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Houston Voice, No. 1108, January 18, 2002
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Houston Voice, No. 1108, January 18, 2002 - File 001. 2002-01-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7041/show/7016.

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(2002-01-18). Houston Voice, No. 1108, January 18, 2002 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7041/show/7016

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1108, January 18, 2002 - File 001, 2002-01-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/7041/show/7016.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1108, January 18, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date January 18, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Back to Laramie The actors and actresses behind the local production of 'The Laramie Project' speak out. Page 13 ISSUE 1108 . www.houstonvoice.com All THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JANUARY 18, 2002 INSIDE Annise Parker, the only openly lesbian member of the Houston City Council, sees little hope for gay· friendly measures under the new m.keup of the panel. Pagel Longtime PY rights edlvlst Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of the Lesbian/Gay Right Lobby of Texas, resigns. Page 3 'Lonely Planet' pulls both tragedy and laughter from two men trying to deal with the effects of the AIDS epidemic. Page 15 Mixed reviews for Bush's first year After a year in office, Texas native President George W. Bush has shown both pro-gay moves and anti·gay actions as he has settled into his role at the White House. At one-year mark, president draws praise, criticism f or actions on gay right s, AIDS by LOU CHIBBARO JR WASHL'\GTOl\ - Since taking office one year ago, this president has amassed a record on gay and AIDS 1SSues that ts histonc for his party His administration has made four openly gay appomtments, including a gay ambassador who mo\·ed into the t: S. Embas~y compound in Bucharest, Romarua, v.1th lus s;ime-!'eX partner A popular political operative who worked closely with gay political groups dunng the presidential campaign became White House counselor to the president and a high-level ad\•iser to the vice preSJ· dent, whose lesbian daughter brought her partner to the mauguratton. The president signed a bill allowmg domestic partners to rep.~ter therr relahon­slups m the nation's cap1tal, ending a nine­> Continued on Page 7 TX governor's race a draw for gays No standout foes or friends on gay rights among candidates for state's highest office by PENNY WEAVER An incumbent with a lukewarm record on gay rights issues and competition among challengers with similarly bland histories with gay voters may add up for an insignificant governor's race for gay Tcx,ms. But despite the potential for a break· even result no matter who the state's nl•xt leader 1s, the race for the Governor's M,ms10n includes at least one candidate with a gay-rclJtcd scandal m his political past. Current Texas Gov. Rick Perry, a Rl•publican, seeks a new term after he suc­ceeded former Gov George W. Bush upon Bush's election to the White House a year ago. Several other pohhc1ans have stepped up to challenge Perry. Among Democrats, businessman Bill Lyon, former Texas Attorney General Dan Morales, oilman and attorney Tony Sanchez and attorney John WorldPeace have launched campaigns for governor. The Green Party's Rahul Mahajan, a research assistant, also is campaigning, as is Libertarian Jeff Daiell, that party's 1990 nominee and a 1988 U.S. Senate nominee Morales and Sanchez are considered top runners for the Democratic nomina­tion, to be decided in the March 12 pnma· ry election. Perry':; support on 1;ay rights bsues IS lukewarm at best, political obsen·ers say. Dr. Richard Murray, political scienhst at the Uni\·crsity of Houston, said Perry can­not be expl'Cted to be a fnend to gay Texans. "He's probably not gomg to be any > Continued on Page 7 Incumbent Gov. Rick Perry (pictUfed), a Republican. faces potential cballeagers inducliag Tony Sanchez and Dem Morales, former Texas attorney general, both Demoaats who face off in the March 12 primary election. 2 BPECJt I '1J. I ::: 7 3 529}J~/:;o OFf 7J3~~--- {phone1 NEWS Mon-Fri • 5am-10pm Sat & Sim. 8am-8pm Voted Best Gym Last5Years 4040Milam Houston 713-524-9932 Personal Traine Avaliblef WWWltnessexchange.c JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE $200 Off or Buy One Get ree • All Phases of Tree Care Residential and Commercial r ...,. BARTi E T'l' 1719 West 24th St., Houston. TX 77008 BA~;~ THEE EXI'Elrl'S 718-862-4777 F Certifiro Arborlsts y \\ ''\\ .bartlctt.com James Doyle & i 1ID0thy Leach G1mltil by Tit• .llert/ttt n., RutGrelt L•l>outorHs •nol E:xttrntttntizl Greunils. Cli11rlotrt. NC I-.-- --------' HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 18, 2002 3 Hopes dim for gay-friendly Houston Council Observers expect little positive for gay voters to come from new makeup of Houston panel by PEN'\Y WFAVFR ThL• new 1 louston City Counol is in office and at work, but political observers expect little in the way of gay-friendly action from this p.mel "There's not a lot of g.1y issues we can deal with," said Anmsl' Parker, the only openly gay member of the Council. Parker won re-election to her At Large Post 1 seat without a runoff. She is om• of six women who now 'en·c on the Council, the most female representatives e\'er for Houston "In general, I'm pll'ased with the new Council," Parker said this week, just d,1ys alter citv officials took their oaths of off1Cl' "I like the fact th.it we'\'e gone from two wonwn on thl' Council to six. The nl'w Council ml'mbl•rs seem to bl' very focused on ... getting as much informa­tion <lS they can " But tor gay Hou5tomans, thts may bl• a quil'I term at City 1 lall, in contrast to last Obituary Danny Carver, musician Danny W.iyne Carver of l louston died of AIDS on Jan 7, 2002, follow­mg a dec.ide­plus battle. Se rv ices are 2·30 p m Sunday, Jan 27, at Grace Eva nge l ical L uth e ran Church in Houston. A re<:eption will follow at the Pink House on &lmar. of the Council.'' he said "I think it'll be a few month!' before we know that answer" As 1urra\ pomted out, ne\\ Counol member Ada Ed\\ ard ... , who represents D1stmt D \\ h1ch mdudc,. hea\•1ly ga) Mortro~e. 1~ a kno\\ n tnend to gay Houstomam.. "She', probabh a reliable member on bsues of concern to ga)::. and le bi.ins," .\lurray ,.aid Another po,.s1ble friend to ga) con­stituents is Carol Al\'arado in Distnd L who 1s known to be politically clo,c to gay­fnendly t>.ta~or Lee Brown. Murray said Addie \\"beman m Dbtrict £: I!:> another Counal member to w.1tch on gay is,.ucs New Houston City Council members Michael Berry, At Large Post 4, and Shelley Sekula Rodriguez, At Large Post 3, may be the most interesting Council freshmen to watch this year on gay-related issues, according to political scientist Dr. Richard Murray. \\"1th the new members, l louston's panel of leaders nm\ 1s C'qually ... pht along party lines, wJth se\•cn Republicarts and sewn Democrats. Parker pointed out that fall elec­tions took at lea-.t one pro-gay \Oler, Chrb year's hot-button topics of the city's non­Bell, out of thL• picture discrimination legislation and deb.1te O\W doml•stic partm•r insurance bC>nefits for Houston "orkers. pohhcal scientbt at the University of Houston. "I guess we'll iust wait and !-l'e." "\\e had a net loss of support on Counol," she :,aid. ''ln·t1ally, I don't sec any gay-rdated bsues (this term]," P,uker said. Murray pegs Rodnguez and Berry as the two to observe on this Counol for gay con­stituents. Berry take ... Bell's old po..,t \\ h1le Rodriguez has the :>eat formerly held bv Orlando Sanchez, not known .is a fm'nd to gay::. - and both are known as modl•.ite Republicans l\c1thcr Counal mCJT1.ber wa.. . cndor,,ed 1" the Hou,.ton Gav & Lc ... b.an Political Ca'uc~. &th previously opposed pro-gay fegi,Jation. Nl'W At Large rl·presmtati\'es mdude Shl·lll'Y Sekula Rodrigul'z and ~11chael Berry. Nl'ither 1s likely to be a standout pro­ponent for gays. "It 1s early.'' notes Dr. Richard .\1urr,1y, a "I think Berry and Sekula Rodriguez would be the most intrresting to watch: whethl'r they go mer to the more opposed members - [Bruce] Tatro, (Burt] Keller - on some of these [gay] b~ues, or whether they go with the more moderate membrrs Hardy-Garcia resigns from LGRL Activist cites 'sense of completion' in resigning from statewide lobbying organization b) PEN~\ Wi:AYi::k AU~ilN -After nearly a decade leading the Le ... b1an/Gay Rights Lobby (I.GR!.) of Texas, actmst DJ,innt' Hardy-Caroa L' stt•pping down as exl'cut ve d1Tector "! feel il scn.'>l' of rnmpletion m m} \\ ork" Hardy-Garcia told the Voice on Thursdav. "I had contempla!L'd ll':wmg last year, but really feel good about the decision to :.tay and finish. "I do think it's always good to bnng m nl'\\' blood into an orgamz.1tion," she addl•d As the exl'cuti\'e director, Hardy-G.irc1.1 lobbied and orga· nizl·d on a stJtewide ll'n•I for le:-bian and gay equal rights in Texas, according to l.GRI. Under her diTL'Ction, LGRL helped stop the Texas version of the DefenSl' of Marriage Act three times. work on something I passionately believed in, but it was also a very inll'n:-l' experi­ence," liardv-Garr1a saJd. "I thmk i need to ta.ke some tune to put that mto perspectl\ e You don't go through this work\\ 1thm.t get­ting some battle ~ars." She said th.it \\ h1le she somct1I11es 1' sur­pnscd by thl' na1\'ete oi young gays, shl• 1 encouraged by the hopefulness of youth now taking o\'er some of the battles for gay rights. Fnends recall that Carver's life was \'aried and creative. He served in the U.S. military. lil' was a florist .ind a pianist who illso was kr1own for hb humor and dry wit. Hardy-Gama's vision and organizmg skills helped prevent the passage of legislation that would have barred gays and les­bians from adopting or pro,·iding foster care. She organized the first p.1ssage of the Non-Di~nmination in Education bill that mcluded sexu.1! orientation and gendl·r identity in the Texas House of Representatives. ''My job 1s not to tell them how hard it's going to be; my ]Ob is to make their path softl'r and to tell them to go for it," Hardy­Garcia said. Longtime activist Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of the Lesbian/ Gay Right Lobby of Texas, announced her resignation this week. She said she wants to take time off to deal with 'battle scars.' Survivors include his partner, Robert Wittliff; father, A. D. C.irvl•r; brothers, Doyle and Randy; and a number of cousms, nieces, nephews and friends. In lieu of tlnwt•rs, memorials may be made to Omega House. - From staff r.:ports Hardy-Garcia is perhaps be~t known for her work against hate crimes. In the last eight years, she helped lead efforts to pass stronger hate en ml' l,1ws m Texas, which culminatl-<l m the 2001 pass.1ge of the J.imes Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Act. The historic legislation came m the wake of 30 anti-gay murders over the last decade in Texas. It also marks the first legal\ recognition of gay Texans. "It's been a very intenSI.' time. I was so lucky to be able to Gay nghts ad\·ocates said thL~ week that Hardy-Garcia's prescncl' will be nusscd. 'This departure will be a greJt lo!-s to our organization and to the community at-large The gain.~ we've made under Diannl''s leadership are nothing short of hbtonc," said Jill Ireland, LGRL board co-chair 4 JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE A SHOWTIME ORIGINAL SER IE S Full. Frontal. Second Season. SUNDAYS 9PM ENCORE PLAY TUESDAYS 10 PM - FIRST ~ASON VIDEO AND DVD COL~ECTOR'S EDITION AVAILABL~ NOW _ r ~RIGINAL SOUNDTRACK AVAILABLE ON RCA VICTO; ~-TO_ORDER CALL: 1-800-SH_OWTIME_ J queer.;filt.com ~ AOti "CQfllTtlfT. truDm.. WNC .. HliUAti(, StlOJIG SUUAL COlllTUf I [W[R DISCl£JJOJll AO'flS[D ClllZIMtr!JINl!ht<Uloc il!~-Sltft:l(ll•~~-·"--""' '1111: 1rOCt11C- ~Ullllll•lttnlHHtrHtllllllli<tiotl1I Unru.tlrt••"ll< bu-llollkmtt IT'S TIME TO PICK UP THE BOYS AND GO ALL NIGHT ... Take home the entire first season of QUEER AS FOLK! SPECIAL COLLECTOR'S EDITION DVD with 3 HOURS of exclusive BONUS FOOTAGE: It' Behind-the-scenes outtakes I Special Edition episodes with cast and producer commentary ,. Exclusive extended scenes ~ Enhanced DVD-ROM with web access to secret site • Season 2 Sneak Preview ••• AND MUCH MORE! VHS and DVD box sets ON SALE NOW! Original Soundtrack Available On RCA VICTOR More at queer.:fil•.com NEW EPISODES SUNDAYS 9 PM CIZOOl - -·In< All rlqllt< rt<tntd SHOl'llM( 11 I rfqf>I- tr-rl ol S--llttwwtl lac. I Y<Kom '-"Y :fil•WTIME HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 18, 2002 NEWS 5 Md. 