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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 002. 2000-01-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-01-14). Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7077

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000 - File 002, 2000-01-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7109/show/7077.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1003, January 14, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date January 14, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript ! IHiTTT^nTTTl \ oice Atlanta Braves relief pitcher John Rocker apologized this week for his comments about minorities and gays, just days after Major League Baseball ordered him to undergo psychological evaluation. Page 10 Gore Vidal talks about being a 7^^^ BBk queer pioneer ■■ who not only defined what it " is to be gay but then managed H to escape the pigeon-hole of that definition— ■ ^m / gloriously. 1 ' / Page 15 ISSUE 1,003 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JANUARY 14,2000 Texas City killings go unsolved Three dozen people took part in a vigil last year (or two gay Texas City men slain in a double homicide, including Betty Parker (background), the mother of one of the victims. Kevin Tryals (left) and Laaron Morris were shot and found dead along with Morris' burned Ford Mustang on Jan. 17, 1999. The killings of the two gay men remain unsolved. • '■' t—f r T T A year after two gay men were slain, police have exhausted their leads, as family and friends prepare for a vigil to remember the victims by MATTHEW A. HENNIE Betty Parker will once again stand on the front lawn of her Texas City home Monday, light a candle and search for the closure that has eluded her for a year. The day—Jan. 17—marks the one-year anniversary ol the brutal double homicide that claimed the lite of her son, Laaron "Larry" Morris, and his friend Kevin Tryals. The two gay men were shot and burned to death in the city's firs! double slaying in more than 25 years. And in the year since the two men were discovered in a burning Ford Mustang on a dead-end road, the crime has continued to stump police investigators, who have exhausted the few leads they had, and made no arrests. "You get agitated and frustrated because you have nobody to take to trial for two murders," Parker said this week. "The onlv thing we can do is keep praying." Friends and family will join Parker on Monday to plant two trees tn memory of the slain men, and hold a final vigil to commemorate the anniversary- of the killings. While the event may help Parker and others to cope with the unsolved crime, Parker said she will not soon forget what happened to her son. "For me, it is not a closure on the case al alt. That tree planting will keep his memory alive. Maybe I can sit down and kxik at the tree and it flourishing and go out and remember the good times," Morns and Tryals stayed out into the early morning hours ol Jan. 17,1999, stopping in at a local bar, visiting nearby (lalveston ,uk\ spending time behind the wheel of Morns' Ford Mustang, purchased a day earlier. They left a club in the 6100 block of FM 1765 about 2:30 a.m. Then bodies were found about tour hours later as police responded to a report ot heavy smoke near Bayou Campbell Road. Sometime after 2:30 a.m., the two friends wen- shot several times and killed, and put in or near Morris' car, which was set ablaze on a dead-end road off Loop 197 South, just a few miles from Parker's home in Texas City. Morris was so badly burned that family members identified him through jewelry and his auto. After the slayings, Texas Citv police spent hours in two Galveston gay bars that Morns and nvaIs visited, logging interviews with people who knew the two men. They gathered mounds of forensic evidence from the crime scene. Bui in the days after the killings, and in the months since the crime, authontiL^couldnf uneartli sus[.xvts or de\'elop strong leads. Because the two men were found with their jewelry, robbery may not be a motive, police have said. And police say none of the evidence in the case supports a hate-related motivation. > Continued on Page 14 Baton Rouge High School student Martin Pfeiffer's transformation from closet case to activist now includes a push to start a gay student group at his high school. Baton Rouge youth leads fight for Gay- Straight Alliance Martin Pfeiffer left school officials scratching their heads when he asked to start a student-led Gay-Straight Alliance In Mi:i.l\l).\SiillTO\ BATON ROUGE—Make no mistake about it. Martin "Marty" Pfeiffer is one self-assured guy who's it ahead of most youngsters his age—which happens to be 17. In many respects, he's not unlike other high school seniors: his bleached-blond hair is closely cropped; he wears an earring in each eariobe; his baggy Cargo slacks are topped by an over-sized sweater. Slung over his shoulders is the over-packed backpack that has become an extension of every student's wardrobe. Despite the similarities, Pfeiffer is notably different. The tall, lanky high schcxil senior is remarkably articulate, politically astute, and hell-bent on changing the world. And he's gay. > Continued on Page 12
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