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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 026
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 026. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 026. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7101

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 026, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7101.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 14, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 25 Past Out 1983 GAY AND LESBIAN HISTORY by DAVID BIANCO A 'brave and foolish9 darling by DAVID BIANCO Who was George Cukor? Hollywood director (leorge Cukor worked in a variety of film genres over his long career, but the comedy of sexual manners became his particular forte. A gay man whose homosexuality was an open secret in Hollywood, Cukor's comfort with both male and female sexuality and identity shines through many of his now classic comedies. Cukor was born in New York City in 1899 to middle-class, I lunganan Jewish parents. If his family had gotten its way, he would have attended Columbia University and become a lawyer like his father .mi.\ uncle. But Cukor, who had been entranced by New York theater since childhood, had Broadway in mind. At first, he wanted to be a playwright, but he soon found he hated one unavoidable aspect of writing—working alone. Naturally gregarious and witty, Cukor discovered he was better suited to stage—managing and directing. I le got his start in summer stock in the early 1920s and within a few years had founded his own seasonal company in Rochester, NY. In regional theater, Cukor gained a reputation as a director whom actors could trust because he both listened to them and modestly refused to take credit when their performances excelled. "He had great pride," one colleague recalled, "but no vanity." Cukor moved on to Broadway, where his productions were only moderate successes. Still, he was in demand because of his talent for working with actresses, whose roles he seemed to understand and empathize with better than straight male directors did. Ihe appellation "woman's director" (a slight, given the sexism in the entertainment industry) followed Cukor when he went to Hollywood in 1929, and over the years he made his mark with a number of so-called "women's films." Besides his affinity with actresses. Though not particularly political or feminist, Cukor was sensitive to women's issues. Cukor fell into comedy by accident, but it proved his strong suit. I le once quipped that the studio moguls "used to judge your talent by your personality It you walked into the front office with a long face, they gave you straight drama; if you cracked jokes, they gave you comedy. I cracked jokes." I lis first few films were unremarkable. But in 1932, he garnered kudos for "A Bill of I Mvorcement" starring 24-year-old Katharine Hepburn in her first screen role. I hat movie launched a lifelong friendship with I lephurn, who went on to star in nine ot his films. Another uillahoration with Hepburn was "Sylvia Scarlett," a gender-bending comedy a>-stamng Cary Granl "Sylvia Scarlett" was Cukor's most personally revealing film, "brave as well as foolish," as he later phrased Academy Award-winning director George Cukor was originally selected to direct 'Gone With the Wind/ until he and Clark Gable had a falling out on set. it. The lead character is an embezzler's daughter, who cross-dresses to escape a run- in with authorities. The plot direct!)' challenged traditional male-female roles and boldly winked at homosexuality. Cukor was David O. Selznick's original choice to direct "Gone With the Wind." But after only a few weeks on the job, there were conflicts with Clark Gable, who hated Cukor's fey manner, especially the way he called cast members "darling." One day during filming, Gable stormed off the set, shouting, "1 won't be directed by a fairy! I have to work with a 'real man'!" Shortly thereafter Cukor was replaced by Victor Fleming, a pal of Gable's Although the general public was unaware of Cukor's sexual orientation, his homosexuality was well-known in the industry. For years, he hosted soirees at his Hollywood villa, which had been decorated by gay actor William Haines. At these lavish affairs, the queer elite could see and be seen. Cukor's Sunday afternoon parties competed with the all-male fetes of Cole roller, and the two were sometimes called "the rival queens of 1 lollywood." Cukor's career spanned five decades, but he won only one Academy Award, for directing "My Fair Lady" (1964). When he made his last film, "Rich and Famous" (1981), he was 81, the oldest director still working in Hollywood. He died two years later. Many of his films have become queer cult favorites: "Camille" (1937), with its exquisitely painful death scene; "The Women" (1939), with a campy "hitchiness" reminiscent of drag culture; and the musical remake of " A Star is Born" (1954), a comeback vehicle for gay icon Jud) Garland. / tevid Bianco is the author of Gay Essentiab, a collection of his history columns. He can be reached al 1 aoicom.
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