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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
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Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 001. 1999-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6340.

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(1999-12-24). Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6340

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999 - File 001, 1999-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6369/show/6340.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1000, December 24, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 24, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 1000 Texas Attorney General John Cornyn squelched a gay activist's request to establish a legal registry for same-sex domestic partners, though at least one county clerk vows to ignore the legal opinion. Page 2 Hollywood wunderkind Matt Damon breaks from his usual hard-core heterosexual characters to do gay for pay in the new movie 'The Talented Mr. Ripley.' Page 15 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE . AND YOUR STYLE . DECEMBER 24, 1999 'Tis the season to think before you give The holiday season is often a time of charitable giving, but some well-known organizations that ask for your gay dollars in Houston have anti-gay policies or fund anti-gay groups by GIP PLASfER For many, the holiday season is a time of giving back, often m the fonn of charitable givmg. But many gay men and le:;bians might be surprised to learn that some popular charities they have supported in the past have anti-gay policies or maintain close ties with anti-gay groups. Houston's Uruk'<l Way of the Texas Gulf Coast has policies and benefits that support its gay and lesbian employees, but it H also supports the Sam Houston Area Council of Boy Scouts of :::: America. § The Boy Scouts has fought nationwide to kL'Cp gay men and i boys out, cwn trumpeting the gay ban Ill fund-raising to con­'=> servahve mailing li'ts. wrong that it turned dov.n millions of dollars from the dl) of San Francisco becau~ of an ordinance that would ha~e required the group to offer benefits to the domestic partners of employees. And UnitL'<l Way dollars in Houston go to the Sah·ation Ann}; too. United Way stands by Scouts United Way m Houston has an employment nondiscruruna­tion policy that Uldudes protection based on <;('XUal onentation and the organization will begin offering domestic partner ben­efit-; to its 120 employees on Jan. 1. But some of the dollars donated to United \\a} end up m the pockets of Boy Scouts of America Even more of those dollars go to the Sahation Armr. Across Houston, bell ringers from the Salvation Army are col· lecting funds for a charity that is firm in its belief that homo· sexuality is morally wrong. 7. Outside retail L'StabJL,hments C\erywhere, volunlt'ers and employrcs rlllg bells for Salvation Anny, a combUled church and charity so finn Ill its belief that homQ>.Cxuality 1s morally The local Boy • :outs organizatJon recc1\ ed more than SJ 4 mil: on of the $70 million Lmted \\ay raised Ul metro Houston :;..- Continued on Page 7 Gay couples wzn equal rights in Vermont • State legislature may decide between marriage license and domestic partnerships, state Supreme Court rules b) l.AL!RA BROWN Gar coupl1·s .ire l'nhtled to the saml' benl'­f ts .ind prot1'C hons .l:. thl'lr m.1rned hell'ro· sexu.il rnunt1·rp.1rts, the Vt>m10nt Supn:m1• Court ruhl ~1ond.1\·. llll court stopp1•d short of c,1Jlmg for the st,ltL to 1 sut• marnag1• IIC'enses to s..1nw·scx couples, holclmg that the state IPgislaturl' should dec1dl' 11 lwthcr to gr.mt the benl'f1ts through m.11nage or thmugh a separate :-v:r tcm I kc donwshc partnership' "Whatt•ver system is chosen, howl'ver, muq conform with the constitutional impera· t11·c to afford all \'cnnontcrs the common benefit, proll•dion and security of the la11;" the court ruled. Whil1• the deciswn did not legalize same­scx mam.1gt.> outnght, as some acti\1sts had hoped 1t would, 1t also did not foreclose the poss1bilil)\ and in fact notl'd that ga1· mar­nagcs would be an "ob\1ous" way for the leg- 1sl.1tun.' to pnmde the benefits. 11w JU tKL~ said l'Xtmdmg the bmef1ts to ~ s.1ml'-Sex coupk'S "as Vermonters 11 ho seek nothing morl', nor less, than legal protection Q .ind s\umtv for tlwir .ivowed commitment to ~ an intimat1• .ind loving rdahonship is simply, i:; whrn ,111 is s.11d .ind donl', ,1 n'Cogruhon ol our 12 common hum.iml)·." ' This is a great day,' Nina Beck (left) told reporters after the C.11· nghts groups dl'Cl.m'<l thl• ruling a Vermont Supreme Court ruled that her relationship with Stacey ma1or \'1Cton. Jolles, who is holding their son Seth, was entitled to the same - Continued on Page 11 benefits and prote<fions as a heterosexual married couple. Texas Attorney General strikes a blow against DP registries, page 2 Editorial: The Vermont court giveth, and taketh away, page 8 For expanded coverage: www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 NEWS 2 INSIDE NEWS ~ound the llohon . . . . . . . . . . . • ... 5 fxpelled student seeks $7 5 million in suil •. . 5 FJo men sentenced 10 death for murder •. . . 5 Judge scales bock gag order 1n Shepard cose 5 Alf head thinks bombing suspect is dead . . .• 5 Study. Calif ban on gay marriage would harm kuls . , .. 5 Health Bnefs . . .. . . l 2 Gore supports 'flex1b1li1y' 011 manjuano .... 12 Number of elderly with HIV increasing , .. 12 IDS Action to head Calif heohh agency ... 12 Sbslivo may be superior lo protease mhib1lors 12 One m three schools teaches 'obstmence-on~· 12 VOICES & ECHOES Ediloriol: The Vermont court giveth, and roketh away . . .. . . ..... . . . ..... 8 Arenschielch: The night we hod to talk .. , ... 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU The Talented Mr. Damon • .. . .. . .. . . . .l 5 Hohdoy Hope . .. . . . .. . . . .. . ... 15 Out in Pnnt· 'M1smeosure of Desire' . . ... 16 Bestsellers . .. . . .. . . . .16 &!ling Out: Trendy ironing lo perform ..... 19 COMMUNITY Block Tie funds go to local groups .... . . .. 21 Occasions .. . . . .. .. ... .. .... . .. . , .. 22 Community Calendar . . . . . . . . .. . 23 My Siers! . . . . • . . . . . . . . . .25 CARMA T •• •.•• •• •.• •• •. . . .• •• .••.••• 22 BUSINESS DIRECTORY . •. ..•. . ... . . ..• . . ... 24 CLASSIFIEDS ..•. . .••. . .. •. •... .. ... . ... 26 Issue 1000 H I r v accep•s ~rs.: I c tcd ec· t< .ii "er" but c · rot lak_ •espo ,1bl 1~ for 1ls rerum The e<' • iese"' • 1'1 1 ght 10 Accept. rciec · u rd I ary sub ~1~s1on A r h's revert lo ~utt>ors !'