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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
File 008
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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 008. 1999-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-24). Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6347

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 008, 1999-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6347.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 24, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 NEWS Holiday giving: Are charities naughty or nice? > Continued from Page 1 in 1999, making it one of the biggest recipients of the local funds, according to Mario Gomez, a United Way spokesman. "Our United Way has a long standing partnership with the Boy Scouts, for the past 76 years," Gomez said. There are no plans to change it, he said. "Basically, our position is that each one of the agencies which we fund has the right to make its own decisions on internal matters," Gomez said. But United Way does fund many important charitable causes, including gay and lesbian agencies in some cities and HIV/AIDS service agencies, including some in Houston. Montrose Clinic received more than $98,000 in 1999 from United Way and is expected to receive even more in 2000 to fund HIV counseling, testing, education and case management. United Way also provided about $121,000 to Montrose Counseling Center this year; funds are expected to increase to $124,000 in 2000. Each of the nation's 1,400 local United Way chapters makes individual decisions about what to fund and whether to affiliate with the United Way of America. While some United Way organizations in California and the Northeast have stopped funding Boy Scouts, most still do. Like Houston's United Way, the United Way of America offers domestic partner benefits to the 190 employees of its national headquarters in Virginia. The national group also has an employment nondiscrimination policy that includes protec tion based on sexual orientation and a diversity statement that includes sexual orientation. The problem with Boy Scouts Boy Scouts claims 4.5 million members and 1.2 million adult participants. The organization's prohibition of homosexuals is rooted in the Scout Oath that all boys and men must take to become a part of Scouts. Boy Scouts of America has defended its prohibition of gays by pointing to the Scout Oath, which calls on scouts to be "morally straight," Some, however, contend that at the time the oath was written, "straight" did not have the same meaning it does today. Whatever the reasoning, BSA continues to discriminate against gays, despite a New Jersey court ruling against the organization in that state. The BSA announced in August that it was initiating a study into the causes of homosexuality and the consequences for funding if the ban stays in place. Officials from Houston's Sam Houston Council of Boy Scouts did not return calls seeking comment from Houston Voice. Church, charity, army The Salvation Army shares as much in common with the Religious Right as it does with social service organizations. Nevertheless, it received almost $1.6 million from the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast in 1999. The organization provides much-needed assistance to some of the country's most needy people, but a conservative Christian interpretation of the Bible has led to denunci ations of homosexuality and a refusal in one city to abide by an ordinance requiring recognition of gay couples. Salvation Army in San Francisco turned down $3.5 million in funding from the city of San Francisco in June 1998 because the Salvation Army did not want to comply with an equal benefit ordinance that requires all entities that do business with the city to offer domestic partner benefits. The Salvation Army argued that the law runs counter to the group's religious beliefs. The organization is still not accepting funds from the city, according to officials in San Francisco. Col. Tom Jones, a spokesman for Salvation Army's national office, said that while it refused to comply with the ordinance, that does not mean mat gay men and lesbians are being refused services. The church's services are made available to anybody, Jones said. The only qualifications are whether the person needs help and whether local resources are available to provide the help. But the Salvation Army is a religious organization based on spiritual principles, Jones said. When asked if the group has a written position statement regarding service to gays and lesbians, he said the Bible is its position statement. "This is a sticky area for us," said Roian Chambless of the Houston Salvation Army. "We have a certain religious belief and we also have a belief that we should help anyone." The Salvation Army is not just a charity but also a conservative Christian church, complete with worship services and an organizational model structured after the military. The church believes in an 11-point doctrine that is similar to policies of many conservative Christian churches. The doctrine states that they believe in one, three-part God made up of the Father, the Son and the Holy Ghost. United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast 2200 N. Loop West Houston, Texas 77018 713-685-2300 unitedway_president@uw1gc.org www.uwtgc.org Pi Salvation Army of Houston 1500 Austin St. Houston, Texas 77002 713-752-0677 Sam Houston Area Council Boy Scouts of America 1911 Bagby Houston, Texas 77002 713-659-8111 feedback@samhoustonbsa.org www. sa m houston bsa .org
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