's House majority leader quietly comes out ANNAPOLIS, Md .Vhen the Maryland General Assembly convened its opening ses-sion Jan. 9, Dell'gate Maggie L. Mcintosh (D-Baltimore) was introduced as the first female House Maiority LeJder, J position she was appointed lo last July. But what many watching the proceedings didn't know is that Mcintosh is also the first openly gay person in the state legislature. Mcintosh came out before an audience last October during an acceptance speech for an award from the Women's Law Center of Maryland. This was the fi rst time Mcintosh had pubhdv said ~he was a lesbian, but no media was pre­sent. "It wasn't .1 surprise to anyone, everyone already knew," Mcintosh said. " It was the right thing to do at that time " Actlvisb note that 1t speaks to Mcintosh's political prowess that she was appointed to a powerful position bl·cause she is a woman, a lesbian, and from Baltimore, a city known for its liberal politicians. Maggie Mcintosh (D-Baltimore) became Maryland's first les­bian and female House Majority Leader on Jan. 9. Calif. judge won't stop dueling AIDS rides LOS ANGEi.ES (AP)- The California AIDS Ride, a fund-raising event that has become a st,1te institution, can expect competition for bicyclists this year, a judge ruled Jan. 14. Superior Court Judge David Yaffe refused to issue an injunction against the San Francisco ,\ IDS foundation and the L.A. Gay & Lesbian Center, which have set up an event to rival the nine·yl'ar-old San Francisco to Los Angeles CJlifornia nde. Pallotta Teamworks, which organizes the AIDS Ride, sued to stop the nv.il AIDS/Lifecyle nde, arguing that its scheduling two weeks before the Pallotta event would dilute support from the original. "One 1f not both ot these rides 1s going to tail," Pallotta .ittorney Jayne Kacer told the judge "Then.• 1ust isn't enough community." The nonproht agenr1es planned the AIDS/LifeCycle Ride after accusing Pallott.1 of overspending .ind mismanaging last vear's event, which raised Sll m1lhon The chanlies said thev rl'Ce1wd 1ust 50 cents of every dollar raised br rider~, who spent a week traveling 5i5 miles. Lesbian festival in conflict over trans inclusion W,\SHIN(, lo:--: - Years of controversy over the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival pol­icy of only letting in "womyn-born-womvn" for thl'lr festival has rL-sulted in a petition bemg orculated .Kros.' the country via l'·ma1I rpquesting that festival organizers change their pol­icy The 25-vcJr·old festival 15 well known for cultivating .i women-only space for a week in rur.11 Nl1ch1gan, whill• pro,·1dmg music, workshops, c,1mping spaces and vegetarian meals. The popular event has been the center ot contro\'l'rsy for years surrounding 1b policy not to allow trans-identified women on its premise~, and has spawned a transgender camp across the street from the festival Sadie Crabtree, editor of strapon.org, based in Washington, D.C., said the pehhon 1s intended "to heal the nft, honor our d1fferencL'S, and create a cohesive movement towards inclus10n of trans people in women-only space." c 0 Vt. court dismisses civil union lawsuit MO TPH IE:R, Vt. - G.iy t 1v1l rights supporters applauded the Vermont Supreme Court's favorable legal dl'C1s1on Det 26 on that ~tale's civil union la'' that ras been the subiect ot Jn ongoin~ struggle But one leader there said pohtl~.11 challenges remain. "l thmk tre law is safe from challenges in court," said lawver Beth Robinson, chair of Vermonters for Civil Unions and co-coun­sel tor the plmnt1tfs m the 1999 .msu1t th.it kd to enactment of the nation's onlv la\ 11 union .. 1w. "Thl• bigger worry has always been political challenges. We lost our pro-civil un10n maionty ,n the !Vermont! House in the !\iovember 2000 election, and our pro-nv1! union m,1jonty in the Senate has d\.\ mdled to two \<Otes," shl• said. The court ruled that town clerk> may not refuse to offer civil union licenses on the basis of their religious belieis and that votl'S by member~ ol the Vermont I louse who engaged in a "betting poolH ,1bout the c1v1l un10n leg1slat1on's outcome m the House should not be nulli­fied . l'he law took effect in July 2000. Court: Gay Tempe mayor's term extended Pl lOE:'\IX (AP) - The state Supreme Court upheld Tempe voters' deos1on to lengthen thrn openly g.1y mayor's term of office, allowing Neil Giuliano, a Republican, to continue to lead ,\nzona':. seventh largt'St city until July 2004. Thl• Supreme Court said Jan. 11 tn a bnd order that a :..lay 2000 approval of Proposition 100 by voters "was a '"11id l'lechon and Proposition 100 was prop­erly .ippron•d by ,1 ma1oritv of votl'r~." The me.1surc lengthened mayoral term~ to tour \'l'ars from two. Giuliano said he was pll•,1sed by the ruling. "l am look­in~ torw.ird to i-erving this community for thl' remainder of my final term." C1uh.mo's term was set to expire this summer. Ch.11lengers had argued that the votl' was in Valid because Tempe did not properly publicize it. They abo argued th.it the chartl'r amendmC'nt was .in unrnn titut1onal "spet,al l.iw" intend· For more news, visit ed to benefit Giuliano. www.hovo.com r--- -- -- - - - ------ -- ----~ C3CICIC15CIN Chrysler Jeep c . .-... ~~ .pO'OO' Bring This AD! Goodson~~6:;~KatyFreewayl '-.i!fJ:llMJM•QiJ!i:UIJ1!l•fli0Hit:llfl!flZI.-' ~- -- - ---- - - --- - - - - -- -~ 6 JANUARY 18, 2002 •HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON ,,. DENVER ,,. PHILADELPHIA ,,. LOS ANGELES ,,. 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Beware of: v Treatment centers and pro­grams that exploit the gay com­munity. Authorized Deal FREE PHONE Save $79 75 Whenever Minutes 500 Weekend Minutes l'.alrQllDMll s 1 mg nt1lMdf9v ~· 1000 Whenever Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes =.,~..,'...=,..\..,I1i._i1 11$ 699eo9nd t AIOfil'I•~ Motorola 2282 600 Whenever Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes r.cao11n~ s3 rug 11!llltBlt9°g ~- 2000 Whenever Mmule$ 2000 Weekend Minutes :':'iZ8w s9999 fb..,-J-" - •nUIUQl.IOGl.'I HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 18, 2002 7 Bush appointees include gays, conservatives > Continued from Page 1 year federal policy blocking this local, District of Columbia ordinance. The anti-gay Family Research Council responded to these and other developments by denouncing the White House for embracing a "homosexual political agenda" and "imparting legitimacy to the homosex­ual political cause." Was this the first year of the Clinton admin­istration? To the dismay of many of the nation's anti-gay political groups, and to the surpri..e of a number of gay Democratic activists, these devel­opments took place during President George W. Bush's first year in office. "President Bush has not only confounded his many gay detractors but has also enraged the far right, stood down their criticism, and moved ahead with his inclusive agenda," said the national gay group Log Cabin Republicans, m a written review that unabashedly gloats over the president's gay rights record. "Remember how every other gay organi­zation was predicting disaster for the nation and the beginning of an 'extremist' anh-gay era?" Log Cabin states in an essay in its January 2002 newsletter. "What a difference a year has made." But as Bush ends his first year at the nation's helm, officials with non-partisan gay political groups, like the National Gay & Lesbian T;isk Force, are far less compli-mentary in their assessment of his record. "The president's gay appointments are on the positive side of the balance sheet," said NGLTF Executive Director Lorri L. Jean "But they may be the only significant positive things he's done, unless you decide to list the fact that he didn't do something bad as a positive." NGTLF, for example, notes that Bush has appointed a number of high-level officials from the Republican Party's socially conse1vative wmg who have anti-gay records. Among them is Attorney General John Ashcroft, an outs}» ken opponent of gay rights during his tenure as a U.S. senator from Missouri. The Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay political organization, argues that while Bush says he will hire without regard to sexual orientation, he won't say whether he would sign the gay civil rights bill pending in Congn.>ss known as the Employment Non­Discrimination Act, which would enact that policy into fodcral law. HRC political director Wmnie Stachelberg said the administration has not responded to HRC's request that 11 endorse ENDA and anoth­er bill that would give the federal govemmmt authority to pl'CN'Cllte anti-gay hate crim~. "Many que~tions remain unanswered," Stachclberg said about the administration's gay rights positions. Stachelberg and officials with other gay civil nghts groups acknowledge that while Bush has yet to make major policy advances on gay issues, he has so far chosen not to roll back the advances made by the Clinton administration. Bush has left in place two key executive orders issued by President Clinton. One prcr hibits )Ob discrimination against gay federal workers and the other bans government agen­cies from denymg security clearances to an mdividual based solely on sexual onentation. However, the White House announced last June that Bush had discontinued a Clinton practice of issuing annual presidential procla­mations designating June as Gay Pride month. Gay picks rile rigtlt-wing Most gay activists view Bush's gay appoint­ments as a positive development, although some note that Bush hasn't appointed nearly as many gays as Clinton to high and middle level administration jobs during the former presi­dent's first year in office. In June, Bush nominated gay State Department official Michael Guest for the post of U.S. ambassador to Romania. The Senate confirmed Guest bv a unanimous vote. Secretary of State Colin Powell drew attention in the press when he recognized Gul>:;t's domestic partner during a sweanng­m ceremony, which Powell administered. Anti-gay groups were especially angry over the appointment Guest. The Family Research Council opposed the nomination on the grounds that his sexual orientation would be unacceptable to Romanians, but govern­ment officials there have dismissed the con­cern, praismg Guest for his experience and knowledge of Eastern European affairs. AIDS record Some \IDS acti\'ists said Bush's appoint­ment of Scott Evertz, a gay man, as <It.rector of the White House AIDS office was an impor­tant symbolic development because it recog­ruzed the strong interest in AIDS issues with­in the gay community. But groups such as the National Association of People With AIDS called Bush's record on AIDS mixed, saying Bush has retained the Clinton administration's overall policies, which some AIDS acti\'ists have called adequate but not sufficient to address the AIDS epidemic. "For the most part, the new administra­tion has contmued the policies of the Clinton admmistration," said :-\AP\.\'A's Anderson "To many of us, that's OK, because some people feared they would pull back from what we have now." L.og Cabm offiaal~ say the Bu..'h adminis­tration has pven Evertz the green light to work cl<N>ly Mth a wide vane!)• of con­stituencies, mcludmg gay and AIDS ad\•ocacy groups, to help shapt' the administration's pol­icy on AIDS m the next three yea~. Sanchez, Morales top Dems in governor's race ;:;.. Continued from Page 1 help at all on [gay] issues down the road," :vturr,1y said. Just more th.ma year ago, Perry ascend­ed from his heuten.mt governor post under Bush to serve as governor. At the time, most gay nghts proponents did not expect Perry to get m the w.1y of any gay-positive leg1s­l, 1tion, but ,1lso did not expect Perry to st.md up for g.iy conshtuents either In i\1.iy 2001, Perry signed the )aml'S Bvrd Jr I late Crimes Act into law, although h~ was noncommittal on the measure until he g.H"e it his signature. The law strength­ens the penalties for offenses against minorities mcluding gays. Perry's predl'Cessor, Bush, had refused to support the measure two years earlier, saying ill! criml's are hate cnmes. "l think we've gone from one intellectu· ally mediocre governor to another," Clarence Bagby, Houston gay activist and member of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, told the Voice about Perry a year ago. Other gay rights advocates also initially saw Perry as a conservative Democrat. "Rick Perry 1s more closely aligned with the right-wing [than Bush]," said state Rep. Debra Danburg, D-Houston, a longtime supporter of gay rights. Murray also pointed out that Perry is strongly connected with conservatives in Texas. Wealthy oilman Tony Sanchez is among top Democrat runners campaigning for governor this year. Most political observers consider Sanchez and Dan Morales, former Texas attor­ney general, top contenders for the porty's nomination. "He is generally in a much weaker posi­tion than former Gov. Bush is to stand up to . the far right and Christian [conserva­tives]," Murray said On the Democrat side, Sanchez and Morales have emerged as top runners for that party's nomination for governor. Murray expects Sanchez to win the prima­ry, largely due to his ability to finance his campaign. A wealthy oilman and attorney, Sanchez has never held public office. He endorsed gay-friendly ~1ayor Lee Brown m the fall Houston ell'Ctions. "Te\as' diversity is one of its greatest strengths and Lee Brown has been an excel­lent mavor to all Houstomans," Sanchez Slid m endorsing the incumbent. But last spnng, Sanchez sent a letter of apology to Texas Secretary of State Henry Cut:'llar in