..On i;ub wt an G•,ld res for freei.1nce tr bul r. are a~ able upo::l r quest Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd , Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713- 529-8490 State's top lawyer nixes DP registries But some county clerks may ignore legal ruling that says they can't allow a same-sex couple to register their union by CHRIS Lc1:DS Dallas Voice Answering a request that onginated from Bexar County's gay community, the state's top lawyer ruled last week that county clerks are not required to accept registra­tions of same-sex domestic partnerships. Attorney General John Comyn's opin­ion, issued Dec. 23, comes about four months after a gay San Antonio resident sought to legally regtster his relationship through the Bexar County clerk. But the decision seemed to create confu­s10n for the two county clerks immediately ~ affected by the ruling because it states that 15 county clerks are not required, and uses ~ language to suggest that DP registries are ~ not allowed under Texas law. Q. Bexar County clerk Gerry Rickoff said Tuesday that he would consult the district attorney before commenting on what the opinion would mean for his office. In Tra\·is County, the only county in the state to offer a domestic partners registry, County Clerk Dana DeBeauvoir said she expects no changes in the registry's exis­tence and operation. The Travis County registry was established when the City of Austin first offered benefits for same-sex partners in 1993. In July, the chairman of the San Antonio Gay and Lesbian Community Center, Michael McGowan, asked Rickoff to accept a declaration of his domestic partnership. Unsure of his obligations, Rickoff asked district attorney Susan Reed to request an opinion from the attorney general. Cornyn's opinion, which does not carry the effect of state law, cited previous deci­sions, established under former general Dan Morales, to deem declarations of domestic partnership not "documents required or permitted by law to be recorded." Heather Browne, a spokeswoman for Texas Attorney General John Cornyn ruled last week that state law does not require or permit county clerks to accept domestic partner registries. Cornyn s office, said the legal opinion is limited to interpreting existing statutes about stmilar affidavits. Comyn's opinion does not say whether county clerks can or cannot register domes· tic partners, she said, but maintains that "it's not their duty," Browne said. "Opinions issued from this office arc nonbinding legal documents. They're not something someone has to follow by law and put into statute," she said. "It's just the opinion of this office, clarification of the law on a certain issue." Debeauvior said Travis County officials plan to study the opinion, but added that she expects to continue accepting affidavits from same-sex partners. "Now that we've gotten the attorney general's opinion, we're going to read through it very clearly," DeBeauvo1r said. "But at this point in time, I'm not .:mticipat­mg any big changes." McGowan said he viewed the opinion as a step backward for Texas. "Naturally, I'm disappointed," he told the San Antonio Express-News. "In the broad view of things, this is a an example of just how far behind the time:. Texas is. With private employers across the country and in our state offering domestic partnership benefits, Texas is going in the wrong direc­tion." Leaders of Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas say they are not overly surprised about the opinion. "I'm not surprised by the ... opinion, and I don't really think it will have that much effect on gays and lesbians in Texas," said Steve Atkinson, co-chairman of the gay lobby's board of directors. Cornyn's opinion will have no effect on existing statues that restrict marriage to a man and woman, nor will it alter Texas family Code that precludes the Stille from issuing marriilge licenses to same-sex cou­ples, Browne said Police arrest suspects in Montrose shooting From staff reports Two men have been arrested ilnd chilrged in connection \\1th the ~m·. 28 shooting of il Houston woman, pol.cc sa.id Wednesday. Kevm Albert Rivas, 17, and a juvenile were arrested this week and charged with attempt· ed capital murder after Pasadenil polict! spot­ted one of the men in the car of Tracey Lynn Dccl. Her Honda Accord had Ix-en mtSSmg sincE: Deel was attacked ill a fa~t food rcst.1U­rant, shot several hmcs and left for de.1d in the 10,000 block of East Hilven Road. Lilst Sunday, Pilsadena pohce arrested two )U\'enile suspect~ for shoplifting and discov­ered that the vehicle they were driving belonged to Deel One of the suspects admit­ted his role m Decl's attack and allegedly tmp' cated Rivas, police said Pohce arrested Ri\•as at htS Pilsadcna home on Monday Authoritie. have said two young Hispanic males attacked Ot.'CI at Whalilburger, 3712 South Shepherd, about 3:55 a.m. and ordered about $9.55 in food. The attack came lrss than two hours ilfter [)(;el left Chances, il ~fontrosc bar for lesbians. Dt.>e.I called a fnend about 2:30 a.m. Sund.1y ilnd said she was ill Chances, which wa:. preparong to dose, police s.:ud ,\bout two hour~ later, Deel-who had Ix-en ~hot several times by .1 .22-caliber pistol-managl'd to crawl more than 300 yards to .w:akl·n res1· dents of an ilpilrtment complex ill 102 0 Wmdmill Lakes and ask for help. Friends in Houston's lesbian community hilve ralhed to raise fund~ for Decl's med­ical recovery and joined with her f.ither to post a $5,000 reward for information lead· mg to the arrest and indictment of her .ittackers. CnmeStoppcrs has offered a $1,000 reward in the case Tracey Lynn Deel was shot several times after being attacked at a South Shepard fast food restaurant Nov. 28. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HIGHLY EFFECTIVE THERAPY CR · !AN · 1 cc · , · · 1 with ant1retrov1ral agents 1s a powerfi.J protease 1nh1brtor that fights HN and rs among the preferred treatmerts for HIV 1n federal heahhcare gurdellfles. CRIXIVAN can help reduce the chance of illnesses and death associated with HJV· CRIXIVAN can also help lower the aMOUnt of HIV rn )'OUr body (caJJed \llraf load'') and raise your CD4 T-celJ count as shown 1n stid1es over a one-year period Some oatients may not Pxoenencc these effects. CRJXJVAN 1s not a cure for HN or AIDS. • DURABLE RESULTS Jn a ,..;ldmark 'udy. ovt:· 90% of 31 patients receMng a comblnatJOn of CRJXNAN.AZT.and JTC reducedther serom viral load below the hmrt of detection after 24 weeks. Importantly. the limited number of patients who chose to stay wrth the study for longer penods of time ma1nta1ned these resuhs through the one-year mark. Ir a separate study, 30% of 26 I patieots receMng dual therapy of CRJXJVAN and AZT had serum \/lraJ loads below the l1mrt of detection at 48 weeks. Jn another landmark study, 43% of 40 patients receMng combination therapy wrttr CRJXJVAN, AZT. and 3TC had plasma viral loads below the lunrt of detection at 40 weeks. Jn this study of over I ,ODO patients. the group of patients rece1v1ng CRJXIVAN along with 3TC and AZT achieved a reduction rn deaths and AIDS-defining illnesses over those taking JTC and AZT alone Overa I, the number of deaths was inadequate to assess the impact of CRIXJVAN on survival. Blood viral loads were f'Tleasured by ava1lab'1-; "e.-- a-........... ..., . ,..... .- -- . - 11 1-,, :---.-,...