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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
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Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 001. 1996-06-21. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6880.

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(1996-06-21). Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6880

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996 - File 001, 1996-06-21, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6917/show/6880.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 817, June 21, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date June 21, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript L.~ide ' !\HOWS no borders. HoustonLesbian&GayPrideWeek1996 rz 0 ~ ::l ~-------il AbouT PRidE Pq. 4 COACH FiREd Pq. 8 OuTsidrn Pq. U JANis IAN Pq. 22 0 :c PRidEWHk Pq. 25 7k 1/o(a o{- ~~4 ~· .t~, ~~ & 7~ eOf#t#rt.JIU'f L ... ______ ... JUNE 21, 1996 • ISSUE 817 The Folks That Make it Happen The Pride Committee - They make it happen! B) Debor ah Bell Every >·ear in late June thousands of queer foll>s gather along \\estheimer to watch one of the largest parades held annually 1n Houston. Some have joked that e\en 1f no one put on the parade there \\OUld still be a gathering of spectators as tf by instinct, I kc Theater LaB brings controversial play to Houston B) Andre" Ed monson Houston, TX - Theater L aD continues its tradition of bringing Houston the most challenging ne\\ pla)S "hen the company presents the South\\est premiere of Poor Super Man - A Play With Captions. The play arrives in r exas on June 26, trailing a sheaf of glowing re\ 1cws from cri1ics and a great deal of controversy the vice squad sho\\ed up. checking "hcther the shoYi's frontal nudll) and simulated oral and anal sex. and blunt language violated public decency Time Maga7ine's esteemed theater critic William A. Henry Ill also caught the production. He selected Poor Super Man as one of the ten best plays of 1994, praising the piece as a witty, moving slice of urban life -­In Cincinnati, where Poor Super Man gay and straight, gay and sad." received its world premiere in April 1994• This is familiar territory for the acclaimed Transgender Conference Independence D~y weekend The Sth Transi;ender La" Conference will be held at the Ramada-Astrodome Hotel in Houston, TX from Jul) J-7. The conference is sponsored b) the International Conference on Transgender La" and Employment Policy. Inc. (ICTl. EP). Health Law Standards On Thursday PM, Ju ly 4, a single workshop will be devoted to the "Health Law Standards of Care for Transsexualism" as promulgated by ICTLEP in 1993. There has been so much misunderstandi ng about the intent and the coverage of these Standards, that ICTLEP has invited its principal drafter, former IC'TI l:P Health La" Director, Martine Rothblatt, Attorney to explain to and answer all comers. She will also compare these to those of the Benjamin Soc1et) On Friday P\I, July S, another single workshop (no competing workshops are scheduled) will be devoted to the Gender Identity Disorder (GID) category in the Diagnostics and Statistics Manual of the American PS)c hiatric Association. There has been such abuse of GID in the DSM. there has been such a clarion call by the transgender community to kill the GID category, and there has been a loud opposition that wants GID in order to obtain insurance coverage, that ICTl.EP has invited a very involved investigator, the Staff Attorney for the National Center for Lesbian Right!, Shannon Minter, Attorney, to chair this workshop. lfis interest began in this area when several teenage lesbians were institutional11ed by their parents usmg the GID as a medical weapon to bludgeon these (Conlmued on page 13) gay Canadian pla) "'ight fraser 1s perhaps best known for his earlier won;. Lmdenufied Human Remains and the frue "'•lure of Love, "hich pla)ed to critical acclaim in Canada, London, and :Sew York. In both plays. Fraser takes an unflinching. often funny look, at the \\a)S m which isolated ) oung urbanites attempt to connect sexuall), spiritually, and emotionally. In Poor Super Man, a gay painter, blocked in his work, tries to jolt himself by taking a job as a waiter. To help the young couple "ho own the restaurant. he induces his closest female friend, a beguilingly bitch) columnist, to tout it in print. The place thnvcs. So d~ passion between the painter and the young husband. "This play is for adult audiences only," a flyer produced by Theater LaB for the production steml) "ams. Did Fraser set out to pen a play that was deliberatel) designed to push people's buttons? Or was he, like man) artists, simply follo,.ing his own uncompromising inner voice? An essay he wrote that accompanies the published version of Poor SupcrMan sheds some light on this question. "Being a homosexual, my work quite naturally includes a great deal of overt homosexual content," he observes "Men fall in love and have sex with other men Women get involved with other women Cocks are sucked Asses arc fucked. Vaginas arc licked and fingered. People have sex All kinds of sex. I find it impossible to write about fConlmued on page 2) lemmings unite to d1\C tnto the sea And many seem to think that all the glitter and glamour of the parade and fesuval happens b) magic. The truth c-f the matter is the parade and all of pride \\CCI. rs put together b) a small committee of se,cral dozen people. Their \\Ork "behind the scenes• 1s a year long labor ntenstve effort. Jure 11 several hundred people gathered at rhc C uy of Houston f\.fuJo .purposc Service Center to hear about the final arrangements for this year's Pride Parade. The rules are revie\\ed, quest.ons ans"ercd and lme-up numbers are announced. At podium arc Robin Duncan and Ray Ramirez who arc the Parade co-chairs, 1ust part of the committ<'C that \\orks on the project known as Pnde \V <'Ck Ray opens the mceung and announces that special tents that "111 be available for those \\ith special needs, including \\heclchair seating (see related sto') pg. 9). American Sign Language interpreters wt .. also be "' ailable for those" ho need them. Before going O\Cr the rules and regulations that are part of the mandatory mccting for all parade delegations, Ray asks "ho among those present "ill be m the parade for the first time. Included among those arc; Supercuts, Secret Lives (A community soap opera m the "orks), the Ga) and Lesbian Yello" Pages, The Transgender Caucus. Sparkletts Bottled Water, C ub Attitude, Manline, and Altematl\eS (a matchmaking service for Gays & Lesbians). The rules that have developed over the years stem mainly from 1nsu~ance liability (Continued on page I 81 Conductor Stephen Stein See page 3 2 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21, 1996 ETCHED IN MEMORY. PRESERVED IN GRANITE. THE AIDS MEMORIAL BOOK. It's made of solid granite and bordered "panels" in which you can inscribe the name and date of your departed family member or friend. Proceeds are donated to AIDS charities through an advisory board composed of local leaders in AID"S-related services. To make an appointment to see the terrace" call a Forest Parle Lawndale representative at 921 -66L3. The Foundation for Interfaith Research & Ministry and Forest Park Lawndale THEATER LaB HOUSTON presents the controversial play the Cincinnati vice squad wanted to close down POOR SUPER MRH by Br ad Fraser An erotic story of a gay artist and a married man. EXCLUSIVE SOUTHWEST PREMIERE Opens on WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26th at 8:00 PM FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS thru AUGUST 3rd at 8 00 PM SUNDAYS, JULY 21st & 28th & AUGUST 4th at 6:00 PM All TICKETS $18 ~ 1706 ALAMO OFF 2100 HOUSTON AVE. This play contains sexual situations/nudity ~~'..1!:~~~vby HOUSTON VOICE TICKET INFORMATION 868-7516 Poor SuperMan continued ... (Continued from poge I) relationships without including sex. It seems unrealistic and irresponsible. ·1 am aware that many people are uncomfortable with sexual behavior, particularly homosexual behavior. Especially in America where straight white men prefer to keep all gay contact in the dark where they can indulge without their wives finding out.• And Fraser feels that the scene depicting a sexual encounter is integral to the flow of his play. "It's (the play's) about love and trust and by that point in the play the audience knows the characters intimately and the context.• he says. "No one has walked out yet - not even in Cincinnati, and that's real middle America.· Whatever happened in Cincinnati. the poy,crs that be at Theater LaB arc standing firmly behind Fraser and Poor Super Man. And with good reason. In September 1993, Theater LaB staged a splendid production of Fraser's Unidentified Human Remains as part of its inaugural season, winning hosannas from the critics and playing to sold-out houses. "Watching a work by a playwright in full command of his materials is the most exhilarating experience. • declared Jeremy Kingston of The Times at the premiere of Poor Super Man in London. Brod Fraser, ployvmght ""Poor Super Chances are that Theater LaB has another hit on its hands. Brad Fraser's Poor Super Man -- A Play With Captions will be performed at THEATER LaB June 26 - August 4, 1996. Tickets arc $15 and $1 8, with discount tickets available for groups of ten or more. To purchase tickets, call 868 75 16. Theater LaB Houston is located at 1706 Alamo, j ust off the 2 100 block of Houston A venue. Poor SuperMan has been generously underwritten by The Houston i 'oice Pride poster to benefit Visual AID San f·r;rnc1-sco, May 27 Uay Area artl't Franl Pictron1gro, unveils a commerno rat 1ve fu ll color J1g11al media print lltlcd f.:qualit_v anti J11H1u· FtJr All . dur· mg Pride Month 1996. which hon ors le-h1an and gay divcrslly. A portion of the proceeds will hen· ef1t V1~ua~ AuJ. a non-prot 11 oi:-gan1za11on ded1cateJ to f1nandally assisting ar11s1s w, l AIDS and orher hie-threat CQtng 1 nes ... es. The Whne House has JC~nowledged grat11ude tor bemg pre'Scntcd w1lh this h1s10r 1cal documen• l·uM Lady 1111 •ary Rodhatn r• nton wrote to the 41r11st. 0 Thank you tor the pie tcre. l:quahty anJ Justice I or ·\I .' YoJr encouragemcqt and supp1..rt a'"e especially mean 1ngtul to me:· Equalll)' tmd 11Hl1cr f or All. pn~sen1s 1welve lcstuan and gay (:ouples f J1vcni;e cultural hack· ground.,. and ages Fach cmtirac- Equalll_\I anti Justu:e for A II on• c~uple is captioned w11~ ""·or~s of affirmation including Honest and C.raceful. Cartng and Respons1hle. \'monuy and Tender. Strong and hH­g1ving, I ovatilc and l·rec. Crca11vc and .Sp r1tual Intu111ve and nUmorous. Open and l'houghtful, Ju<t and Honora­ble Founded in 1989 Visu;il Atd JS a San Fran­c 1sc o based nu~·profll organ1Lation dedicated to financially ass1s11ng art· ists with lite threatening illnesse-. so that chey may contrnuc makrng arc. Visual :\iJ s program" relieve arc1sts trom the 1solallon ot illness. promolc dialogue 011 AIDS and disab1I J1y w1thrn the crea- 11ve fll: ld, and guarantee 1hc inclusion of arusi.. with AIDS and other lite-threaten· ang illnec:ses an che foreground of our cul· cure Frank P1euonigro currently serve~ a~ Boardme1nbcr ol the Cutro Street Fair Corporation Frank has been actively exh1b11ong in San Franc1'cn since 1978 and his work ts represented rn galleries throughtout the Untied States He has served che commu111ty as an arcs adm1111s trawir through the productrnn ot San Franci>co s Art In The Park 111 1982 and t 983. lie was appnmted by the San Fran· c1.,co Arcs Commission to Director of the San Francisco Arts 1:esllval in 1985 Equahty an<I lustier Fnr All is also being h1ghllghtcd 1n the Castro 01\tfltt's world wide web Sile located ~l hcqi·// wwwwcbcaslro.com The print will he located on WebCastro's Gallery which showcases ocher fine arl created hy frank: Pietronigro Printed in a l11nucd ed1t1on, this 18 .. it 24 •• full color print " hcing oiler for col· lect1on in both signed and un'1gned e<.11· lions. Prints are available at $35.00 lor a signed copy and $20.00 tor an U11'1gned copy and can be obtained by sending a check pay· able to; Ma>terwor ks to PO Box 193163, San Francisco, CA 94119-3 163 or by call· ing 4 I 5·695-0933, Shipping charges of $5 95 &hould he included with ea<h order 20 percen1 ot all proceed-s gtncrated from sales will Oenetll Visual Au.I Stone Soup MacGregor Medical Association has presented Stone Soup, an HIV/AIDS food pan1ry, wilh a donation of non-perish­able necessity items. Bins for collec1ing goods such as paper towels, diapers, toilet paper. tissue and detergenl5 were placed in the waiting room area of each MacGregor facili1y. Bo1h patien" and siaff con1ribu1ed to 1he collection Taking care of llousionians since 1953, the MacGregor Medical Associ­ation 1s accredited by the Joint Commis­sion on Accreditation of Healchcarc Organizations (!CAHO) and 1s the exclusive contracted provider for Pru­denlla l HealthCa re HMO. Th ree Plays Three new plays by three women will be presented Fr id ay, Sat urday a nd Sun­days l h rough July 7 th at the Chapul1- epec Restauran1, 8813 Richmond. The short plays have been 1ermed out ra­geous, ou1la ndi sh and out o f the o rdi­na r y and i nc lude Transmigration of Existtnct by E lizabeth Gilber t , Cas­ktt lttttrs by Holly H ildebrand a nd A littlt Litt larctny Part II by Diana Weeks. F r iday a nd Sa1urdays June 21 to July 6th curiain time is 8:00 p.m. and Sundays June 23 and July 7 performances will be al 3 00 p. m Dallas Singers T he Turtle C.rcck Chorale, Dallas' world renowned 200 member male cho­rus, has announced 1he 1996-97 concert season entit led "Old Friends" focus-lhe chorale will look back at old fiends with revivals of some classics and audi­ence favorues No specifics for llous1on appearances were available but the chorale did announce 1hat a selec1ed group will be per­forming Kris Anthony's "When We No Longer Touch" on Washinglon DC al the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt dis­play 10 October Current Issues Barnes and Noble (Wes1he1mer at Yoss) will be hoscin& a discu~sion of current gay and lesbian issue< at 7;30 p.m. Wed­nesday June 26 wi1h Shelly Potter of the Human Righ1s Campaign. Eric Roland of Outsmart Magazine and Sieve Nettles of the Montrose Clinic. Legal and polltical issues such as !he receni S upreme Court ruling o n Colo­rado's Propos11ion 2 will be led by Ms. Po rte r, Mr. Ro la nd wi ll lead a d iscu s­s ion on the role of media and contempo­rary gay lilerature and Mr. Nettles will d iscuss loca l se rvices and oppo rtun i­ties. A rime for quesuons and answers will fol­low. For more information please tele­phone 783-6016 Ho us ton Area NOW The Houston Area NOW Chapter will be d c lcgar ion number 66 in thi s year 's Lesbian &. Gay Pride Parade. All NOW members are asked to Jll'" 1hem at the line­up s11e. This is the fim ume since 1992 1hat the group has marched in 1he Parade For rng o n n o~ tal g t a, comfo rcaOle things morC' 111forma1ron ca ll lht.