Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 010
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 010. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7085.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7085

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 010, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7085.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 14, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES VIEWPOINT Conquering the queer virus that infects us by MARIA E. MINICUCCI We're certainly aware that gay men and lesbians are beginning not only a new year, but are on the verge of a new era. Media hype aside, our reactions range from nonchalance to hopefulness to anxiousness. Most of us, on some level, are hoping, if not expecting, that our world will be a better place for us. And better means a place free of prejudice, free of violence, free to love and to live. The recent court decision in Vermont over gay marriages gives us a glance at what could be in store for our community. And over Ihe years, it's been the tireless work of many to help create such a place for all of us "sexual outlaws." Our efforts are sometimes valiant in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds and insidious obstacles thrown in our path. We have been strident in identifying these obstacles and diligent in working through, around, and with them. (Xir work needs to be cheered, celebrated and carried into this new era. Hut the work is hampered by our inability, or unwillingness, Io identify and attack a serious source of contamination. It is helping to undermine and sabotage our objectives. It's the queer virus. The virus is running rampant among some of us. Unfortunately, it's not endemic to Houston—it reaches queer communities throughout North America. And it has the potential to be lethal to us as individuals and to our civil rights work. In a simple definition, the queer virus is trashing ourselves, what seems to be the unique ability by gay men and lesbians to eat our own. Sometimes it's the casual, off the cuff remark or attitude in criticizing a person or some group or organization without regard to the consequence oi what we're saving. It's easy to see—eavesdrop on the crowd at local gay coffee shop or read through the daily postings to the Houston Activist Network. The queer virus has left behind scores of the walking wounded, folks like me who have worked in the community and watched as the virus eats away at organizations with a good mission. They end up dismantled, stagnant, or fraught with discontented members. Some of us disregard the nature of the virus and fed justified in spreading it, a sort of barebacking without regard. "Can you believe this group had the nerve to do this, this and that?" I can hear the grumblings. A quick reaction to why this happens might point to internalized oppression and homophobia. But whatever the causes, we The virus is running rampant among some of us. Unfortunately, it's not endemic to Houston—it reaches queer communities throughout North America. And it has the potential to be lethal to us as individuals and to our civil rights work. need to be reminded how all of this serves as a major impediment to our work on civil rights for our community. We need to take responsibility for it. Rather than recycle these old, harmful mindsets, resentments and self-righteous attitudes, we need to rebuild our political platforms, psyches and relationships that have been infected with this queer virus. Taking on this rebuilding is essential if we are to claim that we're committed to success. It's not an easy thing to do; it's much easier to damn and criticize than rework and rebuild. But we should consider the cost of not doing it. That cost is much higher. Let us step into a new era with a commitment to new and positive ways of thinking, new approaches to old problems, a positive regard for our differences. Rebuild not recycle. Maria E. Minicueci is president of the t louston lesbian & Gay Community Center. Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must include a name and phone number for verification Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvotce.com www.compxchange.com Inexpensive Small' Business Networks members Quality Systems Competitive Prices Old Fashioned Service' Sharp, Speedy Repairs! Greater Houston | Avard^Diar ffl Chamtxr of Commwco |J computer exchange 1212 Westheimer • 713-529-6789 ^rt*\\ Maranatha **) fj) Fellowship fyi\ Metropolitan ' f Community Church I ~A liberating church serving a liberating God." „* For more info... 713-528-6756 or maranatha@evl.net WE'RE MAKING A MOVE... we will be sharing the home of Central Congregational Church at 1311 Holman (right across from the HCC-Downtown campus) on January 30, 2000 Our worship time will be at 6:30pm; with Bible Study at 5:30pm. Offices are located at 117 Tuam. We will continue worshipping at 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 through January 23rd; with worship celebration at 10:30am and Bible Study at 9:30am. And... Beginning this Sunday, January 16th, Part 1 of an 8-part sermon series on the truth about homosexuality and the Bible; "Is Homosexuality a Sin or Not?" Everything you wanted to know...and MORE! We're starting this year oft in a new direction! Come visit us in our new location (Jan. 30) at 1311 Holman across from HCC-Downtown Campus
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1003_009.jpg