-r'L 1n ~•'-,...r -~an systems. • THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT CRIXIVAN CRJXJVAN dfl be·.·· w.. t> an e-·. "I ·°' iacn. Some patieots treated With CROOVAN may develop kidney stones. For some, this can lead to more severe kidney problems. 1ncl;.id1ng l<Jdney fatlure Dnnking at least 6 glasses of water each day may help reduce the chance of forming a kidney stone Other Side effects reported include rapid breakdovvn of •ed blood cells and liver problems. As With other protease inhibitors. changes in body fat increased bleeding 1n some patients With hemoph1ha. ard increased blood sugar levels or diabetes have been reported. Addl!Jonally. severe muscle pain and weakness have occurred rn patients also taking cholcsterol-lowenng med1c1nes called "stat1ns:· There are some common medications and AIDS-related med1cat1ons you should not take with CRJXJVAN. Discuss all medications you are taking or plan to take wrth your doctor. For more detailed m{ormauon about CRIXIVAN, please read the mformat1on immediately {ollowmg this advert.Jsement Guidelines for the Use of Anttretrowal Agents 111 HIV-Infected Adults and Adolescents. Panel on Oirucal Pracuces for T reatmcnt of HJV JnfectJon, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Moy 5 1999. Remember to ask your doctor about CRIXIVAN. CRIXIVAN. \.., Capsules 3 4 DECEMBER 24, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE .,+-.• . '· CAI Xi VAN" Patient Information about CRIXIVAN' 1KRIK·slll·vanJ : e 1nkn.o• ,. ""'te~ - , . . for HI\' (Human Immunodeficiency \irtt~) lnfecti<Jn · MUl lCIYU \llllkl 1 - Generic name: tndinmir (in·lllH-nuh-veer) sulfate : C'.llliMli . • - 9024509 ; Please read tills f tJon before you start !al<lng CRIXIVAI Also •ead Ille lea!lel eacr. tJme you .-enew your ~ JUSl 11 case anytt ng has changed. Rememllel: fills leaflet i:ties not take Ille place of car disl;-.;:;;;ans witl1 yw OOC1Dr You ~ doclDr shOOd discuss CROOVAN ~ you st<Wt taking ~ rieOultJon and at regular cllecl<.Lps vou remair> under a doctor's -:are when JSll1Q CROOVAN and SllQJfd ru Cl1ange or stop treatment w1111out first tlft<lng Wiii! )'OOI' docla What is CRIXNAN? CR!XIVAN IS an oral capsule used for the treatment of HIV 1Human lmmunodef1c1ency Vtrus). HIV Is the virus that causes AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome). CR!XJVAN IS a ~ of llV drug called a JX'OW3Se (F'llO tee ase ' How does CRIXNAN work? CRIXIVAN a protease .nhlbilor Iha! fights HIV CRIXIVAN can •.e1p reduce \'t'. chances c• getting Lnesses assoc.Jted w1th HV CRIXIVAN can also tie!p lower the atnOll1I of HV n your txx!)' ' 'Wal aid raise your C04 (T) ~ CRIXIVAN may not ha'l!l t'iese effects 11 al patien!s CllOOVAN presc. :Jed w1lh other anti-HV augs sucl1 as ZllV lalso tailed AlP. 'liC ddl ddC or d4T CRIXIVAN wor1<S d tly trom 'hese otner llV drugs Tafk with your cloctor about how you stWd lake CRIXIVAN CRIXIVAN Im bee!' stu:!ied In aootts "le 'ety and ef!edi'le!less of CROOVAN cl!ildren and adolesallls have 10t been estatlGShec1 How should I take CRIXNAN? Tllere se Sil lll1llOflalll ttlirQS you must do ll llelp you benelil trorn CSIXIVAN 1 Tiiie CRtXftlAN cap;des ""1'f day as precrtJed by yow doclot Cclntrul tN>J afiNAN IPess )W' 11'.l:b' leis you ., SIC!l. Talil 1te eo::I anrut d amJAN Itel )OS D:x:tJ leis you ., lal<e. ~ trtm 1te very stltt To help rrol<e lill1l you WI tierer.: from tllOO'IAN you = nd Sl<lp doSeS or lake 'drug l'l*!ayS' I you cbl l3ke O'IXPJAN as~ Ill! aCIMti d CXWArl may re reQ.axj ji.e., ~ , TaJ<e CRIXJVAN capsules every 8 hour$ around the clock, every day. ft 'l1ay be eas.er 'ellle!Tlller lO lake CROOVAN I you lal<e c at tile same lime Mr'/ day • you naw questiOnS 8llou! when take CRIJ(_'VAll yaur doCIOr or heal:ll care prOVider can help you decide Whal SClledlJle works 'or yoo '\ If you miss a dose by more than 2 hour$, wall and then tal<e the next dose al the regularly selleduled time. However ~ yoo mlSS a dose b>( less ll13n 2 txJurs take YQJ' ll1iSSOO dooo 'llflMately Then lake your next dose at the regularly scheci4ed lime Do not tai<c more or lesS IJlan your prescrlled dose d .;mavAN at any one ~ 4 Take a!IXIVAN with water. You can also tJl<:J CROOVAN will1 Oll1er lle'lerages SUCh as k or llQ!! Jal mil<. Jn. cottee or tea Ideally, take each llOse of CRIXIVAN withool toad but with water at least one hOur before or two hOurs after a meal. Or yoo tai<c ::lllXIVAN ' a meal w~ Ol light ic:uoe cl) u:e and la! milk and you ..ann Does CRIXNAN cure HN or A/OS? 10l Does CRIXNAN reduce the nsk of PQSSing HN to others? All has not t>een mm nWa; HV to Ollle!s ltlrougll sexua C'lnlacl or ':'cod Who should not take CRIXNAN? Do nol lal<e Cfl!XJVAN 'iad to ;.RIXJVAN or any OI JITIIXlOl?fl What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? doctor AN W lOnotyetliJ'Olt""' CROOVAll • Diabe! • Hemoclllilia • 1tg1 o:llofeslerol aid yoo are lakJ:Jg d1oleslerol tlwerilO "liedi:ines caBed • ' • Tel 'JOOf aoctor a!Jout lllTf medlaneS ye;; are 1a1<mg or ll lake n:tJOng non pr~ nlldianes Can CRIXNAN be taken wrth other medications? .. Drugs you should not take with CRIXNAN SE111A1£• (ter!eroOOeJ H5MANAl. (as!em<lllle VERSED" (rr.idaZolam) HALCION" (b1a2olam PRaU.Sll" (Cisa+Jrile ~ 'l'CdlO!lOnS g Wograine" :.i ca1~-i Takllg CRIXJVAN with the 8IJa;e 'lledJCa!Jons COOld • ser1o!JS q lte '!Jreatenono problems !SUCh as ITegui:w 'learllleat or exressMI SleepineSS) In addiliorl ya. shoold 'lOI take CRIXNAN with rttampln k.'lOWll as RIFADIN" RIFAMATE" RIFATER' orRIMACWP Drugs you can tal<e With CRIXIVAN include: R£TROv. • {Z!dovllfine lfJ.I also called ~ EPMR (lamlvldM 3'C) ~ 1Stavud1ne 1141 <SOnlalld (INH) BACllllM"ISEPTRA" (""'ne~ DlfWCAtl" (ftuconazde) BIAXIN" ((;lanthromycm) ORTHO NOWM 1/35" oral cooYacepti'le) 'AGIJ,!ET" nelidine Mcll1adooo VllEX" (didarllsine, <kllJ u yoo lake CRIXIVAll w1th VllEX" t:ll<ll 111em at least one too:.; apan MYCOlllTill" (n!abut 'l you take CROOVAN will1 M"COBl;. N" ym aoctor may I both Ille dose d MVCOBUTfl aid the dose of CRIXIVAN NZCPAL.0 ~-1 you~ Ol)aVAll wt!1 NZCfW.• )W' ltx:ID' may~ te oose d CRXIVAN llSal'TOO"~ -I you l3ke CR.WAN v.C1 ltSCIFTCJ!" yru <l'.1%1' llUf ~ te ctJse d CR.WAN. 9'(JWlJ(" ~-1youtw.e~..,9'CJW(l)(• yru lbD' rmt iq.s tc oosed C1fJt1Jf>tl 9.EVA" (e!avlrenzl U you tJke CllXJVAN will1 SUSTNA" YtK.J doctor may adjtJSI Ille dose cl CllXJVAN Tall< to your doctor about any medications you are talong. What are the possible side effects of CRIXNAN? f)f ~palll 'Iii' oss: ll!JOW!l lllellais wil!l or wtttart lllll8IJDn and runllleSs of hi '"lOUlt1 Tel )'QJ' aoctor prort¢t IOU ttese or ll'f Other I lte corntm ~or wooms. medlcal How should I store CRIXNAN capsules? • Keep .JflNAll capsdes 1n the bottle they came 1n and at !'lOOl ·~(59 86"f) • Keep CRIXMVI c:apsUes dry l1f Jea'/hg the desioo:! 'pillow" In Ille bottle Keep 'he boll!e doSed J'llrs-,... ,,,_,-/or_,__ __ Clo ltOt ... 