• JI A N OW Hc.H· and familiar faces. While moving ahead, line al 665-8NOW. Symphony Nights with Stein HOUSTON ·Continuing a trad111on begun on 1940, the Houston Symphony offers "' 561h season of free concerts. lnown this year as the Houston Chroni· cit Summa Symphony Nights , for !he public a l Miller Outdoor Thealre beginning Friday, June 21, with addi­tional concens l·r1day, June 28, Satur· day June 29, Thursday. July 4, and Satur­day, July 6. GueSI soloisis appearing wi1h the orches1ra in these concens are viol in­ISIS Hilary Hahn and Eric Halen, cellis1 Sophie Shao. and pianislS Angela Cheng and Scott Holshouser. Each of 1he free concert< begins at 8:30 p .m. al Miller Ou1door Theatre, 100 Concert Dr. in Hermann Park A Joyous Ovenure on June 21 siarts off the series with Stephen Stein conduct­ing. Stein's many appearances in Hous­ton dale 10 summer 1991, when he led 1he orchesira 10 Sounds Litt Fun! perform­ances al Miller Ou1door Theatre Since his appointment 1n 1992 as conductor­in- residence, he has conducted on v1r­iually every series-inc luding !he Clas­sica I Season, Exxon Pops, and Wood­land Pavilion conceris. To his eve r ­expandmg schedu le of North American guest conduc11ng appearances, he added h is in1erna11onal debul in Jan u­ary, 1996. wuh iwo weeks of concens wi1h the Israel Chamber Orc hes t ra African -American conductor Isa· iah Jackson, who made his debut with the Houmin Symphony '" 1995 will conduct Parisian Nights on Friday, June 28 Jackson makes has second appearance w11h the orchestra in a concert sho_w· cu.ma the u lents of the second prize winner of !he 1996 Housion Symphony Ima Hou Na11o nal Young Artists Com-pelition cellt<t Sophie Shao Jupittr and Stars on June 29 brings S1e­phen Stein back 10 lhe podium. in concert w11h soloist Erit<Halen in the Prokofiev Violin Concerto No.2 American com poser Aaron Copeland', Music for 1he Theatre and Mozart's Symphony No.41, Jupiltr, are the orchestral selec­t ions Spirit of Amtrtca on Thursday, July 4 h ring~ out all the p1cn1cs, flags. and fire· works wluch along with the Houston Sym· phony concert have hccome a Founh of July tratl it 1on for thousand~ of Hous­tonians This year, S1ephen S tein leads the orchestra and p1anis1 Scou Hol­shouser in music that captures the spirit of America Beginning wllh Tht S1ar­Spangltd Banntr , S1ephen Stein con­linues with Aaron Copeland's Fan/art , for lht Common Man and four dances from I Rodto ; Georce Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blut , fea1uring Scott Holshouser at the keyboard; music of George M. Cohan and Du ke E lling ton: Anderson's Bug/u's Holiday : an audience sing-along of Texas songs; Tchaikovsky's 1812 O.-u­lurt . and Sousa's the Stars and Stripts For..-u March Admiss ion 10 Miller Ou1door Thealre is free. Tickets for the covered seat ing a rea are ava ilab le at the T hea t re's box office be1ween 11.30 am. and 1:00 p.m. 1he day of the perform­ance. For information call 7131520- 3290. T he llouslon Symphony's perform­a nces a t Mi ller Outdoor Theatre arc sponsored in part by the City of Houston through !he City of Hous1on Parks and Recreation Departmenl and 1he Miller T heure Advisory Board. Inc UFPER IDE GK Hotel --- Sunday - Thursday $49 50 .,., per n 1ght for 2 Weekend Special 2 nights - 2 people s125., .. Suues Available Up to 4 people 11- ()~ .. '" ~ ~ thd· Crews Quarters Bar lst Gay Bar on South Padre Island! 120 E. Atol Street P.O. Box 2309 South Padre Island, TeJCas 78597 (210) 761-5953 FAX (210) 761-4288 We accept Visa/MasterCard Write or call for a brochure. HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 3 I listen - I hem· you I care When you need healthy solutions for: Deprr~ .. ion and anl.irty • Dpfunrlional family/ inrr t • AIDS related ronrern• • Relation•hip ;,,ues/ ohame • Compul:--he un .. afe .. r"ual heha,·ior • ~cw Solutions For Lh ing Stan l uhl,... Jr .. L\IS\\ -,\( I' 713.526.8802 hna,ge ... until iliey get to know you, it's what's on the surface that counts. With that, do you want your nnage quickly spla..,hed on paper> Or do you want Hou.'< of Coleman to ink a hener jolY HE IMAGE INKER t:> rt E 1 ~ House of Coleman Fine Pnntm_i: & C.rnp/Jro 90 1 W ES T At ABA M A ·HOUSTO N , TX 77006 4693 713.523.2521 • FAX 713.524.2643 YouR Ou1 & PRoud ClmHiNG STORE 12~2 WEST~EiMER lH/522-1626 HOURS MoNdAy-SArnRdAy 10 TO 9 SuNdAy 12 TO 6 Sltow YouR PRidE GREAT SELEcTioN of GAy/LEsbiAN PnidE MEncltANdisE TCAps TDEcAls TGihs Tl-S~iRTS T JEWElRy TMAGNETS s~~~. OPEN PRIDE SUNDAY 11 To ~ SEE YOU AT PRIDEFEST! 4 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 1996 In Loving Memory Epitaph for Cal Moran STEVEN DOUGLAS ROACH It's been a year since you went away Born March 3. 1954 the pain and grief still remain, Died June 9, 1996 an empty hole in my heart Steven D Roach, 42, a resident of Houston, Texas passed away on Sunday, June 9, 1996. Steven was preceded in death by his father, Calvin I still possess, and all I have left is to write In memorium of the man I loved as a friend, a confidant. a mentor, a father. Bernard, and mother, Clara Dean Roach. He is survived by his brother, Glen Roach of San Antonio, Texas and nephews, Patrick and Christopher Roach and many friends So few understood, so few can. but we understood, and that's all that matters And I will carry my load and try to resolve what I can here on this earth Steven was an active member of the Executive and Professional Association of Houston and formerly a member of the Miss Camp America Foundation. Steven was also very active in many committees and fund-raisers for the Houston community until 1n another lifetime A memorial service will be held at Rothko Chapel, 1400 Sul Ross at Yupon, 5 p.m Thursday, June 13 If you wish to remember Steven. donations may be made to Omega House, 602 Branard, Houston. TX 77006 I can see you again I miss you Daddy Cal. Love your daughter, Jackie Pride -What's It All About By JACK VALINSKI The Pride Commutec lf Houston, Inc. is a non-prof11 75Ul(c)(3) organization whose purpose 1s 10 ceordinate and pro­mote events which celebrate the diver .. s11y, unity and history of the Lesbian and Gay Community. The organ1za11on's bylaws do not discrimma1e on the basis of color, sender, transgender or bisexual 1den11fica11on, the physically chal­lenged or dofferently·abled or on 1he basis of ace. Every year this group puts together not only the annual parade, but ten days of events either sponsored by the group itself or in coordination with dozens of com­munity organizations to commemo­rate, educate and celebrate our pride and to create a pllh towards a positive future for all humanity not to exclude any seg­ment of who we arc as a people. The Story Behind Pride Week Most of us know the story by now, but II always bears repealing. One of the more volatile and cmot1onal social move­ments m the nauon"s history emerged on a summer night 27 years ago at a ransacked bar in New York Cuy's Greenwich Vil­lage. At 3:00 a.m. on June 25, 1969, police raided the Stonewall Inn investigating alleged liquor violallons Until then. raids regarded as routine harassment of bars catering to homosexuals had met only token opposition. Wuhin minutes. however. more than 400 people had gath­ered in nearby Sheridan Square and a riot erupted. More disturbances followed the next two nights. A minoraty shrouded in mystery, fear. self-deprecation and loathing decided 11 had enough It was the Le'1ngton of a civil nghts movement, a gathering of forces and the beainning of a tumultuous march. The true story of events surround­ing the Stooewall nots has always been a bot elusive. and media accounts printed at lhe time appear blatantly biased and notably ladrng 1n factual det11I. However, the above quotes tell the story that IS most widely known, and the results of that night in New York Cny can be seen today as our national community grows in both rnflu· cnce and in sta1ure in our society. In I 970, a noted gay activist from Los Angeles named Morris Kight (who was born in Texas by the way) was responsible for the ' Remember Stonewall vigil that has become a yearly event around the coun­try. In 1975, the first gay and lesbian march tn Texas .. as held m Dallas as a part of the Stonewall remembrance. Community act1v1sts in Houston held a widely attended news conference that summer ,..h1ch announced, among other events, the formation of a polttical coahuon that has become the Houston Gay and Lesbian Polmcal Caucus. The Houston Story 1 In 1975, an estimated 200 people held a march m downtown Houston to commem­o ratc the Stonewall riots. which was sponsored by the fledgling Gay Activists Alliance of the University of Houston. Singer and former beauty queen Anita Bry­ant's appearance as featured entertainer for the Texas Bar As~oc1at1on convcn- 11on in 1975 brought an estimated 5 ,000 angry protesters down Houston's streets. The heavily publicized march, headed by such notables as gay publisher David Goodstein and Rev. Troy Perry of the Mctropoluan Community C hurch was in vivid reaction to Ms. Bryant's involvement supporting an anti-gay ordinance then in effect in Dade County, Florida. A few weeks later. Houston's community held Its first Pride Rally in Cherryhurst Park to celebrate what has become a national holiday for Lesbians. Gays and their allies Over 4 ,000 community activists met at the A.<trodome m 1978 for Town Meeung, the first organizauonal &athering in Houston that included gay & lesbian peo­ple from every aspect of Houston society. Former state legislator and vice-pres­idential nominee Frances 'Sissy' Farenthold was the keynote speaker, and the meeting was chaired by Virginia Apu­zzo, a lead1n1 gay activist who became Executive Director of the Nat1onal Gay and Lesbian Task Force m New York. Many of Houston's gay serv1ccS, including the Montrose Counseling Center and the Montro•e Clinic, were formulated and organized at the first historic meeting During the 1980> the AIDS ep1dem1c hit the Gay commun11y. With little federal and almost no state and la<:al help, the com· mun11y responded first by dealing with own mortality then by building commu­nity inst1tut1ons dealing with AIDS. Smee I 979, the cay community of Hous­ton has celebrated Gay and Lesbian Pride Week (alternating wnh Lesbian and Gay) with a full schedule of events in late June. Where We Are Now This year we are celebrating 'Pride 1 Knows No Borders' ma year m which 'out' ha• truly been ·m· -m the news, m the world spotlight. The involvement of gay and le<b1an people on the elec11on process and the seemingly endless det>ate over the military ' s an11-gay and lesbian policy have ushered rn at last , a time of intt:nse attention to our issues in the overall pub· he. Gay men and lesbians. our lives, goals and political movement have rtcc1ved more senous coverage rn the main stream media, print and electronic, in the past su months than they have m over a dec­ade. Pubhc op1n1on polls continue to show that while most Americans support equal rights for gay people, the majority of Americans do not understand that no fed­eral law protects lesbian and gay people from d1scriminat1on . Most people do not know that II is perfectly legal to fire someone in the 41 .1ttate.11 that do not have civil rights protection based on sexual orientation. Driven both by the positive anitude of our government's new administration and the swift and fierce negative back­lash to the changes from the radical right, role models seem to suddenly be crawling out of the cracks in the pavement. They are everywhere, coming out or coming for­ward in d roves, and thc ar appearance has coincided with a reexamination of val­ues. policies and approach in society at large. Just as the participants in the parades and the marches on Washington and state capuals represent a cross-section of a broader gay and lesbian society, our com­munity is a microcosm of society itself. Cons1derin1 this, we arc about as much 'like everybody else· as we are ever going to get. That we define our vision of a nebu­lous •everyone' deservina of our respect and emulation in terms of a minority within society that rejects U) 1s an irony rooted in self-hatred. In the wake of 1993 ·s March on Washing­ton for Gay. Lesbian and Bi Equal Rights and Liberation, and with this year's flood of positive media portrayals of gays and lesbians, it would appear that pride, diversity and being Out are good for us after all. It 1s true that sexual orientation is only one aspect of an 1nd1v1dual's pcrsonal- 11y However, historically and in today·s political climate, 11 is not cay and lesbian people ,..ho have made the biggest deal out of 11. While we are consistently described » an aggressive and powerful lobby, m truth we are only now regrouping from an overwhelming blow the AIDS cri­sis landed on our energy. leadership, organization and polllical firepower Meanwhile. those whose political agenda 1l has always been to deny U) bu1c human rights have maintained thetr pres­ence and power and have become more aggressive If we are here celebraung that we have a respon>1hil1ty to support the weary. warrior. who do more than their share of our community'~ worl. We also ha~e .• re>pons1bihty to personally part1c1- pate, each m our own way, and to offer our leaders the insight and guidance they need from a broader and more representative commun11y We have reason to celebrate. But now 1s not the umc to compromise ourselves back into a closet of obscurity, even a pad­ded one with a view We make positive strides and wtthsund negallve aggres sions from )ilcncc to celebration . Another way to reach us! You can now send your letters, news leads, and other correspondence to the HOUSTON VOICE by e-mail. Address to: Hou Voice@aol.com. IVOICE :: .,. ... , ........ c .......... ·rz::'--- ISSUE 817 June 21. 1996 Published Fridays Estabhshed 1974 as the Houston Montrose Star. re-estabhshed 1980 as the Houslon Montrose VOtt:A. changed name IO The NM VOtCe 1n 1eg1 mcorporating the New Or1eans Crescent City Star. re-estabhshed December 1. 1993 as the Houston Voice 811 Westhe1mer, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 Contents copynght t 995 Office Hours· 9am-5:30pm weekdays Crlld Ourentpubhsher Jack Leonardtgenet•I m1nager Matthew Pennongton/p<Oduct>on menager EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Deborah Moncnef BelVod•t"' STAFF WRITERS Jon Hamson. Marl< Henry, B R McOonold, Carolyn Roberts, Javier Tamez, Glen Webber CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Jon Anthony. Sam Dawster. Andrew Edmonson, Keny Kadel!. Chns Lambert Curt Momson Jazz Paz, John Reed CARTOONISTS David Brady, Scotty, Eart Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS David Goelz, Kim Thompson ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Lee Davos. Carolyn A Roberts CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS Maggie Brahe!< NAllONAl AOIJ[RTIS+NG REPRESENTATIVE R,.,.... M-._.mg p 0 SOI 5U!I. 'Nledleld. NJ 1908) 232·2021 MJllt:»lo~..,. ~,_.~,.,_,._ .. 9'!ec:t,.,.M~1995 _,,__.or~ f'tlP'OCkdon o1 any-~,..... ..-tldeOt,._,. CIOP)'Ol'~frornlt'lllHouMor!Voa• _....,.....,. __ _.QpnorW 4txptMMd br cobMiata or c::.toc:ristS •• not r.> ....-ay 9lOM ol h ~ Voa or iu staff and we....,,.. no i..bM)' tar h CDnlent nprllllMd or mplled ol Mid a-tlCIM or -lik.,....olS*'W)nl5WigordNd tNlorh:tlonilll.,lhe --P\.GICltiOn oflht '*Yleor ~of srry penon or Ot· ~'°"In 8'10.. or~.,,,. Houston Voa •not 10 be construed aa "'Y 1ndahon ol IN M•U91 cwl9l'Ub0n of saidl*IOl"lor~ -The 8PP8•rce of~~· or opiniOt'tl ••Pl'"* ....,..,.. do not CO'lltilul• .., 9ndorMmet'C or ~ by Tht Houl1on Voa or 111...,. HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 5 GJ.\Y PRIDE SU~tDJ.