relation to a gay scandal. Pri\·ate investigators hired by Sanchez's lawyt:'r, who was looking into the origm of a reportedly threatening letter, told Cuellar's friends and family he is gay. That prompted Sanchez's letter of apology, but he stopped short of apologizing to Cuellar for alleging that he wrote the threatening letter to Sanchez, the Voice reported in April 2001. Cuellar responded by saymg that Sanchez needed to also apologize to Cuellar's family and publicly admit that he did suspect Cuellar of writing the letter. At the time, the Associated Press report­ed that Kathy Walk, a spokeswoman for Perry, called the incident "character assassi­nation ." That prompted at least one gay activist to question why a person's sexual orientation would be perceived as so harm­ful. Although Walt told the Voice at the time that she did not use the term attributed to her by the AP, Dianne Hardy-Garcia, execu­tive director of the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas, said that 1f Walt did call the accusation that Cuellar ts gay "character assassination," her comment was "unfortu­nate." "We still live in a soaety where e\ en a .suspinon that you're gay is ~een as some­how harmful to people's reputation," Hardy-Gama told the \oJCe at the time "It shouldn't be any big deal who you are." Sanchez also 1s a Unt\'ers1ty of Texas Regent. He has been endorsed by people mcludmg longtime gay activist Sue Lo\'ell, a member of the Democratic .:\at1onal Committee, and Carroll Robinson, Hou~ton City Council member and D:-.:C member. Morales 1s the former two-term Texas attorney general and oftiaally entered the race for governor on Jan. 2. In 1990, he became the first Hispanic elected to a non- 1ud1c1al statewide office m Texas. As attorney general, ~1orales handed down legal deasions that mcluded man­dates to deem declarations of domestic partnership not "documents required or permitted by law to be recorded," the Voice has previously reported. His successor, John Comyn, cited those decisions when ruling that county clerks are not required to accept registrations of same-sex domestic partnerships. Cornyn currently is campaigning for Texas U.S. Senate seat to be vacated with conservative Phil Gramm's retirement this year. 8 NEWS JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE Two gays join Mass. governor's ticket Republican governor backs gay candidate for lieutenant governor, ready to support would­be treasurer bv LO~ CHIBBARO JR T\\O ~av Republicans have announced b d for statewide office m Massachusetts. \Vmg to run on a slate headed bv acting GOP GO\ Jane Swift The mtmm go\ernor surprised support­er and detractors alike when, on Jan 3, she ~nnounced her selection of Patrick C C..uemero, 13 an open1} gay former mayor and state representative, to be her candidate for 1 eutenant governor Less than a \\eeK later, on Jan 9, Dan Grabauskas, J . the registrar for the ".iassachusetts Department of Motor Vehicles, announced he was running for the Republican nomination for the office of state treasurer. Although Swift had not selected him for that post, she md cated through a spokesperson that she would have no objections to having h:m on her slate 1f he WlllS the nomination. "Both of them running al the same time L'> a bit of a coinodence," an unnamed Swift adrnm- 1Strat on offioal told the Boston C..1obe "But 11 s not a coincidence that you have a lot of talented people in the party who happen to be gay." If Guerriero IS successful in overcoming a series of hurdles, including a hotly contested Republican pnmary, and if the Swift-Guerriero ticket wins the November general election, Guemero would become one of the nation's highest-ranking openly gay elected offiaals. Grabauskas, who IS credited v.ith trans­foITT! ing an ineffioent motor vehicles depart­ment into a well-run. consumer-friendly agen­cy, has good name recognition and may also have a shot at wuuung, according to Garry Daffin, ro-charr of the Massachusetts Gay & Lesbian Polib ~ Caucus. In a telephone interview, Gucmcro called Swift's decision to select him "a bold move" that confmns her commitment to "fairness" for gav men and lesbians. "I hope 1 will show that it is my creden­tials, character, and work ethic that counts, not my sexual onentahon.'' Gucmero said. Guerriero 1s a lifelong resident of \1elrosc, Mass., a suburb of Boston. He became the youngest member of the Massachusetts House of Repre~entallvcs m 1993, when he won a ~pedal election at the age of 25. He won re-election in 1994 and 1996 by lopsided margins. He was elected Melrose's mayor m 1998 at age 29, and was re-elected m 200C Last MJy, he re,1gned to become Swift's deputy chief of st.iff When vou're read greater success with: Relationships Love Happiness Sex Inner Peace Career Call For An Appointment 713-527-0000 TONY CARROLL, LMSW-ACP Counseling, Psychothuapy, l'orksliopsfor l ndfridual.r and C,oupln com Scrw1g Houslon\ Ga1 and lesbian Comm1mitv Smee 1983 Gay Democrats praised Swift for selecting Guerriero but noted that he was not openly gay when he ran for and served as a state representative and mayor. Guerriero onlr came out after Swift asked him to jom her ticket as candidate for lieutenant governor. They said many of the state's political leaders knew his sexual onentation for some time Gucmero said that although he never before publicly acknowledged bemg gay, he also never sought to conceal his sexual ori­cntatton. He said he has been visible within the gay community and ha~ parllapated m ~ events spol"sored by Log Cabm z Rcpubl cans, a gay GOP group ~ But gar Democratic official Steve ~ Dnschol, co-chair of the Gay & Le~b1<in ~ Cai1cus of the Massachusetts Democratic ::< Party, noted that Swift does not support ga\ marriage, while Guerriero docs, which could lead to fnchon. Mark Goshko, former president of the state's Log Cabin Republicans, pointed out that no Democratic candidates for governor, or even the state's two liberal U.S. senators, Edward Kennedy and John Kerry, support gav marriage, either Guerriero s formidable primary oppo­nent IS James Rappaport, a multimilhona1rc who served as chair of the Massachusetts Republican Party m the 1990s. Acting Gov. Jane Swift of Massachusetts, a Republican, tapped a gay man, Patrick C. Guerriero, as her running mate in a move seen as part of a trend by the state's Republicans to stake out liberal ground on social issues. HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 18, 2002 NEWS 9 MTV, Showtime confirm plans to launch gay channel Race for all-gay channel heats up while gay media group fears shock-jock jokes by ANDREW KEECA:\ In a span of four days, two separate enter­tainment companie" announced plans to launch cable networks devoted to gay pro­gramming, with a third expr~sing interest in exp.mding ib current Canadian gay-based digital cable channel into U.S. markets. MTV: Music Television Judy McGrath, President 1515 Broadway New York, NY 10036·B901 212·25B·8184 Showtime Networks Inc. 1633 Broadway New York, NY 10019 212.708.1600 E·ma1. talk2@SHO.com ALT 1-TV David Mckillop 202 248· 1264 E·ma1I md ii 1pOalt 1.tv Pride Vision TV 370 King Street West, Suite 308 Toronto, Ontano MSV 1J9 Canada 877-PRIDE TV MTV and Showtime, both owned by media giant Viacom, will collaborate on a national cable channel devoted to gay pro­gramming, according to a Showtime official. "The notion of a gay channel was first mentioned m 1994 but really got serious attention last year, after the success of 'Queer As Folk,"' said Gene Falk. senior \"ice presi­dent for Showtime's Digital Media Group. Around the !'<lme time, executives at MTV were also toying with the idea. Smee .\ITV and Show time are sister com­panies, it made sense that by collaborating on the proiect, a channel that would do 1us­hce to the concept and community could be produced, said Falk, who is gay. Viacom research indicated that 6.5 per­cent of television households are occupied by gay viewers. First, we have to get distribution in place and secondly, we have a responsibility to deliv­er prD),'Tamming that lives up to the gay com­munity's high standards," Falk said. The Showtime/MTV collaboration isn't the orily proposed gay channel eyeing the t.:5. market. The Canadian network PrideVL"ion, which L" ownt>d by Headline Media Group Inc., a publicly traded Canadian company, began opcratiorL~ fast September and is actively seek­ing to enter the much larger gay market in the U.S. The company has been in talks with executives from MTV and Showtime, but a collaborating business relationship between r--ON VOUR NEXI VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAY B&B we•re right IN the neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars. 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com Sh Plhhi 1111hl t the two parties has not been finalized, said Anna McCusker, senior vice president of marketing for the company. "It's not a matter of if we are coming to the States," she said. "It's just a matter of when." Also entering into the fight for gay view­ers 1s MOC Entertainment, a Washington, D.C.-based company, which hopes to be up and going by 2003. The project has been in the works for about nine months, according to Chance ~itchell, co-founder of ALT 1-TV, the name chosen for the gay channel. ALT1-TV will be launched as an ad-sup­ported network, which is different from the mini-pay service being explored by other industry players, said Mitchell. While the gay channel announcemenb drew praL-;c from some potential gay viewers, a national gay media watchdog group warned ib supporters to be on the lookout for radio com­mentators who u.-;c the news to defame gays. Within a day of the announced MTV /Showtime collaboration earlier this month, some radio talk JOCks across the coun­try had a field day commenting on the likeli­hood of an all gay channel, according to the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. ''I thought there already was a gay chan­nel. What about the 'Home & Garden' or 'Food Network' channels?" quipped Jimmy Baron, co-host of the "Morning X" show on Atlanta radio station 99x. Meanwhile, at WKTU in New York City, MTV mid Showtime wl colaborate on a rpy cable chcmel - after the success of Showtime's 'Queer As Folk' series, accorcing to Gene Fall, a setior vice president for Showtine who is rpy. GLAAD said a DJ suggested parodies of current shows which could show up on a gay network, including ''Malcolm Up :\1y Middle" and NFAG." "Th.ts type of humor concerns me as long as gay youths are still dealing with haras~­ment m schools," said Hallie Whitaker, GLAAD' s mtenm Southern reg10nal manag­er. "In many of the.'e mommi:; shows, there's not a balance, it '~ just the gay jok£.>S." But Baron, of the .\1ormng X m Atlanta, disagreed. "Ye.,, some are distasteful and are made out of meanness, but you have to look at the source. We may ruffle feathers, but it ts not done out of spite," Baron said. MONTROSE SOFTBALL LEAGUE I - Invites you to Recruitment Day 2002 Sunday, February 10th 10am until 3am Memorial Park Fields 4 & 5 Softball • Prizes • Food Come play softball, receive information, meet various members, and join the Montrose Softball League for an experience of a lifetime!! Beginner • Intermediate • Advanced Levels Call 713-867-3913 or visit our website www.montrosesoftballleague.com for more information • Fields located on Picnic Lane In MEMORIAL PARK j ust south of Memorial Drive • Rain out da will be held Sunda , February 17u. 10 STAFF Executive Editor Chris Cram Editor PennyWea11er ed torOhoustonvo1ce com Production KyleW Us Contributors KatheF." Lee Kay Oa~. Andrew Keegan George Jonte Lou Ch1bbaro Webmaster: Doi.glas Wnght Photographers Dalton DeHart. K mberly Thompson Advertising Sales Wanda Faulkne' Sales Manager wfaulknerOhoustorvo1ce com Edward Anthony Account Execuuve eanthoryOhoustonvotCe com Administration & Sales Support Carolyn A Roberts croberUOhoustonvotCe com N11t1onal Advertising Representative R1vendell Marketing Company. Inc 212-242-6863 Publisher· Window Media LLC President· Wilham Waybourn Editorial Director- Chris Cra1r Financial Director- 0-r s Reid Sales Director· Peter Jackson Art Director· Rob Boeger M.irlceting Director· Enc May =:IP per u.. .d_H1EHaBERl1E .. er _ CHARTER MEMBER Established 1~74 as the Monuose Star 500 Lovett Blvd Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-3490 Fax (713) 521}-9531 www houstonv r com Office ~t;na~~~s1l1J'~~~ekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words We reserve the nght to edit for cortent and length We will w1thho1d names upon request. but you must include your name and phone number for ver1f1Cat1on Please send mat! to Houston Vo1Ce, 500 Lovett Blvd .• Suite 200. Houston. Texas 77006, fax (713) 529- 953 i or e-mail to ed1torOhoustonvo1Ce com Op1r1ons expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Vo1Ce Al matatiaJ ... Houdon 1'oice .. poteded by le:ienll ~ Iii• Md rmy nor be fllPR)(l.clld ..chol.C !he •nllen corwer.: of t-bdlOn Voce The HXual ==~-::.c~~~The-=== Of narnn OI pctonal repreMntalion do-. not l"I«~ n1icn the Ma\.91 oneru11on of 'NI person or pel'IOnl tiOuslon Voce acctipb ...olcfed edllonaJ rnatericll but caMOI lake~ tor lb r.cum The edlfor NMfY9 the rigN to .c:.r;.:e.p.1 - r..,..a .or. « M Ai ~ ,......., IO .ihon '4JOn ptdettion_ ~kw he&ance ccnrtUcn .,. .,...... '4IO" '*J.