remain his home. "His experience of living on death row for close to two decades was a traumatizing experi­ence," Recer said. "He came close to being exe­cuted and the terror of having that over his head for nearly 20 years has finally been removed. He is very relieved not to be facing the executioner:" Burdine was convicted of killing W1se at the Houston trailer they shared. Burdine confessed to police and later recanted, claiming an accom­plice killed Wise while Burdine tried to talk him out of it. That alleged accomplice, Douglas McCreight, made a deal with prosecutors in exchange for testimony against Burdine. Mccreight served eight years in prison for his role in the slaying before being released. After the first trial, the jury foreman and a court clerk described how Cannon, Burdine's court-appointed lawyer, slept periodically during the testimony and sentencing phases. Recer said prosecutors took advantage of Cannon's lapses by often referring to Burdine's homosexuality during the trial. "No real defense was put forth," she said. Rosenthal said he doesn't believe Cannon slept because the court transcript indicates time­ly objections, and "you don't expect him to be as vigorous as he was if he were actually sleeping." A three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals first reversed the finding that Cannon's snoozing violated Burdine's rights in a highly criticized ruling in 2000. The full appeals court then chose to hear the case and agreed with the first court that Burdine didn't get a fair chance to defend himself. In July 2002, the Supreme Court allowed that ruling to stand. Last fall, Burdine's case again made head­lines when, in a rare move, a federal judge called a state judge to his courtroom to resolve a civil suit that stemmed from Burdine's retrial. In October, U.S. District Judge David Hittner ordered Huffman and attorney Annette Lamoreaux to appear in his court. Lamoreaux, East Texas regional director for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU}, represented Burdine in his fight to keep McGlasson as his defense counsel. McGlasson handled Burdine's death penalty appeal and appeared with him in Harris County court a year ago for a hearing to determine Burdine's future counsel. But at that proceeding, Huffman refused to appoint McGlasson as Burdine's counsel. Her stated reason was that he is not on the Harris County list of lawyers approved to rep­resent defendants in capital murder cases. By the time Burdine's new trial was to begin this spring, he rejected help from two defense attorneys appointed by Huffman, and McGlasson and Recer both agreed to rep­resent Burdine at no charge. The Associated Press contributed to this story. Houstonians enjoy 25 days of Pride 2003 The Sixth Annual Housto Pr de 5k Run & Walk was held o~ ..____ _ _,____ _ ,__ _ __..... Saturday, June 2l at Sao Houston Park This month's bevy of activities has led up to Saturday night's infamous nighttime Houston Pride Parade. See today's special pull-out section for all the details on Pride's biggest weekend for 2003 and the 25th anniversary of Houston Pride. (Photos by Dalton DeHart) Left: Pop singer Thea Austin entertained the crowd in a concert as part of Six Flags Astroworld's Pride Day Above A number of gay Houstonians turned out for the Saturday, June 21, Pride Day at Six Flags Astroworld. Left: Benng United Methodist Memorial Church hosted an Interfaith Gay Pride Service ....___.. _ _.. ________ ~~------=,.___--' on Sunday, June 22 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice com Ariz. governor bans anti-gay bias in state agencies PHOENIX -Arizona Gov. Janet Napolitano, a Democrat. signed an execuuve order June 21 barring state agencies from d1scnmmating based on sexual orientation, the Arizona Hepublic reported. "To the people of Arizona. I say, 'Welcome to a new Arizona,"' Napolitano said, announcing the order at the Arizona Human Rights Fund dinner. "It's the right thing to do because it sends the mes­sage that we're going to value people on their workplace merit, and that's the beginning and the end, period." Officials with the Human Rights Fund, which lobbied for the measure, praised the move. ''It's one more step for· ward for us in gaining the rights that everyone else takes for granted," said Kathie Gummere, Arizona Human Rights Fund public affairs director. But the Center for Arizona Policy called the order "an outrage." "If one gov· ernor can put it in, the next can rescind it." said Len Munsil. president of the conservative Christian group. Anzona Gov. Janet Napolitano said her order banning bias based on sexual orientation is 'the right thing to do' for state workers. (Photo by AP) Gay employees at Justice Department hold Pride event despite snub WASHINGTON -Department of Justice Pride members held their annual awards ceremony in the Russell Caucus Room on June 20 and honored Joseph Clark of the D.C. U.S. Attorney's Office and Susan Sommer from the Lambda Legal Defense 1''und for their contributions to gay equal­ity. The event, sponsored by Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), who did not attend, last1Ki for nearly two hours with speeches by IJOJ Pride members and Rep. Harney Frank (DMass.), who is gay. Originally scheduled to be held in the Department of Justice's Great Hall. the event denied hy the department earlier this month because the employee association, DOJ Pride, did not have an official preslden· tial proclamation. In recent \\eeks, the department agreed to allow the event to go on as scheduled, but said the group would not receive any official sponsor· ship. DOJ Pride President :\farina Colby took time out of the ceremony to honor those employees not present who might "fear retaliation for attending" such an event. About 150 people attended. Calif. high court limits judges' membership in Boy Scouts SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - California judges who are members of the Boy Scouts of America may have to disqual­ify themselves from hearing cases involving anti·gay discrimination, the state Supreme Court announced June 12. But the state's top court, which sets rules for California's 2,000-member judiciary, did not bar judges from being members of the Irving. Texas-based Boy Scouts. as several local bar associations requested. Under the new rule, judges would either have to step down or notify litigants in cases dealing with discrimi­nation in the workplace against gays, and "any case involving gay adoptions or cases in which the sexuality of the litigant is an issue," said Angela Bradstreet, the former San Francisco Bar Association president who urged the Supreme Court to alter its rules. Gregg Shields, the scouts' spokesper· son, said the or iginal proposal to ban scout membership by judges "would be inappropriate and unconstitutional." Gay bias complaint filed under new Orlando law ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) - Six months after Orlando passed an ordinance barring sexual orientation discrimination, a man filed the first complaint under the law alleging he was kicked out of a sports bar because he is gay. Roger Welch said a bartender at Players Sports Pub told him to leave Feb. 13 after Welch men· tioned to another patron that he was gay. Welch said he refused to leave but the bartender called police and he was cited for trespassing. The city's human rcla· tions drpartment was investigating the complaint, but wouldn't release any details. A manager at Players Sports Pub rleclmed comment. The Orlando city council voted in December to add "sexu­al orientation" to the list of categories 1n the city's anti.di -crimination protection law, which includes employment, hous Ing and public accommodations. Soldier's mom continues fight against general's promotion WASHINGTON - Pat Kutteles, mother of slain Army Pfc. Barry Winchell, returned to Capitol Hill on Jw1e 17 to again lobby against Major General Robert Clark's promotion to lieutenant general, NBC Nightly News reported. Clark served as commander at Fort Campbell, Ky., in 1999 when Winchell was beaten to death in his barracks by fellow soldiers who believed he was gay because he had a transgendered girlfriend. An Army investigation found that Clark was not responsible for Wmchell's death, but said soldiers at the base had not been properly trained on the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. "If he's promoted, then everything that surrounded Barry's death and Barry himself didn't matter," Kutteles told NBC. Clark has declined interviews on the subject. He met with Winchell's parents last month. but Kutteles said he did not apologize and they remain upset that he did not attend their son's memorial service or contact them earlier. "How can you spend four years, four years and never once call on us, never acknowledge in a face-to-face meeting our child's death," she said. From staff and wire reports JUNE 27 2003 11 Go Straight to the Gay Market Presents EIDllWlr 2003 Community Expo and Consumer Market September 20 & 21, 2003 George R. Brown Convention Center .... •'JPMorgan -: :=;:.:..:::;- ;~.---:: =--=~----=--=--·---- Join our sponsors and returning vendors iri courting the growing GLBT market. W hy? Because there are over l 2 million gay adults in the U S. with over $452 billion to spend annJally. Call 713-523-7576 or visit www.ghglcc.org. STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Exeru!M! ElitAlr CHRIS CRAIN ElitAlr PENNY WEAVER editor.ii'.houstonwice.com PndJcliol1 BONNIE NAUGlE. JOEY CAROl..INO Com:s1 ... 0:ids: LOU CHIBBARO JR, JOE CREA. !AURA DOOGlAS-8ROWN. MIKE FUMING, MATTHEW HENNIE. BRIAN MOVlAN. KEVIN NAFF, KEN SAIN, JENNIFER SMITH. RHONDA SMITH. STEVE WEINSTEIN cantmJlm JOHNNY HOOKS. El1A TYl.£R Pbotopihers DALTON DEHART. KIMBERi. Y THOMPSON Wellnaster ARAM VARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION f.eleri1I Mwger DANIEL EMERICH demencl(ii)houstonvotee.COOI Acau1t ExecutMs BRETT CULLUM - bcul~houstOIMlice.com BRIAN MARTIN - bmartin(a;houstonvoice.a: Mniiistrative ~ USA GAUARDO - ~houstonvoice.com NatXml AIMrtising Represenblive Rivendell M.rlebng Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 Nilisher· WINDOW MEDIA UC l'n5ident· Wll.UAM WAYBOOR.~ Edtorial llincttY· CHRIS CRAL~ Co!pora!e Controller· BARNETIE HOlSION Art lliredor· ROB BOEGER t.eneral Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Mmting Mana!Jer· DAN GARRIOTI r.1::·­~:.. : j b t..t _.dM1E MaBER1 1Dr ................. .,_ OWITTR MDl!ER f.stablished 1974 is the Martrose 51¥ 500 Lovett BIYd.. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (7l3) 529-8490 Fax: (7l3) 529-9531 YNtW.houstonvoice.a Contents copo;ricjrt 2003 Office hour>. 