\Y VVED~IESD>\ Y JOIN US AT llpm TO BID FAREWELL TO CA TIA LEE LOVE AS HOSTESS OF OUR WEDNESDAY NIGHT MALE STRIP BOY TOY Ji~~~~ CONTEST DANCERS WE:K GAY MEN'S FICTION: Flesh and Blood, Michael Cunningham Pub. Price SI 3.00, LOBO PRICE $11.70 LESBHN STUDIES Dyke Life, Karla Jay Pub. Pnce SJ.100, LOBO PRICE $12.60 GAY MEN'S STUDIES De Los Otros, Joseph Carrier Puh. Price 516.50. LOBO PRICE $14.85 with LOTS O' PARKING and TWO ENTRANCES LOBO is the shopping place to be. LOBO is now located at 3939-S Montrose Blvd. LESBIAN BIOGRAPHY Aimee and Jaguar, Erica Fischer !'uh rice SUDO. LOBO PRICE $19.20 ANTHOLOGIES/NONFICTION Gay Lesbian Li ary Heritage Claude S mers, ed Puh. Price S./. .Oo. L BO PRICE $36.00 COHE 'l'O LfJ/JfJ HHl ALL ~()(J ll f>Illltl~ WEEK NEEltS ! 6 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 i. 132!, ~~I~~~!: ••• (713) 529-1414 BILL CLAIRE FAMILY MORTUARY • Private Cremation sm Complete: ""''·· ...... lllC. On o4 CoauTll for lbe FU1JilJ' • ~ele F....,,.al • Pre-Arranged S«vices n-ttome Servtces • Pre-Need Insurance • Alignment • Brakes • Al .,..ance Polcies Honored • 522-9030.=t~~. TEXAS AIR. NC. Air Conditioning & Heating Specialists 880-4629 ::E l 1 -=-ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED ~ 'w:t. A00610C Prooily Serving OUR Comm.riity OV8' 12 Years! W ~r~~ v~; ~ ~ 'R~ ';;le'te!! rr"t_ ;i -4' Call for details ~ ~~. . . ,;, v (713) 529-8490 _,, Beyond Remorse, Beyond Recrimination, Beyond Recovery Discover Yourself l)js,over 11-41'~ t-f110 N Al.11'\' SELF DIRECTED GROWTH for Individuals, Couples and Groups Dr. Charles C. Perroncel Intentional Therapy by appointment 526-9259 ••••••••• Proudl4 Assistinq Lesbions & Go4s to Discover & Celebrate !!PRIDE!! SfteWlU ~ 1 Oz. Long Stem Roses $19.99 "' fl// /tanging Baskets ST.99 AU7~20%o{t floral arrangements for all occasions fTD World Wide Service and local delivery Fresh Cut Flowers Terra Cotta Pottery Bedding Plants Topiary Animals Tropical Plants HanQ111g Baskets Vases, Cards, Gilt Ideas & more 112 Westheimer (near Montrose Boalevard) (713) 529-6050 ~ Better to die on your feet than Live on your knees I feel real bad for Dale Carpenter and the Log Cabin Republicans. I've been where they arc and I would not return for anything It's going to be hard for them to get away, too. It may be the hardest thing they will ever do I was not a wanted person when I was born . My parents were not dis ap­pointed m me per se, they iust failed to sec how I could be comfortably accom­modated onto their plans . Occasion­ally I was tucked under an adult's arm and toled about to meet their appointments. More often I wa s iust ignored . Day-to-day I was tolerated by my folks as the family masc ot. They disc ussed my di s abil1t1es and immaturoty, bad coordination and their embar­rassment of me as if I were a dumb pet. The mos t frequently mentio ned word regarding me was " stupid ." If l had been a pet I would have been left behind at a rest stop . To the neighbors, and everyone else whose admiration they coveted , my parents were a little defensive of me, as if to suggest that I was not repre ­sentative of their "other" children I used to fantasize that they loved me, but that for some political reason I did not grasp, they were not really free to say so Consequently I never felt like I was one of them . I never felt like an inte­grated part of that family. I imagine the Log Cabin Republicans feel the same way Alter soliciting a donation from them, and getting a check for one thousand dollars, Bob Dole returned their conu1but1on when he realized that they were gay. That must have hurt, but probably not as much as seeing Dole publicly waffle on his position. That made them goofy with hope that perhaps it was all a misun­derstanding, and they were not an embarrassment after all. Hope inspired swift action and the aspiring Republicans applied-and were teasingly accepted-as a full par­tic opating member of the Texas Republican Convention, complete with their own booth and full -page adveruscmcnt in the program . Surely this meant acceptance' They were mem­bers of the family , nowl But The Family realized their error (or tired of their JOkc) and dispatched a severe rejectio n and re fund o f pay ­ments o ffered for sa id provil eges Membership in this organizatio n is not for sale, they miffed Dale Carpen­ter says that the Republicans should "live up to their word ," I think that they have. I think what Carpente r wants is for them to change their word-and their heart. He said so himself when he said he hoped the party officials would " reverse their blatantly discrimi­natory decision ." I don' t think that is going to happen . "But no matter what they say or do," he said, " We arc not going away." Andrew Hodges and David Hutter had 11 right in 1977 (With Downcast Gays): "We have been taught to hate our­selves. How thoroughly we have learned the lesson! " Dale Carpenter needs to find himself a new family I know. Wave at Jazz in the Pride Parade. She will be marching with htr family. The Houston Pride Band . AVES presents Latino Pride Gala Houston-On Saturday, June 22, 1996, Amigos Volunteers in Education &. Services (AVES), Inc. will present "Latino Pride Gala", an official event of Houston's Lesbian & Gay Pride Weck . Maior sponsors are National Interven­tion, Merck & Co., Mendez Counseling and Xavier Luna, Mr TGRA 1997 Candi­date. The Gala is a semi-formal dance which continues the tradition begun 18 years ago to celebrate pride in being gay/lesbian and Latino/a and is open to everyone. The event will be held at the Edwin Hornberger Conference Cen­ter, former sue of the Shamrock Hotel, on the Texas Medical Center (2151 W. Holcombe @ Shamrock), from 8:00 p.m. unul 2 :00 a.m. Admission to the Gala is a $30 tax-dcducublc donation ($40/ door), which includes open bar all eve­ning. Latino music (Tciano, salsa, cum­bia, etc.) as well as country/western and other dance music will be provided by the Accent Band. AVES os a non-profit community based AIDS services organozauon . The mis­sion of the agency os to promote a healthy community through educauon. dis­ease prevention , advocacy and direct care to Latinos and ocher hostorocally under-served populations . AVES works to empower these com~unttics by res pecting differences . •n lan­guage , culture and sexual identity Those rcccovon& services from AVES include men , women and children, 70" are Hispanic, 20" Whott and 10" Afri­can American. Approximately 70" of the population served os gay. All pro­ceeds from the Gala will enable AVES to continue its m1ss1on. Angela Mora, Executive Director of AVES, os pleased to present this event to show her gratitude to the lesbian and gay community. "I found out recently that the Latino community would not have the dance they usually have during Pride Week and, with the support of my staff, our Board of Directors and some individuals from the lesbian and &•Y community decided that we would take the responsibility of or1anizing a similar event . Cons1derin& the immeasurable amount of support that AVES has received from the Latino les­bian and gay community and the gay community in general, this os the least we could do,'' Mora stated. She added, "Through this cclebrauon, every­one will have an cnioyable evening and at the same tome allow us to raise funds to enhance our programs for the benefit of the entire AIDS community." AVES will also participate in the Pride Parade and Festival. Advance tickets can be obtained through 8:00 pm .. Friday, June 21 , at the AVES office, 4126 Southwest Free­way, Ste 1717 (Twelve Oaks Tower) . Tickets will be available at the door on the night of the event. For more informa­tion , call 626·2837 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 1996 7 Gay Groups case goes to Supreme Court GOP Emergency Appeal By CURT MORRISON In a resounding victory for our community, a Travis County District Judge last week. ordered the GOP to grant the gay and lesbian group. Log Cabin Republicans a booth at the state convention and a full-page advertise~ ment in the convenrion program. State dis~ tri<t Judge John K. Deitz ruled that the party had violated the group's right to free speech under the Texas constitution In his ruling Dietz cited broad consticutional princi .. pies as a determining factor in his decision Dietz ruled that GOP officials cannot use .. unfcuered discretion" as a means co restrain freedom of speech . As e•pected, the GOP asked the state Supreme Coun for an emergency appeal in an aue"1>t to reverse the lower courr ruling. The GOP entered a Writ of Mandamus, an extremely rare and extraordinary course of legal action It is highly unusual for any Supreme Coun to grant such an appeal. Be that a.< 11 may, the Texas Supreme Coun agreed to hear the appeal. The hearin& took place Wednesday N OT A LL BATTLES ARE FOUGHT WITH A SWORD. OCTOBER 11 13, 1996 AIDS MEMO IAL Ql/ILT DISPLAY WASlllNCTON DC NAME~ ProJ<a: 415-882-5500 Tr.tvd Info: 800 926-2631 June 19 at 10:00 a.m At press time, a decision had not been reached . ·•tt is disappointing 1hat par1y officials have expended precious resources and time to keep a Republican group from having a six foot booth in the Alamo dome, rather than fighting to elect Republicans and to defeat Democrats," said Log Cabin State Presi­dent Dale Carpenter. "I just can't under­stand why party officials are afraid of a full and fair debate on an 1mpor1an1 public issue like gay and lesbian civil rights . They're 1reating 1his booth like it is a threat to west· em civilization or an auack. by the Bar­barians on Rome " lesbians and their right to parcicipate in the political process, jt 1s a victory for the principles of free speech and equality and the right to contract," he remarked at a crowded press conference in Austin Log Cabin has received tremendous sup­port from mainstream Republicans throughout this ordeal .. In contras1 to the intolerance and narrow mindedness of parry officials, we have received tremen­dous support from mainstream Rcpubli· cans across lhe state;• said Carpenter The Houston Chronicle rcponcd 1his week that Te<as Gov. George Bush, a Republican, said internal parcy figh1s over abortion and opposing gay rights should not be taken as signs that the party is incolcran1 "The vas1 majority of Republicans m the stace of Tex.as arc tolcran1 people and good people." said Bush In addition, Carpenter rejected specula­tion from state GOP officials that Judge Dietz's decision would open political con­ventions to cx1remist groups ... The party's parade of horribles is an auempt to divert attenuon from the fac1s. Pany officials were caught red-handed m an act of discrimina­tion.'' retorted Carpenter The Supreme Coun ruling aside. the group IS looking towards the future . .. This is no1 an end to our struggle. it 1s just lhc beginning," said Carpenter "We will continue to work: in our precincts, m our counucs, m our sen· ate districts, and in every state in this coun- Pruid•nr of Lo1 Cabin R•publicans­Dale Carpenur Carpenter hailed Dietz's decision as a vic­mry for all concerned. ''This is not a victory just for Log Cabin. It is a victory for gays and try, to convince the pany that 11 should adhere to its fundamcn1al principles of limi1ed government and individual freedom,. f NEW LEATHERS AND STYLES! Herds of new leathers and styles. - .. ..... '4 ... -·. Geneva 5-Seat leathi;_r Sectional l11998 Quasar ~.ee; ather Sofa S999 Fre<co Leather Sofa $1499 D1ablo ~eather 5<,fa Concord b-Seat C~a"e leather Sernonal $1399 54549 Leather Leather has brand new styles and new leathers. Choose from our quality leather solos, sectionals, sleepers, recliners, chairs and ottomans now available in even more styles, leathers, and colors than you could ever imagine. So head ·on out to Leather Leather today and see all the new styles and leathers we have in store. LEATHER -··· ...... ,, ........ ·-·•·"•4• LEATHER D1llu • H1utt1 7519 Westheimer, Houslon, Texos 77063 713 977.9393 Opeo Mondoy-Friday 10·8 Salurday 10-6 Sunday 12·6 _J 8 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 1996 CRAD DUREN, M.D. __j/ou.1lon, Around the World Celebrate Your Pride 1213 Hermann Dr, Suite 430 Cn3) 520-0653 Internal medical pracuce offering discreet confidential care to the community, including HIV/AIDS diagnostics & theraputics ~c...;-, 'L. • ..c.,.c.~i--­" 9"'11'!l:"-...1J' ~~'9' ?69.tti·~ Winning Coach Loses Job By DEBORAH BELL Holly Nuber. coach of the Pearland High School "Lady Oilers" had led her team to a state championship this year, but after the May 18 victory she received a poor evaluation and was relieved of her coaching duties. Nuber, the first and only female health teacher at the school has been employed by Pearland Indepen­dent School District for six years. Last year the team made it 10 the state district SA playoffs. The team was invited to the Astrodome after their championship win and Nuber was honored lo throw out the gamcball. The joy of that victory has now turned sour, even though as she told the crying girls from the team when they heard of her dismissal, " They can never take away what we did this year," Filing a grievance to be reinstated. Nuber claims that she was unfairly evalu­ated by Athletic Director Van Nelson and has suffered both sexual discrimi­nation and bias due to her perceived sex­ual orientation. Nelson has expressed anti-gay sentiments a number of times according 10 witnesses allegedly stat· ing. " We don't want that lifestyle in Pearland. We want positive role mod­els for our kids." Susan Lenamon, PISD communications director said 10 an interview with Channel 2 News, "That would not mailer 10 the d1s1nc1. Sexual onentallon 1s a pnvatc mauer." She also reports that the d1s1nc1 has not faced any legal action due to sexual discrimi· nation to her knowledge and 1hat 1h1s 1s the first such charge against Nelson m his 3 years with the district The distribution of a book called "Enough 1s Enough" by a Baptist Church rn Pearland is also cued as being rcspon s1blc for ins11gat1on of this episode One chapter 1s tilled "Out of the Closet and into the Classroom •• The testi­mony ot witnesses will be crucial to Nuber winning her case, and it is feared that many will not come forward wllh 'up· port due to a possible "witch hunt." especially by other teachers who fear Io's of their jobs Nuber, herself named All American Outfielder in 1985 and 1986 while play· ing for Stephen F. Austin, said that her evaluations over the years by Nelson were very critical, with what seemed to be nit-picking and many things she felt unfairly cr111cized for. " When I would receive a review I would feel really low, 1 really doubt myself.. but l tr1ed to use 11 as an opponunity to learn from my mis­takes ... ways 10 do 11 beuer Sure I make mistakes but I try 10 improve. I love what I do and really love working with the kids." A number of parents also have been cril· 1cal of her, but she says most of the par­ents and her team have stood by her. ''I've worked hard 10 build the program. The team 1s a dynamic group of kids and I feel privileged 10 have worked with them. I also try 10 make sure that I've taught them more than softball," Nuber expresses. Asked 10 elaborate she says. "Well. if they make an error in some way I tell 1hem to go a little slower, examine the way it wu made in the fir.I place, and think of how 11 can be corrected-don ·t make another error by acting 1n haste. Like 1f you say something in anger th•l you don '1 really mean. then don't make 11 worse by not going back and apologizing·· Another exam· pie she offered was, "If you are doing weight training and you end up wllh a weight that 1s more than you can handle, go back and use •omething a lnllc lighter Just hke m life. ~omcumes we take on more than we can handle and we have to know when something becomes a burden and find way' to lighten our load" Ken Oswwald, whose daughter was on 1he team said that the champion!.h1p could Winning coach Holly Nubtr not be credited to Nuber's coaching, .. the team would have won with or without her.'' Denise Lee, a softball player who has played on a ch•mpionship winning team said "There is absolutely no way the team could have won without their coach. No mailer how talented the individual players, they could not have been a win· ning ttam without a winning coach." She continued, "a successful coach does more than choose the hne-up and call the plays. She has 10 have the ab1hly to instill the inspiration to win. as this coach obvi .. ously did." After hearing of Nuber's sue cess in her first year of teaching, working w11h special education studenlS 1n a poverty stricken area in the Texas val· Icy. one wonders what belier role model Nuber could be One lmle boy who al the age of nmc could not yet read, also lacked verbal skills so he could barely talk mtel· ltg1bly and rarely oaid anything lie had been abused and neglected mosi of his hfe. Nuber took eflom 10 give him special aucntion. One day she asked the class "If }'OU could have one wish come true. what would it l:lc? .. Nuhcr wat 4u1tc surpnscU when he raised his hand in response His answer was to say his dearest dream was to be able to reac.J. Ahcr three weeks of work .. ing with him not only was he reading at a primary level, but actually could assist some of the other kids. One of the things Nuber h3' been Crill· cized for was that she did not wear her uni .. form to the games. 