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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 023
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 023. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 023. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7098

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 023, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7098.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 023
Transcript 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 14, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE (Vuud > Continued from page 17 was conducted via fax from his hotel in New York. Houston Voice: Where did the inspiration to write "The Smithsonian Institution" come from? Gore Vidal: 1 enjoy inventing alternative universes like Myra, Breckinridge and Duluth and now Smithsonian. There are intricate structures and you must never cheat the reader. I started out with a premise: how could World War II have been avoided? Well, eliminate World War One and there would be no vengeful Germany falling for a psychopath like Hitler. So how to stop the First World War? Eliminate Woodrow Wilson as president. So my 13- year old prodigy hero, installed as of 1939 in the Smithsonian to work on the atomic bomb, does just that. But things go wrong. ... That's the plot. HV: h the novel a metaphorical approach to any modern issues? CV: This is not 1939. No collision of great powers is in the offing despite what the mil- itarv and their friendly politicians have to say at appropriations time. But it is clear that our military industrial political complex is longing for a major war with China. This will probablv kill us all but not before the few have made a great deal of money, our god. HV: If you, like your citaracter T from your book, could set a view screen to lookfonoard in time, what might you expect to see as the most important event of the next century or two? GV: In a pessimistic mood, the end— either gradual or colorfullv nuclear. In an optimistic mood, our departure from a planet that we are using up like a frayed piece of Kleenex to yet more pristine Kleenex in the heavens. HV: At the end of diapterfour, the living display dummy, Tom, indicates tliat more than one of the former Presidents made use of an all male escort service "pretty regularly." Who might those Presidents \iave been? GV: You are prurient. It was said of lifelong diplomat bachelor Buchanan and of Franklin Pierce in whose arms, in Plymouth, New Hampshire, Nathaniel Hawthorne died. HV: You have described sexual orientation labels as adject izvs describing acts rattier than nouns describing people, do you still feel this way? GV: It seems so obvious that I no longer repeat myself other than to add that only in a so weirdly superstitious and sectarian a country as the U.S. could a personal identity be forged out of sexual desire, the most fluctuating of all transient emotion. HV: Both presidential candidates Bill Bradley and Al Gore have shown support for domestic partnerships but have opposed outright gay marriage. What are your feelings on their stances and this issue in general? GV: Monogamy is hardly normative in the male, particularly in youth. The marriage issue, however, is a great boon for homophobes because it lets them sidestep all the things that should be set right, from sodomy laws in various states, to discrimination in the work place. Also marriage makes people think of God, who is so very important to our poor, bamboozled folks. The founders (and I) wanted God thrown out the window at Philadelphia, but the crazies breed like chiggers and he keeps slithering back in. He now dominates so much of radio and TV. Until a stake has been driven through the heart of monotheism, the U.S. will never come within a continuum of civilization. That suits them chiggers real fine. HV: Do you liave a stance on the topic of gay adoptions? GV: For most Americans, rather than expose the young to love and, in due course perhaps, desire, it is far better to lock them up in prisons, subject them to torture, sexual abuse and execution. That is the American way. We are famed in the civilized world as the most barbarous of nations in the treatment of our citizens. But I reckon God wants us like that, doing his work. 4.9 million Americans are in prisons, under detention, under surveillance, on parole. Now the privatization of prisons is proving a bonanza for some of our crooked citizens. George W. Bush exults in the fact that as governor of Texas, he has barbequed I (X) people. Good American George, God loves him. HV: You once wrote (in 1966) that "in a civilized society, hue should not function at all in the area of sex, except to protect people from bang interfered with against their will," and said tiuit ''sex lives are of no consequence in civilized countries." What influences continue to make sex and -exual orientations such a controversy in America ami does this mean we are not civilized? GV: As you may by now suspect, 1 don't think we are civilized. The media is obsessed with sex, particularly in the private lives of politicians, due to the fact that as we do not have a representative government (offices are bought and paid for by corporate America), we are not allowed to discuss real politics. This leaves us with nothing but private lives. What is politics? Who collects what money to pay for whom to buy what. That's it. In one handy phrase. But corporate America observes omerta [code of silence] on this delicate issue so we never know what goes on in the Senate Finance Committee. And never will now. The corporate owned media is happy to go along, smearing politicians who are, admittedly, of no great use to anyone in any case. The Smithsonian Institution by Gore Vidal Harcourt Brace & Company, $13 Reservations Recommended (713) 978^DECO (3326) 2990 Briarpark Drive at Westheimer Enjo) exrfjuisite culinary creations at the Adams Mark Hotel including made-to-order omelets, homemade pastries, savor} seafood, mouth- watering pasta, seasonal salads, delectable entrees, plus an unbelievable arra) oj our finest desserts. Then sit hack, relax and sip champagne Me listening to some 0/ Houston's finest jan musicians. Every Sunday, 10:30am - 2:00pm Adults: $22.50; Seniors: $20.50; Children 541: $12.50 Under 5 Free F DINER Experience the Art ot Dining "If my husband would ever meet a woman on the street who looked like the women in his paintings, he would fall over in a dead faint" —Mrs. Pablo Picasso Comfort Food is what this Vixen's Fixin' Hours Mon-Thu Lunch 11:00am until 2:00pm Dinner 5:00pm until 10:00pm Friday Lunch 11:00am until 2 00pm Dinner 5:00pm until 11 00pm Saturday Dinner 5:30pm until 11:00pm Sunday Brunch Buffet 10:30am until 2:30pm 905 T A IT HOUSTON, TEXAS 77019-2613 713.523.5FOX Proudly serving all hungry Houstonians!
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