9 am to 5:30 p.m. weekdays Issue 1183 editorial Blind justice Bush style The president says he dreams of a 'color-blind' America, and apparently a 'gay-blind' society, too. But our victories in the courthouse won't be so easily ignored in the White House. By CHRIS CRAIN EORGE W BUSH HAS SAID precious llttle during his politi· cal career about his views on homosexuality and gay rights. g Those who know him­especially family friend Charles Francis, the gay Texan who orga· nized the meeting Bush had -...ith 12 gay support· ers after he clinched the GOP presidential nom i· nation say that our president is personally comfortable around people he knows to be ga;: Other gay Republicans argue that Bush is at least a "rompas.>ionate conservative" on our issues; in other words, don't look for him to stick his neck out In favor ci gay rights, but at the same time don't worry about the type ci anti.gal( wedge politics practiced by the right wing ci his party All this is probably true enough. but the record of his administration so far suggests a y;orldview that is a little more nuanced. and more than a little bit troublesome, for gay Americans - and for Bush's political future. COMMENTATORS HAVE LONG NOTED this president's sunny view of human nature; he is a likable guy who is prepared to enjoy the company of most of those he encounters. A classic example surfaced just this month, when Bush played host at the White House to a college reunion of his fellow Yale alums. As the San Francisco Chronicle reports it, one woman told a surprised Bush, "You might remember me as Peter when we left Yale." Bush didn't mJss a beat. according to those present. He grabbed her hand and responded, "Now you've come back as yourself." Of course. that doesn·t mean the president will be lobbying Congress to add "gender iden· tity" to gay rights legislation - he hasn't.even said he supports gay nghts legislation -but it does suggest a welcome personal acceptance. That sunny disposition, and its disconnect from public policy, was also on display this week afler the Supreme Court announced its split ruling on the affirmative action policies used m admissions at the University of Michigan. The court approved of affirmative action in principle. citing "diversity" as a com· pelling government interest that justifies treating different races differently. The White House responded with a state­ment from the president praising the court '"for recognizing the value of diversity on our nation's campuses." The statement neglected to mention that Bush had personally approved a Justice Department brief that urged the court to strike down affirmative action entirely. Even more telling was the portion of Bush's statement In which the president added, "Like the court. I look forward to the day when America will truly be a color-blind society." If "diversity" really is a compelling inter· est, of course, then America will never truly be "color-blind." and shouldn't be. Race neutrality is not the same thing as color-blindness, but that difference appears lost on the president. THE SA.\tE MAY WELL BE TRUE ON GAY issues. The president's personal acceptance of gay people has made possible the appoint· ment of a number of White House staffers who were known to be gay, even if they are "private·• about it. But in none of these cases does the presi· dent appear to see his gay appointments as proof of his commitment to "diversity," or as his predecessor put it, putting into place a government that "looks like America." In fact, as far as homosexuality goes. the White House "line" is that it is a non-issue, irrele· vant in every way. The Bush administration's position on our issues is roughly the same, "gay-blind" approach: Hom6sexuality is private. a non· issue, and has no role in setting public policy The number of closeted Republicans in the Bush administration, and on Capitol Hill. only reinforces that sentiment A "gay-blind" government is better. of course, than one outwardly hostile to us and our interests. But we are constituents as well, and Ignoring us comes at a cost. Take the president's AIDS policies, for example. Bush has consecutively named two gay men to be h!S AIDS czar, but the stark con· trast between the two Scott Evertz played a HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 27, 2003 PAGE 12 loud and visible role but was removed in favor of Joseph Phillips, has been missing in action - suggests that the position is to be neither seen nor heard. The primary AIDS focus of the White House has been on the global epidemic, which Is largely heterosexual, probably because it is viewed though the prism of our national secu rlty. The president's only real contribution to addressing domestic HIV and AIDS has been increased funding and favoritism toward "abstinence-only-until-marriage" as a preven· lion policy. That approach only makes since if the administration is blind to gays, since mar· riage is not an option for us. ·when AIDS groups have tried aggressive marketing to get gay men interested again in HIV prevention - using sex as a lure, just like Madison Avenue and Hollywood would - the Bush admtnistration warns against "encour­aging sex." Absent an effective alternative, the m~e again appears to ignore the gays. The New York Times has even reported that AIDS groups fearing cuts in funding are avoiding use of words like "homosexual" and "anal sex" ln their grant applications. Hear no gays, see no gays. PU'ITING ON THE GAY BLINDERS HAS ITS downside, and it is not all ours. A number of cities are reporting an Increase in HIV and STD rates among gay men, and if that trend continues it will be our president who must answer for it. (Presuming, of course, that our AIDS organizations over­come their bloodlust for federal funding long enough to rediscover their activist voice.) Even more daunting are some pending gay rights victories in the courthouse that won't be easily ignored in the White House. If, as expected, the Supreme Court this week strikes down the Texas sodomy law. how will the president respond? George W. Bush was governor of that state, after all, when Tyron Gardner and John Lawrence were arrested, convicted and first challenged the "homosexual conduct law." Gov. Bush swore back then to uphold and defend the Constitution, but our Supreme Court will be saying that he failed to do that. Will he find away to again praise the justices, as he did on affirmative action? The real challenge, however, is coming from the north. First Canada will legalize gay marriage, and then (according to many court observers) so will the Massachusetts state supreme court. Conservatives are already planning a constitutional amend· ment to block forced recognition of gay marriages in other states, and perhaps even forbid them outright. President Bush is on record opposing gay marriage, but how far will a president who wants our lives kept private go to squelch this issue? 14 L IE 27 2003 ASE ONLINE AT TON,ORG, QC.AL MERCHANTS. A DWESTGRAY MV houston vc. ce.com HOUSTON VOICE I 'In Amenc11n 2003, you can't say bad things about Af1 ican Amencans, but you can still say bad things about gays. That's where we are." Republican strategist Rich Galen. on the rela· tively calm reaction to the comparison of gay sex to bestiality by Republican Sen. Rick Santorum (Pa.) (immediate left), with the firestorm over former GOP leader Trent Lott's wistful view of Strom Thurmond'sfailed segregationist bid/or the presidency (London Guardian, June 16) "This 1s gay Mardi Gras; it's a day for us to be who we are. It's a party, but it's also a meaningful celebration, and for some people, it's the only time all year that they can be who they are. Jean ('ienasd, a member (Jj the Albuquerque, N.llf. chap/ff of l'urents. Familws & Friends Qf Lesbians & Gays (PF!..AGJ. on thectty'~ Gay Pri.defestiool (A.<;S1Xiated Press, June IS) "(The Smith College policy is) political correctness carried amok. I believe that we're going to see a coming generation that will curse the ground that was plowed with political correctness." Reu Lou Sheldon, of the Traditional Values Coolitlon. on a vote by Smith College students to replace the pronouns "she" and "her" in the student government constitution with "the student" as a way to welcome transgendered students into the women-only school. (Associated Press. June 16) "If there was a show about attractive gay women who happened to not have their clothes on occasionally, do you think some straight men might watch?" Show time chair and CEO .\fatthew mank, on the auditncefor "Quee1 As Folk," u·hich i•1cludes 50 percent women, most of whom are assumed to be heterosexual (.VeuJsweek. June 23) "Les always calls me in the middle of the night and says, 'Yow· show i~ so special, it's like a Faberge egg. I can't bear to show it to anyone yet. I just want to look at it over and over and over.' And he told me he was changing the title to 'My Big Fat Greek Gay Congressman.' And we'll be premiering after ·csr: Athens,' so be sure and look for that." Gay actor Natlzan Lane, reacting sarcastu·ally to the decision by CBS president Leslie Moonties to delay by six months the premiere of Lane's new series, "Char/it Lawrence" (Clei·e/and Plain· Dealer, June 14) "Disgusting. I'm ashamed to be a London Free Press reader, I'm ashamed to be an Ontarian. I'm ashamed to be Canadian." A reader angry over a front page photo of two men kissing, illustrating a story on the historic court ruling in Ontario opening up marriage to same·se( coup/~ (London Free Press, London Ontario. June 14) "I would lllrn to congratulate you and commend you. I'm 77 years old and I don't understand it, but J accept it." Aoother reader reacting to the same front-page photograph and coverage (I,ondon Free Press, London Ontario, June 14) The British have a system that ... they call It 'Don't ask. don't misbehave.' I think the leaders in the [United States] Armed Forces will look at that some day," Cieneral Wesley Clark.former NATO supreme allied commander, and potential !Jemocrotic presidential candidate, on the currrnt American policy of "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" on gays in the military; asked by NBC's 7'im Russert if he would look at changing the pali.c): Clark answered, ''Absolutely." (NUC'.~ "Meet the Press, ".June 15) HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com KALETRA is indlc:ated for the treatment of HIV infection In combination with other antiretrovlral agents. Safety lnfomlltlon KALETRA should not be taken with Halcion•, Hlsmana~. ()rap , Proputsld'", Rythmor-, Seldane9, Tambocor™, versecr. Rimactane", Rifadin", Rifater9, Rifamat~. Mevacor-, zcx:;o;-, ergot derivatives or products containing St. John's wort (Hypericum perloratum). Discuss aU medicines, Including those without a prescription, and herbal preparatioos you are taking or plan to take with your doctor or pharmacist KALETRA should not be taken if you have had an allergic reaction to KALETRA or any of its ingredients. Pancreatitis and liver problems, which can be fatal, have been reported. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease such as hepatitis. In patients JUNE 27. 2003 15 taking protease inhibitors, Increased bleeding [in patients with hemophilia) and diabetes/high blood sugar have OCCl611ld. Changes in body fat have been seen in some patients receiving antiretroYiral therapy. Some patients rec:eMng KAl£TRA have had large incl eases in triglycerides and cholesterol. In clinical trials, the most commonly reported side effects of moderate or severe intensity were: abdominal pain, abl IOml3I bowel l1lOllen1eOts, diarrhea, feeling weak or tired, headache, and nausea. This is not a complete list of reported side effects. KAl.£TRA oral solution contains alcohol. KALETRA does not cure HIV Infection or AIDS and does not r9duoe the risk of passing of HIV to others.. Please see adjacent page for Patient Information. 16 JUNE 27. 2003 KALETRA® (loplmYlrlrllMaml ap5llk! 1JopUuTiifri .... rir) onl - ALERT: Fmd ool -t ~ tllol illauld NOT hr takm •itb KALF:lll\. Pka« al!o r<>d die - "'MEDICll>'ES Y(J{. SHOUJ) N<Jl"TAJCE wmt KAUJ1tA. PatieDt lnfonnation KAl.ETRA (kuh-l.Ef.-tral GcocricN- ~­( lop-IN-ob--hit-ON411--) Rad dllS re.t!d aRf1111y bdon:,.. _....,. KAUJ1tA. Aho, rQI. - - )'Oii "',.... KAl£TRA JmallfJOD dllal.. ""' ""'3d!lq Im chqod. nis iolumD:m dccs .. t;ilr die !ibc< of t4q •ill> ,.... doc:cr""' )'Oii -lllis mcdicmc: ml·-up..A.11. ,....-iI,... hr.c ill!)' qocstxm - KAlFl'RA WUI Is WflRA 11M llow ua rt wort1 KAl£TRA IS I comllimtioa of"'° tnediaaes. 'Ibey an: lopmvu ml nlOllrnr. KAl£TRA IS I !ypC ol m<dicinc c;iJJcd .. HIV (bummi - oddic-i- ruusJ pro<tU: 1PR0-1<<-&><) lllhibitor KAl£TRA n llw>yi med m cocnlMatioa wnh oth<: 111111 lilV medicil1l:s IO llCll people with - Ulll!llJJIOddio .,.., 1HIY; illfC<IKJIL KAl£TRA "fiw adWts and forcluldr<n age 6-m.andolda. mv ..rcmoo destroys en. m cdJs, wtuc.11 ..., omporuo1io111< - .,....._ Allor a bq< -i.c: of T cdls ""' dcstroycd. acqailtd lllllllllOC .imc-y l)'IB'om< (AIDS)*'""""'- IW.ElllA blocb HIV pro!CIS<. a dianial w1lich IS ombl b HIV IO nilliply IW.El1lA mas die llDDUlll of HIV a F blood ml ooc.-­a lb< m:cib:r of T cdh. Rcduciag lb< -of HIV m lb< blood - lbodlmc<of-or cifa:tiom.,."-"-ln'f"'11.....,.,,_" -~illfcdions~ DolS WfTRA .... IVY 1t AIDS1 KALETIU - IOI ""' HIV lofcdloa w AID:>. Tbr loa;-tmo rlr«ll of KAu:ntA .,. llill know. 111 lllls dmt. l'leplr ta1Jos KAl.ETIU ••still ad~ lor«tiam ... -....­tbal ..._ willl 111\ lnft<liua. s-of lll<w ~ ... ,...... .....0.. llerpa - lnf«llom, ud M...--., ..U.. ._it. l\t~C)- Dm WflRA-111 rilkll-HIYll lllets' KAl£TRA docs .. -die rui ol pmmg lilV io-.dllough Ila· IW ""°""IX blood-.mmatJOa. Continue 10 pndlCC s:ife ta ml do oot1S<ordwedirty-... ltft .. 14111111 WETRA1 • Yoo.tald!ZZfan:badoctt'san:•flmtikqKAl£IRA~"'~ ,..._orlOlp--lfttillqUll)'Ucttra • Yoa-llk< KAIEl1IACY<'7 day C>ldly as )'Ollr-paaib<d 11. Th<.,,. of KAIEl1IA may be dil!am b )'Oii iiia! bother ...,..,._ FoBoio ... diftc!.m - y<lll' doctor. <Udly • """"' ...... bid • n,.q • -(maxq clUml 12 yen"• nl _,, lh< ....i cbtb-nlcipUes(4W100""''"5.0ml.oflbocnldilioo""" adn"""""" mdmgUJ.m-•1111 odxr-lllV a:iaid:n • llosq ID dli1'ftn !ram 6 -m, IO 12 yatJ of""" <lildlai - 6 -m, IO 12 years of ag< can Ibo tale KA!£TRA. Th< dii!d s doctor •iD d<ode lbe ,;pr obe lmrd oa lbe dlild"s wciOll. • lie KAl£TRA with food IO help • "°"' bctla. • ~""' dlallF ,__Of llllf 111.q KAl.ETRA ·-mt tilliq •'llhJOlll'doctor • Wm yo. KAi£TRA mpply 1btU ID nm '°"' I" - lrom "J'* doctor or pharaucy. TlllS" "'1 IDlplfWlt beam< die - of mis la )'001 blood may mcr<a!< If die mcdicme 11 ltq>ped for <><II I s!ion - The .,.... my dndop ~ ID KALETltA aod becoair llanlerlDl!<ll • II< ...... set up I tellcduk Md lollow d coudallj' • Ooly 111.t malidlle ......... .,... pr<SCnb<d sp«i!ically for yoo. ~ ... SI'" KA1£TRA IOodlen IX ..... medicmc pracnMI for -dsc. ...... w 1• d 1 ..... " Ul.ETRA' ~ .. _.... lbat you do llOl llllSS 111ydooes. If yoo .... ·-of ICALElllA. 111.c •.,...,. • pouibl< and dlcll l>b: '1"" onl scbalidcd obe at Is iqWar lmle. If• n almmt llmc for Y""' oC1l dooc. do., till 1_1>e...-.o.b. e...W..'.".a odl3l.cl!IC11«1bc11dlereplst=c.~lllll llUI .,,_~I llb 111 mKll Ul.ETRAI lfp_.111a1,...10o1<-llmlbepaahdobeofdm--. _. ,_ loal """"" ............. Of amp:J ..... lllllXdllcly ,.. •"Ill all pmcniitioo ..dieinei, IW£11lA - II< ktpt ... of lbe r<xll of )'Ollrlli cllildrm. IW£l1lA tiqDid - I brJe - of alccbal If a toddler or )'Olllll child acadmWly drillls mon: 0... die l<C· - - of IWETRA. k - ml< - sod from""' ..ti-. Ccct:ld JOlll' ioc.J - ""1ll1JI '"*'or .-PY .... ll!lm<di3ldy If .... "3ppcn< ....... Ill lab WflRA? Togdhcr •ilh )'001 doctor, you octd 10 dccidt - KALETRA Is ~gilt for you. • ~DOI &>le KAl.f.l1tA ~you"" W.loa C<IUlll lll<du:ules. Thoe could cmc «nous lido effects llW coold aosc .a. Bcftn you till KAlElltA. you 1111111 lell )'001 doclor - aD die mediaocs yoo .,. tWq or"" pbmling ID bl.c. l1n: mdude otla pmalpllCll aod - lftSC1IP!IOll m<diciaa aod babel~ r...---...-you-... t>l<•idlKALl!TRA. please rad 1be KalD'ltitlrd MIDICllo'l!S YOU SllOl.'Ul SOT TAKE wmt KAl.Ellli,.. • Do ... ~ KAl.£l1IA 'you """ .. .n.qy .. KAl.£l1IA .. 111y ol .. ....,...lldlfq..._ .. ~ c.. I llb WflRA ...... lcltiOS,. KAL£TRA may llllmCI """other -..... mdudioa - you tale - a~ You...., 11:11 )'001 doctor lbJut oil lb< medicines yoa an: 111.ioa or pbonmg IO lili bdorc } .. rm KAL£11tA. llElllClllES YOU SHOUl.D llOT TAlE WITH lAU1RA: • ~ "°' tW: die foUov.111& IDCdicincs with KA!£TRA bcame d>cy can came scnous pn>bJcms or dea!h iI lilio •1111 KALETRA Dihydroagobminc. crgoacmnc. crz- llld mclh)lcrgonorillc l1ICI! as c.fcrg«9. M1granal9. DH Ii 4~ E;Jotr>!e M.ik:il<, .~mlodlen Halcion9 (lri=bm) -(-=oie) Onpe (pimozide) PlopuhidO (cmpndc) - R)'lhmolO l....,,tcoooc) ~(lafcmdioc) T-"'(ile<2ioidc) VcncdO(midambm) • Do DOI tilt KAl£l'RA with ril=pm. abo i._,, a~ ~ Rtfarae. °' IW- 1U1am1Jin may io.-.r lbe llllOlllll of KAL£l'RA ID your blood aod de d leSI dl«ti>e • ~ootlll.cKALElltA-St.lolm"nut(hypcricompaforbm an bcrliol prodoa di IS I didx) suppkmeat. or po<licls-- St. Jdm's wort Talk widi your - If you"" tllq or pbminc I> tile St.Jdm"swort T St.Jobo'sWMmeydoamcKALE11tAfn<ls ml IO<l IO illa=cd vir.11 load illlll l'Qiblc ~IO KALHIRA °' cross--.: io oth:r .... mv mafi<inc>. • ~ .. tale KAIElllA with the cllDlatml "'"-mni mcdicincl ~(kM!tilin)or/D:U4(11m.......,)bccancofpossibl<1CnOUS --1'bm .. abo .. inmoscd risl. of chg --- KALETRA Ind~(-~ tdk 10yourdoctorbdcr< you lili ,., of dlCX cl>olestcrol-raluciog mcdidnc> willl IW.El'RA. l!Mic1MSlllll ... VlffattMj­b1Spouibkdoo)' 001doctorl!l.1)'....SIOIDCJQO<or-dledoS< cf ot!l<r mcdicin<s "1lcn yoo llO abo tibia KAlEntA Rcma:ibcr IO Id! your doctor all mtdicmi:s you 111t liling or pbn IO tile -.,,..,.,..,....,.,t..A _l.F_.T_11A_.b_ol< .1.,1_,_ ,..- . _., ___ ofHU;RA.-aslow --· ................. -....... -·---·-- ......... -4 ..................... .. ,.._ -. .. ,_.,...., .. --~-~ .. ,... • If yGI II< tibia on! COOlr>cq>lll<S r111< pdl"J IO ......... ~. you should ..... addltiooal .. mlfcrail In>< ol ~ llllCC KALEl'1lA may ~ ""' d!<cti_.. of onl COll!lxq>ll .... • Ebvumz (s.utm"'i or ""1Djllll< jV.....,..) ..,y '°""' lb< - of KALEl'1lA • "!'*blood Your doctor may UICtWC yo. dooc of KALEl'1lA 1f yoo .. Ibo l.llmg cfmmu., ..._, • If yoa 11< ..,,. Mycobotia'I \nf.obotm). yos doctor ••ll - die doS< of \t)t<li>uha. • A c11aos< lo tlicnpy doould hr """"1<nd Ir,_ an tUJ111 KAIXTRArill: -""'8ytoial~mlOlhm) c..--rr..-..sOlhm> n..oc-.. ..,-die _of KAl£TRA 11,aablood and ..... , • lcA d!cclMe • ()tMrs,.<illC '' - KAl£TRAonl ..,...., __ Tiil _,__ir,.. .. I.till&.,......,. ...... _ .. _~_ .... "'""""'"'"..,.. • If pate llUJg both -...C (Voda•! aod KAl.Jil1!k ~ (Vodaei sboold II< lllcn - - bcfon: « too hoon .. KAIElllA .... Ill ... ""'*" .. llocll " Ul.ETRA1 • TlllS WI cf side d!CCb" DOI complct< If JOU ..... qucs1101!S about Dk effects. ult yav doctor. 11me. or pbatmaciat. y.., should fC!1<X1 "'l' ..,_ U"""""""' ~IO your - rip. nay Y<Nll­may II< ollic .. bclp you ....,,. - .... d!ects www.houston voice.com • The .-commooly reported side d!cct; cf modct:JIC scvm1y l"'1 .,. thought ID be drug Rlalal .... abdomiml .. Ill, allnonnaJ stooh (00.d _...). d"mrb:a, '"'""' •caL'tired. bco<bcbc. and ......, .. Cluldml liling KALHIRA may somctma"' I UID mh. • Blood • po11C11b lal.ing IWJ1lltA may...,_ """"* liwr p<d>- ~lc •ilh 1iw:r m....., such" ttep.ritiJ B llld llqatiti• C •"bo '""']'"'"'""' may ...... _....,,., liw:r - Wu problems S ~ -a.'cornd 11 pollCllb bi.Ina KAILTRA In lllllhcs, ~ "ln:bJao if KdAl.E-tR-A. ............ """" liwr prollleim - ..... 111.mgother mcditlllCS. • Some ,.._ tWllg KA1£lRA an dMlop ..,_ problems with ""'7-lp:mcrc3bll>), .. bich may aoasc dc3:h. Yoo ba-.e 1 biil>­a"'-< of bmq pontrulllu d yoa - Md• bdore Tell J""' doc 1er if you "-......_ ~ or abdoauml p1111 Thoe may be apsof......,_... • Somc palXl1IS .......... mcr=:s 11 lriglymidcs and d>olnlcrol Tb< loog tam chanc< cf gclbna axnplialiom sud! IS bean lll!rl$ Of stroU cb: ID lnCl'CUCS m lriglyCCl1lh ml cllolcsltrol cawed by p!O­""' inlubttm is llllC knoo11•dliJ11m< . °""""' aod hiili blood """ (bypc!Jlymni>J cx;:m .......... ..un, proll:O-'< mhJbam sud! as IW.Ell(A. Some ...,..u hJd ddbcto bdcn lllftll1g prolCl5< iMibiton. odim did not. Some """"" -i dwlp U1 lhelr diall<trs m<dicme llllm IX<dcd acw di>bclcs nrdicw • Cbangn m body .., ban been """ IA 10111< pob<Dls lllma antuttmv> rol lbmpy Thoe cm.,c. may illdUdc mcr...cd llDOUlll of I.it m tbc llpp<f l>rl and ..n rbufl'.io 1wmp·). i.-. 11111 - 111< 1run1. Lou of fa from die l<p. anm aod b:c my also boppen. The came llld lillg- bc>llh diem of Ibex <Mlllioas ft ... l::owa M lhis tnne •Some palXl1IS •1111 bcmopbili> have lllCltao<d blecdiOI •llhprotcasc iDhibitcn. • 1bm:""" I= dbcr ado c!!= • pirms KAIEIRA '"'°'""- t!JaC sill= dfctu 1111)' hr.c b:o .. IO c<!JCt malo;nn""' pnllll •m tJlm& or 1> lbe Illness ib<lf Some ol"""' ..00 d!cas ao be.....,.. wut-1llllmyNcWNtorl111:111 KALETRAI • UY<"' .,. prrfrldlll ., p/anllblg • i.m:- ,,.,_,, The cf!tcts of KAl..ETRAGa~WQDCllorlbeirunbombobocs110ootk"""'11 • If Y<"'.,. /lrrd-fndiot· ~""'In= lea! .CJOU .. bl.q KAI £l1!A You lhould"' .._.foed if you hM IDV If you an: a """"" •"bo !i.s IX ..W hr.c I baby, laJk •11h your dot1or ah>a! lb< llC!l H) kl Iced y<llll' bob)- Yoo lhould be.....,. that If your b;iby doa noc ah-tody hM HIV, dle2t IS a~ Iha! lilV cao 1'e """"1lllld lflrouP--lttdu!g. • If,.. haw liwrprob/tnu. II yoa have IMrproNtmoor an: infected with llcpallllS B or llcpolillS C you should IC!l your d<>.-ior td""' l&l.111& l(A!£11!A • If,.,...,... diabnts. Some peopl< tll.101 procc;vc llllubim dmlop oew or _. 