1'There are no uni .. forms," she says According lo her, Ncl· son i~sued maroon coaching shirts (team colors are maroon & while) that were "men's style" and asked that 11 be worn with khaki or black "dockers" style pants. "The shirt was of thin material and I did not hke the way 11 or the pants looked on me. I wore the same clothes I wore la•l year and there had not been a problem then," Coaches in other spons also did not follow Nelson's suggested "uniform" and did not get in trouble for it The points of the grievance filed lune 14, are that Nuber was unfairly evaluated and not renewed in her coaching duties for reasons which are: I) discriminatory against her because she 1s female; 2) are retaliatory because she had com­plained to the district"s executive director; 3) are retaliatory because she exercised her first amendment rights to speak out on issues of public concern (sexual discrim1nat1on), and 4) arc a denial of her right to equal protection on the basis of her sexual or1entat1on Nuber retains her teaching pos1t10n Asked how she feels about stayin& there, e.pcc1ally 1f she docs not win her griev· ance she says, "When I leave I want 1110 be on my own terms. Even wuh my case set .. tied win or lose. there are things that need to be dealt w11h there." Assistance and support may be offered through contacting Allnrney Darah Headley at 286·3346. Tell EVERYONE you sow it in the T HOUSTON VOICE Message from the Parade Co-Chairs By ROBIN DUNCAN & RAY RAMIREZ O.K. gang, lhe bog day is fasi approaching and we want to send a few special messages 1hroughou1 1he communi1y Fi"t of all, in consideralion of !hose w11h special needs, 1here will be 1wo "Safe Tems" sci up along lhe parade rou1e . One will be "air condilioned" and is in lhe parking 101 of Hollywood Video (The old Tower Thca1er in case anyone has for­gollcn). There will be seating provided and II os wheelchair accessible. The 01her locauon os the parking 101 of 811 Wcs1he1mcr. There will also be water s1ations in both of 1hese areas. Please spread the word of you know ofany folks who could benefit from these special areas. And please, be rcspcc1ful of those who need the special scaling. The parade line-up (bclwccn W. Alabama and Westhcomcr on Hazard and Wood­head near Lamer Jr. High) will begm al 2:00 p.m., w11h all uni1s in place by 4:00 p.m. Floals will be linmg up on Harold, east of Woodhead, all other units should be in consecutive number order. Since Haz­ard and Woodhead will be closed to traf­fic during lhis time, please avoid the area unless you have official business there. The parade will step off promp1ly at 5 00 p m .. go East along Westhcomer to Tafl, where II will then 1um in to Loven Blvd. The Fesuval is al tha1 sue, so you can JUSt fol ­low the end of the parade to the party! Be sure to pro1ec1 yourselves from 1he sun and heal. Wear sun block, a big hat , shades, and drink plenty of water (carbonated beverages are not good lh or SI quen­chers). Pe1s are bellcr off lef1 at home. Las1ly, bu1 by no means leas1. trash con­tainers will be set up along the route and at the Festival Siie on Lovett. PUT THE TRASH WHERE IT BELONGS. The Pride Commillec is responsible for the clean up of the area on Monday, and you can make our JObs a lot easier by helping us out. If you have kept up with the on gomg debate in the Houston Voice. you are aware that there is much hostility from area rcso­dcn1s and businesses regarding the mess the Wcsthcomcr Fes1ivals make. Be sure not to block residential driveways and respect private property, do not destroy lawns or use them as to1le1s. Let's prove we arc an example 10 follow, by not li11ering and by properly disposing of trash. Have a fabulous Pride Weck, we'll sec you on Sunday! Happy Trails! What You Need to Know Lack of information os a big problem in 1hc HIV communi1y. Many people liv­ing with HIV/AIDS lose valuable righ1s and benefit~ hecau~e they jusl don't know the proper procedure of steps to take to pro1cc1 themselves. Allorney Muchcll Ka1ine and Social Worker Roseann Houseman have tcamed­up to help the community by offering a series of free workshops on various top­ics. The workshops will cover every­thing from how 10 use heal1h insurance and go on long-1crm disabihty, 10 employ­ment issues and the preparation of estate plannrna documents Various topics will be covered and each is designed spe­cially 10 teach you wha1 you need to know. The Friday workshops will be held at Oncol Medical Associates, 4140 Soulhwest Freeway, 4th noor from 6 to 8:00 p.m. There IS no fee 10 allend and will be held each mon1h, cxcepl November. I Everyone is invucd to aucnd, but due t~ limited seating rc~crvat1ons must be made by calling 961 -7100. How To ... Workshops Schedule June 28· ·Bow to go on Long 1erm disabil ily. July 26- How to use your health insurance for HIV medical care . Aug. 30-How 10 protect your cmploy­mcn1 if you arc HIV positive Sepl. 27-How 10 sell your life insurance Ocl 25-How to gc1 your cs111c docu­ments in order. Dec.6-How to unders1and your insur­ance benefits . HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 9 Where you can be PROUD OF WHO YOO ARE! 713.629.0600 2200 Post Oak Blvd., Suite 450 Senior Lo;an Officer Houston, TX 77056 Pager 919-5626 Lesbian/Gay Lending Specialist THANKS FROM SYDNEY M'f~~ aHJ~~ TUA FRidAy, JUNE 21 AT 900pM ~·ver ./Ua.ks fine Cars HI! We're you~.e~eiqhbor! Heavenly Cars at down to Earth prices. 1912 S. Shepherd at San f elipe 521-3880 Free HN Testing at Clinic Ms. MONTROSE CONTEST The Montrose Clmoc will expand ils HIV testing hours on recognition of Na11onal HIV Testing Day, June 27. Regular hours wlli be expanded to start two hours earlier at 11 :00 a.m. and con­tinuing to 5 :00 p m. The testing os offered free of charge but a donation os requested (S0-$20), however no one is ever turned away for inabiloty to pay. Appointments arc encouraged though not required by calling (713) 520-2000. This will be the second annual National HIV Testing Day campaign which began last year 1hrough the efforts of the National Association of People with AIDS. HIV whole not as yet curable, is becoming a more manageable condi­tion as a rcsuh of new medicines and heller hcahh programs. However, knowing one's own HIV siatus, regard­less of age, race. gender, or sexual ori­entation, is 1hc only way to begin potentially lofe-prolongong early treatments. The Montrose Clinic offers onc-on­onc peer prc· tcst and post-1cst counsel­ing . The clinic provides a comfort•· ble and professional environment where clocn1 anonymity and privacy is highly protected. Currcn1ly, Hous­ton ranks seventh in the nation for the number of AIDS cases and Texas ranks fourth among 1hc states m 1hc na1ion. The Clinic urges all persons who have never been tested or not tested rcccnlly to schedule an appointment. The Montrose Clinic plays a pivotal role in Houston's HIV care, providing the most HIV tests for a coty sotc and offering specialized HIV medical and research services . The Montrose Clinic is a not-for-profit, community­ba< ed Unucd Way agency cSlablishcd to serve people in 1he Hous1on area by providing low or no cost health, social, educational and research services. It spccoalozcs on identifying unmet needs and developing client-cen­tered programs to address 1hosc needs. The professional staff and volun­teers of the Clinic arc dedicated to pre­venting 1hc spread of disease, prov1d- 1ng early diagnosis and promoting appropriate intervention . Co ME CHOOSE f ROM OUR bEvy of bEAUTiEs! HElp US SElECT A SpECiAl PERSON TO ROUNd ouT THE fAMily of MoNTROSE RoyAlTyl S T RdAy_, JUNE 22, PM LADY VEE BIG ROBERT and The future Stars Band Rhythm & Blues dance music that makes your feel want to dance! SuNdAy, JuNE 2) ALL DAY PARTY!! Hot food • Cold Cocktails • The LUGE!! Vi sir ouR BEER CARdEN A Nd ENjoy ouR f ESTiviTIES WHilE HAViNCj A fRONT ROW SEAT f OR THE pARAdE SH1ElA LENNON AT 9pM! • 1100 WESTHEIMER • 523-7217 • 10 HOUSTON VOICE/ JUNE21, 1996 Sometimes tfo: biggest chalkngc you fiu:l" ls fitt111g 1111 thal LI\ IN<l into \Our daih LIFE. For utl"rg) to kcl"p up with it nll, reach for u ddic10115 l'cmcrBar cneim· hm·. I.cm-fut urnl high!) m1tritiou&, a PowerBar gi\~ )Oil lon~·lu.-;ti11g cnagy to help vou pl:rfurm at \our hcst in \\hatc\-cr )OU do ( ho•:nlutc • Mnlt :»ut • \\ilrl Ben; \ppk·l'lnnumon • Bnnnnu • l\fodrn \ lslt us it www.powerbar.com for updat.i; on fun i;ummcr <\cnL'> 01996 Poworlood Inc 800 58 POWER Gn Canad•. 800-500·56341 Gay Today by Glen Webber PFLAG-There For Us Peggy was shocked. She called her son one night to talk, and the phone was answered by a friend. When she asked who this was, his reply, "Honey, I'm his boyfriend ." She then hung up the phone, not identify­ing herself. As Peggy sat down, she real­ized all her fears came true. Her son was a homosexual. All his friends were homo· sexual as well, She wondered what kind of lifestyle he was loving . She decoded to vi;ot him and find out. Her son, named Alex, mel her at the airport. Along with horn was a good friend, not the one who answered the phone. His friend was very clean cut and attractive. What we might call a pretty boy. On the way to hos apartment, Peggy didn't say much. Now that she was seetng her son in a different light, she didn't know what to say. At the apartment, Alex knew something was wrong. After his friends left, he sat down with hos mom and asked what was wrong. She replied, "I know you're gay." Alex wasn't ready for such a blunt announcement. His reply to his mother was "And?" Well, said Peggy, "Are you alright? Do you have AIDS? Is there any· thong I need to know?" Alex decoded to be honest about everythtng. He explained to her that he was HIV-positive but didn't yet have AIDS. He showed her the many medications he was taking. He tncd to explain to her what the medicines were for. She said she would like to speak with his doc1or, and they called him. He was g lad to speak with Peggy. They had a very informative visit. Although Peggy felt better knowing Al ex·~ cond1t1o n , s he was s till very sad She knew one day she would lose her son. This was always her biggest fear, that her son would doe before she did. She also had this anger towards the gay community for the spread of this disease. She knew this feeling was irrational, but s he couldn't help n. Where was the person who infec1cd Alex? Is he still alive? Was Alex the only one. or were there more. And what about Alex, was he tnfcctrng people? She had to know. It was then <he got a call. The woman was asked to call Peggy by Alex's doctor She was a member of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG) and also had a gay son. This group helps family mem­bers cope when their children (or sib· long) comes out to them. She offered to meet with Peggy and talk wuh her and maybe try to answer any questions she might have. Peggy replied she had a lot of questions that she needed answered. They met for lunch. The woman brought two other mothers with her. One was in PFLAG and the other was a mother whose son died from AIDS. They explained that the Gay community is tryrng to stop the spread of AIDS, and about the many edu­cation programs that were designed to inform people how to avoid getting it. They talked with her about safe sex. They explained to her that AIDS was spreading because people, both say and straight were ignoring safe sex warnings. Most had no idea what It meant to become infected with HIV or fool ishly thought that they were not at risk. They also explained how important the support of parents 1s for gay and lesbian children, especially those that arc liv· mg with AIDS. That support sometimes made all the difference in the heallh of their child. That the secrets of remaining m the closet might be too stressful on their child's immune system. So Peggy made a determination to tell her son that he had her total support. Pcsgy also decided to join PFLAG, and Jct the world know how proud she was of her son, and how brave she thought he wa s. Peggy asked Alex to join her on the sofa. She told horn what <he was going to do. Alex was so proud of hos mother's commit· ment, he started to cry. She held him m her arms, and told horn he would never have to worry about a place to stay or someone to take care of him if he needed it. She said she would never tolerate someone speak- ' ing bad about gays. And <he said her life was much better since she knew the truth about Alex. At the first PFLAG meeting, Peggy was very pleased with the turn out, She has made many new friends. Although her trip was coming to an end, she planned to join the PFLAG group tn her city. That group wasn't very large, but ot was a very strong chapter. Peggy knew she could add a lot to it. Alex died several months ago. He did have to go home, where he was taken well care of by hos mother and her friends. His last words were "Thank you mot~r. I love you." But all os not lost for Peggy. Her par· ticipation in PFLAG has kept her going. Her pride in her son kept his memory wann in her heart. She gamed something impor- 1ant. even lhough she suffered such a ter­rible loss . Her part1c1pation in PFLAG and the support group at her church helped her deal with Alex's death. She thanked God for his blessings. TI1e funeral was very 'i.Olcmn. Bui lhe nice thing was that PFLAG was there. They were lined against the wall and several of the members were holdtng the PFLAG ban­ner, on respect and memory of Alex. Peggy was lhc only speaker. She said she learned more from Alex about hfe 1han she ever knew possible Hos courage and strength. his determination to live a quality life, and hos ability to accept his illness gave her strength to accept it as well She thanked Alex for hos life and Jove. She then walked quietly towards the back of the room to leave, and her PFLAG friends draped the banner around her as she left. She was grateful she wasn't alone that day. PFLAG IS a wonderful group. They arc very strong and supportive of our com· munoty. If you have a parent (or other family member) that supports you, get them involved on this fine group. They can be especially helpful of you are just com· mg out to your family. PF LAG os the great· est ally of our community. When you sec them in the Pride parade this year, please thank them for their support. They love us very much. Not JUSt their own children but all of us. Enough to face the horror of AIDS wuh us, enough to 10 to Washington to lobby for our ri&hts, enough to learn and crow, not only to accept us, but to be there for us through ot all. Anyone who wants to extol "Family Values" should look at PFLAG, because tome after tome they prove by example what we all know-Love makes a family, noth in& more and nothing Jess. The Houston Chapter of PFLAG can be reached at 7 131867-9020. Gltn Wtbbtr is a form tr tmployu of Contlntntal A1rlints and a ptrson liv­ing with A IDS 1n Housron • See Gn importGnt news story hGppen? • Cqll the HOUSTON VOICET HOUSTON VOICE/ JUNE21, 1996 11 14 REASONS TO CHOOSE MARTIN'S FOR ALL YOUR FINE ARTS AND FRAMING NEEDS! 