-1 Issue 1108 VOICES & ECHOES JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE EDITORIAL When is brutality not worth a headline? By Chn.s Cram It was a sick way to rrng m the • ew Year. On Jan. I, m a city in southwestern Saudi Arabia, three men were beheaded by the Saudi Arabian government m a public squ.ire for the cnme of "extreme obscenity .ind ugly acts of homo~exu.ihty, m.irrymg among themselves and molesting the young." But even more remarkable th.in the bru­tality of the Saudi regime has been the utter silence about the crime, and about the treat­ment of g.iys generally in that part of the world, from the Amerrc.:in media and the U.S. government. IA>spite all the attention focu~ed rrght now on the Middle East, the Wa~hington Post judged the Saudi story worth only a ~ingle sentence buned at the bottom of page nine. And this wasn t Woodward and Bernstein iournalism: The item was repeat­ed from Reuters, which wa~ il!ielf reporting the story secondhand from an Arab news 5er\'!Ce. As worthless a job as the Po~t did, most news outlets performed even worse Even with the luxury of 24/7 coverage of the cn­s1s in the Middle East and the "war on ter­ronsm," the cable news networks didn t touch the story. Not a smgle news operation outside S.iudi Arab1.i, with the .ippan•nt exception of this newspaper, has made any effort to do an onginal report on the execu­tions. f\oo doubt as a result, the US. govern­ment h.is also taken a pass, declining to comment on the beheadings whm asked by the Blade, and not expressing even a whit of concern for the fate of these men and oth· ers who face brutal murder at the hands of an American ally for .i crime no worse than bemg gay. There is no good excuse for this ab1ect failure of the Amencan media and the U.S. government. But for the sake of argument, let's con~ider the most hkely offmngs. Excuse No. 1 Gays have always been repressed in Islamic countries like Saudi Arabia and Afghanistan; there's no "news" here Corrections An article in the Jan 11 issue of Houston Voice chronicling movies m which gay plothnes were removed mistakenly identified Stanley Kowalski as the gay character in "A Streetcar Named Desire." Jn the play, it is Blanche Dubois's husband who 1s gay, a fact that is omitted from the movie version. The story also reported that Bill~· Hayes, the Turkish-held prisoner depicted m the movie "Midnight Express," was gay. In his autobiogra· ph}~ Hayes wrote that he had a sexual relationship with another prisoner, but never indicated that he was gay. Houston Voice regrets the errors. Th" .,amE could be said for the treatment of women in this region of the world, but that hasn't stopped their phght m Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia from becom· mg a cause celcbrc in the American media. Time magazine even devoted a cover story to the topic. C:\~ repeatedly broadcast a mini-documentary, 'Behind the Veil," th.it highlighted the repressive history of women under T.iliban rule. The press has reported that in Saudi Arabia, our ally, women are made to live under .it least some of the s.1me rl'Slrictions as under the Taliban, and even fomale US. serVJce members are required to wear long g.irments when off-base and on S.iudi soil. The cowrage of women under conscra· tive Islamic rule has provided ;.ome of the finer moments thus far for the American media, which generally prefers to focus on endless footage of caves and bombs, expl.imed to us by retired generals pomtmg at maps with arrows. Ifs been all .ibout who's got the "big mo" m the war m Afghani~tan, much as the press has turned our political contests mto poll-dnven horseraces. But as disturbing as it is that women in Afghanistan were forced to wear head-to­toe garments and denied an education, the treatment of gays by the Talib.m was f.1r more brutal. Men discovered to be g.1y were executed, by crushing rock walls on top of them And as troubling as it is that our Saudi aUies won't permit women to drive, it is surely at least worth coverage that they behead by sword those disco\·ercd to be homosexual, along with the murderers and rapists. Fxcuse \Jo. 2. You c.in't compare the treatment of women to the treatment of gays, even m America gay rights remains very much an unsettled question. True enough, and it's a point often lost on g.iy acllv1sts who complain when the mainstream press publishes views about gays th.it they wouldn't touch if the target were women or blacks or other minorities. Our society's take on homosexu,1lity is still very much "in play," and it is fJ1r game for the media to take that into cons1dera· lion. That's why it is OK for a reporter domg a story about gay parentmg to seek comment from the Family Research Council, even when the same reporter wouldn t necessarily seek out the "other side" m a story on interracial parents, for example. But that doesn't excuse the inattention of the American media to the plight of gays in the Middle East. However wrong and sm· fut our hves Me viewed by social conserva· lives m this country, very few .1dvocah.• our execut10n, much less by brutal ,1nd public me.1ns. E,·en the rabidly ,mti·gay 'Re,•." Fred Phelps, who routinely celebrates our ultimate descent into hell, has not argued that the U.S. government should send us there. So to the extent that the disparate treat· ment of women in Afghanistan and S.iudi Arabia has dnven coverage of thJt ~tory, the same justification is there for shedding light on the heartless treatment of gays. In some ways, II ought to make for an even better story, as journalists could put conser· vative5 in and out of our government on the spot about whether their .mathema for g.iy rights at home has colored their w1ll­mgness to tolerate the e>.ecut10n of gays abroad Excuse: The warm Afghanistan is about terrorism, not gay nghts. Maybe so m the initial weeks of the mil· 1tary campaign there, but not since Nm·ember, when the Bush White I louse l,1unched a calculated campaign to use thl' 'Talib.m's mistreatment of women as 1ustifi· Ciltion for American bombing there The Washmgton Post has catalogued the ways in which the president and his staff h.1ve pushed the issue, including an unprecedented rildio address by First Lady I.aura Bush that urged support for the w,1r in Afgham~tan in part as a way to liberilh? Afghan women. At a 1oint appearance with Russian President Vladimir Putm, Bush calll•d the Tc1hban 'the most repressiw, backward group of people we have seen on the face of the E,uth in a long period of time, including and particularly how they trl'at women." The vice president similarly chimed in, telling the BBC that the T.ihban had "seri· ously mistreated and abused women." The State Dl'partment even issued a report, 'ihc lahban's War Against Women," which described rights abuses therl' And Victona Clarke, assistilnl secretary of defense for public affairs, held a conference call with female chief executives in this country to further spread the word White House talking points, issued to Amencan officialS' around the world, called the Taliban 'one of the worlds leading per· petrators of human rights abuses.' Mary ~1.itahn, a gay-friendly Republican political operative on the vice president's ~taff, said, "The president dol·~n·t see this as a women's issue. f le sees it as a justice issue." Why h.1s the State Department f,1iled to issue even a single statement, much less a full-fledged repot, about the execution of gay~ by Islamic regimes? Where 1~ the press, to ask each of these officials about the brutal tre.itment of gays by the Taliban, and by our allies in Saudi Arabia? The White f louse has ins1stl•d that its consc10us effort to shed light on the fahban's treatment of women was not a cynical .ittempt to shore up support for the war in Afghanistan at a time, last fall, when progress seemed slow and pundits hild begun to second guess. But without even the ~lighte~t pressun.• or .1ttenhon from the press corps, thl• cal· lous hypocrisy of American policy toward gays in the region will apparently go unchallenged. C/rns Cram is executive editor of the Houston Voice and can be reached at ccrain€1window-media.com. HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 18, 2002 VOICES & ECHOES 11 VIEWPOINT Two firemen find love at Trade Center disaster by MUBARAK DAHlR This is a remark­able but sad and true story of unlikely love, and its untimely loss. dashed from behind the desk and down to his truck parked on the street below. Three hours after leaving his office, John finally made it through traffic to the World Trade Center. By the time he arrived, both towers had crumbled to the ground like sandcastles. "I couldn't believe what I was looking at," he says. His mind 1umped instantly to his crew, the group of 30 firefighters he worked workmg at Ground Zero nonstop smce the attacks occurred. Exhausted, sleep-deprived and emotionally distraught, John was in no condition to drive. The fire department assigned Richard to chauffeur John to a Bronx fiwhouse, where the two men were given a couple of days to recuperate. \.\'hen they arrived at the station, it was virtually empty. Perhaps it was the soli­tude of the desolate fire station, or maybe around each other, the two men began to kiss. Unexpectedly, they spent the night making love. While so much was lost m the face of death and destruction from Sept. 11, these two men m1raculously managed to find each other But their love was not to last long. Too many outside forces would soon tear them apart. Two firemen working side by side at the site of the World Trade Center inihal­lv were unaware of each other's oncnt.:i­tion, incognizant even of their strong attraction to l'ach other. But in the face of unimaginable de\'astahon, they discov­ered their improbable lo\·e. But whill• they found each other in the face of neilr-dl•.:ith, they were ultimately unable to hold onto each other in the face of ewryd.:iy homophobia Extreme conditions brought two New York City firefighters together, but everyday pressures ultimately tore them apart. They continued their affair for two and a half month.~. But on the weekend following Thanksgwmg, john reluctantly called it off Extreme conditions brought them together But everyday one. tore them apart. John, who is in lus early 40s, b married and has a small child He concedes that he's gay, but he can't muster the will to tell his wife or his iam1ly and friends. Especially now, he can't deal \\Ith the repercussions a coming out would entail. Sitting in his Midtown Manhattan office where he is a part·hme Internet consult.:int for ,1 large telecommunications comp.:iny, "John" was finishing off the last bites of his breakfast bagel when he heard the news that Aml·rican Airlines Flight 11 torpedlx•d into the north tower of the World Trade Center. As a battalion chief and 20-year veter­an of the Fire Department of New York, John knew all available hands would be needed to tame a burning building the size of a World Trade Center tower. Even before he understood the country was under attack, evm before the second plane smashed into the south tower, John alongside at the st.:ihon. They had been called to the World Trade Center immedi­ately, and had arrived before either build­ing tumbled. John would discover that 28 of them penshed in the towering infer­nos, including his two best friends, "brothers, really" as he refers to them. But there was little time for grie\ing. John, like other fire department officers, was assigned a group of 19 men to super.ise in the rescue and relief effort. "Richard" was one of the men assigned to John's team. At 22, Richard was a new recruit, fresh out of the academy. John took little notice of him unhl the evenmg of Sept. 14. That's when the fire department began rotating out battalion chiefs who'd been Let us know what you think! Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Include a name and phone number for verification. 1t was just the first opportunity either of them had to reflect on the horror of the past three days. But alone in the station, the two men burst into tears together. Despite their fatigue, neither could sleep. "By this hme, our emotional state was dangerously volatile," says John. "The dam just burst. We talked and cried and hugged for several hours." john doesn't know what Richard was thinking, but he doubts Richard e\·en knew he was gay at the time. "I think at that moment he just needed to be loved, and l was the only person around." For whatever reason, about an hour after John retired to bed, Richard came to him and asked to be held. Arms wrapped Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 Richard, still so young, is slowly dL'­covering what it means to be gay and love men :\either can imagine hvmg openly in the machismo world of firefighters. John breaks down as he talks of the agony of letting Richard go. "It's almost too much to bear First, l lost all mv bud­dies. Then I lost the only person '1 ever truly loved." Mubarak Dah1r 1:< a syndzcatrd colimmi:<I l1t•mg in A:<toria, N Y., and can be reached at M11barakDalr@aol.com. e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com The M1st11 Unlabul1us saclal llla 11 Etban Graen bl arlc arner .