1alOUS m..bctes e11uP blood supr 1Cll )'OW' docto< if yoa hM di3bcv:s or an JDCt= • llunt °' fn:qucnt anm11o11. • /fJ<lfli...."'->plrilia PlticnlslililgKAurrRAmay1-inamal -... How • I llorl Ul.ETRA? • Keep KALETRA and all Ol!Jcr m<dlcmcs out oldie .-h of dlildrm • Rdn;trwd KAl£TRA apmln aod onl - """"' IUhlc 1111111 lb< <>"""'°" dale pr1llll:d oa lb< lab<L 11 llO!td at room ll:lllpmllft up., 71"F (2S'CI. KAl.fTRA -la aod onl - dloold be mcd .. i:!m12- • A>cid nposm< IO 6"""" bc3l Do ,.. kttp - !hat IS ""' ol date or dJat you • Ionia need. Be mtt lhll if y......., miy medicine ••ty. d a OOI cf lbe-=!I ol .Jiiklr<n Gtlertl MwlCI aHll ,,.scn,t•oe •ltl•c.•· Talk IO yourdoclDror other bcolib ar< P"'"'let If yoo bo,.aoy qucslJl)(IS ""°"' lllis modJciJlc or your CCllldiuon Medicines are somrtnncs prr s<nb<d for ...._. Ol!Jcr lhan !hos< listed ID I l'lli<llf lofonnotlOll t...11ct. 11 yoo "'"' _., """°"' about lh1s medJcme. W. y<llll' doctor Your doctor or ...,_ist cm gne yoa illl'onnallOn about dlis m<dJcuJe lhal • .., wnncn for be2lth we prof.....,.... Do DOI me !his m<dic111e for I coaditioe I« •1Iich • •OS "°' pmcnb<d ~ DOI shin: !his mcdJ <mt with-people. •lb<..-Jad11<1Ddemmtsoflb<Jrltlp«ll"'llW1lmmlareoot ..-i of '*"' l..tiormn:s. Th< malcn of ....., lnods ...... allilillod ... aod do DOI Clllb1e A1*lll ......._,., or Its pttGicb. ltd ID 5239 Rg IDA~I0-1 ~'TER R"""1J..-y.2'113 HOUSTON VOICE OUT ON THE TOWN: Pride extends beyond this month when gay Houstonians help their fellow Texans. Page 20. I PARENTING: Houston activist Sue Lovell shares her story on the road of gay parenthood. Page 21 ut By FAREN D'ABELL EBONY HAITH PROBABLY IS NOT the first black lesbian model, but she may be the first to come out on national television. Haith, one of the 10 finalists on UPN's reality show "America's Next Top Model," says executive producer and supermodel Tyra Banks brought together a diverse group of contestants to compete for a mod· eling contract and other high-value prizes. Since a "top model" has to be more than just a pretty face, they learn something new each week. One week, gay consultant J. Alexander - a thick black man in a dress and heels teaches the girls how to walk down a runwa)Z Another week, they take acting clasoos with Alice Spivak who helped Cindy Crawford and Claudia Schifiei: After their lessons, the models are judged on how well they applied their lessons. A panel r:i celebrity model judges eliminates one model each week. Imagine "The Waltons" meet "The Jeffersons" meet "SurvM>i:" Robin Manning - a plus-sized model whose personal motto is "I can do all things through Jesus Christ who strengthens me" - became the mother figure to the group as they were narrowed from~ women to 10. But that mother quickly became disapproving of several women in the house, Haith says. Elyse Sewell, the Wynona Ryder look· alike, is an atheist, and Haith is a lesbian, so neither participates in the bible study classes held by Manning. nthe HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 27, 2003 PAGE 17 Black lesbian isn't 'America's Next Top Model,' but she's still out and proud The outspoken Haith says she was not going to let Manning bring nega. tivity into the house. "The first thing I told her was 'I was born 7-7-78, honey. I'm all lucky. Sevens are the gates to heaven, now you look at me and tell me I'm not a child of God,"' Haith says. 'Mer that, I didn't hear a word from her." FROM THE BEGINNING, HAITH SAYS she was there to win. She was not in the house to make friends. The first argument occurred when the girls arrived at the house and were treated with new clothes of different sires. Haith says the logical way to divide the clothes 'M>uld be to see what looks best on each model. But mother Manning irevaiJed, causing a clothing raftle r:i sol1s to determine which m:xlel.receMld which outfit- ~r:i size. In an early episode, Haith lost a competi­tion to win a night partying with recording artist Wyclef Jean. When ''Tyra Mail" - little notes from Banks telling the contes­tants what to expect the next day - came while the four winners were out partying, Haith wanted to hide the mail from them. But, there's more to every story, she says. "It's an eight-hour show. We were together for over a month," she says. "A lot of the times, my interactions with the girls were things that were built up. If I got frustrated at them, these are things that we went through in and out all day." The almost 25-year-old model from the Bronx says she's not as mean as TV view· ers might think. "Why was I portrayed this vmy?"' Haith asks. "Sometimes African American women especially in my style - have a tendency to be portrayed [as) angry or very forceful" HAITH IS NOT THE TYPICAL SUPER· model. Her current style is bald and a bit rough around the edges. Even people who know her well may not always recognize her because her style, which has included blonde hair, is constantly changing, she says. "I'm naturally a clown," Haith says. 'Tm really a girly girl as well If I'm going through something, you're going to know it" Her big clown smile was seen natural­ly when she invited her girlfriend, Ka, to visit the house. "The girls came in to meet my girlfriend, and their whole attitude [changed]," Haith says. "They all came and introduced themselves - Robin too. ... I knew that they were going to be acceptable toward it and understand that this wasn't something that was a joke." Haith was an out lesbian from the begin­ning of her involvement with the show, but none of the other contestants knew. "Tyra already knew," Haith says. "After we were narrowed down to the 10, that was the first thing she said to me, 'we all know you're a lesbian.'" Haith told Banks that because there are so many gays in all aspects of fashion, she didn't believe that being gay would hinder her career. And besides Manning's protestations, if the other on-camera guests and celebri­ty judges are any indication, she's right. In one episode, the flamboyant runway expert J. Alexander refers to his husband, the doctor, when one of the model-hopefuls reveals that she'll attend medical school if she does not win the competition. Manning's anti-gay sentiments were dis­respectful to the large numbers of gays who support models and actresses, Haith says. "I was a little shocked," she says. "Thinking to myself, 'You're not only making these comments toward me, you're making the.c;e comments to the per­son who made you look fabulous yester-day, the one that made that outfit that you wore look amazing, the one who held your hand when you were crying.'~ DURING AND AFTER JUNE - TYPI­cally known as Gay Pride month - Haith says gays should be out and proud in all aspects of their lives. She does not fear that being out will hurt her modeling career. In fact, she wants to be a director and an actress as well, and fears that may be more difficult. "I think that people are always going to be in fear of what other people say," c;he says. In the future, Haith says she hope· attitudes will change. "We have newscasters who are 60 years old, 'iO, 80, who are coming out saying they're gay now," she says. "W~ have priests who are now finally getting accepted into churches. This is something that, In the next ten years, it really is yesterday's news." After a month of nationally televised grueling work - including sub-zero out­door shoots, criticisms about dry skin, and being called a sinner; Haith is still smiling. "I think I'm one of the most happy finan­cially unstable people there is," she says. And she says if she learned one thing from participating on "America's Next Top Model," it's that she exists. "I am present," Haith says. "I have always felt that as an African American woman especially - a woman, period - that I have had to do extra to say I'm here. •.• I was helped to realize, by watchlng this shol\; that I was present from the beginning.'' Haith was eliminated on the June 10 episode. The show's season finale airs July 8. @MORE INFO 'America's Next Top Model' Tuesdays, 9 p.m. • UPN 18 JUNE 27. 2003 ENHANCES SEX DRIVE + REDUCES FATIGUE + IMPROVES SLEEP + LOWERS BLOOD PRESSURE INCREASES ENDURANCE LOWERS CHOLESTEROL INCREASES CARDIAC OUTPUT REDUCES MUSCLE WASTING . 777 II www moderntherapy.com Proud rnemll@r of the Allll'rlcaa Academy of Antl·Ag ng Medicine. THE Health Club for montrose 4040 milam St. Houston Between Richmond 6 Hlabama In IDontrose www.fltnessfxchange.cc 713.524.9932 $2000FF Annal 111n1111rshl11SI www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE www housto voice.com There's a Rne Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash Former conservative publisher trades holier-than-thou image for role as porn star Sam Tyson. From 'Hero' to porn star REMEMBER HERO MAGAZINE? IT was that conservative gay men's publica· tion that had a su·ict policy against adult content. Hero was geared toward men in committed relationships and had a gener­al "we're gay, but we're so normal" flavor In late 2001, the magazine closed its doors for good after three years in oper­ation. The publisher told Press Pass Q, an electronic newsletter about the gay media, that a weakening economy and a drop in ad sales after the Sept. 11 attacks caused the magazine's downfall. Ironically, Genre magazine now reports that SAM FRANCIS, one of the ccrfounders of Hero. became SAM TYSON - a gay porn star. Co-star of such movies as "Goldenrod" and "The Hole," Tyson apparently is one of the hot stars on the rise in the adult film industry. "(Hero] re.illy served a market of men who felt alienated from the heavily sexual vibe of other gay men's maga­zines," Tyson said in an interview with Unzipped.net, a porn magazine. Tyson said there was always a part of him that wanted to do what he's doing now "It existed even before I came out," he noted. "But back then I was too ashamed and too afraid. So this part of me the sexual energy in me was Just held back." LESBIAN :MEDIA BIGWIG lfiLARY RO­SEN joins CNBC Aug. 1 as a regular com­mentator on the "Capital Report," "Power LunC'h" and "Squawk Box" programs after le.1Ving her job and $1 million annual salary this week as chair of the Recording Industry Association of America. Rosen, the life partner of Human Rights Campaign Executive Director ELIZABETH BIRCH, came under fire as a spokesperson for the RIAA as ille­gal file-sharing made it easy for anyone with IntP.rnet access to download music online without both· ering to buy CDs. "I really like the perspective of CNBC and the way they .communicate with an audience whom they expect to be knowledgeable "'911i1111.;;;:.iliil••I- and sophisticated about issues," Rosen told the Washington Post. "So I don't feel like I'm entering show business." Rosen and Birch announced earlier this year that they are leaving their full· time posts to spend more time with their children. Birch's tenure at HRC ends in Dccembe1: Pom star Sam Tyson