1. All REsidENTiAl & COMlllERciAl IRAMiNG & SERVicEs i~ ONE srop. 2. Fit.£ ARTS GAllERy, exkibiriNG NATiONAl ANd locAl ARTiST. }. liMind ediriONs, pRi~Ts ANd posrER GAllERy. 4. ART Appu isAls A~d RESTORATiON (liCENSEd & bON<kd) o~ REQUEST. 5. SpEciAl SERViCES of ACQUisirio~s & RESAl£ foR OUR CUSTOOICRS (SECONdARY MARkEI spEciAlisr) 6. L.uliNATiON S£Rvicu IOR W.dividuAl & COMMERciAl. ], Acid fR££ MATS & fORM boARd C\/STOMS. 8. MusEUM 9UAliry pRESENTATiON & CONSERVArio .. ON All jobs. 9. SpEciAhy & UNUSUAi im1s Ol.R SpEciAl COl'oCERN. 10. lrtTERiOR ckcoRATOR ON STAii. 11. CONsiSTENT ki<;lt 9uAliry. 12. fRH kOME OR olrice ddivERy. ll ALL WORk AND PURCHASES FULLY GUARANTEEIU 14. TLC•• Nor •vJ.Jilr ""' t '"°" .. y orln c;.llroy. .,,. ._ 0.. sp<ci..J coocc.., p<.,.,.,J cOMl<lr .. tiO'< AAd Tr.do Lov"G C..< loo <Ad< IT<~ you bm<; ro "' E•rk K TR<Arcd 'lllTk £XTTIA sp<ci•l CAR< b<cAUS< rky Ml lXIRA sp<aAI.. 1641 'fr'HTilliMOI 71J ~2J-6t2S 817 FAIRVIEWe • , (713) (ttt CoMerse) ~ 4 528·9204 Su/JU 1fJ~ s~ s~ Fri/111/, ]Mne 21st Miss Z11cli Fr11die L11111 As/rlel/ HHstu s,1cl11I GMest Fril111J, ' " "' 28th M/11 Z11clt Led H11lso11 K11r11 o;,,, s , ec/11/ Glllst S'°"'-~ ll:OOp. ~ S11t11rl 111/, ]11111 2211/ Miss Z11elt '11ilfi Lee L•lfe R1111 s,eci11I G111st S11t.rl111/, Jane 29tlt Miss Z11clt Br1111Ji H•aso n R1111 s,1ci11I Guest Sn/11111 , .,,, 23rtl Miss Z11elt N11Hti W11r/lliclt Le116 H11/stu Vicori11 Nic•le S•11/111J, '""' 30th Miss Z11clt Sit/ Rns K11r11 l> i•rr s,eei11I Gust 811 ~tzotesslona{ O ttlce Space Wes~;~:~:onttose Bob Leasing and Management RYAN 1131s23-1600 12 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE.21, 1996 PRIDE IS AS PRIDE DOES! LET'S MAKE PRIDE HAPPEN! (on Pride Day Mass at 10:00 am Followed by Brunch Parade Group meets at 3:00 pm Woodhead between Westheimer & Harold) BERING MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH A Reconciling Congregation There can be no RAINBOW unless it has rained. .. your Father ... makes his S\lll rise on the evil and on the good and sends the rain on the righteous and on the unrighteous. 1440 Harold St. Houston, Texas 77CYJ6 (713) 526-1017 Miii S:4S (Paid AdvcrtiKmcnl) ASK THE PASTOR Q- ••w1t•t U idolatry7 How do I know wh•t idolatry is to­day ,ince things ha\le chang~ so much since the writers of the Bible!" A Last "'eek "'c looked at the definilion of idolauy. II is de­fined a.s, "The paying of divine honors 10 any created thing; the ascriplion of divine power 10 natural agencies.• The Old Testa­ment wa.s clear aboul how God viewed idolalry. In Exodus, the fir.t two commandments referred to idolatry as being in direct conlradiclion to loving and sc"'ing God. This week "'e will look al "hat the New Teslarncnt says aboul idolatry and how "'e can apply this 10 1oday's understanding RC\ Janet Parker In the New Tcslarnent lhe "'ord for idolau1 is "e1dololatria • The "ord denoles a gross sin (a sm denoting anything thal pulS you m a place of being on equal Slat us "ilh or above God, i.c , an indepcndenl spiril) and comes m lhe list of vices in the following Scrip1ures. Lei's look al them In I Corin1h1ans S 10. t I 1dolatl) refers to the sexually immoral, the greedy, 1he slanderer, the drunkard. and lhc s"indler tn I Connth1ans 6:9 the lisl goes on 10 add the proslll\Jle and the thief In Gala­ltans S .20 the list expands 10 include: "'1tchcrafi. hatred. discord. jealousy. fils of rage. selfish 11111b1uon. dissensions. facuons. en\')', and orgies. Colossoans J.S adds lusl to 1he hst. The lost 1s made complele m Rc\Clat1on 21 8 by adding. lhe cowardly, the unbelieving. the vile. the murderers. those who practice magic ans. and liars. \\ha1 docs all of1h1s mean~ It seems so n.:gatl\c and dcstruCIJve Can anyone be rescued for this !1st of "don'IS.,. Surely \\C ha'e all found ourscl\CS somrnhcre in this hst of VJccs How can ~c find our "'"3Y out? Jesus tells us in Matthrn 6: t 9-24 thal '" arc 10 <tore up for ourselves treasures in heaven. V.:c arc lo focus on thal which "'II never die. The lhings ofth1s world and the pleasures that accompany these things"'" one day pass away. No one can se"'c two gods. There will al­wa) S be one that "'clove more. God wants our ultimate love and attention There is no doubt that the "'orld is continually at "'ar with our affections. For us today. our 1do!5 can become ourselves. our lime. our finances., our career. our spouses.. our home, sex. rela1ionsh1ps. etc. \\"hen our allegiance 1s pledge to none olhcr than God. "'e find our;clvcs bemg tempted and 1ned by the "'ooing of the "'orld You m1gllt compare the two 1ug of wars as the la"' of gnmty figllling ogamst the la" of acrodynarmcs. It all depends upon "'ho "'e surrender to in the figllt. If we find ourscl•es puttmg ano1her J>C™>n. or lhing above God, then "'e mu<t rcpcnl Re­pentance 1s luming around 180 degrees and "'alking in 1he opposite direction. The bcauly ahoul bcmg a child of God is 1ha1 forgiveness is always available lo the one who secs their wrong and confesses 11 to God It is lhc work of the floly Spirit "'ho will convmcc you of your own idolatry in your life. For the person ,.ho is not a Christian and is llllppcd 1n a life of idolauy, we can pray for them. tt is a kno"'n fact that we. as humans, were created "''th the need 10 worship someone or something. fact)onc has a god m their life. Only the LORD God Alm1ghly ha.s the su­preme abilil) to love and care for us and give us evcrlll'ltng life full of peace. love and JOY Who ts first place 1n your life• IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ASK THE PASTOR A QUESTION, WRITE: REV. JANET PARKER, MARANATHA FELLOW­SHIP MCC, P.O. BOX 667032, HOUSTON, TX. 77266-7932 ~ttutn 's ~nust lltsq [tst: HIV/AIDS Transitional Living Home • Fruit Juices: apple, grapefruit, orange, cranberry • Soft Drinks: cola, diet cola, uncola, fruit flavors • Copier Paper • Cleaning supplies: bleach, Lysol spray Lysol liquid, dishwasher detergent, dishwashing liquid, laundry detergent • Paper goods: paper plates, 6 oz. drinking cups, napkins, paper towels, bathroom tissue, facial tissue • Garden Hoses (2) • Water Dispenser w/ hot and cold spickets • Smoke Detectors w/ carbon dioxide sensors • Microwave oven • Hospital Overbed tables (2) • Patio table and chairs wl umbrella • A larger house w/ 5-6 bedrooms, 3-4 baths • A smaller house or apartment for offices and room for v1s1tors All donations are tax deductible. For questions, or would like to volunteer, call: (713) 522-5757 P'3fl A eoaUUou 'ZIJ~ ~ 'ZIJtd Lut ~ Dinefle Sets Fons Dressers End Tables Lamps Silver wore Dishes Sheefs Towels Coffee Tables Pol and Pans Wheelchairs Donors con drop off ilems of a our off ices, 3400 Monlrose, Suile 106, • OP call Erm While, Warehouse Coordinolor, rk,, • lo orronqe for pick-up. J Phone 522-5428 or Poqer/VoiceMoil 949-2412. KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH Catch a glimpoe ol the Kingdom of God Sunday School - 10 A.M. SUnday Worship Service • 11 AM Wcdncadays; A Course in Miracles - noP.M 4404 Blouom at Snover 713-862·7S33 5lJN1)AY 11~ R~J~P~ An evangelical ministry with celebration services of Praise, Prayer and Study of God's word Bible Clas.5: lOam 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap accessible) (Montrose at Hawthorne) For ill!o. on weekly home groups, call 528-6756 014 Ltiu YOU, 11 C1111 1~m t~t LOVING EXPERIENCE. Senint th• G1y, Lu~llft, Bl-uml C1111111nity ef Catheliu & Fri1"41. Bm1111 1 put ef Ditnity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass klclualvo lturgy colobr1t1d. Cal and pr111 4 for o .. Soclal Evonta ' Sch1dul11. Todoa bl1nv1nldo1I (Full details in ~5 - '.% Gay and lesbian Yellow Pages) In the Heights 1307 Yale Ste. H Phone 880-2872 COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH 'A e~ gldtt ()~ -L-" 501 E 18th at Columbia • Houston, TX Services: *Sun. • H:OO A.M. PRAISE & WORSHIP Sun. • 7:00 P.M. EVENING SERVICE Thurs. • 7:30 P.M. MIDWE~K SERVICE • Signed for t~e Hearing Impaired P44toli - e,"'4 e~ (713) ff0-9235 What Is Pride? Pride Knows No Borders. That is this year's theme for the annual celebration we all know as Lesbian and Gay Pride Weck. All week there have been events in honor of this ritual that will culminate with the parade this Sunday. Aside from all of this, what seems to be remiss is the reason for which we arc celebrating. All 100 oflcn the Gay and Lesbian commu­nily capiculaccs lhc pride ceremony's origins inco noching more chan a block parry Granted, our community is celebrat­ing us culturc·s pride and that is impor- 1an1 It is equally important that our com­munity understands the significance of this celebration m terms of our heri­tage- past and present . Many people in the communi ty arc unaware of Stone­wa ll a nd it 's histo r ical impac t on o ur civil liberties. Nor arc they aware of the inroads that arc currcnlly being fought on a dai ly basis by many ind ividua ls who have decidedly taken an active role in the polit ical process to e ns ure that we as a commun ity have a voice. Too many younger members of our community arc completely unaware of the laborious cfforlS that many of the "cldcrs"-any­onc over 30-havc involved themselves wuh in chc name of obtaining equal righcs for Gays and Lesbians. As a result , some of the freedoms, and most of the toler­ance, chat exists for us Coday stemmed from the efforlS put forth by those community "ciders." Our commu ni1y owes dcblS of gr11 11udc 10 the following individ­uals for chcir (oflen unheralded) efforts on behalf of our cause: Gary Van Oote­ghem. Marion Coleman, Ray Hill, Ann1sc Parker, Bill Stolt, Marion Panzer and our very own eduor Deborah Bell. If these names are not familiar 10 you, chey should be . !rrcspeccivc of cheir poli­tics, these individuals contr1but1ons to our community are immeasurable They are an indelible part of our history. And they arc not alone, there are numerous other individuals who deserve men­tion . Unfortunately, che fight for gay and les­bian c1v1I rights is far from over and unless the nexc &cnerallon is willing to get involved and pursue that agenda, we may lose the baulc. Perhaps then, the 1mpor- 1ance of community involvement would resona1e . I ceruinly hope our commu .. nuy does not have 10 endure such wake-up calls m order 10 mobilize themselves mco acuon. Thal would be a craves1y. So, cel­cbrace Lesbian and Gay Pride wich all che fervor you can muster but ask yourself during the process what you have done 10 contribulc 10 the successes to dace . To be sure, noc all of our community 1s remng on cheir laurels, JUSl the maJor- 11y. There are many fine young individu­als who are working within the parame­ters thal "pride has no borders." The Houston Gay and Lesbian Pol111cal Caucus (HGLPC), the African-Ameri­can Lesbian and Gay Alliance of Hous­ton (AALGA), chc Log Cabin Republi­cans of Texas (l.CR-TX), che Human Righcs Campaign (HRC), ecc. All of chcsc organ­izations and a hose of others arc able 10 cxisc because of chcir dcd1ca1cd volun­teers. Although each organization may have different approaches, they are all working for the same cause, gay and les­bian civil rights. That in usclf is worlh championing Two Who Lead Houston IS lucky to have two leaders in this community who have demon­strated beyond a shadow of doubt their comm11men1 10 equality. Like che afore­mentioned leaders. these two individ­uals arc the risin& leaders of today and cheir accomplishments 10 date speak for themselves. I am of course talking about HGLPC Presidenc Pat Gandy and LCR­TX state President Dale Carpenter. Pat Gandy as President of HGLPC has been impressive. She has used her power in that posit ion to make sure that our com­munity has a voice. Gandy has been astuce enough to realize that our community is diverse in many ways. Some of us have children, some of us own property, etc. Gandy has made a concerted effort to ensure that our concerns are addressed in many facets of public policy. Although Pac Gandy and I would probably disa­gree on most issues, she has earned my respect and that of the community's through her actions. She is a woman who means what she says and scands firm based on her principles. That 1s called lcadcr­sh ip. Da le Carpenter 's term as state presi­dent of LCR-TX has been equally as impressi ve. Carpenter has only been in his pos111on for less than a year and he has catapulted Log Cabin into a major force as a gay and lesbian c ivil rights organi­zation in the s111e of Texas. Like Gandy, Car penter has demons trated his uncanny abillly 11 leadership, some­thing that is all to often remiss in today's pol11ical circles. Carpenter, an auor­ney in Houston, 1s one of the most dedi­cated individuals I have ever met with respect 10 obcainmg equal rights for us. While it is not polit ically popular in our communuy to be a Republican. it is pre­c isely within Chai party that che bigotry muse be confronted. Carpenccr knows that 100 well and has had the courage 10 take on such a daunting task w11hou1 a moment's hesiullon . Log Cabin 's c u r­re nt dispute with the GOP demonstrates his unwavering commitment towards achieving the group's goals. Keep in mind, that 11 1s far more difficult 10 con­front your adversaries on their home turf 1han u 1s to work for inclusion m an organ­izat 1on who is not as vehemently opposed 10 your agenda . I consider myself 10 be lucky indeed 10 have che opportu­nity 10 work wich Mr. Carpenter. It has been inspiring beyond comprehen­sion. I would like 10 remind my readers 1ha1 neither Gandy or Carpenter receive remuneration for their efforts. Nor does anyone else who par1ic1pa1cs in those organizacions Both of these leaders do so out of conviccion and chcy should be respected for 1heir commitment to our community, regardless of their respec - 1 i vc poh11cal ideology. Equally important 10 any organization are the members and volun1eers of 1hose groups, such as Matthew Huston (HGLPC) and Tirey Councs (LCR-TX). I am not attempting to dim101sh their contri­bu11ons. 10 do so would be inappropri­ate. Motivation slems from good lead­ership. W11hou1 11, 11 would be difficult for any group 10 accomplish much Gandy and Carpen1er have a vision for 1heir organizauons and the dep1h to follow 11 through . For chat we can all be proud . Finally, the biggest disappoincmcnt to our communuy of late was President Chnton·s announccmenc chat he would sign chc pending Defense of Marriage Ace , 1f 11 is passes Congress. II was an act of placing e lec11on year criumph based on short-term calcu lat ions over long-term goals. This bill does not JUSI deny us the abillcy 10 get married, ic denies federal cax. welfare . pens ion, health, immi­gration. and surv ivor's benefits 10 same-sex couples. Such an act of aban­donmenl towards one of your most ardent group of supporters at chcir hour of need 15 cowardice and deserves to be casti­gucd. HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 13 WHEN NEbb sf/If FREEZES ov~~;::. , .. ~-:!fl! Following the Pride Parade, The Men of Summer present: HELL NIGHT! The Party 96' After being punished by the summer sun! Keep Your Cool With: ::c 6 Giant Air Conditioners! ::c 8 Hot Bartenders to fulfill your needs! i:c Hot Damn Frozen Over waiting on the Patio! And You will Sweat with: i:t Sinsational Dancers in the Cages of Decadance! :,'c Our Steaming Laser Lit Dance Floor! :.'c Sinful Dance Music! :.'tThe Lowest Regular Drink Prices! $1.25 Well, $1.75 Beer, $3.00 Call & $125 Schnaapsl ALL NIGHT-EVERY NIGHT! *** Please Designate a Driver *** Pulse Pay Now Available! 