-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~. r---===-~~~~~~~~1~~=""~~~~~---, Calling Him. S o it turns out that Ethan's latest boyfriend prospect is named Peter Filmore. Eeth just got his phone number from directory assitance. N ow it's 11:24am---which is a good time to call some guy if, like Ethan, you're currently to.o chickenshit to actually talk to him, but stiff . wanna check out his answering machine to see if he sounds normal, or like a freak. I t's 11:15 in the morning at Channel 12, where I f Monty ever Ethan is employed. A minute ago he was working up gets Jost, Ethan is the nerve to call Peter ---but just now he was definitely gonna interrupted by his nosey-parker boss, make the call. TV Weather Personality Monty Poole. A nd if, you 're surprised, and the guy actually does answer the phone at this mid-morning hour when responsible boyfriend prospects are at work, well dude, he's not a guy you wanna date anyway. hew, it's a machine. OK, so early indicators are good. Nice voice. .. Htv. 111 Ptltr Sorrv I rn1sstd vour llUT Coll IWT If. : SEYMOUR ~ HUSH• hth hth Thor u1os Stumou .. SO ltOVt 0 musagt . ... But what's that weird noise in the background? A goat? Could he have a pef goat?. No, sounds fika oird. A large bird .. 12 Houston's largest Aduh Boutique HAPPY IEW YEAR! And TltanL\f or linu BIL\ina.\ in 100 I! Menswear Lounge wear Thongs G-Strings Sexy Gilts Leather Novelties Videos I DVD's JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE on the record "That rumor wasn't true, bro." Pittsburgh Steeler quarterback Kordell Stewart. responding to long·stand1ng gossip that he 1s gay and was caught having public sex, to ESPN Magazine "If we don't succeed, Vermont's 'civil union' law will infect marriage laws in all 50 states like a flesh-eating bacteria." Rev David A Stertzbach, president of Vermont Defense of Marriage Political Action Committee, 1n a letter to sup- Kordell Stewart porters rem1nd1ng them that "GocHeanng· people nation· wide were watching and praying that the landmark gay nghts law would be overturned "AIDS Activist Larry Kramer Dies" The headline on an Associated Press story sent out on the newswire several days after the 66-year-old playwright and AIDS activist received a liver transplant on Dec 21 . The headline was in error; Kramer was released from the hospital on Dec. 26 "At least he went down fighting." lmTy Kramer AIDS activist Jeff Getty, in a telephone message to Larry Kramer's partner Rodger McFarlane, upon reading the AP headline; Getty was subsequently elated to hear that Kramer was recovering "We shouldn't face a death sentence because of who we are or who we love." Larry Kramer, arguing that more HIV-pos1t1ve patients needing organ transplants should receive them, to the New York Times, Jan. 8 "We'll go from Coors Light to Coors Light in the loafers." Max Mutchnik, gay _reator of "W11 & Grace," on the antiopated trend toward more targeted advertising to gay consumers "I want to see mushy romantic moments with people like me. As a friend of mine says, gay people want trash, too." Gene Falk, a Showtime vice president who 1s developing a new gay cable channel, to the New York Times, Jan. 13 '"The Weakest Twink' (game show): Randomly selected nightclub patrons compete to answer incredibly easy questions to which the answer is usually 'Stonewall.' Dismissive host Ian McKellen gets snippy when they don't know the answer." Washington Post writer Hank Stuever, suggesting TV shows for the new gay cable network in development by Showt1me "'Bitchy Switches' (lifestyle): Lesbian couples swap houses with male couples and each has just two days and $1,000 to completely redeco­rate a room in the other's house. Pilot: Fur flies when Rita Mae and Sneaky Pie Brown add wood paneling and Napa Valley style to Jann and Matt's ultra-minimalist loft." Washington Post wnter Hank Stuever, suggesting TV shows for the new gay cable network in development by Showt1me "The ejuestion was would you support civil unions, ... and his answer was that he would be open to a discussion but he wasn't famil­iar with all of the legal aspects." Matt Szabo, deputy press secrt>tary to Caltfor" d gubernatorial candidate Richard Riordan, recounting the form"r Los Angeles mayor's comments at a forum spor>sored by a West Hollywood gay group, as report­ed by the Associated Press, Jan 9 Elton John "As a gay man, I'm very lucky not to be infected. My concern nowadays is that young people think they are invulnerable, but they're not." Elton John to ITV news, Jan 8 - From staff and wire rrports HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 18, 2002 ltLLU Lil 'Laramie Project' takes to Houston stage with its tale directly from townspeople involved in Matthew Shepard tragedy by KAY DAYlJS On Oct. 7, 1998, Mathew Shep.ird was brutally gun-whipped, beaten bloody and left to du~, strung up hke a sc.arecrow on a fence in Laramie, Wyo. It was a cold night, near freezing, .ind he was to die hke a common murderer or thtcf In actuality, Shepard's only "cnme" was to be a young gay student at the Um\•ers1ty of Wyoming who stumbled into the wrong bar on the wrong night. The sad story of Shepard unfolds in the play, "The Laramie Proiect," now open at Stages. His char.icier nrver appears m the play: fodder for the pro­duction is gleaned from interviews with Larc1m1e res1dmts shortly after the cnme A preacher in Laramie told an inter­viewer that although he denounced the cnme, he hoped Shepard saw fit to reflect on his "hfl'5tyle" in the agomz­ing hours he spent bleeding to death His remarks seem to reflect not only the b1gotq but also the ignorance of m.in~ of Larc1!T'1e's res1dentc;. Rob BunJy, St.igec; arttsllc duector, says, 'You l.m't c.ondonr someone for 1gnor.ince, you h.ive to appeal to them .mot1'cr way But wt. h1l hJve to rraJ ic.ite their 1grior.mcc" Written by l\101s s Kaufman .md member of the Tec.tor1c Theater Proicct, the pl.iy looks JI how h.ite 1 born .ind nurtured m a seemingly friend!} mall town hke L.lram1l, \\}o views Bundy reveals that. as a gay man the play h.is been tor tum, ha healing 1oumey through hell " He says he 1s lucky to be .ible to work on thIS plJv, c1 production that 1s one of the "most hopl'ful pl.1ys I've worked on "And hr wants to share its sentiments with oth­ers Bundy grew up m Boulder, Colo so he s.1ys hr can at least empathize to some extent with the mentality of the folks in Lammie "It's the prame, with prame men tJhty," he explains "These pt.'Ofle \\ere totally bhnds1ded b} th cnme com­mitted by their own uth The~ hJd to ~onfront \ t h "But they and" r dw d th hut l " I I ft t DiverseWorks presents Claude Wampler's latest film, •Ambulance,• with premiere screening at 7 p.m. Jan. 18 Wampler has established a reputation as one of the most provocative visual and performing artists working today. Through Feb. 2. Diverse Works, 1 117 East Freeway. 713· 223-8346 www.diverseworks.org. The 2002 Compaq Houston Marathon steps off at 7:30 a.m. from George R. Brown Convention Center The route runs from the center in a single loop that includes downtown Houston, Woodland Heights, Montrose, Hermann Park, Rice University, the Galleria and Memorial Park More than 8,000 runners are expected to participate in the marathon and also in a half-marathon and the Uptown Park 4 on the same day. Marathon runners include Houston fire­fighter Richard LeJarza, who will partici­pate to raise money for the Baylor International Pediatric AIDS Initiative. The Center for AIDS, in association with Alley Theatre, plans an encore perform­ance of •Falsettos,• directed by Alley's Paul Hope. The one-time production ----------. benefits the Center for AIDS: Hope a n d Remembrance Proiect. The theater hosts the event fol­owed by a reception with '--~-~~~~__,the cast Wi'lner of the 1992 Tol"'y Awa d for Best Book and Best Score, •Fa settos• 1s a story about a neurotic family searchmq for fam1 y \i )lues arn1dst a chaotic. co" tempor.uy America T c.kets $'36 50 & $~ 1 50 7 30 p m Alley Theatre, 61 S Texas Ave 713-228-8421. 13 14 JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE 'Project' finds hope after senseless Shepard tragedy :» Continued from Page 13 was in fact only 5'2'' and weighed 1ust 105 pounds. As an African-American woman, James says she knows all about discrimination and meets 1t in subtle and not-so-subtle ways dailv. She equates discrimination against blacks to that against gays. "It JUSt affects a different population, the hatred comes from the same seed," she savs gnmly Veteran actor Rutherford Cravens says being in the play 1s an emohonal expenence for him "It's incredibly moving and I think we all had a sense of m1ss10n doing the play I hope 1t will get people to look at a lot of issues, especially the toxic tSSues of our culture," he expl.iins. Cravens says the killers, Aaron McKinney and Russell Henderson, "are cer­tainly not typKal of our culture, but still a product of that culture It raises a lot of qucsttons and makes us look at what's gomg on in this country." One of Cravens' characters is the emer­gency room doctor tending to Shepard Ironically, this same doctor was tending to McKinney. who got mto another fight after beating up Shepard and had gone to the emergency room for treatment. The doctor was pulled away from Actors and actresses in 'The Laramie Projed' eoch play several roles during ea<h performance. McKinney to treat the mortally wounded Shepard. "It's strange," Cravens says. "One has this sense of inevitable tra1ectory of these three hves coming together and all three lives being destroyed by that coming together." Kelli Cousins also plays several charac­ters in the local production, but for her the most memorable is Zubaida, an Islamic stu­dent at the University of Wyoming. "She's incredibly clearheaded," the actre~s says of Zubaida. "She's the moral barometer of the play. She is saying, 'We Ji!EiA Megaphone is NATIONWIDE! For your local S)'.stem call (800)289.1489 phone SM need to own up to this. Be sad that it hap­pened, but own up to 1t."' Cousins laughs a little wryly when she tells the story of Shepard renting a limou­sine to take hnn to gay bars across the state line in Colorado. Laramie was a small town with a population of less than 27,000 and no gay bars. So it is quite clear that Shepard knew he was in a straight bar that fateful night he met McKinney and Henderson. For Shepard, it was as sad and irretriev­ably a fateful night as it was for those who loved him, but for those left behind, there must be hope that something can be learned from this senseless tragedy. "The Laramie Project" Through Feb. 10 1·30 p.m. Wednesdays & Thursdays 8 p.m. Fridays & Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays Tickets: S 19-23, preview perform­ances; S32-42, regular performances Stages Repertory Theatre 3201 Allen Parkway 713-527-0123 www.stagestheatre.com HOUSTON VOICE •JANUARY 18, 2002 on stage THEATER REVIEW 'Lonely' brings tears, laughter Tragic comedy features men dealing with the loss of all their friends to AIDS epidemic by GEORGI: JO:'\TE "We will k•.iw some tr.JCes, for we are propll' and not cities." Th.it quotl' is ,1ttributed to absurdist playwright l'ugl'nl' Ionesco in his play, "The Ch.iirs." /\meric.in playwright Steven Diet1 dr,1ws a reference from th.it quote to cre;itl• one of thl• most compelling dramas in modern theatl·r repertoire, "Lonl'ly Planet." Cum•ntly being givm a stunning pro­duction ;it Actor's Theatre of Houston, Dietz' "l onl'ly Planet" showcases the writt•r's talent to weave pathos and humor into a tragicomedy that packs a wallop but still ll'il\'l'S you with .i feeling of hope Consider, if you will, having lost e\'l'ry­om• who is ne.ir and dear to you through an inm•dible epidemic Granted, thb epidemic 1~ tlw .1ll-too-f,1mili.u AIDS crisis. /\!OS n•mains .in unconquered d1se.ise that h,is bl'en ,1 cruel th1d to us .ill Peopk• still sit around .ind laml•nt that all of their friends arc gom•. /\nd that b what makes this .:i timl'ly p1rn• of theater even 20 years afll'r the AIDS crisis hrst began The play takes place 111 Atl,:mta in a small m.1p store owned by Jody (George Brock) and centers around him and best friend Carl (Kent Johnson) .md how they deal with the epidemic Jody h.1s dealt with the loss of good friends by turmng inward and becom­ing a rL•dusc - almost an mcurablt• agora­phobic. I le h,15 ,111 apartment close to the m.1p store but h,1s set lip living just 111 till' store. So horrified by tht• ordeal, Jody h.1s even refused to be tested for the virus. I il' surrounds himself with his maps .md his globes to Cl'l'.lll' ,in altern.1te reality, but, 111stt'.1d, cre,lll'S much frustration and an\1- ety tor his pl·r~ona as wl'll as his friend's. !:le oltl•n n•fers to till' w.iy various map­makC'rs disproportion tht.