11 lrx any O/flercondtli<ln or give It II> lflYO«ly- Keep C1UXIVAN Mttl Ml_ ·ou-t of- Ille- ru-dtt afd chiklyflfl .If 1 1J11 ,,,._, /l!At _. ttwr IM prncnO«J dosll of /his modk:lntJ /laS bHn ~•m. Ctlflta<t your fog! pa/Ml control""'" llos loallel llO>lides I umiary" lnfonnallon llbcll CRICVAN n jlW....,.,. ~ ar caams libot4 ellr!er CRICVAN or HV tall ID,... - 'RegisOnd.;..... at ..oiii&co he COPl'RIGlfT CUERCI<' CO he 1996 •:m ,_, '911> ,_ •n..ln'< __ ..,._IJOre1Rn ... .-.-•M«d< &Cll. he tjMERCK CRIXIVANe ' (indinavir sulfate) Capsules HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 24, 1999 NEWS Around the Nation Expelled student seeks $75 million in harassment lawsuit BOSTON (AP)-A student expelled for allegedly threa tening clas.smates just days after the Columbine High shootings in Colorado is suing Sandwich, Mass. school officials for $75 million, claiming they did nothing to stop the haras.sment he was getting from fellow stu­dents. Ten days after the April 20 Columbine shooting, the unidentified boy, 16 at the time, allegedly hsted the initials of four classmates on the bathroom wall and wrote: "You will die.'' The boy's lawyer, Michael Turner, said the boy was taunted for 18 months by other stu­dents. "Can you imagine being in a classroom and you raise your hand and someone behind you who is bigger and stronger says 'Shut up faggot,' and everyone laughs," said Turner. In papers filed in federal court, Sandwich officials acknowledged that the boy told school offi­cials of the harassment, and that they did nothing. Turner SJid the boy, who is not gay, has been rejected by another school, and his parents can't afford to :;end him to private school. Fla. man, 45, sentenced to death for murder, mutilation PUNTA GORDA, Fla.-A Florida man was sen­tenced to death for the murder and mutilation of a 21·yl•,1r-old m.in during a sexual encounter, APBnews.com reported Dec. 10. Daniel 0 . Conah.in Jr., was sentenced to death for the April 16, 1996 murder of Richard Montgomery. The prosecution contended Conahan lured Montgomery to a wooded area by offering him money to pose nude in progressive stages of bondage. Montgomery's genitals were surgically removed after his death. Prosecutors said that Conahan, an unemployed nurse, believed that if he left Montgomery's genitals intact, police could link him to the crime through saliva left behind from oral sex A charge of sexual battery was dropped because of a lack of evidence. ~ ~ ~ ID ~ ::;: ....... _ ........ _ Daliel Cocd!an Jr., 45, was sentenced to death for the murder mid lllltilation of a 21 ·ym-old mcm ii FloridcL If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. As one of the oldest viat1cal settlement brokers, we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. M. Bryan Freeman famdef & Chief Qen1 Advocalt * One quick, simple application * Competitive bidd1n9 process among multiple fonding sources * Any size policy * No cost or obligation at any liMe * All policy types considered, mch1din9 some less than two years old * HIV and other serious illnesses * Qualify up to 900 lcells *Your settlement may be lox.free * Con~dentiality, now and always BENEFITS 1AMERICA Return YO!J' completed appl'~non and rewve a tree Videotape: Exercises for People with HIV by Peoplt With HIV. 800-777-8878 Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. www.benefitsamerica.com Judge scales back gag order in Shepard case, orders release Member Viahcal Assacoaltan of America Benefit> America NA, Inc LARAMIE, Wyo. (AP)-A judge has lifted part of a gag order on the court file of one of Matthew Shepard's killers. The order signed by Judge Barton Voigt allows the public to view court documents in the case against Aaron McKinney, 22, who is spending life in pnson. According to the order, 18 documents on file will remain scaled to protect "the sanc­tity of jury deliberations." The gag was imposed to protect the confidentiality of McKinney and Shepard, but there b no longer a need to prevent the public from viewing the file, V01gt said in his order. Mc Kinney and codefcndant Russell 1 lendl•rson, 22, were sentenced to life in prison without parole for the beating death of Shepard, who was beaten, pistol-whipped, ti,..d to a fence outside Laramie last winter Outgoing ATF boss thinks bombing suspect Rudolph is dead MURPI IY, N.C.-Police searching for accused bomber Eric Rudolph say it is impossible to know whether he is alive, in spite of a statement by the departing director of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, who said in an interview that he thinks Rudolph is dead. "My gut in~ t inct is that he is still there, in a cave, and he's dead. That's only my opinion,'' said ATP Director John Magaw, in an interview with USA Today. "There hasn't been any missing food. There haven't been any missing shoes. No cabins have been broken into. Life isn't sustainable over this period of time if he stayed in there," he said. The ATF, members of the Southeast Bomb Task Force, the FBI and local police have been searching for Rudolph, 33, in North Carolina's mountainous Nantahala National Forest for more than a year. He's accused of six bombings, including the hate-motivated bombing in February 1997 of the Otherside Lounge, an Atlanta nightclub popular with lesbians and gay men. "I don't know how anyone can make a flat-out statement that Eric Rudolph is dead," said Murphy police chief Larry Payne. New study shows Calif. ban on gay marriage would harm kids A study has found that California's proposed ban on gay marnagl would adversely affect at least 40,000 children living with gay couples and 100,000 more with gay single parents. Tho:;e children could fod ostrJcized by society if thrir parents' unions were considered invalid, concludes the review by Michael Wald, a Stanford University law profes.<;0r. Proposition 22 would fon:l' California to recognize only m<1rri.1ges pcrforml-<l between a man and a woman. It will oc' voted on m March. Meanwhile, in S.1lt l£1ke City, an effort has begun to recruit students at llngh.1111 Young Univl'rsity as volun!L'(?rs to hdp p<1Ss Proposition 22. Jim Backman, dmxtor of BYU's Office of Academic Internships. :..1id his office has not yet sanctioned the pm1cct as a crcdih.•arning expmence, but U1at it 1s not unusual for students to St·r.·e pohtically diargl-<l internships. In l:>enwr, a proposed constitutional amendml'nt to n.~trict $<!me-sex marriages in Colorado has been .ipprov1.>d by the secretary of st.1te's office and now ad\•anccs to a 30-day challenge peri· od. Jf it surviVl'S, signatures of nearly 64,000 n.>gisten.'<i voters would have to be collcck'<i to put the measure on the ballot. -From staff and wire reports Friday, December 24TH • &pm Christmas Eve Candle Lite Service "The Greatest Story" Friday, December 31 sr • 7:30pm New Year's Eve Watch Night Service 5 6 &:TRONGEST IDEAS have ah,"avs I been the simplest ones. The ones that grow from vision. At Chase Texas, it is our \'ision to manage di\'ersity as we would any other strategic resource. \Ve have made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know that bringing collective experiences and skills to the table enables us to do things that none of us could do alone. A simple idea that inspires great rewards. QCHASE The right relationship is everything.rn Member FDIC DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices ..--~~~~~~--. Phone: 713-266-4304 Fax: 713-781-8445 E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net visit us on the web: www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer WE THEIMER ROAD 3: ..... ~ CLARKCREST !!:! N z w ex: c *~en .w.. z 0 i.. RICHMON 0 a: 0 ::: z AVENUE o HOUSTON VOICE •DECEMBER 24, 1999 NEWS 7 Holiday giving: Are charities naughty or nice? ;..- Continued from Page 1 in 1999, m,1king 1t one of the biggest recipienl~ of the local funds, according to Mario Gomez, a United Way spokesman. "Our United Way has a long standing part­nership with the Boy Scouts, for the past 76 years," Gomez said. There are no plans to change it, he said. "Basically, our position is that each one of the agencies which we fund has the right to make its ol'.n decisions on internal matters," Gomez said. But UnilL'CI Way does fund many important charitable causes, including gay and le-Oian agencies in some cities and HIV I AIDS service agencies, including some in Houston. Montrose Oink received more than $98,000 in 1999 from United Way and is expected to n.'Ceive even more m 2000 to fund HIV counsel­ing, testing, education and case management. Unitt'CI Way also provided about $121,000 to Montrose Counseling Center this year; funds are expected to increase to $124,000 in 2000. Each of the nation's 1,400 local United Way chapters makes individual decisions about what to fund and whether to affiliate with the United Way of America. While some United Way organizations in California and the Northeast have stopped funding Boy Scouts, most still do. Like Houston's United Way, the United Way of America offers domestic partner bene­fits to the 190 employees of its national head­quarters in Virginia. The national group also has an employment nondiscrimination policy that includes protec· lion based on sexual orientation and a diversi­ty statement that includes sexual orientation. The problem with Boy Scouts Boy Scouts claims 45 million members and 11 million adult participants. The organii.ation's prohibition of homosexuals is rooted in the Scout Oath that all boys and men must take to bt'CO!lle a part of Scouts: Boy Scouts of America has defended its prohi­bition of gays by pointing to the Scout Qith, which calls on scouts to be "morally straight" Some, however, contend that at the time the oath was written, "straight" did not have the same meaning it does tod'ay. Whatever the reasoning, BSA continues to di.<r criminate against gays, despite a New Jersey court ruling against the organization in that state. The BSA announced in August that it was initiating a study into the causes of homosex­uality and the consequences for funding if the ban stays in place. Officials from Houston's Sam Houston Council of Boy Scouts did not return calls seeking comment from Houston Voice. Church, charity, army The Salvation Army shares as much m com­mon with the Religious Right as it does with social service organiz.ations. Nevertheless, it received almost $1.6 million from the United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast m 1999. The organization provides much-needed assistance to some of the country's most needy people, but a conservative Christian interpretation of the Bible has led to denunci-ations of homosexuality and a refusal m one city to abide by an ordinance requinng recog­nition of gay couples. Salvation Army in San Francisco turned down $.3.5 million m funding from the city of San Francisco in June 1998 becau!'e the Salvation Army did not want to comply with an equal benefit ordinance that requi.n.~ all entities that do business \\ith the city to offer domestic partner benefits. The Sah·ation Army argued that the law runs counter to the group's religious beliefs. The organization is still not accepting funds from the city, according to officials in San Francisco. Col. Tom Jones, a spokesman for Salvation Army's national office, said that while it refused to comply with the ordinance, that does not mean that gay men and lesbians are being refused services. The church's services are made available to anybody, Jones said. The only qualifications are whether the person needs help and whether local resources are available to pro­vide the help. But the Salvation Army is a religious organization based on spiritual principle!>, Jones said. When asked if the group has a wntten position statement regarding service to gays and lesbians, he said the Bible is its position statement. 'This is a sticky area for us," said Rolan Chambless of the Houston Salvation Army. "We have a certain religious belief and we al'iO haw a belief that we should help anyone." The Salvation Army IS not Just a charity but also a conservative Christian church, com­plete with worship sen;ces and an orgaruza­tional model structured after the military. The church belie\·es m an 11-point doc­trine that 1s similar to policies of many con­sen ·ative Christian churches. The doctnne states that they believe in one, three-part God made up of the Father, the Son and the 1 loly Ghost. United Way of the Texas Gulf Coast 2200 N Loop West Houston, Texas 77018 713-685-2300 unitedway_president@uwtgc.org www.uwtgc.org Salvation Army of Houston 1500 Austin St. Houston, Texas 77002 713-752-0677 Sam Houston Area Council Boy Scouts of America 1911 Bagby Houston, Texas 77002 713-659-8111 feedback@samhoustonbsa.org www.samhoustonbsa.org 8 VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE rrrt, i' t4 r, i I ii EDITORIAL ~OICe The Vermont court giveth, and taketh away STAFF A.nociate Publisher Mike Flem1r>g m 1«. eChoustonv0tce.com Editor Matthew A Henn1e ed torChoustonvo1ce com Production Bethary Bartran Graphic Designer Mike Sweruor - Grapl>JC Designer Contributors Rich Atensch e!dt. Kay Y Dayus. Trayce D1slon. Earl Dittman. D L Groover. Robert B. Henderson. Gip Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. Kim Thompson. Terry Sullivan Ad ve rtising Sa les Richard B Hayes Ken Burd Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Classified s & Directory Carolyn A Roberts Carolyn White Nat ional Adve rtising Re presentative RIVendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 A Publishers Chns Cram Rick Ellsasser rn ........ ~=p•per MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER rtl GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Esubhshed 1974 as the Montrose Star SOO Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Ho~ton, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax. (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Office hoors: 9 am. to S:30 p.m. weekday5 To submit • letter Lette" should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the r ght to ed•t for content and length. We will will-hold names upon reque1t. but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Ho~ton Voice, r;oo Lovett Blvd. Suite 200, Ho~ton. Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editorChouston· voice com Op1ruons expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Vo1Ce The :!~-- ____ :his \\ ~c·k by the rights, are talking about enachng sex coupiL-s, the Vermont court If the court su~ct'eds in forcing Vermont Supreme Court repre- a separate domestic partnership refused to concede_ thJt the the Vermont legi~IJture to enact sents drama!Ic progress m the regime for same-sex couples attempt to linut marnage reprt"' such protections, 1t would repre-battle for recognition of gav mar- rather than expanding marriage sented anti-gay discrimination, sent among the most progressive nage, but its impact 1s still to include gays. even acknowledging society's approaches m the wo~ld today sinking in among combatants Gay marriage "makes me '1ongstandmg hostility" tow- tov.'ard equality and fairness for on both 5ides. uncomfortable, the same as any- ard homosexuality. gay couples. On the one hand, the court body else," Gov. Howard Dean That's right, the court made On the other hand, the court ruled that gay couples are s.11d after the ruling. clear that the ban isn't one on gay does not list what IS Mthout entitled to the exact same legal It's striking how a court could mamage, but on "same-sex" doubt the most important legal benefits and protections as appear to so clearly "get marriage. Under the current law, benefit that the state of Vermont marned couples. 1t," but at the same time dirl>ctly the court noted, gays could fl'l'Cly bestows upon couples W1Shing That's remarkable progress, encourage a Jim Crow, "sep- marry an opposite-sex partner to marry- a marriage hcense m:- e\•en in a state like Vermont arate but equJI" legal sy5tem "Plaintiffs h.we not demon- ognized by the governments of where gay couples already for gay couples and strated that the exclusion of the other 49 states and most enjoyed the right to adopt straight couples. same-sex couples from the defini- foreign countries. children, wm vbitation rights As the dissent nghtly points lion of marriage was intended to If the legislature takes the bait, should they split, and where as out, 11 would seem "unfath- discriminate against women or as expected, and passes a DP individuals they are protected omable" to us today that the U.S. lesbians and gay men, as racial regime, then gay Vermont cou-from workplace discrimination Supreme Court would have con- segregation was designed to pies lose every one of those and anti-gay hate 01mes. sidered a "separate but equal" set maintain the pcmiaous doctrine newly minted legal rights the Along the way, the Vermont of partnership rights for interra- of white supremacy," the court minute they cross the state line, court noted v.ith striking Ian- cial couples when it struck down held, incredibly. something you could do by guage the fundamental human anti-miscegenation laws in 1969. Not only ~ this the kind of making a wrong tum in a state ib nght at 1SSue in the case On the one hand, the court argument only a lawyer could tiny as Vermont. "(The dCC1Sion) to acknowl- drftly rejected all the s.tate's P.ur- love, it seems impossible coming What's more, the state of edge plaintiffs as Vermonters ported reasons for withholding from the s.1me court that ju.~t Vermont has the authority to who seek nothing more, nor less, legal ~nction from sam~x cou- pages earlier in the same d.eci.s~on issue marriage licellSl"S to pn.'- than legal protection and sccunty pies, including the pnnc1ple listed as justifications for hm1t1ng sumably anyone asking for one, for their avowed commitment to worry that doing so would marriage argued by the state regardless of where they reside, an intimate and lasting human undermine "the !mk between things like "bridging differences" and there's a long history of legal relationship is simply, when all procreation and child-rcanng" between the sexes and discourag- recognition for those licenses is said and done, a recogni~on of The cour~ pointed out th~t ing "marriages of convenience." in other states. our common humanity, the many opposite-sex couples don t ls it such a leap to conclude If a gay couple from Texas, for court held. get marrie? with any idea toward that inherent in the idea that gay example, should travel to On the other hand, the court having ch1ldrcn, some never do marriage cheapens the institut- Vermont and obtain a marriage didn't order the state to is.sue and others can't. At the same ion is the "pernicious doctrine of license no different from that marriage licenses to sam_e-~ex ti1!1~· many same-sex co~ples are heterosexual supremacy," other- bestowed on straight couples, the couples, even though that IS the ~Nng children. and their future wise known as homophobia document has a much greater only remedy sought by the gay 1s ha.rmed, not helped, by with- or anti-gay bias? chance than a "DP certificate" of couples who brought the lawsuit. hold mg legal protection from 'There is no doubt," said the affording legal rights and benefits Fm~r of the fiv~ Vermo~t justices their pai;ents' relationship. one Vermont justice who dis- back home, or at least in the 20 ?,coded that doing so nught have W~at s ~ore, the court ruled, agreed with the majority on this states that haven't yet enac~ed disruptive 11 and u_nfo~est>en ~ere:. no SJgn that the lack of a point, "that the fl'<juirement that laws that refuse to recognize conseq~ence; on the ms!Itution b1ological conne~t10n from one or civil marriage be a union of one same-sex marriages performed of mamage both parent::. m a same-sex man and one woman has the in other states. Instead, ~e st~1te legislature relationship res~lts in less effect of discriminating against And even in states like ('.corgia has. been _g1v~n a reasonable parental ?ttenhon-anymore lesbian and gay couples, like the that have passed a "Defense of pcno? of time. to either expand than theres evidence of a plaintiffs in this case, who are Marriage Act," the Vermont marriage to include same-s~x s1m1lar problem among opposite- unable to marry the life partners hcense offers a much more pow-couples or enact a "domestic sex . couples who resort to of their choice." erful challenge to DOMA under partnersh!p" rt>gime that looks medical_ assistance when one On the one hand, the court the U.S. Constitution's "Pull Faith and acts hke mamage; . _ partner IS mfertile. . listed dozens of legal benefits and and Credit Clause." Already, the states pohhcal On _.the other hand, haVIOg protections to which married First in Hawaii and then in leader.;, who are among the m~t ca~t a~1d_e these baseless reasons couples are entitled but which arc Vermont, gay couples are finally recephve anywhere to gay aVll for denying recogrutton for same- denied to same-sex couples, winning fairer tn•atrnent from the among them "access to a judicial system de;igned to pro-spou~' s medical, life, and dis- tect our civil rights. ability insurance, hospital ':'Isita- But just as the I lawai1 rourt tion and other medical dt>c1s1on- shrank from its n.