Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
File 013
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 013. 1999-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-24). Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 013. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6352

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 013, 1999-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6352.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 24, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript 12 NEWS DECEMBER 24, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Xwdk Sfumti &m Provider dedicated to serving the HIV community Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs a Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem SlOOOFFiS Sale Tines© MMRnee Voted #1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 Monday to Friday 5 am - 10 pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm Ml MHI R JASON (JKK.CFR Health Briefs Gore supports 'flexibility' on medical marijuana CONCORD, N.H.—At a New Hampshire town hall meeting Dec. 14, Vice President Al Gore gave his tentative support for the use of marijuana to relieve the suffering of medical patients, the Washington Blade reported. In response to a question from the audience, Gore said that doctors "ought to have the option" of prescribing medical marijuana. "Where the alleviation of pain is concerned, we have not given doctors enough flexibility to help patients who are going through acute pain," said Gore, whose sister decided against taking the drug during a painful, fatal bout with cancer. "Many of us have seen that ourselves." Gore qualified his statement slightly during a press conference after the forum, saying that marijuana should be used to relieve pain only "under certain limited medical circumstances." Gore's rival for the Democratic presidential nomination, Bill Bradley, has also said that medical marijuana should be studied further. The Clinton administration has generally opposed efforts to legalize medical marijuana. Number of older Americans with HIV increasing at fastest rate HOUSTON—Seniors are the age group with the fastest-growing AIDS rates—up 22 percent between 1991 and 1996, compared with a 9 percent increase among people age 13-49, according to the CDC. But health officials warned that the increases seem dramatic because the numbers are small, the Houston Chronicle reported. Currently, about 11 percent of AIDS cases are in Americans aged 50 and over, totally about 72,000. According to the CDC, slightly more than one-third of older people with AIDS are gay or bisexual men, with about 20 percent infected by using a dirty needle to inject drugs. Ironically, the drug Viagra that has allowed many older men to revive dormant sex lives also has heightened concern about the spread of AIDS. "They are pretty AIDS-unaware as they venture out into the world of sexual activity," said Sara Selber, executive director of AIDS Foundation Houston. "AIDS wasn't really on their screen at the time they were [previously] sexually active." AIDS Action executive to head Calif .'s managed care department WASHINGTON—Daniel Zingale, the 39- year-old executive director of AIDS Action, announced last week that he will resign from that position Jan. 2 to become director of California's newly created Department of Managed Care. The move will make him the highest-ranking openly gay man in California state government. In his new position, Zingale will create an entire bureaucracy to evaluate and oversee the care that California's $15 billion HMO industry provides. From 1993 to 1997, Zingale was political director at the Human Rights Campaign, the nations largest gay political organization. "Nothing short of an exciting, big challenge could have taken me away from this job that I love," Zingale said. Sustiva may be superior to protease inhibitors, studies suggest WASHINGTON—Two new studies underscore the effectiveness of Sustiva, generically called efavirenz, in reducing the viral load in people with AIDS. One of the studies, published in the Dec. 17 issue of the Not England fournal of Medicine, found that in 48 percent of cases involving treatment with a protease inhibitor (Crixivan) plus AZT and 3TC, blood levels of HIV fell to undetectable levels. That result compares 70 percent of those taking a mix of Sustiva and the same two other drugs. Also, 43 percent of the protease inhibitor patients stopped treatment because of side effects, while only 27 percent of the Sustiva group dropped out. The study was funded by DuPont, which manufactures Sustiva. In the second study, doctors tested a drug mix with both Sustiva and a protease inhibitor on 57 youngsters who had taken only the older medicines. Youngsters' blood levels of the virus fell to undetectable levels in 63 percent of cases. The article suggests that one of the reasons Sustiva works better is because it's taken only once a day, while protease inhibitors must be taken three times a day. One in three schools teaches 'abstinence-only' sex education WASHINGTON—A survey of high school principals reveals that one in three school districts is using an abstinence-only curriculum that permits discussion of contraception only in the context of condom failure rates, the New York Times reported Dec. 15. The poll of principals revealed that 95 percent of classes discuss AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, while only 39 percent discuss how to use condoms, and only 36 percent discuss the issue of sexual orientation. In the South, 55 percent of schools teach the abstinence-only curriculum, while only 20 percent of schools in the Northeast teach it. Only five percent of Southern schools offer comprehensive sex education, the survey found. Much of this may have resulted from Congressional action in 1996 that made $250 million in federal money available to teach abstinence-only classes. —From staff and wire reports Daniel Zingale is stepping down as director of AIDS Action Council to head up a Catfomia state health agency, making him the highest ranking openly gay man in state government there.
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1000_012.jpg