was fonnerly know as Sam Francis. who founded the now-defunct Hero maga· zme. which catered to conservative gay men. (Photo courtesy of Badpuppy.com) MAER ROSHAN. THE GAY EDITOR of Radar magazine, is having a bad time. In May, someone sent a box of human excrcmPnl to his New York office and claimed the messy missive was from rap executive SUGE KNIGHT. the New York Post'~ Page Six reports. Roshan named Knight as one of the "celebrity mon· sters" pron.Jed in Radar's debut issue. Knight's handler told the paper he did not send the package to Roshan. But in the July issue of Stuff Magazine, a Maxim knockoff headed by editor GREG GUTJ<'ELD, a cor- Maer Roshan rect10n ran saying, "In M11;; we sent n package of excre­ment to [Roshan]. Turns out, he had a~ked us to send it to his home address." Gutfeld is claiming the correction was a Joke, hut Roshan is skeptical. "I received n box of shit from 'Sugo Kmght' whkh later turned out to be the, uh, handiwork of [Gutfeld], Roshan said in the online magazine Black Table. "I thought it was one of his more impressive accomplishments as an editor." Ouch. I e Send comments. suggestions to ~ editor@huostonvOK:e.com Jur,E 27 2003 19 " If you have to as , you stiouldn't come" Ma ture Audiences - Strong Language - Nudit) written by Robert Chesley Directed by Joe Watts Starring Brett Cullum & Glen Fillmore Through JULY 12th •Fridays and Saturdays Curtain: 8PM •Tickets: $20 •Reservations 7 13 - 522- 2204 BSldi•lnl 1415 California St. Houston, Texas 77006 MEXICAN RESTAURANT BEST TAMALES • QUESADILLAS MENUDO • FAJITAS • CALDOS AWARD WINNING MARGARITAS • 1.99 FROZEN MARGARITAS •1.99 HUEVOS RANCHEROS TREAT YOUR SELF TO OUR ORIGINAL MEXICAN FOOD. ALWAYS FRESH, AT AFFORABLE PRICES. TO GO ORDERS WELCOME. 713-522-2365. CHAPULTEPEC - WHERE EVE1?\10NE IS BEAUTIFUL • Lunch Buffet 1 l am - 2pm • Dinner 5pm - l Opm • Sunday SpecJOI. Bottomless Mimosas and Belinis All Day! 20 JUNE 27 2003 Board Certified Psychiatrist Jon-~..aut Hamilton, M.D. • Treatment tor Depression, Anxiety, Relat1onsh1p Issues, ADHD. • New Office in Montrose with Immediate Appointments Available. www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE out n e tovvn JOHNNY HOOKS Houstonians can show their pride anytime by helping fellow gay Texans in need Pride lasts all year "WE'RE HERE, WE'RE QUEER, GET USED TOJTf' Your first Pride parade is always a memo­rable experience. I have been fabulously fortu­nate in my life with opportunities to march in the New Yor'k City Pride Parade in 1009, tit the height of the ACT·L'P protests; in San Francisco the year Bill Clinton swept into office on a dream called HOPE (we sang "Ding. dong the witch is dead" from "The Wizard of Oz!"); in Houston's pre-nighttime, Sw1day afternoon, drag queen melting parades of Yore (oh those nelly ribbons!); and its much cooler sister. the Saturday, only nighttime parade In the country, disco ball over the intersection of Montrose and Westhelmer extravaga.!17.a. Whew! As I look around today, in our local com­munity and our national and global ones, 1t seems that the years of hard work, loss and pride are paying off You can't turn on the TV now without running into gay and !es· blan characters such as Will and Jack from "Will & Grace.~ Lena and Bianca on "All My Children," or real·life couples like Riechen and Chip from the "Amazing Race," or recently voted off Ebony and her girlfriend Renee on "America's Next Top Model." By the time YoU read thi~. the US. Supreme Court probably will have ruled on the constitutionality of the Texas anti·sodomy la~ hopefully decriminalizing the actions of tens of thousands of Texans. There are clear­ly lots of reasons to celebrate PRIDE thls year. HOWEVER, EVEN THOUGH YOC MAY TAKE Monday after Pride weekend off to recover. there are people in this city who can't take time off before heading back to work. because they can't wor'k. They are too sick. too ill to even attend the parade, to enjoy the celebration that all the hard work over the years ?<as for. My column usually highlights people, places and events that are, for one reason or another, of mterest to the GLBT comm\llllty ci Houston. The Houston \'tuce has pJt together its annual Pride guide 1i:r Houstoo alre:ld}: I decided to remind yru, dear readers, that after the rartY sttJill, }".JU can make a REAL difference in the lives ci ~le infected aixl affected by HIV aixl AIDS It takes as little as one hour a week, but the help You provide-and the good it does for our still-young community- insures its survival, and maybe even your own. D.l.F.F.A Houston. The Design Industry Fbundation Fighting AIDS is the largest source of pnvate dollars for HIV I AIDS care in the greater Houston area. according to DIFFA leaders. The group has granted more than $2.6 million to local service providers since Its inception in 1987. DIFFA Houston gives funds to HIV I AIDS services organiza­tions that provide preventive education pro­grams targeted to populations at risk of infec. lion and to pro>iders of treatment and direct· care services for people living with AIDS. Throughout the year. DIFFA raises money with amazing annual events like Dine OUt & Chip In, the J loliday Collection Auction (featur Ing wreaths designed by local artists. designers and loving citizens like myself!) The heart of the local chapter is Rodney Honerkmnp, but the organization depends on volunteers for its lifeline. The 2003 Holiday <:-Ollection Auction steering conunittee meets for the first time this week and could use YOU www.diffa.org/hous­ton ha5 further info on all volunteer needs. AIDS Foundation Houston. Volunteers are the backbone of AFH. Officials at AFH note that it i5 the oldest HIV I AIDS organu.a­tion In Houston, and it has a four-step process for becoming a volunteer: Application, Interview, Orientation and Placement. A short walk around their well-organized Web site shows a need for help Ill the follow­mg areas: Big Brothers and Sisters, Newslettei; Habitat for Humanity (helping build homes for HIV+ families), Camp Hope;Gamp H.U.G, special events, hospital visitation and lots more; unfortunately. lhll list is long and continues to grow. Take a minute and see how you can HELP. wwwaidshelp.org Bering Omega Community Services. Founded in 1986, Bering Omega provides a continuum of compassionate, quality care to People Living with HIV I AIDS in Southeast Texas, according to Bering leaders. Bering Omega relies heavily on volunteers to deliv­er cnre to more than 2,800 people each year. Utilized m all aspects ci Bering's operations, volunteers contribute more than 23,00J hours of assistance each yeai: Bering Omega provides assistance including a free dental clinic for pro ple living with lllV/ AIDS. Even simple ge;tures like recycling your old magazines for their lobby can help. Patients sometimes ha11e to wait for hours and a newish magazine can hE'lp pass the time and the jitters a dental visit can hring. Adult Day Qire, Including nursing, art programs, transportation nssiStance and field trips, Financial Assist, Support Net\l.urk for families and caregivers and Residential Hospice Care (!'he Omega House) for tOOse living out their final days al5o are offered. wwv.:beringomega.org The Assistance Fund pro\oidcs mudt needed support to individuals living with AIDS by pay­ing their health lllSurance premiums until they qualify for Medicare, aa:ording to the group. Assistance Fund al5o offers financial assistance for the purchase cf medication. Those helped through this group have reached a point in the1r disease process where work is no longer possi­ble and available financial rerources are inade­quate to maintain quality of life, dignity and pea~ cf mind www.theassistancefund.org. After the chandelier comes down. and the rainbow balloons are stowed for another year. continue celebrating your PRIDE by showing the cit): the nation and the v.OOd wey we're queci; we're STIU.. here, and they'd better get used to it. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com parenting ELLA TYLER Family enjoys sports, other activities together with the diverse Montrose as a backdrop Lovell proud to be a mom SUE LOVELL, 53, MOTHER OF TWO, says, "The gay and lesbian parenting boom is amazing to me. Growing up, I never thought I would have kids. It wasn't part of the dreams gay and lesbian people had for themselves. It wasn't the way we planned our lives." Lovell, however, always wanted chil· dren, and adopted S·year-old Robbie and his brother Stephen, now 14, when Robbie was an infant. "I was there when Robbie was born," she says happily. When asked if parenting is easier now that the boys are older, she can't decide. "They're more independent, and in some ways that makes it easier and in some ways it is harder," she says. "I have truly enjoyed every age. Each age has different challenges and different rewards." The famlly lives in the Montrose area, where Lovell had lived before mother· hood. "I bought a house here because of the diversity of the area and because the neighborhood schools - Poe, Lanier and Lamar - are all good schools. Good schools and a diverse neighborhood were priorities for me," she says. "Montrose isn't the only place where this happens," she adds, "but I was comfortable here. I wanted a place where they would feel comfortable growing up." Lovell is a big fan and supporter of the Neartown Little League where Robbie plays, Stephen umpires and she is an assistant coach. "Everyone plays. There are no tryouts, just skill assess· ments so that the team's balanced. It is so wonderful to see this diverse group of parents all getting along, all accepting of each other and all cheering for each other's kids," says Lovell, who is a coach as well. Everyone in the Lovell family likes sports. "It's something they chose to do, but I'm glad because it's something we all have in common," she says. "You should have seen us screaming and jumping around when Rice won the College World Series. The boys were really excited because we would go watch them play." LOVELL SPENDS A LOT OF TIME with the boys. "I'm fortunate to have them, and they're my priority. I wanted them so I could be part of their lives, not just to have them," she explains. "I cut back a lot on my involvement in things, but I will have time to do that later. It all goes by so quickly. " Stephen and Robbie like Lovell's Involvement in politics (she's running for Houston City Council this year). They know that It's important, and that it helps people, she says. It isn't always Gay Houston activist Sue Lovell adopted her two sons, Robbie, 8. and Stephen. 