> m.ip represent,1- tions to subst.intiate each one's philosophy of whethl•r tlw earth is flat or round. Carl, on the other h.ind, b Jody's link to the oub1de world. And he 1s faced with the I lercule.in t,1 k of trying to get Jody to reconnect with reality, with the world, and to get tested. I le visits often and starts bringing ch.iirs into the t111y store, provid­ing .in 111m•dibll' stage met,1phor with its cluttl•r, thus pointing out evl'n furthl•r the homfpng m11ity of the /\IDS l'pidemic. /\s tlw pl.1y unfolds, the audience k»irns that the ch.iirs h.l\'e far reaching sigmfi­canre - l',JCh belonged to onl' of thl'ir friends who h.1s JUSt dil'd. This 1s only one w.iv in which C.irl tril':. to deal with the sit­u, 1tion I le 1s also .iltern.itl'ly a restorer of fine ,1rt, tending offtce plJnts and a myri.1d of othl•r profl's.,ions. 1:.1ch of tht'!'l' profes-l ll rm mu 1 um u Kent Johnson plays Carl and George Brock plays Jody in the current stunning production of ' Lonely Planet' al Unhinged Productions, presented by Chris Wilson's Actors Theatre. sions bl'longt.>d to one of the frit.>nds who d1t•d Thts is his war of holding on - if he pretends he is in their shoes and in their ch,1ir, he dcwsn't have to face the reality that they .ire gone. Actors' Thl'atrc has chosen to mount this production in Unhinged Productions' inti­mate space on LaBranch The stage at Unhinged pro\•1des the proper setting, drawing the audience into every moment. Brock h.1s designed a very functional set ilnd mood lighting that capture the full effect of this stirring script Foster D.iv1s has directed tightly yet with ,1 sensih\'e h.ind, allowing the pathos to sl.1p us 111 the face but at the point when we arc 1ust short of wrist slitting, ,11lowing thl• humor to .1tt,1ck us with the same \'l'loc­ity Though young in age, Davis has brought certain maturity to the helm and it works be,1utifully. Brock's Jody h.1s all of the quiet pain .ind inner turmoil you would expect from hb ch.1r.icter 111 great contrast to the more effu­sive and outward characterization of Johnson's Carl. They work beautifully together, ml'shing all those quiet subtle moments that almost bnng you to tears .ind Ihm back to laughter. With ,1 winmng combination of com­pl'lhng script, beautiful direction and seam­less acting by two of Houston's brightest actors, you c.in't help but have a sure wm­ner in "Lonely Planet." Through Feb. 2 Tickets S 10 or SS for seniors and students Unhinged Productions 3304 La Branch Chris Wilson's Actors Theatre of Houston. 713-529-6606 15 SCHMERLER AGENCY 16 The~ Melting Dot. --......_ a fondue restaurant Dip into something differenc!M Tk Mdr ng Poe How11wn·, nly funduc rntaunm ~ heal voted ooc of Hou.Wins •1'-tost Roauntu. D1nins E.s:puiaxcs. .. Come 10in U'I f'or a wuquf' md mumatC' dimttg: npt"ncna IJl a carnal but romfornbk cnvmm· nwnc.. \ic olfa a wide Yaiicty of cnuccc as "'-di n our -*rful chc<.c app<tuen, but don'r furi;n our c:horola dc.'$.4"1U du lun: m.tdc w famou'~ \t', .UC' now fcaruting rhc ultinucc in dining rl=u= A four .. uou-: fu1 :·c t: ... ll .. ,, v '"m1p1C1<'1 chc fonduC' C''<~1cn..:C', CHH.SF FONDUE COURSE $6 700 ~v.·w or Chcdd.1.r Ch""'C':J.C fo11dut. °ln"ln<d lo l'crfa:uon T•blc-Sod< SAi.AD COURSE Bm<r Sw<cr·Coliforn., S.bJ \.hcf's S.l.J or Mushroom ~ .. fad \.iAIS COURSE DESSERT J-.,n M.u~ Lobster T~1a. U:ntn·Cut filer M'&"on, !>r•l\C1C 1igrr Sh,.mp. Choiu: Sirloin Tcri)';Jki, Brcur Of CJudu:n. A&:compan~d Hy An f.xotK Auonmcnt ofVq;<ubk. and s .. ucc" M11k~ Whuc or Ru:tC'r·"'l~tt1 Dark Lh.><.01•« fondu<! Aa:""1pomt<I Bv Fmh Fruiu •nd Cak<s for Drrr•ni; ~Jb c1w1plr. r.B .. p~• pn..,,,, 1J,C11,,,,/t<r) Donuts Yummy Valent1ne Uealf • Buy 1/ 2 dozen Donuts, get 2 Free! • Buy 1/ 2 dozen Kolaches, get 2 Free! w I ad Expires 21 01102 JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE eating out RESTAURANT REVIEW Buca di Beppo brings Italy home Restaurant's huge helpings, family-l ike atmosphere make for a complete eating experience by KATHREEN LEE The scene 1s familiar; Mama, in all her stout and podgy splendor, slowly orbits the crowded dinner table vigilantly seeking white flashes of naked space on her fami­ly's plates onto which she can immediately heap extra servings of lasagna, sausage and spaghetti. She clucks as she passes her 35-year-old live-at-home son's girlfriend, muttcring about her emaoated figure and worrying that the skeletal girl will starve her prL'C1ous bambino. Uncle Tom and Uncle Ray gorge on the bottomless pasta, argue about the maintenance of their 1976 Monte Carlo, gesticulate wildly, and spit bits of food on Noni and Nona, who are quarreling about everything and nothing in particular. Boisterous children run around the table screaming, grabbing food, and pinching each other behind their parents' backs. This is the kind of intimate family atmosphere that Buca d1 Beppo (transla­tion; Joe's Basement) strives to i!Chieve through their "family platters of real immi­grant southern Italian spcctalties" served m a "boisterous, celebratory environment." What is Buca d1 Beppo's immigrant southern Italian cooking? It is the cuisine of the old-pasta Marinara, chJCken Cacciatore, and Neapolitan pizzas - combined with the bounty of the new. Served in family­:. tyle portions, one entree can feed as many as four For instance, the Lingu1ni Cartoccio ($25.95) wraps two pounds of linguini, mussels, clams, shnmp and calamari m an aluminum fml boat and bakes the con­glomerallon in a hght lemon marinade. According to a fnend, the noodles were silkv and moist, and the lemon wheels con­trib~ ted to the flavor and fragrance of the dish with its citrus edge. Our only com­plaint was that despite portions large enough to feed a pachyderm, the mussels were a bit small and many of the clamshells were emptv. A slight shift in the pasta·to­scafood rai10 would have made the dish perfect. Anhnpahng the heavy entree, we start­ed with a fresh tomato ~alad ($9.45), a chunky blend of tomatoes, red onions and mozz.irella drowned m .1 tangy herb vinai­grette. The milky and fresh mozzarclla, the 1uicy quartered tomato slices, and the crisp red onion soaked up the tart dressing and provided the perfect ac1d1c appetizer m prelude to the entree. ~sert portions are no less gar&antuan than previous courses. The Buca Bread Pudding Caramella ($8.95) is basically a Paul Bunyan log stuffed with melted chocolate, raisins and copious other deca­dent fillings. The soft, soggy texture of the bread soaks up the cinnamon, raisin and chocolate blend perfectly to pro\'ide a nch sweet flavor If you're a Buca di Beppo virgin, the host takes your party on a tour of the kitschy restaurant. For those concerned about kitchen cleanliness or those 1ust curi­ous about the machinery of the chefs, there is a kitchen table for six, available with advance reservations, which allows diners to eat in the kitchen while observing the nssembly line. The walls of the restaurant are plastered with more than 2,500 pictures featuring Sophia Loren in her sexier d.1ys, nuns in bumper cars, large family portraits, and various other Itali-ophile photogr.1phs A fnend returned from the men's restroom slightly disconcerted by the main men's room decor of pictures of young boys uri­nating, but fortunately managed to avoid forming unsettling associations. For parties of six or more, Buca di &ppo offers ~eparate dining sections such as the Pope or wine room. The wine room, perfl•ct for office or large birthday p<1rhl'S, feJtures J garden trellis v.ith grape vines and morc than 500 empty wine bottles. The Pope room, appropnate for smaller groups of 10, features numerous portraits of the pontiff and a round table with .1 bust of Pope John Paul II ready to bless the gluttonous feast. '.'vlangia! ~·~ ~~pr" Buca di Beppo 5192 Buffalo Speedway Houston, TX 77005 713-665-BUCA www.bucadibeppo.com Food: fel fel fel ft Service: fel fel fel fel Value: felfelfelfel Scene: fel fel fel fel * Opt for bread, water at home OK, f you really must •• Fine for most ••• Worth the drive, so live a httle ..... lei* 191 ,. rel As good as rt gets HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 18, 2002 THE LOVETT INN llistoric Accommodntio11s • Co1porate Meeting Rooms Ba11q11ct Facilities • ]arnzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub NC'ar Downtow11, Muse1m1s a11d Medical Ce11tcr We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Bf"ud. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 . (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettim1.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! f:low Opin Th~ n~w Col~' s R~staurant 2100 Waugh ®riv~ (between Michigan & .ndiana) 713.94 2.2100 '(l m~rieen Cuisin~ - 5:30 to 10;00 PM: 7 deg£ full l3er op~n +:00 PM fri~ndl(j intimate tltmosph~n~ in th(C h~tlrf of the Montros;z Cefe6rating 25 Years in the Community Satunfags at 7:30pm 1307-:Jf ')afe • 713-ss0-2s12 Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI FREE NICOTINE PATCHES AND USE OF COMPUTER! Stop-smoking research study uses hand-held computer and nicotine patches. EARN$$$ FOR PARTICIPATING! 713-792-2265 Tl-E LNIVER5ffi' OF TEXAS MDANJERSON CANCER CENrER A1aking Cancer History ... 17 18 Maranatha Fellowship MCC Maranatha Fellowship MCC is on the Move! Sunday Morning Services At Our New Location & Time: 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at lOAM For more information, call the church office 71 3.528.6756 Please Join Us For Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love 711at Maranatha Fellowship MCC Hm To Offer! January 20th .. Who is the Holy Spirit'!' Rev. Janet Parker January 27th "Salvation - Receiving God's Gift" Rev. Janet Parker February 3nl "The Covenant of Grace in the Old Testament" Rev. Janet Parker Please Join Us in 2002 for Praise and Worship We Would Love To Have You Visit Us! ·················································································- Church Service begins at 10am and nursery 1s available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more info .•. 713-528-6756 or email maranatha@ev1.net ' I/~ ~~\\ Maranatha ~~ 11 I Fellowship Mttropolltan Community Church RESURRECTION M EUOPOLITAN COV.VIJNliY CHll~CH Turn over a new in 2002! Join us for Worship Services Sunday 9 & 11 am e Wednesday 7pm 2025 W. I I th St. @ T.C.Jester 713-861-9149 ~ www.resurrectionmcc.org JANUARY 18, 2002 •HOUSTON VOICE community calendar saturday, jan 19 Classic Chassis Car Club. Houston annual win· ter video party. Home of Joe Wilson, 1522 Gardenia. 713-680-0141. Houston Area Bears. Social at Mary's, 9 p.m. 2 a.m. www.houstonareabears.com. 713-867 ·9123. every saturday All-Spanish Worship Service/Culto en espanol. 6 p.m. Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church, 2026 W. 11th. 713-303-9403 or 713·861 ·9149After Hours. KPFT 90.1FM. 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713·526-5738. Dignity mass. 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics. 713·880·2872. Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club 9:30 a.m. 281 -437-0636. Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club Call for ride locations. 713·863· 1860. Houston Wrestling Club Practice. 1 :30 p.m. 713-453·7406. Q·Patrol walks the streets 9:30 p.m. Convenes at community center. 713-528-SAFE. E· ma1I: qpatrolincOaol.com St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W. Alabama. 713-528-6665 Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Drop-in noon·4 p.m. • Center cleanup, 10 a.m. • Texas Association for Transsexual Support, 3 p.m. • STAG (Some Transgenders Are Guys), 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne 713·524-3818. sunday, jan 20 every sunday Anarchist Black Cross Federation/Anarch ist Reading Group. 1 p.m. www.houstonabc org. 713-595·2103 Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 8:30 & 10:50 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 713·526·1017. Community Gospel. Service at '1 a.m & 7 p.m Sunday School tor choldrel' 10 a.m. 713 880·9235 or www.commur>otygospel.org. Cove nant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist. Service 9:30 a.m. & education hour 11 a.m. 713· 668-8830 First Congregational Church (Memorial). Service at 10 a.m. Christian Education, 1130 p.m. 713·468·9543 or fcc-houston.org. First Unitarian Unlversalist Church. Serv1ces at 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Brunch available, 10:30 a.m. Pa,.. .. I discussion, 1'30 p.m. 713·526·5200. churchOforstuu.org. Gay Catholics of St. Anne's-Houston 5 p.m. worship serv1Ce Dinner and social alexcamOwt.net. 713·623-0930. Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713·528·3269. Houston Mission Church. Service 10:30 a.m. 713·529·8225 Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m to noon. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houstontenn1sclbOaol.com Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. Service, 6:30 p.m. 713-528·6756 Rainbow Riders. A bocy,le club for women. 713-869·1686 Resurrection MCC. Services. 9 and 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School, 10 a.m. Youth Sunday School, 11 :15 a.m. Handbell Choir rehearsal, 1 30 p.m. 713·861 ·91 49. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rote Eucharist I, 7:45 a.m., Holy Rote Eucharist II, 8:55 a.m.; Education hour. 10 a.m., Choral Eucharist, 11 a.m. 713·528·6665. The Women's Group Meeting and discussion. 