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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
File 010
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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 010. 1999-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-24). Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 010. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6349

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 010, 1999-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 24, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES VIEWPOINT The night the lights went out-and we had to talk by Rich Arenschieldt Earlier this year I attended a piano recital by Russian wunderkind Evgeny Kissen, one of the best masters of the keyboard in the world. The audience was comprised of a "Who's Who" of pianists and teachers from the southwestern U.S. His playing permeated your soul. Rarely do I sit in a concert hall and think, "I am so lucky to be here." This night was one of those times. Then it happened. The shrillness of some bozo's cellular phone splintered the sound in which the audience was coccooned. I latred for the perpetrator was visible— how could they violate what composer Alan Hovhaness called "The Temple of Sound?" At that minute, I wished that telecommunication devices would be rendered obsolete, like the lumps of nonbiodegradable plastic that they are. Some months later, I viewed a wry television commercial that poked fun at Y2K calamities and being stranded on a dark planet as greasy-hair techno-geeks who can't get a date control our future and bring the planet to a screeching halt. The scene is wearily familiar; midnight on New Year's Eve, celebrations in full swing. And at a second past the drop of the ball in Times Square, anything invented by Thomas Alva Edison becomes useless. Enjoying this thought, I wondered one step further. Wouldn't it be cool if all the lights went out, too? I'm not advocating a return to the hunter- gatherer way of life. Having been camping all of once, I am an avowed lover of nature. But rooting around for nuts and berries and competing with vermin for food is not my idea of a smashing good time. Having said that, I am somewhat hyper- connected to the universe, especially during the last minutes of this millennium. Just looking at the stuff plugged into my walls makes me dizzy At home I have two phone lines (and am contemplating DSL), one big computer, a laptop, a cell phone, a pager. The computers come with two e-mail accounts. Like most gay men, I have one for "Sunday school me" and one for "cruisy me." Add to this my other computer, fax, phone and e-mail access at work and I'm the main character in a bizarre Stephen King novel. If only Houston's power company would become temporarily inoperative, then I would be free. My life would change as quickly as a bug that gets fried on one of those blue-colored zappers. Sitting in the dark, realizing that a major morph has just occurred, how would I pass the quiet time? First, I'd make a run for the melting quart of chocolate ice cream in the freezer about as quick as that little Taco Bell Chihuahua heads for the chalupa. After that, then I'd wonder about the neighbors and the woman who lives next door, raising three kids in a single-parent home. The electronic gate surrounding her compound would now be useless. She'd probably be out in the carport looking around, concerned about the safety of her brood. I don't really know her. We usually just admire one another from a distance. Our communication is polite but almost always non-verbal. With my rechargeable spotlight, bought in a rare act of Y2K preparedness, 1 would check on her and the little bambinos. Something strange might happen—maybe we would communicate. With the advent of new technology, our spoken lives have the brevity of a Hemingway novel with none of its accompanying imagery. The world has become verbally instantaneous. It is crucial that we're never out of reach, but our fixation with technologically insular communication prohibits us from reaching out. People shy away from conversation that has any intensity. As long as quips and jokes are bantered about, all is well. But let the topic turn thoughtful or deliberative and people flee. Communication that takes time or effort is becoming an endangered species. Our quest for verbal accessibility and immediacy have come at the expense of intimacy. When—and if—the lights go out, make sure you have a candle nearby. Then you will be able to see the expressions of those around as they are forced to talk with you. Don't miss this opportunity. Houston resident Rich Arenschieldt writes about tlic arts, HIV and adixxacy issues for tiie Houston Voice. Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com -Selling your life insurance is a i_tu decision When you're gay, living wilh HIV and thinking ot seling your life insurance, shouldn't you be given a face-to-face consultation in a no-pressure, no-obligation environment? Shouldn't this option be discussed Linked Viatical Benefits is proud to be the only gay owned and operated viatical broker with a local office in Houston. After all, we believe in providing you 'he personal attention you deserve and getting you the most money in the shortest time! Call 1-800-275-3090 today! 37C: tot>y Drive Suite 1036 Houston. TX 77098 713 528 6777 e-mail: jtxf@hotmail.com Registered in Texas Member of National Viatical Association LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS MUSCLE MECHANICS PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO 4316 Yupon — By Appointment — 713'523-5330
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