14. when Robbie was an infant. easy for them, though, she admits. "They'll get teased or harassed about who I am when my name is in the paper or I'm on the news." However, she says, "When they see someone [else] being harassed, they'll reach out. They know what it's like." Lovell is very proud of her sons. "They're really good kids, and it doesn't seem to be a struggle for them. They're fun, smart, and have good senses of humor. They're well rounded, and that's important to me. They do volunteer work," she says. The boys maintain contact with their bir.:h mother, Lovell says. "They have two sisters, one younger than Robbie, and they see them." They also have close ties to Lovell's family. "They're leaving soon to spending three weeks in California to see their cousins," she reports. THE FAMILY ALSO HAS PETS, though not as many as they had last week. "We had 10 puppies, but fortunate· ly, they're gone," Lovell says. "It was a good experience for them, and they wanted to keep them until they saw how much work they would be." Although the gay and lesbian parent· ing is more visible and accepted than it once was, Lovell says there still is progress to be made. "Gay fathers and Jes· bian mothers still lose access to their children in divorces and single parent adoption is allowed, but gay couples can· not [adopt]," she says. "If I had to give advice to a young gay or lesbian, what I'd say is there is no right moment [to have children]. Don't wait for enough money or time or the perfect situation," Lovell says. "Just do It. Things will fall into place. I've been amazed." JUNE 27 2003 21 June 29 •"Can You Be Bought? ... What's Your Sellout Price?" Rev. Janet Parker ~W July 6 • "Jesus Was Amazed!" ~'4. ~ ~ Rev. Ralph Lasher, ~t.~ • ~ guest preacher Maranatha ~~ ,, Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion• Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/Children's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is a~a1fabfe for small children. M1d·week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and l¥orship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship 1\fCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1.net www.maranathamcc.com Register School! ~~'IT@~@ n ~®OOIB@ filfi@I~g ~ilfl!inflDIIflJH <tltwr1J9~ ~'jJl.J Vacation Bible School July 28th - August 1st 5:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 2025 W. 11th St.@ T.C.Jester 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org 22 JUNE 2J. 2003 Alignments Brakes 2314 Washington 713-880-4747 Carpentry • Repairs • Remodeling • 936.563.S 180 / 936.760.5531 Lawrence Gilstrap www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE PROFESSIONAL SERVICES . Remodeling lntenor and extenor. Add1t•ons ·Any kind of room added to your home. New Construction· New bwldmgs of any kmd. home, garage, etc. c :r:lfu• C )'nrn~u:,rt 1 dr cJ Ro.:. Jt'': d 1 Nn J ,t T ,,, S"•d Get results! Call now at 713.529.8490 to place your ad in the directory! If your hair Isn't BECOMING to you, then you should BE COMING to mo. DONGIU STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 Customers are out there! Help them find you by advertising here Call 713-529-8490 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com television BRIAN MOYLAN Ellen DeGeneres returns to stand-up where she belongs, but trail-blazing comedian plays it safe on HBO special. Ellen playing it safe IF YOU SAW ELLEN DEGENERES Jive on her latest stand-up tour, skip watching her new HBO comedy special, "Ellen DeGeneres: Here and Now," on Saturday. The special is the same act she performed on tour this spring. DeGeneres shouldn't be faulted for this. A show that is going to get so much exposure on national television needs to be tried out in front of live audiences beforehand. But for a special called "Here and Now," not only is the material a bit old, but there is also nothing edgy about DeGeneres' act anymore. It's neither in-your-face like Sandra Bernhard's standup material, nor polit· ically current like Bill Maher's whiny revelations. DeGeneres garnered national atten· tion for being one of the first actors to come out in publicly - on national tele· vision and on the cover of Time. But since then, she gradually shied away from talking too much about politics or sharing cutting-edge material. THE NEW SPECIAL IS VERY SIMILAR to DeGeneres' last failed sitcom, "The Ellen Show," which aired on CBS in 2001. It tried to resurrect the familiar feelings evoked by family sitcoms like "The Dick Van Dyke Show" and "The Andy Griffith Show." Ellen's now-defunct show had its funny moments. but something was lost in the translation from Griffith and Van Dyke. Too much time passed, and the formula for those programs faded to the point thnt audiences just couldn't relate. The new special would be more aptly titled "Then and Now." since most of the jokes are based on the disparity between how simple life once was and how complicated it is today. DeGeneres jokes about the days before remote controls, how toilet paper used to have more than one ply, and how pickles used to be in a big barrel in the general sto~. If a comedian like Bob Hope, who turned 100 on ;vfay 29, were to discuss such revelat10ns in his act. it would generate chucl<les. Hut Ellen is only <15 not exactly a spring chicken, but also not old enough to do the "when I was your age" bits yet. Many of her observations are quite funny and astute, but some of the jokes fall fiat before reaching the finish line. Talking about how hard it is to open new CD is more of a gag to do with friends in a bar than a bit in n standup act. After breaking barriers when she came out on national television, out comedian Ellen lleGeneres fails to break new ground on her HBO special on Saturday, June 28. (Photo by Cliff Watts/HBO) IF NONE OF THIS SOUNDS GAY· oriented, that's because it isn't. At the beginning of the show's hour, DeGeneres says that everyone in the audience has something in common. "You're all here. because you're ga;;" she teases. It's a smart move to address the "gay issue" right off the bat. For someone who became famous for being openly gay, but who still strives to reach mainstream audiences. it's worthjokiilg about briefl}: "That was my obligatory gay remark," she says. "If I didn't do anything ga); pe<>· pie would be upset. They'd sa); 'She didn't do anything ga): She's not our leader! What happened to our leader?'"' She'~ makes a gay joke or two. but the meat and potatoes of her act is the wr;: insightful. observational quips that will crack up anyone, regardless of race, religion or sexual orientation. DeGeneres notes in the show that the real rt>ason everyone has gathered bl'fore her is just to "to laugh." Watching her in action does gener· ate laughti>r. Just don't expect her to radicnlly change the face of come~~ C) MOREINFO 'Ellen DeGeneres: Here and Now' June 28. 10 p.m. HBO For video lughhghtmg upcoming special, access www .houstonvo1ce com JUNE 27. 2003 23 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES J-.s amness & Home~ Serv ng 71w QN11111unllJ " Smee 199 5' Jerry W. Simoneaux, Jr. nttnrnt'~ nt law 713-227-1717 Legal Protection for GLBT Families lmttl,Jms Specializing in relationships. both personal and professional. and in transitions in life. Helping you find :;-our passion is my purpo.<e •.• 4040 Milam. Swtd I 0 713 467.8"48 or &32.283.7390 E-mail· doom~Aonrueday. com ""',.. donrucday com &oliry IltDfJf1Y Cnt:f"4 .•.•. A. THI 11al PIACI •Alignment •Brakes 1307 Fairview Inc. (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 1e1s '°"' JVo Worries their omt Let your pct' relax at home so you 'Call relax on \"3cation. I pro, id.: in-horn 11.C, daily walk and pla) for ) our pets to k~"ep them happy w h1le ) ou arc d ,.;o;~;;~;dforA=mb;ca1;;.. ~ Established 1995 • e-mail: lo 318@aol.com • 713.942.8816 Get results! Call 713.529.8490 to pla~e your ad in the directory! 24 JUNE 27 2003 ISl'T IT TIME? GET TESTED FREE ANONYMOUS HIV/STD TESTING Houston Area Community Services 3730 Kirby Dr. Suite 1165 • Houston, TX 77098 713-526-0555 ext. 226 "60 ON A JOURNEY FOR LIFE" •PURCHASE** ANY NEW VOLVO VIA THE VOLVO OVERSEAS DELIVERY PROGRAM AND YOU WILL RECEIVE TWO COMPLIMENTARY ROUND TRIP AJR FARES TO EUROPE AND ONE NIGHT HOTEL IN GOTHENBURG, SWEDEN. Generous savings on the U.S. MSRP and even more generous travel offer. For more information contact: Tina Harris at 713.868.6844. VOLVO for life Tina Harris • 713.868.6844 tharns@starmotorcars.com www.volvocars.us/ overseas www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE KEVIN RIORDAN 'The Queen of Harlem' novelist is not his own title character, and being out in interviews serves a larger purpose. Black gay author 'represents' YES, BRIAN KEITH JACKSON IS GAY and hves m arguably the most famous black neighborhood in the country. And yes. his latest novel is titled "The Queen of Harlem." But this vivid and insightful book. which has been likened to an African· American "Breakfast at Tiffany's." is not an autobiography in fictional drag. "I am not the Queen of Harlem," the 35-year-old author says recently from his home m the storied neighborhood where his third novel is set. "I wanted to create a book about iden· tity, and perception." Jackson says. "There's no better city in the world to do that than New York, and I've had a fasci· nation with Harlem for a long time. I wanted to explore what Harlem means to people." Jackson moved to Harlem's West Side two years ago, and like his narrator, Mason Randolph, the author - who was born in New Orleans - grew up in a well· off Southern family. BUT MASON, WHO TAKES THE NAME Malik and disguises his upscale origins when he moves uptown, is thoroughly het· erosexual. He's smitten with the glam· orous Carmen the "queen" of the title and with Kyra, a wealthy Columbia University student. Jackson says writing characters Mis not always fun for me." But Carmen - a wise and witty diva whose SOc1al network seems to include every bold-faced name in New York's gossip columns was "very fun" to write, he says. "Everybody has a little Carmen i~ them." Jackson says. "I honestly beheve that. She's grand ... but she"s aware." Like Mason/ Malik. Carmen recreates herself in a neighborhood not only histor· ically famous for its artists, musicians and writers, but more recently renowned for a surge in the value of its residential and commercial real estate. Hamstrung for decades by the neglect, decay and drugs that afflict many city neighborhoods, Harlem is hip again. Jackson wanted to explore what it means to be a young black· man in a place where so much is changing - and not always in a positive direction, he says. With its contrasting scenes o( blue-col Jar and upper crust black life, MTlie Queen of Harlem" is more concerned v.1th class than race or sexual orientation. JACKSON WAS A CO~BIJl'OR TO "Shade," a 1996 anthology of fiction by black gay men, but until recently tended to be pulr licly circumspect about his sexual orienta· tlon in interviews as well as in his work. The QYeen I of ar e111 RRtAl': KFITII )An:so.' Even though he does live m New Yorlc's famous black neighborhood. gay writer Brian Keith Jackson does not refer to himself in the title of his third novel. The Queen of Harlem.' "It takes a great deal to be who you are," Jackson says, comparing Carmen's fiercely proud act of self-creation to the ongoing process of being gay in a straight world. "I basically identify as ga);" he adds. "I've never trted to hide it. It's a non-issue to me." Besides, he's too busy: Jackson is writ mg a screenplay based on "The Queen of Harlem," working on a one-man play in which he will star, and getting started on a new novel. "[The new novel] is going to be about how people have relationships based on the free minutes of their cell phones," he hints. Jackson also admits that being out in recent interviews promotes his work and his date-ability. But it has another. larger • purpose, he says. "It's about representation." he says. 