10:45 a.m. 713-529·8571 Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Adult d1scuss1on, 9:45 a.m. Serv1Ce, 11 a.m. 281· 277-8882. www.tuuc.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Service, 10:30 a.m. 409·765·8330. Unitarian Fellowship or Houston. Adult forum, 10 a.m. Service, 11 a.m. 713 686-5876. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Cente r. Drop-in 2· 5 p.m. • LOAF (Lesbians Over Age Fifty}, 2 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne • 713·524·3818. monday, jan 21 every monday AIDS Mastery 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713·529·0037 Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713·830·3000. gayDAR. Wellness Community. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-526·1017, Ext. 211. Gay Fathers/Fathers First. Support group. 8-9:30 p.m Grace Lutheran Church. Tom, 713· 726-8736. www.geoc1t1es.com/gaydadshouston/ Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsals, 7 p.m. 713·521 -7464. Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713·526-1017, ext, 208. HIV testing. STD exams and treatment. Free. AVES. ' ·6:15 p.m. 713-626-2837. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at ttie Tennis Center 713-692·2703. Kolbe Project. Eucharist 7:30 p.m. 713·861 -1800. l esbian & Gay Voices Radio Show. 8· 10 p.m. KPFT 90.1. 713·529·1223. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713 524·3818. tuesday, jan 22 Bi·Net Houston. Men's meeting. 713-467-4380. every tuesday Bering Support Network. lunch Bunch Gang, 11 a.m. 713·5261017 CPR Classes . 3 p.m. 713·607 7700. For Mature Audiences Only. Support group. 7 p.m. Bering Memorial UMC. 713-526-1017, Free HIV Testing. Montrose ChnlC. 8 p.m. to mid night. Club Houston. 713·830·3000. Gay Men's Process Group. 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713·526-8390 Gay youth. New program for young gay males, ages 18·29 7 p.m. 614 Avondale. 713-533-9786 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 18, 2002 community calendar Helplng Cross Dressers Anonymous Support group. 7 p.m 713-524-0439 Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience necessary. Practice, 6:30-8:30 Westland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529. HTGA. Support group. 7 p.m. 713-520-0439. Men's Network. Discussion group for social, edu­cational development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 10 a.m.·6 p.m. 281 ·633-2555 Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. Two-hour free dance work­shops. No partner needed. Beginner. 2 Step, Waltz, Shuffle & Swing. Drop in anytime_ 8:30 p.m. 713·528-9192. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6·9 p.m. • Lesbian Coming-Out Group, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713 -524-3818. wednesday, jan 23 Center for AIDS. Women's mixer. 1407 Hawthorne. 713-527-8210 every wednesday Ber ing Memorial United Methodist Church. Dinner. 6:30 p.m. Varoous support groups, 7 p.m. 713-526-1017 Bible Study Noon & 6:30 p.m. St. Stephen's Episcopal 713 526-6665 Free HIV Testing Thorras Street Clinic 9 a.m.-1 p.rr 20' 5 Thomas St 713-793-4026. Freelance Art Classes. By Kermit E1senhut for HIV+ 1nd1v1duals. t 4 p.m. lunch provided. 713·523 9530 Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal. 1307 Yale 713 527 0931 www.houstonprideband.org. Houston Tennis Club. 7:30-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center houstontennisclb@aol.com Lesbian Literature Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Meets every other Wednesday. 713-383-6738 Northwoods AIDS Coal it ion Food Pant ry. 10 a m.-6 p.m. 936-441 1614. Spi ritual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Bible Study 7;30 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861-9149. Women's Network. Montrose Counseling Center drscuss1on group for socral, educational develop­ment of gay and bisexual women. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713-529-0037 Houston Lesb ian & Gay Community Center Drop-In 6-9 p.m • Free HIV testing, counseling. 6 9 p.m. • Houston Committee for People's Radio, 6:30 p.m. • 81-Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. 713- S24·3818. thursday, jan 24 every thursday Community Gospel. Service. 7:30 p.rr>. 713-880- 9235. www.communitygospel.org. Free HIV Testing By the Montrose Clm1c 8 p.m to midnight Toyz DISCO 713·830-3000 FrontRunners. Rum'llng club. 6.30 p.m. 713 522 8021. Gay Houston. New social group for all ages. 7 p.m..,7.\l H&·i3 \8!>-,..,. ,,~ ~ o .. <i o o , \.. . Hep C Recovery. Support group. 6:30 p.m. Bering. 713 526·1017, Ext.211. HIV Art Therapy Program. 1-4 p.m. Kermit Eisenhut. 713 523·9S30. Houston Women's Rugby Team No experience necessary. Practice, 6:30-8:30. Westland YMCA. Kay. 713-208-1529 Lambda Skating Club 8 p.m. Tradewinds. Skating Rink. www.lambdaroll.org. 713-410·7215. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 281 633-2555. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Two hours free line dance instruction. No partner required. Drop 1n anytime. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 p.m. 713-528-9192. STD exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 713-626- 2837. Spanish Charla Conversation Group. Empire Cafe, 7 p.m. Email charlahouston@msn.com. 713 416-7203. Women's Clinic. Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop in 6-9 p.m. • Monthly board meeting, 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713 524-3818. friday, jan 25 Kolbe Project. Movie night. •Moulin Rouge.• 1030 heights Blvd. www.kolbeproiect.org. every friday Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830 3000. Govinda Yoga Club. Free yoga ciasses at 31•5 West Loop South, No. 21 713-439-0455. Houst on Area Teen Coal i t ion of Homosexuals (H.A.T.C.H.) Meetrng. 713-942·7002. Houston Tennis Club. 7:30-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclbOaol.com Kolbe Project. Morning prayer. 10 a.m. 713-861·1800. Lesb ian & Gay Voices KPFT 90. 1 FM. 7 p.m. 713 526-5738 Q-Patrol. Walks the streets. 9 p.m. 713·528·SAFE. Houston Lesb ian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • Hawthorne Men's Club, 7:30 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818 volunteer/self-help Gay & Lesbian Help line. For gay. lesbian, bl.Sex· ual, transgender and questioning youth. Staffed by volunteers of all ages. 6-11 p.m. Monday· Friday. 5· 10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 888 340-GLBT. Peer Listening Line Youth only. Staffed by GLBT youth for gay. lesbran, bisexual. transgender and questioning youth. S·lO p.m. Monday·Fnday. 800-399 PEER. Volunteers needed . Trauma volunteers needed at Memorial Hermann Hospital to comfort and support family members 1n the emergency and trauma departments. 866-666-6772. To /1st an event call 713-529-8490, fax. at 713 519-9531, or e-matl ed1tor@houstonvo1ce com. Dead/me is Monday at Sp.m. .a, IM•• ''" uw :tt11.nu ""-'""""'" W'f""""'.,. L PROFESSIO~AL SERVICES American & Foret11n TAFT STREET AUTO Auto Repair & Service 713-526-3723 1411 Tan Houston.TX. 11019 if your hair isn't BECOMING to you, you should SE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APPOINTMENT ONLY MASSAGE Absolute Let-Go if manmassage.ret 13.942.2399 Montrose Location 7 days/evenings Visa/Mastercard • Outcalls welcome Build Your Business! for as little as $40 Jlouston \ale~ JUanUJ.'t'T' for detaib 713-529-8490 713-269-5743 •••• • Hl11al PLAC • Alignment • Brakes • Inc. 1307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 71 3- 529-141 4 Alignments Brakes 2314 Washington 713-880-4747 Penis-Enlargement.net FDA Approved vacuum pumps/surgical. Gain 1-3". Permanent & safe. Enhance erection. FREE Brochures! Latest enlargement info: (619)295-HUNG or 900-976-PUMP ($2.95/min.) 19 20 houston classifieds Houston Classifieds deadline is Monday at noon ANNOUNCEMEl\TS NIBL 2002 NIGHT N BLACK LEATHER • March 2, 2002 • Rich's • 7pm DAY SHELTER Needs new or used clothing and shoes in good cond1t1on • Contact Etaha or Ruth at 713·528-5667 FLU SHOTS MONTROSE CLINIC S20 • Walk-in • Monday-Thursday 9am to 8prn • Friday 9am to 6pm • 215 Westheimer • 713 830-3000 MR PRIME CHOICE We are looking for "Prime Choice· vest of oar former and deceased w nners Vests are to be placed " tre archives ff yo have one or know where any of the vests are, please call Don Gill at 71'3-S21-0911 EMPLOfMEl\T SOUTH BEACH JR'S MINE 800 PACIFIC AVE Ta mg app cations for a po11uons • t< gh Volume • Gay ri1ght club • C•oup health inst.ranee ottered • Apply in person Wednesday thru Fr day • 1 to 4 pm Rec el'lt photo 11 requ red FREE EMPLOYMENT ASSISTA 'CE Offer rg free emp oyment assis­tance to HIV+ 'ld v1du~ s nclud ng 1ob p eparedness. train· ng. resi.ome development, and 1ob searching ass1sta~ce For more :-•o ca , 7'3-981-' 543 LOVETI INN Houston's Premier gay owned and operated lodging facility 1s now accept ~g apphcat1ors fo• full and/or part t me pos1t1ons • Evenings and weekends required • Call 713-528-6433 11am to 4pm for ore nfo or fax resume ( with proto) to 713-528-6708 or send to Lovettlnn@aol COM Eam what you are worth • Experienced grant research and development agent needed to tar­get pr vate foundation funding • AIDS Housing • % comm1ss1onal position • 713-521-1613 Look ng for someth ng d Herent Lh s S.immer' Fr''IESS ADVEN· TURES, a summer camp for grown· ups is currently interviewing per­sonal trainers. camp counselors, and chefs for the Summer 2002 • Call Ned 0 870-356·2645 for appli­cation. FOR SALFJREl\T FABULOUS Glamorous • Prestigious • Those are Just a few of the words that descnbe THE premier address in Montrose • CoMe experience your stunning new community today • Up to one month free• AMLI Town Sq.se•713- 5224111 • wwwamil.com MIDTOWNE/MED CENTER MUSEUM AREA 1700 sf • Prairie style duplex • 10 ft cei ings 311 • 5 • carpet • Hardwoods • W!D • No pets • S lOOO'mo • 7' 3-526-a634. Heights updated 211 • All appli­ances included • S10751mo . .. deposit • 713-868-6154 S Post Oak/W Oren • 31211 • AC/lieat • WID cornect1ons • Fenced yard • Ce1hrg fars • Blirds • Alarm • S750/mo. • Depo11t +first l"'Onths rent • 713 923 3983. •11 great apartment n 4-plex • Ground floor • Hardwoods • WID • Lots of windows • Monitored alarm • Approx 800 SF • No pets • S600/mo • 281-748-6711 MOITTROSE COTIAGES 1n Garden Cottage • HOO and up • Resenied for People living with AIDS • 90 day MAX • Phone. furnished.AC • Maid paid • No deposit • Sudmg scale fee • No drugs or Alcohol on property • AIDS Housing Coa ltlOr AHCH • 7' 3- 52116'3 OFFICE FOR RENT Second floor office ava1 able at Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center • 803 tiawthorne • 14' X 12'6" • Nonprofit GLBT organ1za­t1ons preferred as tenant partriers. but all inquiries welcomed Call Tim Brookover 0 7'3·524-3818 Furnished rooms in Montrose from S295/Week • For single, quiet per­son • Free cable tv, bleakfast, park­ing. maid serv1Ce • With queen bed, k1tche'1, & auridry access Montrose Inn • 408 Avondale • 7 '3. 520-02061 PRIDERfALITY. COM SALES/RELOCATION HEALTH FREE YOGA CLA.5SES FREE yoga classes every Friday 6:30 p.m. • 3115 West Loop South #21 • No restnct1on1 • No reserva· • -~s needed • ,1 ~ ·439'0455 HOME IMPROVEMENT •w time to get those projects done! Decorating ideas • Planning • Refinishing services. Call JuneRose J.R. Futcher • 713·521-7863 MASSAGE THERAPY MASSAGE Absolute Let-Go Houston Metro 713.942.2399 • Mc:--trose L.Oeat:on • 7 days/e.enings • Vlsa/Mastetcard • CMcalll weteome THE ART OF GIVING PLEASURE Incredible 1 hour session • 8 years experience • Body builder • Noori to midnight • S60 per hour M1tche • 713-521-3359 MASSAGE BY KEN Experience stress relief Convenient Montrose location • By appointment only • • 1 am to 8pm • RMT#028519 • KEN CLAUDE • 713· 524-4759 MASSAGE T~erapeut c • Swedish • Sports • Deep Tissue • Myotheraphy • relax­at1or therapy • Jason • College Guy • Memorial Park Studio • wwws1zz ingmassage.com • 713. 863-8888 FULL BODY RELAXATION by Young Athleuc Male RMT#016479 • Tim • 7~3-876-3811 Massage by David Rangel • Swedish • Neuro Muscular Therapy • Montrose area • MCNl5A/AMEX welcomed RMT #8069 Appointments 713-523-0738 M2M Ttierapei..tic • Swedish • Full Body • By fit and toned masseur • 15 years experience • Evemngs and week· end appointments available • RMT# 1664 • John • 713-398-3226 FOR ACTIVE MEN Your time for personal attention • F.ill Body Swedish Massage • Jose RMTI 17316 • 713·397-8286 ' Beginning o "Rent" S Singer ICorriiloH •o. Sexy clothing material '4. Stuff for oral grat1ficat1on 15. • the book· (excuse for not seeing 'The Nizaroof Oz") 16. u.rich of a andl"'ark gay rights case 17. City of Capote's birth 19 Spin like a top 20 01rect1onal ending 11 Earl>art concern (abbr) 12 Reacts to Ph1.adelph1aJ perhaps 23 Some of Rita Mae's d191ts (abbr) 25. Writer wtio modeled a character after Capote 29 Milo of 'Ulysses' 30 Nuts of a tall one 3 • .overs h t tt>ern l3 Coag1.1 ate 34. Francisco 37 It might zoom toward a nude model 38. _ ass (moves q~1Ckly) 40. Like Edde luard s comedy ·11 Queer 42. Transgender hero of "Stone Butch Blues" 43. Corrects 45. Where Muffin Spencer-Devlin takes her driver? 