710 Pacific Street No Cover 84/1 lPm If You re In 701s Drae Houston, Tx. 713/523-0213 .75 Cents Well 84/1lP m $1.00 Draft Pints All Niaht 2524 McKinney rthe Old Axiom SPaceJ 713. 237 • 0029 14 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21, 1996 I Dastardly Doings at Stages with 'The Drunkard Review By JAVIER TAMEZ Ho1Hton Volu!Houston Either one likes melodramas or one doesn't. There os generally no middle ground in these works that arc character­ized by extravagant theatrically and the predominance of plot and physical action over characterization But if you do like them. then you can't go wrong with "The Drunkard," the summer offering from Stages Repertory Theatre The play was originally produced on 1844, but the mus~tal 1dap1a11on being presented al Stages os the resolt ofa 1964 collaborauon between playwrtght Bro Herrod and pop mus c composer Barry Mantlow (before he wrote 1 c sorgs that make the whole world stng) The tv.o rcvl5ed their versorn on 1970, adding new music and ! er ng the staging, d tt os on I~ form !'tat "The Drunkard~ comes 10 Stages The pray le s the story of Lawyer Cribbs (David Grant) a v1. 1nous attorney. who s dcrcrmmcd to steal the roof from over the heads of the sweet widow Mrs. Wilson (Col­leen 0 Ku) and her lovely. gentle daugh­ter. Mary (Kouy Ka•n) Though poor, the Wolsons make do tn their humble couage thanks 10 the good-hearted nature of their IJnd ord, Edward Middleton (Greg Coles), v.ho not only refuses 10 listen 10 Cri­bbs• protcs1a11ons on evicting the Wll sons, but marncs Mary instead But Edward has a fa11tng-1ha1 demon ltq­uor Crabbs capnalazcs on this weakness and soon Edv. ard IS a lost and forlorn soul recalling wuh shame 1he wife and family he dcsencd ro sate hlS need for drink. To the res­cue comes Edward·s smtplc-mmdcd foster brother, W11:,•m Dowton (Aaron Krohn), who wuh back straight and fist firm brings Edward back from the ruuer lo the bosom of his family. And all os nght "'"h 1he world (which os how melodramas always end) While a legu1matc genre of lilcra1urc. melodrama~ carry no deeper meaning than the uncomplicated, moralistic tone that is readily apparent evil-doers will fail and the good and meek shall triumph in the end And this applies to "The Drunkard" as much as any other melodrama, What makes 1his one a little more interesting is the music Now as far as compos1llons go, the songs included here arc as simplistic as the piece Itself, and that" JUSt fine. The tunes included here arc light, at times even prc·schoolish They range from the all-in-fun sappiness of "Peace and Love and Apple Poe" and the dev­ilish plotting of "When You're Dead" 10 the round· 'cm up ht Jonks of "Have Another Drink," •he gospel-ltke celebra11on of "Do You Wanna Be Saved•" and the tongue­IO ·<heek b oes of "Garbage Can Blues" There "ere also a few numbers that were not in the least en1oyable. even after owmg Co t'Jc,, as mus1cJI r.umbe s in 11 melo drama whu:h lowers expect :ions .. Good .s Good" (dud dud) was a Qat, deadly dull and riC: culous number. "Don't Swat Your Mother ' ts an awful tune (~arely qua' y­mg as a refrain much less a song) that os no where near as funny as ots title· and "Curse of an Aching Heart" ts a dull-witted droning that docs httlc on the way of generating >ympathy Oddly eoough, the two most enioyable numbers arc completely irrelevant to the play m every way. Occumng in Act I and Act III, both numbers arc 11tlcd Specialty Song ' m the program though they are dif­ferent tunes Presumably these arc spc· cial because of the very irrelevancy which males the ,. presence so peculiar. They arc complete as des. unrela1ed in any way to the action or the story bemg pre~cn1cd on the stage One could argue that they were inserted for comic relief (both tune.) are funny) but that hardly washes given tha1 melodramas. in thu day and age, arc already comic in presentation 1f not in original intent The unpleasant truth is that these songs were prohably included h filler for a show which " under two hour'i in length even with two (count them-21) 15- minutc intermissions . Thos length-of-pro­gram issue also mani­fested 11self between the first and second acts, as one of the cast members appeared cen­ter stage to lead the audi­ence in a sing.along of "A Bicycle Built for Two" and "Let Mc Call You Sweetheart." (I did not par11cipate . ) I suspect the lime between acu was devoted 10 costume c~anges, because the ' stage set certainly Davod Grano and Kmy Karn 1n "The Drunlard · Photo bv B• required no changes that Appt., Appl• lmatn would have 1alc.cn more than a couple of minutes. And whole the cos­tumes were all quite mcc, the delay ¥WIS hug­ely 1:iord1natc nonetheless and more importanll)' the dead time lapse vrhcn eve­ryone in the audience sat m bored puzzle­ment, was simply unacceptable The c»t members all dod well on Ihm res­pective role~, but such praise should be qualified with a reminder that melodrama os the moll unchallenging of acting dos· ciplinc~ The exaggerated monifica· tions displayed in the perils of Pauline poses from the women and Dudley Doright affirmations from the men (at least the good guys) arc not the roles calling for peal act· tng prowess. That said, David Grant 1s as Snidely a Whiplash as one could hope for m his ponrayal of Lawyer Cribb~ (boooo. hissss) Twisting his wicked-looking handlebar moustache and tossong hos cvil·concca1ing cape over hi!t back with a nourish. Grant makes a good villain (no ironic pun intended) Kiuy Karn as the defenseless and sweet Mary Wilson (hcartfcll sigh) painc~ a patheuc enough p1clUrc of this damsel in distress to make you gag on your spot, v.hoch means she dod the JOb well The other per­formance worth note came from Aaron Krohn who played the hero William (cheers, applause), wuh a squared iaw and a sure stance Director Beth Sanford <tagcd her show well enough, The interaction with the audi· cncc was present but not overwhelming; the players were having fun without 105· mg 1he coherence of the work. and the stag­ing was contrived without being g1mm· icky Musical Director Diane Denson Tobola (who also played the part of Carrie Nation) dod an admirable job on the piano . She included all the recognrzable succes· sion of notes (!here ou~ht to be a word for that) which conno1c innocence. cv1l/dangcr or excitement And of course she wu great as the accompanist for all 1hc numbers UThe Drunkard " IS pretty silly Sluff wouldn't want it any other way. What. "The Drunkard" Where · Stage~ Repertory Theatre When friday·Sunday through July 14 Not my voice but an Echo By DEBORAH BELL My editorial column "In My Own Voice" os not appearing in this week's issue. The work involved in producuon of this special Pride Weck Issue has not allowed me the ume or energy to create a column. However, I am raking the lib­erty of repeating something from PHOENIX • the outreach publication of the Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection, because I could not say u any better, only echo what has already been expressed. The Theme of Pndc Week rhos year os "Pride Knows No Borders." Symbol­ically borders refers 10 how we as a soc1- c1y, place borders around our feelings and emotions. As Gay and Lesbians, we want to see borders of lnJUSllcc replaced wuh com­passion and tolerance, knowing that on order to exist together, the masses of gay and straight people must remove all borders of segregation. No borders also means that we are an 1nternat1onal people We love on all countries, are of all ages, races, and eth­nic backgrounds, work at all levels of employment, have handicaps, and even raise children. In 1996. we are gomg 10 tcll thc world that hfe should not consost of border•. We u Gays and Lesbians are an intricate and producuve part of society It '' tome for us 10 work toward removing borders in our own state, clly. and community PLAIN SPEAKING Sex sells. In 1h1s age of Calvin Klein ads, perfumes and colognes which appar­en1Jy cannol be sold wi1hou1 a prereq­uisite nude body or two. movies which require buffing up or silicone injec1- ing, 1he gay male marke1 has Jong led 1he way Only a J111Je more lhan a genera­tion ago 10111 nudity was 1aboo in maga­zines. During the increased freedom which coincided with the anti-war years. the posing strap fell away to reveal 1hat which men had been imagining for dec­ades. Wi1h 1he advent of video capes. again coinciding with a naiional tragedy-the AIDS epidem1c-1he restramls came down, and in some cases went on. Now, as the gay markel increasingly receives mainstream attention, the marketing mimics socicly in 1eneral. There is a nood of music CDs aimed at the gay male audience, ranging from disco 10 class1- cal, capturing hunky half-nude models on their covers, just in case someone would fail 10 understand the direc1ion of lhe markeling. In Che evolution of our times. 1t is under­s1andable 1ha1 such marketing should invade the very halls which were once closed 10 1he gay market-the major pub­lishing house.. Once 11 was considered daring for such a pubhsher to come ou1 wuh a tule Joke "The Joy of Gay Sex" with •gay• nght there on the cover. On a trip last week to a11end 1he American Book.ell· crs' Associat10n Convention, I took as plane reading a new book by Douglas Sad· ownik ... Sex Between Men," a rnle which prc11y much captures the essence of the book Bui in case 1here remained any doubl , 1he cover carries a pholo by Joe Z1olkowsk 1 titled ""CensoreJ '" of two nude males strategically holding one hand over the privates of the ocher. I would have 10 give Harper San Fran­c1sco , the publisher, an A+ in market· ing. Perhaps 1he Lammys-1he Lambda Luerary Awards which arc given in con· junction with the ADA convcntion­should add a cucgory for markc11ng . Af1er all, the blatan1 selling means more to 1hc guhcred Gay and Lesbian book­dcalers than some of the comes foisted on the reading publoc as Gay and Lesbian studies. Actually, Sadownick's book is an intri­guing mox of gay history, memoirs and reminiscences. and plain sex talk-all this and footnotes 100. And, whole he cov­ers much familiar ground, Sadownick brings 1ogether a larger picture of the evolving gay male sex Jofe. Seeing the Second World War as 1he firs1 grea1 gay hbcra11on. he follows 1hrough the Jaicr Stonewall rcvolu11on into 1hc epic of AIDS W11hin his lim11ation of gay male sex­ual history. Sadownick docs an admira· blc JOb of mining the memoirs and histo· roes as well as 1he recollcc11ons of the survive" , Gay history has 1hc disad­vantage that much of its primary sources arc dcsiroycd or unrecorded, as well as 1hc single advantage of being rcccnl his­tory and thus easier to reconsrruct. A~ a consequence, his sources ar_c familiar names to those interested m this sub1cct: Alan Berube (who JUSt received a MacAr1hur Granl), Daniel Webster Cory, J om Kepner, Harry Hay, Donald by Larry Lingle Vining, and a few ochers whose activi­ties or memoirs remain with us. In dealing wuh the upheaval of 1he Sec­ond World War, Sadown1ck has the advan­tage of the wri1ings of several gay activ­is1s who served in 1ha1 connict Whal does come out of these sources is the dominant theme 1hroughou1 1he book. 1ha1 gay male history seems rcstric1ed to lhe East and ( West coasts with a vast unknown between. Now, granted, Sadownick canno1 be entirely faulted for 1h1s emphasis. One of 1he effecis of 1he Second World War was 1ha1 mos1 of 1hc young men headed for war iravellcd 1hrough one coastal pore or another. And, after 1hc war, those who would return and assume a role in leading the new &•Y movement concentrated in New York, Los Angeles and San Fran­cisco. Thus much of 1he primary material on which our history 1s built comes from such Jomilcd locales. The challenge for all of those not Jiving or coming out in one of 1hesc major cities 1s 10 gather and make available source material on gay hfe elsewhere Unfor- 1un11cly, lhc few reposi1orics for Gay and Lesbian history arc al~o m these same few c111cs . Gay <1ud1es on colleges and universnics arc also concentrated in or near the same Bog Three. While 1herc are .callerong 111empts lo fos1er gay and lesbian hbrarocs in a num bcr of c111cs these rcposuoncs usu­ally consosl ol pubhshed ma1croal much of which comes from 1he Bog Three Such libraries seem in most cases. to rely for I their exos1ence on 1he interes1 of a single 1nd1v1dual In 1he case of Dalla>, Phil Johnson. almost Sin£ lrh.anJclfly, has held 1ogether 1ha1 c11y's gay hoslory in what h3' become one of the largest gay and lesbian c;:ommunity centers in 1he coun try. Hou~ilon, by contrast. has no com­mun11y cenler and 1hc only gay and les­bian library is in 1hc local gay church and was basically creaicd by one person, now deceased . I men11oned in this column recently about evidence of a thriving gay and les­bian intellectual community in Hous- 1on immediately after the Second World War One of the cen1ers of that commu­n 11y was a well known lesbian doctor whose friendships ranged from Tennes­see W1ll1ams 10 Carson McCullars. Yet, I dare say her name would be Jess rcc­ogn ozab le than the 1owcl boy at the baths. Maybe our gay past means nothing to our communi1y today. And maybe we aren't really a commun11y. In a society within 1he greater soc1c1y in which you1h is prized above all else, we 1hmk we have nothmg 10 learn from our seniors. and, 1n 1he process. we Jo-. 1he very 1den11ty which makes us ocher than somply sexual beings. I fear we're playing lhe game JUSI as our enemies would wish-we are becoming 1ha1 which 1hc Chmtoan Coa hcion says we always were · Deviancs set on sexual conqucsi A minority which 1 1 encompasses some of the bes1 and bright­cs1, some of 1hc most 1alcn1cd. Arc we allowing ourselves to sink 10 1hc lowcs1 common denominator'! C3l1JY ~@£Sf! m~~ [LJ ®!IB cs~ Q Patrol needs volunteers. Anyone can join - there are no physical fitn~ requirements. Spend one night a month with us and see what you're missing! Call 528-SAFE. HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21, 1996 15 Ct)ASTAL IMPRESSl~S Custom Sc,..•n Prlntln~ - Embrold•ry - Ad Speclalty • • Fully Automated - Up to I 60 dozen sh1ru per hour • Jn-house Art Department f. • T-Shiru, Sweatshiru, Sportshim, • • Caps. Tumwear, Koozies. Cups and hundreds of other ad specialty items PH: 713-665-1117 Fax: 713-665-1166 Ask for William "Bill" Johnson, Ill l'M BooT S . 