'i\.bout having faces to see. If your face is In a magazine, and you're a novelist, and some kid is in a dentist's office and sees you, that kid knows it's possible. "When I was a kid, I dldri't see many black faces when I was flipping through the magazines," he adds. MI have to go out and be a facP..'' ft FOR MORE INFO The Queen of Harlem' by Brian Keith Jackson Broadway Books 256 pages. Sl2. 95 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I com unity calendar SATURDAY, JUNE 28 EVERY SATURDAY AJl.Spanlsh W<JMp SelVlct/Noche EspWitwl 6 pm. Resumctoon M<?tropolitan Com1111111ty CllJrth, 2026 W lltft 713-303-3409 or 713-861-9149 Aft« Hoen KPFT 90.1FM.1·4 a.m. 09>rty moss. 730 pm for gay Cathof~ 713-880-2872. Free HIV T~ ~ Cioo II p.m-2 am at VMTe" ll>a»Jo:xl G.ly & Lesbian 8teakfost ClA>. 9 30 am. 281-437-0636. Houston Wrestling Club. Practice 130 p.m. 713-45H406 Urrbdo c.rtir. Akchoics Anonymous.11:30 am£~ Opmty GtQ4l, 8 pm S1!ml.ir N9'1 IJw. 9.JO p.m w.ig Ones l'm4). 1201 W Cl1y ro-5211243 or 71J.526-9772. WWW~ Montro!t Soccer ClA>. 10 a.m. practice WoOOrow Wiison School FUVJCW llld Yupon. New pbym ...icome.1iut ~not a..-. mrtly being admitt<d. 713-862·949l http://!leOCillcWJmlmor>. trosesoccer £-mail: montrosesocctr Q;yahoo.corn ~ ~ d the <lrtth "'~""""' hatramo. 9.JO p.m Cmiereat anmnty C81!!1713-528-SAFE.E-mat ~~ St Sl<pftm's [jllscopal _Cluth Rosary 8 a.in IBOS W Alab.lma 71J.528-6665. Houston GL8T ~ c.nta-. Orop-i\ noon-5 pin• CATS (Community Aw.imess for Transqendcr Support) board of dir<ctars ~ 2 pm. • TATS (Tr<JS A<;SOci;rtion for Transsexual 5"pport) meeting. 6 pm. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 71J.524·3818 WV.,•,! l ' 'A· -tPr..org. SUNDAY, JUNE 29 EVERY SUNDAY ~ MtmorWI United Methodist Cluth. Serllces at 8:30 & 10-.50 am. Sunday sdlool 945 a.m. 71J.52b-I017 c.1Ur for Spiritual lMng. Services al ll am.. for childrm at 10-.50 a.in 6610 Harwin. 71J.339-1808. The center also h.ls comrnitmenl ~ mrt.Jphy\ic;ll books!~ and classes. Camuilly Gospel SelVICe at ll a.m. & 7 pm Sunday School for chzldren 10 a.in 71J-88().92J5 or WWW~lOlll Camuilly ol kindred SpWtts In Beaumont Worship at 6 pm. 1575 Spndletop Ave., ee_..,i, Texas. 409-81J.2055. [-mail: cksrcv3@11ttmo.nct eo..nant aud1, E<llTWical Ubenl Baptist Service 9:'!0 am. & educallon hour 11 am. 713-668-8830. Emmon UritiNn Clut!I. Adult eWcatiOI\ 10 am Service, 11 am. llll1Chalnoon www~.Of11- Ant C4niregabonill Cluth (Memorial)_ ServlCl! at 10 a. 'It Clrosllan EducatJOn, 11 JO am. 71J.468-954.3 or fcc-houston.Of9. Fnt lMibrian t.Wwnallst Clum. Servtes at 9 30 & 11:30 am. Bnn:h 11 I0-30 am. 71J.52b-5200 c:luth(amtw.~ Fret HIV Testing. Montrose Chnic. 9 p '11-mldrught at Club lnertJY nJ-830-3000. GI¥ 1!cMt'Q 1..111Ja 7 p.m Pain Ln>. 4191 Belie SW 71J.86Hl8l Gay C&tllDllcs of Sl Anne's-Houston. 5 p.m. worship sern:e Omer and socbl alexcam wt.net. ~30 Cl.OBAL G.ly Lesbian Or 6iscxu:il Aftianc:e. t.; .mrty of Houston Gl8T student group meellnQ. 2 pm at the Houston l.tsbbn & Gay Conmmrty Centtr. 3400 Montrose. Suite 207 71J.524-3818. wwwunedu/.glob.11 [-mad: globa!@bayou.uh.edu. Gin A-..bly Clud1 G.1y/Q.ly-aff'"""1Q coogreoatio!l ll am SffllCe 567 Ced.1r CtOYe. Uvingston. Texas. m51 9.lb-646-7214. E-mail: leo~tlex.net. Gin luthonn Clut!I. Sunday school for all ages 9 am. Serwtce 10-JO 1.111. 713-528-32&9 AA T .tK Houston Alea Teen Coofitiln ol HorrrJse:w.m nwts b-9 pm For mcctin!I i1forn1.1tO\ call 71J.529-3590. WWW ha~ HMlon ~Rugby CU> Pradce from 4~ PJ!1. For more inlonrution. 1og on to www rouglrlcckwgby oro Hollstoo T ... ClA>. q am-noon M..'lllOrial Park at the Tenrus c.nu.- hMtontemisclbqi'ool.com Urrbdo c.ar. Al ""*" Al"oymous. 930 am ea... tD ~ r.ro...>. 1201 w Cl\' 71J.'>7.l t'43 or 71J.52B-9m www~ ~ ftlowshjp Metropolitan Cluth. 10 am service 3333 FdMlll, Suit• 106 713-526-6756 NortllWOOds ~ Unlwnililt Cluth. Servces at 945 & !US am. Sunday sdlOOl 9 45 am. 261·298-2760 Ramdlon MCC. Setvlce>. 9 ...i ll am. Chlldttn Mid ~uuth SundJy Sdlool. 10 am Children" servic•. II am 713-861-9149 91. ,_..... ""°"""" Cllholc ...._ Slnlay M.m at noon Holy l.tioos l!l3i.llllo. r.twp nwts.""' Ho1ir ~ DlO ~ ~ Tms TT7f11409·781-8& E-mal bwatsonl ~ st.~· EjlllClllll Clvcll. Holy £lldwisl, Ritt l, 7;45 am; Holy EllClurist, RM ll 8~5 am., E4atm hour. lo am.; a.or.ii Eudwist.11 am 713-528-6665 ~ ......._For HIV-po51t"" ,....,_ 11 am Riva\ 1117 MisSCIJri st. PAC. 71J.880-0b90 .-m.ut. PoznBuff ~ llww...ti°""""Moet"unl...,_., I0-45am.71J.529--85n '""'-~ .....,..~ l4ilt ch:wion. 9ant Sera, 1ll5 aJll 281 :zTT-8882 WWW twc.org ~ ~ "~ eu.ty. 502 Clvch St Servoco, lo-JO am "°9·7b5113JO ~,......,of.-_ M.it forum, 10 a.m. S..VU.11 am. 713-686-5876. HMDo Ill.BT Conlrulllr Cerltw. llrop-0\ 2~ pm • GI.BT Comnulty OH'cll with llN Meissa l'.llod. II"* >tudy, 10-lfr45 am. woNllP lla.m. www~ • GlOBAl .....tnJ 6pm • 3400 Ma1lrust. 'lull• 'l07 m-524 3618. ~~-"'9 MCN>AY, JUNE 30 EVERY MONDAY C...-lw s,111111110.. __ ,..,..,, ll:"!O a<n·I P-"' ~ ---JU-»t .. Free HIV Testing. ~ton Area Commun•~ Servous. 9 a in· noon at Joseph-H•nes Clime 1710 West 25 St 713-52b-0555. ext 23L 227 or 226 Fret HIV Testing. Montrose cronic. 4-8 pm. at Bricks. 617 faimew 7IJ.830·3000. Frost Eye CWc. Free eye exams for people with HIV 713-830-3000 Gay Bowling Leagues. Women's lea<jUe. 645 pm. Dynamic Unes, 6121 Tamel O.-M. m-861-1167 Gay FatherVFathers Flrsl Support group. 6-9:30 pm. Bering Memorial United Methodist Churtlt TOI!\ ro-nb-8736. WWW.geo<•l16.ccm/gaydadsho<Jston/ Gnia! Assembly Cluth G.ly/ljay-affirmlng congregatoon. 7 pm. aenlblcs class. 567 Cedar Grove. Lrvmgston, Texas, m5L 93b- 64b-72l4 E-mail leol:11>mttexnel Grief & DIYoltlt Suppcit ~ 7 p.m Beri1g. 71J.526.1017. ext. 200. Houston Roughnecks Rugby Club Prac:tce from 6:30-8 30 pm. For more lnfonn.itJO<l, li;>o on to www.roughnedcwgby.nrg. l(olJo Project. Eucharist 'VO pm. 71J.861-1800. l.vnilda c.nur. Alcoholics Anonymous. 8 p.m llcoimen' Group. 1201 W Cl1y 71J.52H243 or 71J.52B-9772 WWW IJrnbcldhoustonorv. Mont7osf Clinic Offers ._-ldy peer S1JPPQrt groups for gay and bisexual m<n wllll HIV. Spanish spe.1klng group meets, 6:30 pm. 21S Westhelmer. 71J.830.3050 Grupo de Aflt1(o para lallflOS OJY y OOl!xuales VJH pcsitivos. LLnes &JO. Para mas onforrruoon lbma al 713-830-3025 ~Voices Radio Show. 8·10 pm. KPFT 90.l Houston Cl.BT Community Center. Orop-11 2-9 p.in • 3400 Moo11r<i • $(, '• 207 71'-~24-"~P wwwhoustonglblctnU.-.~ TUESDAY, JULY 1 Lesbian HuJth InrtiatM. M.. . .tmg, 7 pm. 713·603·0023. NWW 1n · oo • l\.org EVERY TUESDAY ~Support~ Be. :h Gang. II am 71J.52b-l0ll Center for Spiritual Llmg. M"""''--" CdnlJ>in). ll30 a.m. I pm. 6610 fl.ltwrn. 713-339-lBOB. Fret HIV Testilg Houston Area Conmmity ~ 10 am 2 p.m. at Joseph-Hines tr1111C. 1710 west i5lli st. 71J.52b-0555, exl 23L 227 or 22b. Fret HIV Testilg'. Montrose Clil1lc. 6 p.m."'11drnght at Qui> Houston Also 4-8 pm. at 611 Club. 611 Hyde pan_ 7lJ.830. 3000 GlBT PenleaJstals. Bible s!Ldy, prayer 7 pm 11 the HclQht>. For Info: 93b-931-376L e-maol: wwwWgbl947:@cs.com. Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience necess;uy Practice, 6;30-6:30 Westbnd YMCA Kay. 71J.20!H529 Introduction tD Buddhism. All wet:orne at 634 W Ttmple 1n the Hcights. 7 pm. Carlton, 7lJ.B62-8129. Rainbow Ranglffs. F~ e&w dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom No p.lrtner needed Beo11mer 2 Step. Waltz. Shuffle & SwlllCJ. 8:30 pm 713·528-9192 Houston GLBT Com,,..,,;ty Center. Drop-tn 2·9 p.m. • Ltsb!Jn Coming Out Group, 7 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 713-524· 3818. wwwhnu\tc-ilb'.,...."<.r-g WEDNESDAY, JULY 2 EVERY WEDNESDAY Center for SpWrtial Living."" : "' I (drop-ln), ll:JO am•! pm; SOM Dlscussoon & Explor;ruon, 7 pm. 6610 Harwin. 71H39·1808. Cr}5tal Meth Anonymous (CMA), 8:15 p.m meeting Montrose Counseling Center, 701RicfmJndAlie.Room15. ~ Memorial lkitod Methoclsl a...ch. Support Hetwor1c l'llt lud Dinner. 6:30 pm. Varilus suwort groups. 7 pm. 713-52b-1017. Bible Study Noon & 6:30 pm Sl Sttphen's ElliscqlaL 71J.526 6665 Fret HIV Testlng Montrose Cflnic. 4-8 pm. at M.ir{s. 1100 Westhelmer. 9 pm ·mldni)ht at Rrpconl. 715 Fa.-.-. 10 pm.·l a111 at EJ'~ 2517 Ralph; 10 pm.·l am at Midtowne Spa. 3100 Fannon 713-830-3000 Fret HIV Ttsbng. Thomas Strett Clinic. 9 a.m.-1 pm. 2015 Thoma' St OraSur! method Call for appoiritment Sharon. 713-873-4157 c..y lowing Lugues. 630 pm. Palact lane<. 4191 Btlaire BNd 7U-861 ll87 Gin AstemlJly Cluth G.y/Q.ly-afformnJ congreg.itlon 7 pm. ~ c1.1 .. 567 c.d.11- r.ro.e. LivuigstOI\ r.xas. m5L 9lb-646-72l4 £-malt lool •-tlec...t. Houston Pr111111Md. Open~ 7:30-9.30 p m.1307 VIie. ID-862-1468. ..... Rougllnodls ~cw. Prada from 6J0-8JO pm. For ,_. 11fonrwtoon. iot 00 ID WWW~Dr9 ........ T-a., 7:00-9 p.m. Memorwl Paric at tho Ttmis Center houstontemisdl([aotcorn Sj1irt1ua1Uplft....a.7 pm. RtsMmct1on MCC 713-861·914q """""' Gl6T c-.lly c.w. Drop--. 2-'I p"' • Ft.f HIV l<Slm!I ~ ~9 p.m. • HouslDn Gay & ~ Potrucllc...a.i~mettong, 7pm.·~Pndtlland retrar"11. no p"' • 3400 t.1oni...... s.... 'l07 71J.S24 ·381ll WWW ho,,_t.JnQl>tet•nler IJr9 THURSDAY, JULY 3 GiM Cellll T ........... Com1n111eo. M<tbn; m-780-4282 EVERY THURSDAY l!INot "°"5tlll Grnup for bl'"""'"-~ welcomo 7::JO pm Hobb<! C.le, 22'40 PorlvnMI!. WWW w...t/-Wloust. nJ-467-4180. c.1t1r for Spinblll l.Mng. M<ditation 4droP-fll, 1130 aJl'I. ·I p.m. '610 H.lrwNI 71J.3J'I 1808 ~ ~ Sor>~• 7JO p,. 713 ll0-~235 -conunwnolygt<l>ll erg. Fret HIV Ttsbng. Houston Area Comnuiitv Servica 10 a.m.-2 pm. at Joseph-Hmcs Clinic, 1710 West 25111 St Also II a.nt·3JO pm. at Gallery Mediul Cfmic. 5900 North Freeway and Cli TOl'Z lrom 9 pm -f111dmght 713-526-0555. ext 231227 or 226. Free HIV Tesm. Montrose Cli1ic. 8 P..'lt· rrOiqit at Brazos RNe­Bollom IBRBl. 2400 &um. Md Cousins. 817 Farnew 713-B:l0-3000. Fret HIV Testing. 7.9 pm at Al Star Ne~ 3415 Katy f'mw;Jy. Health clinic wrth free testrno for HIV and <yphilis. 