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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 006
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 006. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7081.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7081

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 006, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7081.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 14, 2000 NEWS NEWS 'ns'de Anti-gay marriage bill may hit legislature Around the Notion 7 Gay activists say a recent court decision in Vermont CDC: Number of blatk, Hisponit goy men with may feed a conservative push to ban same-sex aids increases 7 marriage in Texas, allowing an anti-gay bill to slip plea ogreement reached in soldier's killing .7 through the legislature 'like a greased pig' Supreme Court allows AIDS coverage limits . .7 Gay atty. announces long-shot campaign 7 [,„ taMMYE NASH Utah education boord quietly bans bias 7 Dallas Voice Pitcher says he spoke like a 'jerk' 10 During the last tw0 sessions of the Gore bocks away from'litmus test' 10 Texas Legislature, opponents beat back Dallas woman charged in roommate slaying 14 ;»easures desi8ned t0 Prevent the sta,e from recognizing same-sex marriages. But such a measure may face an easier VOICES & ECHOES *'me m tne noxt sessi°n< beginning in . iij January 2001, legislators and gay rights Editorial: Speech troubles Rocker and Gore . .8 advocates said. Minitucci; Conquering the queer virus 9 Last month's decision by the Vermont Supreme Court, requiring lawmakers there to provide gay couples with the OUT ON THE BAYOU same "benefits and protections" current- Vivid Vidnl 17 'y extended Io married couples, may give added impetus to anti-gay marriage leg- The shag's the thing 17 islation in Texas, they said. Out in Print: Mysterious reading 18 "Tht' Vermont ruling definitely height ens the [same-sex marriage] issue in Bestsellers Io Texas," said Dianne Hardy-Garcia, exec- Eating Out: Generous but jumbled platters . .23 utive director of Lesbian Gay Rights „.„..,, ,, ,.,. , ,. „, Lobby of Texas. "We've had to tend of! Past Out: A brave ond foolish darling ... .25 [anH/gay marrjage] bj||s m (he ,as, two Occasions 22 sessions of the legislature. And I expect Community Calendar 26 we'" have f„ even biSS« fi«ht this next time around. MySlars! 29 state Rep. Harryette Ehrhardt (D- Dallas) agreed. There's no question that there will be UIKtUUKY /o an anti-gay marriage bill introduced in CLASSIFIEDS 30 the next session/' Ehrhardt said. "If they ,mi»nT ,i -ire able to make this into a real emotion- UKMAKI Jl al issue, it's going to be very hard to defeat such a bill." Moth previous bills were defeated i — ^-l^ <| Sl/lO through technical maneuvers, not by votes, l99llf? ImiJlMO notefj state Rep rj|en Maxcv (D-Austin), the legislature's only openly-gay member. "We've never had the votes to kill a marriage bill," Maxey said. "We've always done it through parliamentary procedure. Whether or not we could do it again depends on who controls the legislature, the Democrats or the Republicans." Maxey said it was inevitable that the legislature would take up another anti- gay marriage bill in 2001. "We'd have this bill again whether the Vermont ruling had come down the way it did or not," Maxey said. "I don't think we can continue to block it. I know that if the Republicans control the legislature in the next session, Texas will have a 'Defense Of Marriage' law." State Rep. Warren Chisum (R-Pampa) introduced bills in 1997 and 1999 to prevent the state from legally recognizing same sex marriages, including unions conducted legally elsewhere. Both bills died in the State Affairs Committee. Opponents also were able to stymie efforts to have Chisum's bills passed as amendments to other legislation on the House floor. Chisum did not return calls seeking comment. Hardy-Garcia agreed with Maxey that the November elections will play a key role in deciding whether the next legislature will pass an anti-gay marriage bill. "This election couldn't be more important," 1 lardy-Garcia said. "Our community has to have an energized vote in November, and all of our emphasis this year is going to be on the election. That's our best chance to defeat any anti-gay legislation. But if the Republicans take over the Texas House, the marriage bill is going to fly through there like a greased pig-" A ruling by the Hawaii Supreme Court in 1993, declaring that the state's failure to grant marriage licenses to same-sex State Reps. Harryette Ehrhardt and Glen Maxey said that it will be difficult for gay- friendly lawmakers to beat back efforts in the Texas Legislature next year to pass a ban on some-sex marriage. couples was a form of sex discrimination prohibited by the state constitution, sparked a flurry of legislation around the U.S. barring same-sex marriage. In 1996, Congress passed and President Clinton signed the Defense of Marriage Act, a measure withholding federal recognition of same-sex marriages and permitting states to do the same. By the end of 1998, 29 states had passed similar legislation, according to the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. In November 1998, Hawaii voters approved a constitutional amendment permitting the state's lawmakers to declare that marriage was limited to a man and a woman—something lawmakers had already done in 1994. The Hawaii Supreme Court ruled late last year that the constitutional amendment was the tinal word on the gay marriage controversy in the state, ending a lawsuit by three gay and lesbian couples seeking the right to many. Last year, lo additional states considered anti-gay marriage legislation, including Texas. But only one passed such a measure—Louisiana, which became the 30th state with a law barring same-sex marriage. In the wake of the Vermont court decision last month, efforts to ban gay marriages have been announced in two states. llillWI.M voice Hate crimes summit in Houston expected to draw hundreds Ail material in Housion Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent ot Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers and cartoonists published herein is neither inferred or implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation ot that person or persons Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return. The editor reserves the right to accept. reject or edit any submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication, Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 byMATTHl-WA 111 Wll Finding practical ways to address hate crimes will bring together local, state and federal officials during a day-long summit next week expected to attract up to 700 participants. The focus of the event—targeted at clergy, educators, law enforcement and community groups—will include hate crimes motivated by sexual orientation. Nancy Rodriguez, the mother of a gay man slain in I [ouston nearly 10 years ago, and Bill l^snn Lee, acting assistant U.S. Attorney General, who has spoken out on gay-related hate crimes, ^rc scheduled to take part in Thursday's summit. "[Organizers] have tried to really cover the whole gambit," said Tracey Cobb, a spokeswoman for Mayor Lee Brown. "It is a very diverse group." Houston police Chief CO. Mradford will also take part. Since early 1998, Brown and Bradford have greatly expanded the police department's efforts on hate crimes, including appointing a hate crimes coordinator and expanding training for officers The idea for the summit grew out of the regular meetings of the I louston Area Hate Crimes Working Croup, a collaborative effort that includes local, state and federal government officials, law enforcement and prosecutors. Some 1,000 people were invited to attend the event, though organizers moved this week to open the session to the public, Cobb said. The even! is broken into two panel discussions, along with two break out sessions to focus on developing practical approaches to combating hate crimes in metro Houston, Cobb said. Organizers also tapped openly lesbian City Councilwoman Annise Parker for suggestions on what organizations in the gay community should be invited to attend. "They wanted to focus on people who are actively involved in some sort of hate crimes work," Parker said. "It is more about having people that can affect what is happening here in Houston." Hate Crimes Summit Jan. 20, 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. George R. Brown Convention Center 1001 Avenida de las Americas To pre-register: 713-437-6966 www.ci.houston.tx.us/citygovt/ mayor/hatec rimes, htm
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