~pons1b1ltty and making privileges, spousal sup- withheld judgment for more than port, intestate succession, home- tw~ years so the heterosexual stead protections, .:ind many ma1onty could dt>cide whether to other sl.ltutory protections." pa:;.~ an amendment ovrrruhng That's a significant list, and the the court, the Vermont jusbr~ most import.int one there may be have stopped short of doing jus-spousal i.upport and divo:ce lice for fear of offending. laws, which not only provide We applauded I lawaii, and we extra Hglue" to keep .coup!~ from chtw Vermont. But we wait for splitting at the first sign of some court of last ll'SOrt that trouble, but which also protect understands its responsibility to both parties if it comes time to recognize these most fundamen-split up belongings. tal of human rights. HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT The night the lights went out-and we had to talk by Rich Arenschieldt Earlier this year I attended a piano recital by Russian wunderkind Evgeny Kis.o;en, one of the best master.; of the keyboard in the world. The audience was comprised of a "Who's Who" of pianists and teachers from the southwestern lJ S. I lis playing permeated your soul. Rarely do I sit m a concert hall and think, "I am so lucky to be here." This night was one of thow times. Then it happened. The shrillness of some bozo's cellular phone splintered the sound in which the audience was coccooned. I latred for the perpetrator was visible-­how could they violate what composer Alan I lovhancss called "The Temple of Sound?" At that minute, I \\;shed that tek'Commumcation devices would be ren­dl'rcd obsoll'te, like the lumps of non­biodegradable plastic that they are. Some months later, I viewed a wry tele­vi~ ion commercial that poked fun at Y2K calamities and being stranded on a dark planet ,1s greasy-hair techno-gt>eks who can't get a date control our future and bring the planet to a screeching halt. The scene is wearily familiar· midnight on New Year's Eve, celebrations in full swing. And at a second past the drop of the ball m Times Square, anything invented by Thomas Alva Edison becomes useless. Enjoying this thought, I wondered one step further. Wouldn't it be cool if all the lights went out, too? I'm not advocating a return to the hunter­gatherer way of life. Hl\ing been camping all of once, I am an avowed lover of nature. But rooting around for nuts and berne:; and competing with vermin for food is not my idea of a smashing good time. First, I'd make a run for the melting quart of chocolate ice cream in the freezer about as quJCk as that little Taco Bell Chihuahua heads for the chalupa. After that, then I'd wonder about the neighbors and the woman who lives next door, raising thn.>e kids in a single-parent home. The electronic gate surrounding her com­pound would now be useles.~. She'd proba­bly be out in the carport looking around, concl'med about the ~fety of her brood. I don't really know her \\'e usually just admire one another from a distance. Our communication is polite but almost alwavs non-verbal. - With my rechargeable spotlight, bought m a rare act of Y2K preparednt-ss, I would check on her and the little b;imbmos. Somt•thing strange might happen-ma~ be we would communicate. With the ad\·ent of nl'W k>c:hnolo~; our spoken lives have the bn:vity of a Hemingway nO\·el \\ith none of il~ accom­pan) ing imagery. The world has become wrballv mstantaneous. It is crucial that we're ~ever out of reach, but our fixation with k'Chnologically insular communica­tion prohibits us from reaching out. Pcoplt• shy away from conn~rsabon that has any intensity. As long as quips and jokes are banll'n.'C! about, all is well. But let the topic tum thoughtful or deliberative and pt.'Ople flt-e. Communication that takes llme or l'ffort is becoming an endangered spt.'Cles. Our qul'St for verbal accessibility and immediacy ha\·e come at the expense of intimacy. When-and if-the lights go out, make sure you ha\·e a candle nearby. Then vou will be able to see the expn.'Ss1ons of tho~ around as thcv are forced to talk with vou. Don't mt~s thb opportunity Houston TC'Sident Ric:Jz Amtsclueldt wnt~ alxmt t/ie arts, HIV and admcacy l'S~ for the Houston Voice 1 la\'ing said that, I am somewhat hyper­connected to the universe, especially during the last minutes of this millennium. Just looking at the stuff plugged into my walls makes me dizzy. At home I have two phone lines (and am contemplating DSL), one big computer, a laptop, a cell phone, a pager. The computers come with two e-mail accounts. Like most gay men, I have one for "Sunday school me" and one for "cruL~Y me." Add to this my other computer, fax, phone and e-mail access at work and I'm the mam character in a bizarre Stephen King novel. Let us know what you think If only Houston's power company Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or o p-ed submissions (800 words maximum}. would become temporarily inoperative, Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions then I would be free. My life would change ~ 11 A must include a name and phone number for verification. as quickly as a bug that gets fried on one of 'I' U Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, those blue-colored zappers. Sitting in the 1~~--~~.J,/ Housto n, TX 77006 dark, realizing that a major morph has just I fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: e d it or@ho usto nvoice.com occurred, how would I pass the quiet time? Selling your life insurance--, is a T • decision. W!'en 'f(JIJre gay, iving with HIV a'ld thin ~ c:J seling yoo ife 11\SU'ance, should~ t yo., be given a fac&-lo-lace cansullation Ill a '10-~e. no-obigatlOll ervroivnenl? Shouldn't this option be discussed llllked Voahcol Benefits ~ p1oud ta be lhe on.ly gay awned a'ld operated V10lico brol:er wit~ a local office tiOuslon. Atter al we ~e in providing yoc.. lhe personal altention vau deserve and getting yoo uie most rroney" •he shO'!est tune Call I ·800-275·3090 today! 37C' Utiy Olive Suite 1036 Hous!Ot' TX 77rR8 7'3 528 6777 ~ J'x•11root~ com Riogiste<iod in TIOXaS Miombe<ol National Viatlcal Association LINKED VIATICAL BENEf.JTS PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO -~ (,' t(,,lf "' iB-itu/ ~~ Ctne(.u" 4316 Yupon - By Appointment - 713•523•5330 10 Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~ Planetout:com wwwplnlout.oom I AOL~. PlanetOut engage """* enjoy ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Join us in our excitement as we celebrate the arrival of our Lord Jesus at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC ·., 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Corner of Montrose and Hawthorne) Candle Light Service Friday, December 24, at 7pm Reception to follow Y2J(- "Don't sweat it" Sunday, December 26, at I 0:30am New Year's message Look for "Ask the pastor" in upcoming issues! NURSERY AVAILABLE FOR ALL SERVICES. DECEMBER 24, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Cek6rating 25 ']ears in the Community Saturifa!JS at i:30pm 1307-Jf 'Yafe • 713-880-2872 For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Buslneu / ,·u11rance • Workrrs Cnmpensntlon Group l/rul/11 • Ufe lnsurancr & much mart 6575 W. Loop South, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 NEWS 11 Vermont lawmakers unlikely to approve gay marriages ;...