4 7 Very queer ·18. Wit~ 58·Across, Capote no11el 51. _Wu of verse 52. Bea Arthur's TV maid Esther 53._polloi 55. Personal-ad info 57 Britney Spears · _ Curious' 58. See 48-Across 62. Roehr>'s refusal 63 Joe of JFK 54 San Francisco's castro Suites et al. 55 .• Anything 56. Like Mary 57 It goes on a hero s meat, maybe JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE 'f"H:ir• a r ·>lem n 'TFe Boys in the Band" 2 Beloved, ike Chastity's mom? 3 Guitarist Pete 4. •sards of _ Jima· 5 "To a Mockingbird" (novel with the char-acter modeled atter Capote) 6. Franklin, who sang "Through the Storm' with Elton John 1 Room opening' 8. "Fixer Ct>ao· author Ong 9. Meas. of a braggart' '0. They cut eaves of grass '1 Cotton Club singer Waters '2 R E.M frontman ~1chael 'J Hung like a 'B. Charged l2 to the botto (sark) 24 Queens rule over them l6. Singles out, pertiaps 27 Use X l8. Al ce Walker output 29 '952 Olympics site wtiere Dick Button won gold 32 Bundle of faggots 34 Madre ol Mary' 35. Boy George charactenstic 36 Org that may include bears 39. Deg in "The Thin Man• 40 Rip Tern's voice ro1e in "Hercules" 42. Part of a Margaret Cho routine 44. Berristein theme, e.g. 45. Chicken hawk's weapons 46 Hoagland's "Lesbian 48. Etheridge's • Me Some Water' 49 Julian's part~er m a porn flick 50 .nterior designer de Wolfe 54. Out _ {drunk) 56 Old name m 011 58 . • nv1tat1on to a manhunt? (abbr.) 59 Address book abbr 60 'T~e Waste Land' author's 1n1t1als 61 Pr pare to shoot off Answers on Page 22 HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 18, 2002 M2M • Se'lsual Rubdowns • Hot. young and well-built • RMT# 17254 •Call 713-494-402l SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK • Relaxation • Myotherapy • Deep tissue • (RMT#024589) 713-807- 7109 • 713-S01 -98S2. • 1 1/2 hours f r SSO 1 Hr. S40 MASSAGE THERAPY AT IT'S FINEST Swedish • Deep t .•• u • Sp• 'rts • Reflexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out • Hotels • 7 day • Nationally_ certified# 01Ei074 • Jeff • 713-825-<IOF~ MASSAGE Treat sore ,t r 'TIU ,cles. tension and stress • Renewed flexibility and wellness • RMT #016479 • Tom • 713·S20-6018 Full Body Work by Young athletic stud •RMT# 172S4 • Call 713-529· 1109 JOB STRESS? TOUGH WORKOUTS? Call now for a relaxing therapeu­tic Swedish massage • Body builder & licensed therapist • RMT#OOS930 • Randal • 713-S29- 3348 Big • Strong • Muscular • 8 years experience Noon to Midnight • S60 • Mitchell • 713-S21-33S9. AIKAYOGA MASSAGE A two tiour mteract1ve Massage blending Thai Massage and Yoga • Eastern style Mat Massage for Upscale Professional • Tim on Richmol"d • 832-687-5786 OCCASIONS CCCC Member John P. blows out his candle on Jan. 20 Yes Sir' Yes Daddy Bob Sir! Bob Houghton of Blackhawk Leather snaps his birthday whip on Jan. 21 Sexy Jim Sorgini celebrates his birthday on Jan. 22 PETS AFGHAN HOUND PUPPIES Cyan and Devashunii Kennels • AKC Black • Black & Tan • Cream • Blue • Blue & Cream • White • Hand raised • Championship lines • www.devashunii.com • 202-S46- 08S4 HOUSTON HUMANE SOCIETY NO ANIMAL TURNED AWAY!! The HHS relies solely on donations. They receive NO local, state, or federal government funding. Call 713-434-S555 to find out the many ways YOU can help, and for adoptions. PEf SlillNG BOOK FOR YOUR VACATION •Pets love their own home evel' when you can't be there• Established 199S. Book your vaca­tion now • loyal989@aol.com Call Loyal 0 713-942-8816. PRODUCTS & SER\. 1CFS www.rainbowprod.com Rent-to-own SO" Big Screen TVs' Starting at S31 99 a week 800-774-4SS3 Rent-to-own Computers' Starting at S 19.99 a week 1-800-422-3368. Nutritional weight loss products at manufacture's price • Prob1ot1c • Antioxidants • HGH Compound • CPD • All natural • Top of the Lll"e www.voyagergroup1nc.com 877-314-6610 PROFESSIONALSBMCES M2M BODY GROOMING Body Waxing • Clippings • Coloring • Personal grooming by Dale. Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist. Private location in Montrose. Call 713-S29-5952 for appointment. ROOMMATES GWM ookmg to share 2/2.5 condo • Gated complex • Covered park "1g • pool • Westbury • Smoker preferred • Deposit nego­tiable • S400/mo + 112 1.t1 1t1es • 713-721-9432 Noon to 9pm. SGWM • 38 • Seeks roomate to share 2br apt near Galleria • Prefer nonsmoker, no drug users, social drinker • Clean & Responsible only apply • Cal Ronnie 0 713-977-3168 To share 3b home in SW Houston • S9 & Fondern • Smoking OK • No drugs or substance abuse • All bills paid • S395/mo • 713-n3-9029 GWM to share 311 home in Oak Forest • Unfurnished room • Nonsmolcer • No pets • Cable • SSWmo. + ut1uties • Deposit mo . 113-812-9433 TAROT READINGS 2S% Off during January • Ask about my February Reiki Intensive Course • Bill O'Rourke • rain bow prod .com/bi Ibo 713-864-2233. VOLUNTEERS STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregivers for transitiona housing program for HIV+ adults • Must have high school d1pl0Ma and experience as a caregiver • Contact Ms. Straham 0 713-S22· 57S7 or fax resume to 713-S22-1910 WANTED TO BUY CASH FOR BOOKS 713-659-5266 1s expanding and has an immediate opening for an ADVERTISING SALES REP. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated achiever with proven expenence in sales, ideally in advertis­ing. We offer competitive base plus commission, benefits and incentives. Apply m writing (no phone calls!) Spring Cleaning time is coming. Advertise your yard sale with us! call Carolyn 713-529-8490 no later than Feb 8, 2002 to: Ad Sales, Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006-3942 Equal Opportunity Employer 21 r- - - ------------------------------------------------------------------, PICK YOUR CATEGORY FREE': Call for guidelines HIV Services & Education - Volunteers Non-Profit Organizations "Fir\t 20 words INDIVIDUAL RATE $10: Ann• 1uncements Auditions _ Employment-Seeking _ Pets-Free or Lost & Found _ Roommates Personal Web sites BUSINESS RATE $18: Auto Repair _ Business Opportunities _ Entertainment _ Help Wanted Help Wanted-Seeking _ Home Improvement _ Items For Sale _ Licensed Massage Moving Services _ Professional Services Real Estate For Rent Real Estate For Sale Call 713-529-8490 for other categories Classified Order Form Fax: 713-529-9531, Phone: 713-529-8490 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring completed order form with payment to Houston Voice offices (M-F. 9-5:30 pm) 500 Lovett. suite 200. BY MAIL: Ma I completed order form wrtt> payment to Houston Voice Oassrfieds, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX. 77006. BY PHONE: Call m with coMpleted order fon"1 to 713-5~90. BY FAX: Fax COMpleted order form and credit card 1nformat1on to Classifieds 713-529-9531 BY E-MAIL: crobertscthoustonvorce com AD POLICY: Houston Voice reserves the right to edit. reclassify or reJect ads not meeting Houston Vorce standards. No refunds for early cancel.atlO<' Misprints. Houston Voice JS not respons•ble for misprints appearing after first week. Check ads promptly Deadline for ad submission is: MONDAY at 12 NOON WRITE YOUR AD TOTAL YOUR COST Please print clearly CALL FOR DIRECTORY AD RATES CATEGORY: _ ______ #OF ISSUES: Giant or Bold Headline - Not to exceed 14 characters and spaces !I lJ I I I I I I I I I IJ INDIVIDUAL RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 10.00 per week. Add1t1onal words at soc each per week. Up to 20 words: $10.00 Additional words __ x 50¢: ___ _ TEXT: Bold headline: S.00 (per week) ___ _ Subtotal , of issues Total BUSINESS RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 18.00 per week. Additional words __ x 75( per word (per wee!<):, ___ _ Bold headline: 5.00 (per -.ek) ---- Subtotal __ _ #of issues Total S _ _ Name: Address: ------------------- City _ _ __________ State __ Zip. ___ _ Phone _ __________________ _ Check Enclosed __ Charge to my 0 AMEX '.J MC ':I VISA Card # tx.p.__J_ Signature _________________ _ _ ------------------------------ -------------------------- 22 JANUARY 18, 2002 • HOUSTON VOICE • M BBIND Answer to Puzzle on Page 20 0 A s 3 1 s 3 0 ~ THI s N ~ s 3 N I 3 N s 0 s 11\1 I 1 1 0 ~ Singing 'V 3 ~ 8 MIN a N a 1 3 1 No Auditions! All men are welcome to join the l 0 1 H s Gay Men's Chorus of Houston N ~ 0 ~ 'V s 0 in our exciting new season with new director Mr.James Knapp 3 3 1 ~ ~ 'V Form s d 3 ( ore· Rehearsals are Monday evenings (7pm-1 Opm) . 713) 52 1nfo, at Bering Memorial United Methodist Church info@ 7 SJNG ~ I H M N '9rnch 1440 Harold Street ·Org 0 l l 0 3 ~ (off of Westheimer in Montrose) The Montrose Songers, Inc d b a. Gay Men's Chorus of Houston Is a 501 (c)(3) non-profit organiz.atJon H s 3 11\1 I l ~ 'V HOUSTON VOICE• JANUARY 18, 2002 M Sta , by JILL DEARMAN YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE Jan. 18 - ]an. 24 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) Your ruler Mars is spreading passion and intensity through your body and your mind, darling. Act while you are feeling fearless. A Cancer wants you to hit the gas and go. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) This is the right time for you to organize your agenda. Make a list and check it twice. Only you can make your career what you want it to be. A Pisces wants to bring more love into your life, darling. ® GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) The moon meets Saturn in your sign on Jan. 24 and could make you feel a bit heavy and oppressed. Allow your emotions to guide you to action, darling. You need to move, before you stagnate and stiffen up like the Tin Man in the "Wizard of Oz." Luckily, another Gemini can help you to find your heart. CANCER (June 22 to July 22) Five planets in your house of serious relation~hips are pushing you to dig deep within your soul and face your fears of commitment Yep, you talk a good game about love and marriage but your knres are knocking. A Virgo wants to see how far you can go. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) With several planets in your opposite sign of Aquarius, you need to take a rest, darling. Let other people fight for you and take care of you. Act helpless for once. It's not an act! You don't have much control th~e days but you do have a lot of love on your side, especially from a Libra. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Jupiter in your friendship house is spreading s\\'l'Ct platonic vibes. Av01d the urge to make everything sex~al, darling. Your compub1ve side needs a rest. An Arirs is ready to start something decidedly un·platomc. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 221 Take several small steps, darling, before you do a~vthmg radic~l. You have the .ibility to travel in very speaal circles. Use your abahty to wear di_f~ermt mas~ to learn more about the world. Your diplomacy leads you to a multilingual GemlIU. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Lay low in late January, darling. Figure out what other p~ple need fr?m you and gm• ti to them This as your time to be as accommodating as possible. Out of charncter for you, I know, but just do it. A Leo just wants to do you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) ~wral planets hook up in your communication sector in late January, whKh me.ms that you can remove the foot from your mouth and say manr profound th111gs. Kudos! An Aquarius is impressed by your transformation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) Money make$ your world go 'round - now more than ever, baby· as sewral key planets transH your h_ouse ot fin,1nces. Get as much bang for your buc~ as you can, dear. This 1s the hme to mcrease your wealth. A Virgo can help you increase your stamina. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You may go on a thrilling emotional ride in late January, as your birthday season begins. Let go and let love rule. A Scorpio can introduce you to a truly passion· ate way of life. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) This is a particularly poignant time in your life, Pisces. You know you have to Jet go of an old love, but letting go 1s so hard for you. A Libra can help you to put your misery behind you. /11/ Dearman is the author of the brst-selli1!g ·Queer Astrology for 0m" and "Queer Astrohicy for Women" (both from St. Maritn s Griffin). For information on charts and consultations, call 212-&tl..()177 or e-mail QScopes@aol.com. ----~~----~--~--~~~---------·~·----..,.,. .... .._. __ .... _.. ................ _____ _ DON'T LOSE ALL YOU'VE WORKED FOR ... ~f>wi<'CI ynm 12mt11n o 1 /r1111it') ! . INCOME REPLACEMENT-buy tt before you become side/disabled for 30 days or more CALL BREENA KOBY SALES AGENT 23 INNOVATIVE LIFE-it has many new features (eg·it grows cash fast!) LONG TERM CARE-<overs nursing home, home care, adult day care, etc. (O) 281·240-7028/281-564-3736 (M) 832·443·7972 LET'S TALK! if you a-e l.llSll'e about ctaiges that should be mOOe In your life 901 Richmond 0 Roseland, 2 Blocks East of Montrose 713•522•4485 Bronze Package Own the British version that started it all .... Silver Package Series 1 & 2 Was'$9Q_now only 84.95! (save $5) Seri• 1 & 2 and the soundtrack Was "$1~now only 89.95! 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