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Money from a v1atical settlement means immediate access to cnucally needed funds to make choices you might not othern ise ha\e, such as paymg for med it-al treatments or keeping )our home. You ma) e\en use the funds for da)·to-day h\ mg e\penses. Estate Trust, Inc., is one oftbc oldest and most respected names m the natical settlement industry. We arc abo ~at1onal \1anagmg Gent-ral AgcnC) of\~aucu.,, Inc., \\holly O\\ned b) C~A fmant'lal Corp., parent compan) of C\A ln>urance Companies ·one of the largN insurance orgamz.auon' m the counl.T). Together, \\e bring high ethical standards and superior financial \'aluc to the mdi\iduals and fam1hes \\ho ha\e gi\en us their trust. For more mfonnatmn about this important financial optmn, call Estate Trust, Inc., at 1-800-456-5100 or E-mail: es ta test I 1£l aol.com '1cmhcr· Viat1cal Assoc.·13t1on of Am~T•C"a &. ~attonal \ 1at11..:al i\ssoc1a11on &fate Trust, Inc: AW U A ll IW • COW A• 0 \'IATICU~ 16 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 1996 New Concepts for Excelling in '96 SELF-EMPOWERMENT IN HIV DISEASE 111,1,lm1ltl/": PATRICIA SALVATO, M.D. Summit 1\ledirnl C.roup FREE TO THE PUBLIC New Viral Load Assays: Why They Are Critical To Managing Your Health TAREK E I.BEIK, PH.D. 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' MediAlert by Al Kielwasser ON THE RECORD -"En1crtarnmcn1 Wire" (June 4) rcpons 1ha1 Columbia Rec­ords (Sony Mu•ic) has released 1hc •ound track to "Stonewall," a new film that dram· atizes "the events surrounding the trau· mallc and cxhilara1ing borlh of Gay Pru.le " According to a promotional s1atcmcnt. "Columhia Records 1s proud to release an album of the music of the era-a revelatory collcct1on of songs dcmon­s1ratmg 1hc m1crplay between a gay scn­s1b1 uy and 60"s pop consc1ou!'i:ncs~ .. S1oncwall" was directed by Nigel Finch who. wrllcs Chr· stinc Vachon in the album' s liner note\, ··was sec ng the ful fillment of a lifelong dream" Vachon, the film's produtcr adds ''Nigel wanrcd to give the lesbian and gay community a scn!ie of courage and history-and most 1mpor· tantly, of hcrnc.,. In 'Stonewall.' the char· attcrs fight back . Nigel said, "It s a reminder that you have to fight for your rights-they arc not given voluntarily''" Carolyn Ro1hkin, of Columbia Rec· ord\, noted. ''Stonewall, the album and the film. 1~ a celebration of the fight for mdi~ v1dual liberty and d1gnlly " Contact Masaaki Morita. Chair. Sony Corporation or America, One Sony Dr .. Park Ridge. NJ 07656, lei 201-930-1000, fax 201·358-4060; Carolyn Rolhkin, Mcdia/Promot1ons, Columbia Records, 212-833-4146; Sony Music Online. hllp II www music \ony.com/mu\lc/homepagef indc~ . html ACCP.SS ABILITIES -Artis"' Telc­vnwn Acces~ CATA) will host several evc,tS·Of·mtcrcst during Pride Month in San francisco Two presentations (June 20-21) have been scheduled 10 coincide w11h "Dirly Bird 96 A Quecrcorc FcSli· val •• and will feature video. music, film and 1alk A (June 28) round-1able discus ­sion- " Siles of Rcsisiance Access Phreaks and On-Line lnS1iga1ors"-will focus on .. folks who arc using new tcchnol· og1es and the Internet to form sites of resistance, organize for human rights in nontrad111onal ways, and bring the or1cn 10c~pen1;ivc information super· h1ghv.ay to 1hose considered outsid ­ers " Con1ac1 ATA. 992 Valencia SL, San FranclSCO, CA 94110, 415-824-3890, e­mail ata@sir1us com. ~WS & NOTES -As par1 of lls new promo­t iona I pitch to the queer music market, A1lan11c Records publishes "S1ereo Type" ·a free, four·pagc circular subli· lied "The A1lan1ic Group'• Gay & Lesbian Newsle11er." The March/April 1"ue (lhe newsletter's second) includes breezy tidbits on a ran~e of products and person· ali11es-from Melissa E1heridge's favor· 1tc alhums to "the winner of our Bette M1dler Valcn1mc's Day Con1cst." Alm mentioned Franci~ Ounnery, "I Shot Andy Warhol," Michael Fernsiein, 7 Year Bi1ch, Bel Can10, Randy Crawford, Fred Hersch Contact Stereo Type. Atlantic Records H Rockefeller Plaza, New York, NY 10019, encourage your local, closeted mus.c store 10 d1strihutc the newsleuer. PEOPLE TOO -Lesbian and gay parenl· tng 1s the fiUbJcct of an g .. page article-and 12 color pholO~raphs 1n "People" maga11ne ("Happy l'ami11es Arc No1 Alike," June 10) This feature story cov .. ers an intentwnal variety of family type\ <tnd issues, ma effort to demonstrate that · .. Growing up with gay parents can be a \Ource of anxiety, and of loving pride. for 1heir kids," The popular periodical reaches over 4 million readers each week­prec1Scly 1hc sorl of media viS1b11i1y 1ha1 provokes na~ty lcners from homophobes . Contut. l~ndon Y. Jones Jr, Managing Ed11or, "People," Time & Life Building, Rockefeller Cen1er, New York, NY 10020, fax 212-522-0794, e-mail 74774 . 1SI3@compuserve .com, hllp II www pa1hftnder com/people/. "Allhou8h conneclions are not always obvious. personal chan8e is inseparable from social and political chan8e" - ~a«iet L~ HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 1996 17 The Trading Post 11410 S. Put 01k f. - 726-1963 • s '"' Tt'ltt • $t tuft • ElttlrHll t111t All t •lit 111111 TV •$t.SI LH9111kl ·Air Ct14ltlt1l11 & 111-ipt M1d1y • Fr141y th• 11 •l41l9kt S1tu41y tt•• -h• THE ACTORS WORKSHOP presents 111£ lJOGS 01100 by: Scott Ross A drama about a famous gay film director in Hollywood during the l 940's. Final Perfomances: 8:00 p.m. June 21 and 22 $5.00 Discount Witlr Tlris Ad 1009 Chartres at Lamar (713) 236-1844 Join us for a Great 9EXpectations House Party: "9ex, Toys & Videotape" or "Love, Lust & Intimacy" Call AIDS Foundation Houston (713) 623-6796 18 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21. 1996 Folks continued ... (Contmuedfrom page I) concerns that must be adhered to in order for the city of Houston to grant the parade permit. They include such matters as, individual bicycles, rollerskatcrs & skateboarders arc not allowed, they are permitted in the parade only as part of a unit. A positive image of our community is what the committee would like presented. There is a dress code "'hich encourages that everyone be properly covered, and while men can wear a minimum of•Adidas style shorts", women must "car both shorts and a tank top. There is not any yelling of "Thro" me something. mister" like at ~lardi Gras. as delegations arc not allowed to throw anything. Spectators may be "handed" items ho"evcr. Every delegation is required to bring along a garbage bag to keep litter down. The issue of police harassment as claimed in previous years is being dealt with by representatives from Constable Jack Abercia's office. The liaisons are Capt. Martin and Capt. Joe Scott. Any problems caused by the behavior of law enforcement officers (or others) should be reported to involved but it still has to be run as a them or a pride committee member. business. The fact that there are two CPA's Ramirez stressed that Pride Week is a way for us to harness the "grief and compassion that will allow our community to survive." Ray continued by stating, "It is time for our family to be together and have a good time. We deserve it!" He reminded everyone that putting the event together is a year-long project and suggests that if someone doesn't like the way things arc done, they have an opportunity to join up. The Pride committee for 1997 will have it's first meeting this July. Jack Valinski, of the Board of Directors of the Pride Committee of Houston, Inc. was the next up. Jack was instrumental in establishing the committee that oversees the efforts of Pride Weck Committees from year to year The delegations numbers were announced and he explained, 'We tried to accommodate special requests where we could, but pretty much assigned numbers as the applications came in on a first come, first serve basis.• He also commented on the fact that it is pretty remarkable that the committee has become what it has. There is a lot of fun on the board is helpful to that end. He said the fact that we were meeting in a city facility was also pretty remarkable, something that would not have happened ten or so years ago. One of those CPA's is Julie Siska who is the current Executive Director of the Pride Committee. She was busily handing out the information packets to those who had already been assigned their delegate slots. Susan Guerrero was staffing the merchandise table Pride logo t-shirts, rainbow water bottle caps. magnets and other assorted goodies were available. These items will be on display and for sale at the festival following the parade. This is one way of raising funds for the committee's work. Scott Lewis addressed the fund-raising proJcct that he has been in charge of this year. Last year, Leesa Douglas had suggested an idea which became the very first 'Pumped Up on Art." The second annual event has become what may prove to be one of the biggest social events not only of pride week, but of the year under Scott's direction. Shoes fioxers ~ e uUe~ i/tt,. ~ ' ~~ ~!! ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~. Sunday, June 23rd, 8pm Jamie Roberts, Candidate for Miss TGR~ '97 presents ~ Celebration of Gay Pride benef itting ~V f S ; . ~ ; .. Come on Down & see the Hew Look at the fi Rfi More Hew Looks to come!! ; . ~; . ~; .. ~ ... Come On Down & Dance with DJ Jeff Tuesday & f riday Mights Jack Valinski. Ray Ramire; and Robin Duncan share a laugh at the final Pride Week '96 meeting were solicited from a number of celebrities. with one shoe being autographed and the other given to an artist who then creates a work reflective of that celebrity. The shoes will be auctioned off on Friday, June 21. Scott also encourages folks to get involved and expressed that no special skills arc needed, just the desire and interest in learning, Many of the committee members expressed that they would welcome turning their role over to someone else. Valinsk1 announced that the I 'l97 parade will be the first mght-timc event. l cntativcly being called "Rainbow Lights" it is being styled after the famous Gay Mardi Gras held in Sydney, Australia each year which claims an esllmated 650,000 attendance. So the involvement of many more people will be needed. The Pride Guide h85 a full list of the various committees, projects (including job descriptions) where volunteers arc needed. The 1996 committee has made an impressive organizational effort for Houston's Lesbian Gay Pride Weck. Within a few hours of time the meeting is over and everyone breaks off either to go to home, or to JOin with one committee or another over dinner for more work. As everyone leaves, all arc reminded that the parade starts a little later this )Car in an effort to beat the heat. "Step ofTis at 5pm, but unlike most things in our community, Jack Valinski stresses that "The parade always starts on time.!" The Houston l'oice salutes the 1996 Pride C omm1ttee and a/I the »olunteers who "orA so hard to gn:e our community this ,rpeclal celebration The committee meet.f the tlurd Tuesday of each month at 2700 Albany #304 - starting in July, call The Pride I.me "131529-69"9 for the flme Visitor Center opens in Atlanta Opening on June 24, for the fof\l time an Olympic host euy has a Gay and Lc.-bian vi~itor's center. The center, located at 1374 W. Peachtree St. in Atlanta will pro· v1dc visitors and resident~ wuh world class entertainment and hosp1tallly throughout the summer '96 game> The center will also provide perform­ance space for the play, "In Slltchcs-an alternative musical .. Based on the book by Lee Leonard. ll "directed by David II. Bell wllh mu>ic by Henry Marsh, lyrics by Bell It is intended as a "Celebration of Life" in the age of AIDS. For more infor· mat1on about the v1s1tor's center and 11ckct informallon call 770·677-9883 Op 3c6J Not open t HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 19 20 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21. 1996 by Jon Anthony Happy Lesbian & GO) Pride Week Houston' Ste .. Martin has been rapped to replace John Truolta IS the lead in the upcoming film The Double Tra\olta '"'" sued last "eek for walking off of the <et, on locauon in Pans. Last "eek "e reported that Travolta's camp denied their \\35 contention on the set and that the reason for Tra,olta's departure \\35 to comfort his son dur og surgcr; Apparent]) Tra,olta and Double director Roman Polanski had creative differences related to the filming of the mov c~ rcsu':.ng n the cnsmng litigation. T'1lvona 1s scheduled tc appear on CBS' late Show w David le1termen next Fnday. June 21 \\ hoopi Goldberg as a male acuon hero 1n drag• According to scnpt"T1tcr .Jot Eszterhas (Basic Instinct. Sho"girls) th3t is precisely "ho \\ould be <ast " his latest scnpt. An .flan ~ml/hee Film, 1s picked up for distribution I sztcrhas clauns that s,. h·ester Stallone and Bruce Willis ha\e also agreed to cameos m "hat he bills os a "faux documentar; spoof of movie making. Smithee 1s the pseudonym sanctioned b) the Directors Guild for directors \\ho \\Ould prefer their names not be associated \\Ith a particular fi Im for various reasons. The movie purported!) melds ficti:.ous Holly"ood characters with real ones. Rosie O'Donnell's nC"" da)timc variCI) sho" debuted to 1mpressl\ e ratings last week O'Donndl's sho" garnered the h1ghest­firs1 da) ratings for any l:llk show since 1990 . Rita Morono had to fill m for an ailing Sharon Stone at the Salute lo the Ladies of the American Musical luncheon at the Bc\·crl) H .:s hotel last week. Stone's spokeswoman s:ud the actress was suffering from the nu and has had to cancel SC' cral engagements. Veteran tclcv1s1on actor \brk. H•rmon has Joined the cast of CBS' Monday night s13plc Chicugu lfope. Harmon's previous uedits mclude St E.lse14here playing a doctor ";lh Man it is hot Ulaitin<J. for the to start! AIDS, Reasonable Doubts with Marlee M1rtin and last season's short lived crimc­drama Charlie Grace . Composer Guy Thomas has filed a SS mil hon cop) right in!hngcment Ian suit agamst Countr) and Western giant Garth Brooks rhoma. conlcnds that Brook's song Standing Outside the Fire is based on a song he CO-\HOte "ith Kenny Loggin• titled Conviction of the Heart An L.A. judge ordered Brooks to provide Thomas \\llh the recording tracks of Fire Broo~s \\ • .I resume his deposition next month .... Barbara Streisand chatted pollllcs " th President Clinton m his hotel suite for 45 minutes last "eek at the Sheraton Miramar in Santa Monica. CA t'kr attnding t\\o Democratic fund-raisers Besieged by fan mai and picas from polu:e. cl\ic leaders and Congressional members. Fox has given America's .\fost H'anteda temporary rcpric\C. The nch\Orl has: ordered enough original episodes to keep the sho" breathing through September at "h1ch time its final fate '"II be decided ..• Jane Paule~ ,.,11 anchor Time & Again. an upcoming show based on archi\ed NBC Ne"s fool:lge, for the nrn cable ehannc1 MSNllC - •Joint venture bct\\een M1croSoll and "BC · slate1 to premiere next monlh. HBO Independent Productions "'111 tum the WY. Y. C) berthnller Techno J into a television series. This marks the fi"51 lime an onginal \\'eb content mo,cd to t«!le\;s1on . . Betty Buckley's recent appearance at Carnegie llall m a bencfil performance for Broad\\ay Carc:sll,quit) Fights AIDS"~ an enormous success. BucklC) v..on praise from crillcs and audiences ahkc The charismatic performer "as so dazzling that a li\c recording or lhlS spectacular event \<ill hit stores this fall Buckley is contemplaung talmg her shov. on the road, . Veteran Broadv.ay producer David Merrick. upset "1th the nominating process conducted b) the Ton) A\lard~ \\tll stage his O\\on A"ards ceremony next sprang ns an altcma11vc to the Ton) s. lndustf) ms1dcrs arc split as to "hethcr such an event c.:n be a<e.,mpllshcd wuh success. . Mia farrow. Oprah Winfrey and Ari Buchwald \\ere in attendance at the American Booksellers Association convention promoting their respecti•-e tomes, slated for release later this )ear Toni Braxton (Secrets), Lyle Lovell (Road to Ensenodo) and legendary rock iconoclast Patti Smith (Gone Agoin) ha\cjust released new CD's. All three of 1hcsc immense I) talented un1sts ha\'e delivered some of their best material to date on these excellent CD's. The NC>< Republic has a nc\\ editor to replace Andre" Sullivan , \\ho left m April and subsequent!) disclosed hlS lllV status. '.