71J.869-7878. Fron!Runners. Runrung dub. 6:30 p.rn. 713-522-802l Web site: http//home.-wbe nct/larathon/houfr.htm. E-mail: larathon@>wbcllnct Gay ao..Gng leagues. Luci Duos. 9 pm. Dynamic lanes. 6121 Tarrrf OrlVe ID-861-1187. GLOBAL G.ly, Lesbian or Bisexual Alliance at the Unr;mrty of ~ CampJs. Wetk!y meeting. 6 p.m. t-mait nguyen002l,1!liotmail.Clllll. ._, C AoetMoy. Stwort ~ 6:30 p.m l!tm} 71J.52b-IOIZ Ext 2ll Houston Womm's Rugby Team. No r>penence lll!O!SSar)'- Practice. 6:30-8:30. Westland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529 Wt lMngsllln GlBT Support Group 7 pm. dinner and discussion. Grace Assembly o-11, 567 c..!ar Grow, Uvn;ston. Tcx.is. n35l 9J6.646.n14 E-mail: leol li:'easttex.net. ~ SlcalJng CU> 8 p.m Tradewinds Sbting Rlnlc. wwwneosoftoom/-lnc 71J.523-9620. Montrose Ch:. Offers -1cly pctr support groups for gay and blstxual men with HIV English speaking group ~ 6:30 p.m. 215 Westheimer 713-830-3050. Rainbow Ranglffs. Free CJ.W dance lessons. No partner required Brazos R1"" Bottom. 6:30 p.m. ID-528-9192 Recoveiy From Food Addiction (RFA). Meeting for 12-sttp pro­gram apen to all Noon-I p.m. St. Stephen·s EpiScopal Churtl\, lBOS W Alabama Sl RFA: 713-673-2848. www.geocltits.com/rfa7721S/ E·mait rfaworldsel'VICe ii'aolcom. Spoi11S1t Chat1o Conwrsat1on Group. eate Aqora. 1 p.m. r-man char· lahouston@msn.com 71J.41t.-nol Women's ewe. Montrose Clink. 71J.830.3000 Houston GlBT Comninly Centar. 0rop 112-'1 pm. • Montrose Writers' Prllject.10 am. • Mcrding and Stitching." 2 pm • 3400 "" ·- ~ ""'"IJ.524·381awww.houstongtbt~ FRIDAY, JULY 4 Houston G..y & Lesbian Pannts. Board of directors ~ Also. 2 pm. l'lltluck pool party at Cl1ns and Shelby's house. 261 ·290--0473. www.hgtp.oro Hollstoo Outdoor Group. lric!epeOOence Day Party BiD and Thomas. 71J.52b-0961 713-KAMPOO.. T EVERY FRIDAY CenUr for Spirfual lMng. Meditation Cdro!Hn) :DO am I pm. 0610 H.lrwtn. 71J.3J9-1B08. Free HIVT~ Montrose Clric.10 p.m-2 am at The MeatrJd, 2915 San .bc*'llo; 10 p.m.·l am al U; and at Mldtowne Sp,\ 71J.83Q-3000. Fret HIV T~ Thomas S~t Cfuuc. 9 am. I pm. 2015 Thomas St OraSure method. CaU for appointment Sharon 713-873-4157 Frost Eye Clllic. Ft.f t'I' exams for people with HIV 71J.830.3000 ~ AstemlJly Cluth G.1y!g.iy-aff'"'1ll1\l congregation. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar C.-ove. l.tvi1gslol\ Texas. n3st 936-646-7214 E-fllail: leol MaSllanel HA T.CJi. Houston Area Teen Coa toon of Homosexuals mects HO p.m. For meetJng Information, taD ID-529-3590. wwwlla~ tloustlln T .... ClAl 7:00-'I pm. Memorial Park at the Tl!MIS c.ntrr Houstonttmiscli l(olJo Ptajocl Morning praye-, 10 am. 713-861·1800. ~ AlzSn. GLBT Jewish cong,.gation Sabbilth strY1CtS at 6 p"' on the waJl1d Friday of each month al Baby ~ b02 FairYlew Monthly s!Ldy QnlUllS with Ccxr,ireQation Beth lsraot. 5600 North a..a.s->d. Misfl>achat Alizim, P.O. Box 980136, Houslof\ TX 77098. B66-84!-q139_ ext 1834. Q--l'ltrol VokJnt<en wallc the str..ts to help pr!Ytf1! hate crimes. 930 pm. Ccnvm! at COITll!llmity center 713-526-SAFE. E-mail: qpatrolinc@aol.com Hollstoo GL8T Comninly C..- Orop-11 2-9 p.m. • 3400 Montrose,Sil~t 'l07 713-524 3818. wwwhoustonolbtcenter~ A To hst an event. ~ 713-529-8490. fax V at 713-529-9531 or HUil ~ . ~ Oeaililt is lllRay at 5 p111 JUNE 27. 2003 25 a pts a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL UPCOMING Actor and Houston native Rob Nash offers a three-day evening intensive workshop, "The Rob Nash 12-Steps-To­Better- Acting Workshop." Youth and adults from age 16 up may participate. The event is geared for intennediate and advanced actors. Tuition: $75. Limit 20 students, with enrollment on a first­come, first-served basis. 6:30-930 p.m. July 7-9. The Humphreys School of Musical Theater, official training wing of Theatre Under The Stars, at the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, 800 Bagby. 713-558-8801 www.tuts.com. www.robnash.com. NIGHTI.IFE EVERY THURSDAY FO, a local all-female rock band. hosts open mic/cider night. Musicians and vocalists of all styles and genres are welcome. No cover. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Chances. 1100 Westheimer 713-523- 7217. www.chancesbar.com. FRIDAY, JUNE 27 "Countdown to Pride" will be hosted by Space City Empire and Crown Pnnce Royale 1 Keith Vyvial. The show cele­brates Pride and is a fund-raiser for the group, with proceeds going to AIDS Foundation Houston Camp Hope and AssistHers. 8:30 p.m. EJ's, 2517 Ralph. 713-527-9071. GAll£RIES THROUGH AUG. 31 'Bob Knox: Non-Fiction Paintings' will be presented at Blaffer Gallery. New York City-born Knox presents acrylic on can­vas parntings based on photographs of interiors seemingly furnished and deco­rated in the 1950s. Knox's paintings rely on the human psyche to establish mean­ing in them. Free. Open Tuesday-Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and weekends 1 to 5 p.m. Blatter Gallery, Art Museurl't of the University of Houston. Fine Arts Building on the U of H campus. entrance No. 16 off Cullen Blvd. 713-743-9530. www.blaffergallery.org. ONGOING Cilllf Coast An:IMs • MllseMrn of QIJf History 5-..e EldMieR. The first exhibition from the GCAM collection presented at the Houston GLBT Community Center henors the HAMES f>rgject Houston. Comrnllnity Center, 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. 713-524-3818. Positive Art Wortcshop P'hetogr.iiphy Exhibition. Artists living with HTV/AIDS created these pictures with acc~­ing text Houston GlBT Community Center. 3400 Montrose. Surte 207. 713-524-3818. 26 JUNE 27. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS REAL ESTATE SERVICES COLDWELL WKER UNITED REALTORS 'Min you con· Sider st ng your nome. ISll'' 11 nKe ID fax! a reattor that's in the family? ea Mark Boline, he's family. can Mark today '711) 523-< 709 l'llT YOUR TRUST n 1he bes:'' Call REIMAX METRO Real Es tate Serwes (713) 528·1800 or toll free (SSS) 920·MIKE 16453 Visit our websltt 0 wwwm kecopenhavercom or krcopeCaolcom. SALE I HOUSTON FOR SALE AT WESTBURY GARDENS ~hatmtng 2 BR. 1 5 BA 'I! 11 quiet ccurtyard lntenor has been '!Cfl1t!y upgraded; '1eW ~1 cabinets & kno~ parq-.iet fin. French doors IC patlO, 2 built-Ill booltshe!'leS. M9 has bu: HI' boc:k:ase & des< S72,000 "5illlllar TH with different floorplan, also upgraded. S68,000 For lease ""Jg 1 BR study, a~ upgraded. 800 sqft, S 700lmo. "'.ima adorable 1 BR w/ f.1bulous ~pgracles. WO & more. S5251rro. "''lf1CJency OYt ookmg the poq Fantasnc BA nd iacuzz S5251rro. Call (713)729-9316 for an appt MONTROSE REAi.TY Check CUI these wonderful homes' o'lliver Oab/Grey Area Space & Seartf' I BR. 1 BA. 901 sqlt wl area pool Sl 11,900, Ref 110•1 tt0st Area • Delighlfafly Moot:Qsel 2 BR. 2 5 BA. 1189 sqft. s 115 000. Ref 11~12 "'~ lfideaway Hidden Yet (CIM'fllentl 2 BR. ' 5 BA, ·~15 sqft S 149,000, Reff 1013 .-!'ibulous Condo In lhe Heights • High In 1he Hetglltsl 2 BR. 2 5 BA. area pool & "F E~a· ,,_ from rooftop! 1496 sqft. S'94.900, Ref •~014 ...i.!idtown Area · Cute 'll 11 Midtown 4 BR. 2 5 BA. 1658 sqft. S199,000, Ref 11015 ..... hamplons/1960 Area · Beautiful Herne. Greal Price' 4 BR, 2 5 BA. 2320sqft.S159,000, Rel 11001 -'lJngtlOOCI Area · Eff.nent & Quiet 3 BR. 2 5 BA. 2109 sqft S 118,000, Ref '1002 "'!he Woodlands · Dlis ~ This Price 1 In the Woodlands? YES! 4 BR 25BA.2(12sqft.S121 900. Ref 1'005 .,.;;wood llc:rth Area · ~ ufe• 3 BR. 2 BA w1 ~ pool, 1740 sqft S82,800 ReH1010 Ca Steven Midlael Bridgwater Montrose Realty (71 3) 520- 0789 e- <nat1 r.icntrosehomesOaoiccm. STAND Oln' FROM THE CROWD Is your home special? Ttll 01inaders about L uarantee 1hey Wll ste ~With our '1eW feat:m. Bold or boll your ad for added atlJilChOn Cont.la cu customer stfYU reps for "lOle details. 1877) 863·'885 RENT I HOUSTON MONTROSE AREA CONDO 2 BR. l BA. 1140 sqft, wet bat, WO, LR den pooVj cuzz1, covered prig S 1,41Y. mo Ref 11007 MoNrose Rea tf, SIMO Midlael BrWNater (711) 520- om or monuosehomesCaoiCDm 1 3 A 3 8 3 NY~~ Answers to Q puzzle on page 27 RENT IT FAST with our f8 features. Draw attention to your ad by wig our bold or boll feature. Contact our CllS· torner seMCe reps for more details. (877) 863· 1&a5. SHARE I HOUSTON 1960 AREA GM ISO NS M to shr home. Unfum room. S250/ mo + utils. No <tugs. no pets. Leave l!leS5ag(' 1281) 443· 6262.J.2238 GALLERIA AREA Slw 2 BR apt w gay or straighl M or f. Nice. very ~an. No dn.';s. Prefer NS. Sooal drinker OK. Ca Ron (713) 462· 7535 or even (713) 9n·3'68 HEIGlfTS AREA Renov 312 wl pool & spa ID shl wl 30ish, NS, GWM S575/mo + shr uuls. Quiet neighborhood, dose to everylhing I (832) 277-04 !3 NW HOUSTON GWf, NS/no drugs. Slv House, pnv BR. BA. marl)' amen~ S400lmo+ 1ll utls.l281)97G-7912 COMMITMENT CEREMONIES ANNOUNCE YOUll UNION The Homi0n VOICe s proud to announce the addioon of a ·comrr.runent Ceremonies· cate­gory to our Classlf~ tistmgs. \'lben making arrangements for your l..nion, don't forget to Include 1he most important aspect at aft .-.ang the date Pubfislli.'lg your tJ!llOll IS easy & simple Call (877) 863 '885 oxt 223 ID put the fmishing touch­es on your ceremony. ARTISTIC WEDDING INVITES Ulllque & cobfUr Mdding1 comrr.ltment l\Yl!aborlS for the couple stelung to •xpress their lndivlduat1)' Please VISlt my website www nicolerivera.ccm, VIDEOGRAPHY For aimrratmenl ceremonies II wedcfmgs. can (770) 636-2222 or e-mail Vldeofreelanceremth ink.net for more info. ANNOUNCEMENTS HOMELESS CHARITY DONATIONS AIDS she~er needs items for rummage sale & client <ecyde Must be 11 working Cl· det lax rec"PI & non-profit (713)864 1795 (502W 24th SI) EMPLOYMENT ADVERTISING SAW The '1ouslOn VOKe, the le<)IOll's GLBT media leadet IS stek :i; an adverllslng accooot oxeat!IVe. You'n be responsible tor a phases of 1he sales process. quafifying; cold<alling, prospect development conceptuala1ng. plann ng & delivermg sales presentallOllS; wr:~ng proposals. IJt90llatlng ccntracts & dosmg ~ business. One ye111 of prmt or on-lone adveltlS!ng sales expenence preferred, but not necessary. W• offer a dla leng1ng & exotmg opponurutf in a last-paced, goal· oriented (yet fun) enwonment. We offer competJtNe compen· satron, specifk tram:ng & a cornprehensive benefits package in­dud ng hea th/dental/I le 111SUrance, generous paid holidays. vaca ft & more tt you have a proven track record n ~les. are results-dnvtn & want to help build a newspaper that has a pos· 111>e Impact on your .;:mmunity, we want 10 hear from you S.nd cam lett: & resume to Goneral M<lnager. The Houston Voice. 500 llMtt, Suitt 200, Houston. TX 77006 Fa.< (713) 52q 953' E ma demF.chCtioustonvooce com. BARBER STYLIST I COSMETOLOGIST Montrest 111•a T. lease a diam Very easonat.e. More money 11 your ~l YI! Frark (713) 522 2263 CAllPENTER I CARPENTER'S ~,1 wanted. Call ..o.-y 0 lawrr.!e Constn:aJon. (936) 160-5531 GROUPS GAY BRIDGE! Up for a
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1183.pdf