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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 022
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 022. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7097

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 022, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7097.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 14, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU The Shag's the THING *" Continued from page 17 And indeed, the series shows aspects of the gay life that many gay people would gladly join in covering up. Premiering as it did just in time for the Parliamentary debate over lowering the age of consent for gay sex, "Queer" seemed tailor-made for making trouble. "Why doesn't anyone stop me?" taunts the lusty Stuart, the right-wing's worst nightmare of a sexual compulsive as he rushes off to "shag" his teenage lover. "It's not my fault—they should stop me." Try though he might, the self-centered Stuart seems incapable of generating more than a casual interest in Alfred, his son, born to a lesbian friend in the first episode. In the series' most chilling incident, one character collapses after snorting a line of heroin. The trick who gave him the drug simply slips out, leaving the victim to die alone on his kitchen floor. Later at the wake, Stuart memorizes the mother's heartbroken lament and cell-phones it into the office to use In a mortuary's ad campaign. With keys he swipes at the funeral, Stuart raids the dead man's house for his porn collection. Stuart laughs at death—but not at age. His impending 30th birthday (still months away) fills him with incalculable dread. "Frankly, I was expecting criticism from the gay community," said Russell T. Davies, the series openly gay co-creator and writer. "I know a lot of these gay politicians and gay spokespeople work hard, but they've fallen into the trap of living in a world of political correctness. That's not my problem; it's theirs. Not any of it has given me a sleepless night." "I think I'm a little naive," said Nicola Shindler, the executive producer. "Me and Russell have a different threshold for shock. I don't think we were quite prepared for the level of impact it had. We were aware we would be attacked, because we weren't putting across positive images; we were putting across real people." "Everything you see in other programs with gay sub-plots are issue-led," Davies said. "You give them three episodes before the gay character walks in and says, 'Oh, I'm HIV-positive,' or i was just beat up on the street.' [TV writers] have to stop introducing characters where his or her only characteristic is they're gay. That's not a character. That's rubbish." According to one film industry insider, working on "Queer" was no picnic. Mark Levine now lives in Atlanta, but while he was a vice president-development with a production company working at Sony Studios, he met Charlie Hunnam, the 18- year-old actor who played Nathan. "Charlie said the entire process was a really miserable shoot. They were filming on a couple of drafty soundstages in England. The crew was an old-school, traditional, beer-drinking, straight blue- collar crowd. The actors would have to do all these wild sexual antics in front of the crew, and they were being harassed and snickered at. "It was a really terrible environment, and by the end of the eight episodes, nobody wanted to come back," Levine said Hunnam told him. As word of the shocking show spread, its audience grew—eventually to more than 3 million. When the eight-week series ended, audiences wanted more of Nathan, Stuart and Vince. They'll get their chance when two one-hour sequel episodes air this year on Channel 4. Writer Davies said to maintain its integrity, the show must end, not drag on for years. "We could have trotted it out; a lot of people would have been happy. 1 wouldn't, though. "Thing is—if I do say so myself—there was such energy and originality in that first series, and that vitality has to be maintained. It has to stay fresh, it has to stay one step ahead of what everyone in bog-standard-telly would do. And this is the perfect solution. It was never a soap, it was a story. And every good story has an end." But will it end? Channel 4 has reportedly asked for plots for 20 half-hour episodes of a spin-off show to air later in the year. "We found a huge enthusiasm for the show, and it was quite clear we hadn't run out of stories," said Commissioning Editor Jonathan Young. "It's been a very successful show for Channel 4." Furthermore, American audiences will get a U.S. version of "Queer" thanks to Showtime. Gay director Joel Schumacher ("Flawless," "Batman and Robin") is set to direct a two-hour pilot to introduce the U.S. series. The show would seem to fit in with Showtime's bold slogan ("No Limits") and with its established reputation for testing boundaries (its "Sex and the City" prompted a rash of complaints when it aired in England). But at least one big change from the original already seems certain: In Showtime's version, look for Nathan to be 18, not 15. And that change was recommended not by pro-censorship conservatives but rather by the image-conscious folks at Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD). "When it comes down to that, that's an illegal act. It's statutory rape," Scott Seomin, GLAAD media director, told the Los Angeles Times. "Gay men since forever have been linked by the religious right and other groups [to] pedophilia." The furor that greeted "Queer as Folk" in England only seems likely to escalate when the show debuts in its Americanized form. Shooting for the U.S. version—set in New Jersey—should begin this spring. Stay tuned... 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