\liehael Kell). 39, former!) a \Hiter for The Nm Yorker \\ill take the helm of the "eek I) political Journal Kelly gained national prominence with the magazine as 1ts gulf"ar reporter se>eral) ears ago. Columbia Records is planning lo release a rctrospcctl\e or recordings b) the late Jal.L trumpeter :\liles Dni•. The highly anticipated hoxed set hils the streets Augusl 27 A&E "ill adapl Jane Austen's Emma into a telcp1c for the fall or 1997. The cable nct"ork had considerable succc-.s last season nllh Austen's Pride and Pre1ud1ce \'1lerie Harper, fresh from her stint in the Woody Allen play Death Defying Acts, 1s in rehearsals for The Dragon and tire Pearl. The pla) based on the life of Pearl S. Buck requires the lcgcndaS) actress/comedian to play 11 characters. Buck \\OS the first American "'Oman 10 "in the Nobel Prm:: for literature for ·rne Good Earth". The sho'" "ill tour the countl) prior to its Broadway debut Chaka Kahn vmts and performs on Rosie O'Donnell Monday June 24 al 9 am on Channel 13. .. Cher----·--- will spar with David Letterman Thursda) June 27 on CBS' I.ale Show Ihe last several times lhc:se two got together, they made headlines. This gel logelher promises to be interesting indeed Fmall), Country legend Georee Jones '"II be signing copies of his au1ob10graphy, I l.1ved to Tell It All, from 6·8 pm at the Waldenhooks in West Oaks Mall. Milestones: Jo \"an Flttt. an Acadamy A"ard "inning actrC'>s for her portrayal as J1mes Dun·s mother in fAJt of Eden, dic-d al the age of 81 last week. Fleet was the stepmolher m the 1965 •ersion of Cinderella Jaa great [Ila Fit1gerald passed 8\\8)' this past \\eek as well Fitzgerald "as unsurpassed in her licld of contemporary artlSts. lier vocal ab11i11es and mesmer111ng kno" ledge of the musical scales \\35 breathtakmg Fnzgerald \\35 hailed IS one of the greatest singers of the modem era and she "as nrguabl) the most n.- . spcctcd di\ a in her class. She "ill be sorcl)· missed. but her l<gac) "11 rcmam with us for generations to come Top of the Charts: As expected, Jim Carrey's Cable Guy op.11ed #I at the box office "ith a tally or S20 million. The Rod "as a close second at Sl8.5 million \fission. Impossible, flusur and Dragonheart round out the top five AllC's Home Improvement lopped the Nielscns Ratings last \\CC~ Tha Crossroads by Bone Thugs-:\-llarmony remain at the top of the singles charts and Mctallica's nc\\ release load tops the album charts according to Billboard. The Ne" York limes best·scller's lisl ind1ca1es that John Grisham's no•el The RunaM-U)-' Jury is sull king of the fiction charts and Dennis Rodman 1s at the top of his game on the non·fiction charts "1th his phenomenal bestselhng autobiographical tome Bod A.• I Wanna Be. Quote of the \Vttk: "Al a rectnt concert. the smger Jewel H-alked off staRl' mid· .rong ufter bemK hit •wt th u f r1shee. In a related .story Fruhees '+tll now be sold ut all \f1diael Bolton concerts ... • Conan O'Brien on /.att V1ght (LJle lowll photo courtts; of Ke11h Bentfield at SoundPIUJ 520-'JlJ I I'm sure 9/ad that E]'s has $1.00 Bud & Bud Li9hts today and e~ery Sunday! Star ..,,Stllf,i'2JJ saturd~ e .11 * J{ostess: ~* Show Tara Dion 10:00pm * Special Guests Leah Halston * Jessica Van Shelton* D1J.nast1J. Sot-\th of the Border Night with Ma~ily~ "3v.a~i+a" Ma.-4X Thursday, June 271 ll:OOpm 2Sl7 Ralph Street at Westheimer (713J S27-9071 • HaPPY Hour 7am-9Pm weekdays • SI.SO Well 4-7 Saturday ~1~1 MALE STRIP CONTEST ~ g ' at 11:00 Pm w/ PAIUI :!! ~JM Star Studded (/) u '' Saturday Show 10Pm ~ 6/2~ I Budweiser & Bud lieht (/) J All OaY All Nieht ~ ~n~ M~Lfi:8J~~ ~~~AfJrT ~ 1( 51 1\.\~~ C.C. Ryder 6/i~Amr:i~uh~r {J;~nt ~ $~;~,~ o~ ~\~~~\\' Blanca Debris Ji.\\ \)P.'! RocheIIe Stevens and ALSO Granny s Tacos!!! • SI.SO Vodka 7am-6Pm • Mui! Club 7am-10Pm • S3.7S Pitchers & Sl.2S Mul!s ~/~6 Granny's Bur2ers!! ~ HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21 , 1996 21 22 HOUSTON VOICE I JUNE 21, 1996 On Your Next VfiittoHoutton ••. What you get at tire rrwtel on the highway & what you get at the Montrose Inn Motel Heterosexuals with kids fighting next door. Montrose Inn. Gay men next door. Only gay men Nothing but gay men. Motel Several miles to the gay bars. Montrose Inn: 5 tiny blocks to the gay bars Motel: Drive to the gay bars & pay $5 to park, if you can find parking. Or take a $15 cab Montrose Inn· Walk to the gay bars Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Drive back from tbe gay bars and risk the cops making you walk the straight line. Or take a Sl5 cab. Montrose Inn· Walk back from the gay bars Or take a S3 cab. Motel. Pay S35 to $95 a night for a room Montrose Inn: Pay $41 to $79 a night for a room . Motel Eat in their resuurant. Food for the masses. Pay plenty. SI soft drink machrne. Mon1rose Inn· Complimentary late night sandwiches & full breakfast the next day. Free soft drinks, iu1ces, coffee 24 hours Motel. CruISe the parkrng lot and get threatened . Montrose Inn CruISc the hallways . Please! Motel: The receptionist sneers at you. Montrose Inn The receptionist winks at you Motel : Wash mg machine? Iron mg board? Hair dryer? Refrigerator? Stove? Microwave? VCR & gay movies'! Are you kidding? Montrose Inn All of the above Free to use . Motel Full Sile bed, everythrng else is plastic . Montrose Inn: Queen 51ze bed, hardwood floors, hardly any plastic. Motel. Maid knocking 8 a.m., you moan but she's conung m anyway Checkout II a .m Montrose Inn Handsome man next door knocking II a m to Join him for breakfast Checkout I p m Rutrrat1ons uqutsttd. 1-800-357-1228. Tht houst at 408 A rondalt The Montrose Inn 1s NOT a motel. We re NOT a hotel. We re a Bed & Breakfast tAnd we're Ba..c & Butch We're the B&B that's B&B ) We're completely d . trcrcnt' Sponsored by Channel 13 KTRK Maleman Funzine ELF1 PUMPED UPON J! Spomored by Neiman-Marcus Town & Country la Strada 7/b.rofule{t; 7a£ufous Joofa,ear o/!lie Yamous (',elebration and Auction benefiumg The Names Project, Milam !louse, lhe Cay & Lesbian 5wotchbo.ud, The lexas Lesbian Conference, & The Pride (',ommutee of llouston Friday, June 2JJAGS7 pm to ~ /)ronnc l:Janvrci Al ''' Dmrit " Cntt1 of Umtoa ''u!ly '""Y '7?<11,/,ael 5120 Woodway • $20 Donation Requested SILENT AND LIVE AUCTION OF CELEBRITY F001WEAR PUMP ART DESIGNED BY LOCAL ARTISTS Special Guest Speaker: Can ace Gingrich ' Janis Ian's Revenge Interview By JON ANTHONY Grammy Award winner Janis Jan's career ha> spanned decades, four to be exact. That is not an easy .feat in such a highly compell· 11ve industry. Rtvtngt . her newest album , demonstrates why th1' talented singer/songwriter has lasted in the fran­uc business known as the music industry. The album is one of Ian ·s best and that is quite an accomplishment. Known for her acoustic abtllly, Ian departs from the norm and offers a compelling compila­tion of harder edged tunes that Oow wuh depths of emotion that Ian masterfully conveys In a recent interview wilh the Houston Voitt , Ian elaborated on her status in the industry and how coming our as a Lesbian personally transformed her inner self Currently embarking on a continental U.S. tour, Ian 1s on the road promoting the album . "It's about survival," says Ian. "!l's about outlastin& the enemy.'' Ian says she wanted to do something differ­ent from her last album. 1992's s,.aking Siknct Although she thought u was a good album. she felt that tl focu,ed on the songs, not the music . Having worked previ· ously with co-producer John Jennrngs, Ian and Jennings were in accord when selecting a hand for the album . ' (Revenge) took a different direction There ' s a poinr \Ii here you choose 1he songs and after that the album 1alces on us own life. tde .. ally' say> Ian. Ian ts going to change musical directions agam on her next projccl tentatively slated to begin m October She doesn 't feel that her style of music IS harder for the younger generation of today to acccpl than that of previous generat10ns. " It might be a httle different for me because I'm ten to twelve years younger than some of the people 1 started with hccausc I Marted when I was 14 ... ~ut the audience th•! I g<1 is a real uoss· secuon between 16 to the mid 50's and I find that the real young ones are piralmg their parcn1s alhums an<l have been for years . 11 1 ~ a cool thing to he hilling three generatllrns of people," said Ian Asked 1f she ever tires of >1ngrng her 'ta­pie of hits such as At Seventeen, Je~!i.e and Stars. Ian rephed· "They've surted to get a ltttlc old the last couple of year" But this year I'm out <0lo which I haven't done 51nce I wa; IS and everything hu uken on a whole other cast because of u, so no. As corny as u sounds. I 1hink it's a real pnvilcgc to be able to write those kinds of songs " WI has shown that <he " adept al wnting 10 general and not JUSt a s1ngcr/songwr- 11er. !;he •~ also a columnist for The Advo· cate magazine. "The Advocate manag· mg editor. Judy Wieder. came to me two years ago and asked me 1f I'd be interested 1n writing a guest column and I said no," Ian recalls. Wieder did not relent and con· 1inued to pursue Ian in an auempt to per· suade her to consider a regular column "F1nally, I lllerally went to lunch with her and my partner. They figured 1t all out. They had a ltst of due <Lites for me and wme ideas for columns. I don't know why she thought I could write, she doe>n't know either she says. but apparently she wa. right.'' Having been coerced into a career ~idc · hoe as a columnis1, Jan adm11s ~he ha~ sue· cumhed and that she enioys the ta,k . "II" real different. A~ a JOUrnalist )'OU can appreciate the difference 10 know 1hat you've got a limit-at The Advocate 1t s a thousand words-and you've got to get cvcrychrng you need to ~ay into that , .. say< Ian. "I tread that thin hne between really being rude about being Gay and also have some SCO"-C about u. I try to write n in a way where someone who as not Gay can understand It but where a gay person will feel like u's add1n& some d1mens1on to thcu life.'' rca,oned Ian WI IS one of many lcsb13n singers who has come out in recent years. k .d. lang, Meltssa Etheridge. Chastity Bono, etc. Asked 1f she encompassed any ~acklash u a result of her fortitude. Ian rcphed· "Just here Janis Ian and there. We've had silly things, like one label said they had too many lesbians already. I think the backlash happens more when you're dealing with all the peo· pie who are not out. Because once you're out. people lose a lot of their fear. But so long as you stay closeted or mamtam the atticudc that it's no one's business. So long as you're passing, in effect, there are going to be repercussions, because peo· pie know," she opines. "h's funny because when Meli>Sa, k.d and I came out, we all thought that there would be this huge ru>h becau'IC we dtd ll all within a month of each other and there wasn t. Really u 's kmd of stayed there Only English male arusts have came out bcS1des us. There are no English female artISts that have and no American male artists It ' s a strange phenomenon says Ian . Ian contends that coming nut for her was not the catharsis 1hat some would like to bill u u . ''I was our to my tam1ly and hus1 ness . II certainly cha ng es peo ples pe r· ception of you. I don't know that II changes yuur perception of yourself. I never felt parucularly closeted so tl had less of an affect on me ," says Ian . Jan has no desire to add acting to her career She is perfec!ly comfortable being a writer and considering her 1mprcsS1vc success through the last 30 years. 1t is apparent she made the right career choice. In addition IO her wn1tng. Ian has studied theater. ballet and interpretation wi1h some of the mosc prestigious mentors in the business. Her musical compositions have been recorded by some of the rndus1ry's big· gest stars across musical spectrums. Joan Baez, Cher, Bene M1dler. Kathy Mattea, Mel Torme, Nanci Griffith, Amy Grant, John Mellencamp, Diane Shcuur. Etta James, Lee Greenwood, Chet Atkins and Glen Campbell have at one ume or another recorded an Ian tune in the last thirty years. Ian's resume of songwriting credits speak volumes and arc a testament to her uncanny abillly as a wordsm1th and her incomparable ulents as a mus1c1an. Dcspilc all of her accomplt,hment;, Ian has not done all she has <ct out to do. She would love to perform with John Mellen· camp again and ~ees that a' a good possi .. b11ity. An avid fan of Ant DeFranco, Ian believes that she has been an mflurncc on her and vice versa . Jan would also like to work with Bruce Spring<teen and Paul Simon If precedence is any indication , she most certainly will have that opportu· n1ty. Ian laves with her partner Pac, a law \lU· dent. and her two dogs, a dob1e and a tea cup poodle-yes they get along "great" with each other. Janis Ian will perform hve at Rockefclle" this Saturday, June 22 Nancy Ford ts the SJ"'Cial opening guest. Ian encourages her fans to bring any mcm­orah11ia they wish to have her sign alter the show. She will he selhng copies of R~v~ng~ and have an auto1raph session following her performance . For con· cert information, call 869-TICS . Conference continued ... (Contmuedfrompage I) kids into "nonnalcy." (It is noted that the homosexual community extricated itself from the DSM in the early I 970's.) Champion Award - past winner was Raymond Hill. The Tronsgender Advocate Award is for any attorney or legal organization who has advanced the legal standing of the transgender community. The winner is Law Depending upon the interest and attendance Professor Stephen Whittle from the at these two health Jaw workshops, the University of Manchester, England. Prof. discussion could lapse over into a half day Whittle, an out transgendered man has working committee on Saturday morning, written several books on transgender legal chaired by ICTLEP Health Law Moderator, issues in England. He is also involved with Ms. Lisa Middleton, a highly placed "Press for Change", an advocacy group in insurance professional, wherein an attempt to England. Recently, he took the British derive a community consensus on these · Courts to the European Court of Justice. The issues would be sought. EC J ruled that the British Courts were in The Legal Needs of Transgender People of Color On Friday afternoon, July 5, immediate!) following the luncheon speaker, there "ill be a three hour \\Orkshop (with no competing workshops) devoted to the Legal Needs of Transgendcred People of Color. This workshop is not just for people of color, although it is hoped that many will attend This workshop is all transgendered people: our so-called "white" community needs to hear and even participate and to learn the extra and unfair legal burdens faced each day by transgendered people who are also people of color This workshop fonnat was specifically set up because of the misperception that being transgendered is a white problem. ICTLEP asserts that it is a people problem, and that until "e address
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