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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 018. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7093.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7093

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 018, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7093.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript Out on tit Biti HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 14, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME The challenging, boldly erotic British TV series 'Queer as Folk' will come to American television thanks to a two-hour pilot that begins production this spring and will air on Showtime by DAVID GOLDMAN Fifteen-year-old Nathan grins with cocky charm that he's "dead proud" he got laid on his first foray into the gay world. Stuart, 29, picks up the virgin, tops him, then drops him like an empty drug baggy as he races after his next conquest. A friend's mother rings up Vince to tell him her son has died of an overdose. He takes the call on his cell—where else?—at the disco, in the midst of vet another night ot wild partying. The furor that erupted when Britain's Channel 4 exported its "Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City" to the United States virtually ensures that the broadcaster's "Queer as Folk" will never, ever he widely telecast on this side of the Atlantic. That's because the eight-part soap opera about the lives and lavs ot two gay men and a gay boy in Manchester, England, is extraordinarily hold and explicit—so much so that it was blasted by watchdogs on the right and the left when it aired in Britain last year. Ironically, the eight episodes contain just three explicit sex scenes—but these are incredibly raw in their intensity. And the characters' sex talk— as when Nathan ecstatically describes his first anal sex experience—sets a new standard for frankness. Britain's Broadcasting Standards Commission rushed to investigate the show when it received 30 complaints after the first episode aired. Reviews were largely hostile: the Daily Telegraph's lames Watson called it "uncompromisingly rude." The BBC issued an apologv after its breakfast show ran a 20-second "Queer" clip of two men kissing. "It contains the most explicit gay sex scenes that have Been seen on TV," said BBC Online. "Every libel hurled at the gay community over the years seems vindicated by 'Queer as Folk,'" wrote John MacLeod in the Herald of Glasgow. Even the gay rights group Stonewall cried foul, objecting in particular to the portrayal of sex machine Stuart. (Later, the group essentially apologized for its initial reaction.) > Continued on page 21 Not only is Gore Vidal a prolific writer, he's being written about. Biographer Frank Kaplan's 'Gore Vidal/ at 850 pages, was published in November. Gay author Gore Vidal, whose newest novel deals with time travel and the alteration of history, speaks frankly of the end being near and the government needing to stay out of bedrooms by VINCENT KOVAR Essayist, novelist, playwright, congressional candidate and excoriating social-historical critic, Gore Vidal is a queer pioneer who not only defined what it is to be gay but then managed to escape the pigeon-hole of that definition—gloriously. Latest of his many works is "The Smithsonian Institution" in which a 13-year-old prodigy is called from (Yidal's alma mater) St. Albans school to the Smithsonian museum, whose halls stretch both through time and space and where a secret project to create the atom bomb is taking p Humorous, touching and insightful, the novel is one of Vidal's most accessible works and (borrowing from Vidal's autobiography) a palimpsest of many layers. This interview > Continued on page 22
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