- Continued from Page 1 "This is ,1 legal and cultural milestone," said Yfarv Bonauto, co-counsel for the three couples \~ho brought the case. "The court recognized that same-sex cou­ples need and deserve the same legal rights and protections other people take for grant­ed. The court's decision paves the way for morL' secure families and stronger commu­nities," said Bonauto, director of the Gay & Lesbian Advocates and Defenders. "Certainly we would hJve liked to see an immediate order to end discrimination in marriage laws themselves Jnd allow same­sex marriages, but if we have to get to full equality in two steps rather than one, we will continue to march forward," said Evan Wolfson, marriage project director for the Lambda legal Defense & Education Fund. Because the Vermont Court based its deci­sion on the Common Benefits Clause of the state constitution, the case cannot be appealed to the United States Supreme Court. Other states do not have to abide by the ruling, but the court's decision can still have a broad impact in the fight for equal rights for gay couples nationwide, Wolfson said. The ruling also "l,1ys the legal foundation for Vermont to be the first state to accord full equality to same sex couples," Wolfson said. "Once they do, fair-minded individu­als will have a chance to see the sky doesn't fall, and we can continue asking for sup-port and building on this." Vermont unlikely to approve marriage The Vermont Supreme Court's ruling allowed the state legislature a "rea<;0nable peri­od of time" to determine how to unplement the dl'tision, although it abo exp~~ly gave the s."lffil"SCX coupll's the right to bring the ca-.e back to court if the lei,>islature did not act. Vermont lawmakers predicted this week that the state legislature would pass some form of domestic partnership, with hearings on the matter beginning as early as when the legislature reconvenes in January. Gay marriage "makes me uncomfortable, the SJme as anybody else," Gov. Howard Dean told the Associated Press. The gover­nor, a Democrat, said he agreed with the court's ruling and supports domestic part­nerships, but not gay marriage. "I think it's a step forward," he said. "It guar­anll> cs evil rights, but doesn't go into und1arted territory where 1 think the majority of Vermonters, who I think are fair-minded, would have been very uncomfortable." Michael Obuchowski, Democratic speaker of the Vermont House, has been a supporter of gay marriage, but said Tuesday he agrees that domes­tic partnership would be the easiest solution. Groups opp@ng gay marriage vowed to fight either approach to fulfilling the court's ruling. "The options are going to be getting to the legislature at lea~t at a minimum and convinc-mg them that number one, it should not be through a marriage license. [But] we don't think domestic partnership 1s right either," sJ1d Jay Sekulow, chief counsel for the American Center for Law & Justice, which filed briefs with the Vermont Supreme Court arguing against the gay couples, and has filed lawsuit.~ challenging gay nghts measures around the country. Gore praises ruling, growing DP support Vermont has one of the country's most pro­gressive records on gay rights issues in thl' nation, the state Supreme Court noted m its ruling this week In 1991, the state became one of the first in the country to pa<;S a statewide law banrung discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in employment, housing and other public SCf\ ices. Vermont's hate crimes law includes sexu­al orientation, and in 1996, the state's General Assembly voted to remove barriers to adoptions by gay couples. The state leg­islature also took the further step of pro­tecting gay families through court-ordered child support and parent-child contact in cases where $ilme-sex couples broke up. Vermont became the best hope for advanc­ing the fight for gay marriage earlier this month, after the Hawaii Supreme Court L"-~ued a ruling against three gay couples who had sued for marriage licenses in that state. The I iawaii court found in favor of the couples in 1993, calling the mamage ban gender discrimination and ordering the state to show a compelling reason for deny­ing same-sex marriage. ~ Hawau !'tall? k'gislature respooded by pa.--.-<ing a law agan-;t sam~ marriage in 1994, and Hawaii voters in 19% apprO\ed an amend­ment to the ~ta~ constitubm authonzing the law. ~ constitutiorul amendment made the gay cou­ple;' lawsuit moot, the Hawaii Supreme Crurt ruled CA>e. 9. But thl• lfawaii Supreme Court, like the Vermont Supreme Court, has held that whether or not the state 1SSues marriage licen.~ to them, gay couples are entitled to the same nghts and benefits as heterosexual couples-benefit.~ that advocates say number more th.Jn 1,000 at the federal level alone. D.>mestic partnerships have al~ recctved high profile support in the !Rmocratic presi­denbal pnmilI), \\ith both Vice President Al C.ore and former Sen. Bill Bradley stating m pulr lie debates and mter\iews that they support full nghts for gay couples, but not gay "maniage." The developments show a growing trend m acceptance for gay couples, even without providing the label of "gay marriage," Lambda's Wolfson said. The next battleground for gay marriage will be California, Wolbon said, where voters must consider a March 2000 ballot measure, known as "the Knight initiative" after its lead sponsor, that would limit marriage to "one man and one woman." Do the Math and you'll see how the all-new Saturn LS-2 has become a benchmark in its class. ~ ~ I The 2000 LS-2 V6 Sedan (fhat's funny, we haven't seen this chart in any Camry, Accord or Passat ads.) FEATURES 2000 SATURN 2000HONDA lS.2 V6 ACCORD EXV6 6CYL STD STD 8 WAY PWR SEAT $325 STD ALLOYS STD NIA FOG LAMPS STD NIA LEATHER $1095 STD HEATED SEATS STD WILEAlHE:A NIA AAUMCOCASS STD NIA fU.()Tf..l<E'ILESS STD STD PWR ROOF S725 STD PWRWINOOW STD STD PWR LOCKS STD STD CRUISE STD STD INT VOLUME 97 983 WHEEL BASE 1065 1069 Pl«l: • EOJPl'EO $2272000 524 96500 2000TOYOTA CAMRY LE V6 STD $385 NIA NIA $1100 NIA NIA STD $1000 STD STD STD 97 105 2 $~~1198 00 2000VOLKS PASSAT GI S V6 STD STD WIPKG PJ6 N'A STD W1.EATHER N'A STD NIA STD S1500WPKG P.Jl STD STD STD 95 1064 S28 17~ 00 ~99 MONTH 2 .31% APR $995.00 down + TT&L Par-nt ts bated on l11tOndi bllloon. flftlftOni P1ymn1b butd 011 2000 L~ ~ •.th MSR.P of S1' 710 00 Pnmary IC"Od:m t<UtC" """'approve lldiYCry •ust ~ u\cn from pamop..., rtu.kn b7 Ill l.'00 At th< end ol th< t<nn. buytt .,., rtlinantt th< f.o.I .,.,..,., o1 S 11 117 00 oo th< L ~ l or sdl cht ..:hklc to cht 1'11di"i oa1ritu- ind .,.y 1 dupoul kc oJ SllO 00 plus ••7 .. ., Ind 1m di1rw<1 Mila;c c!wic ol So l per •ilc ovc:r3t,OOOmi1n 01999~tun:aCotporauon "w-wAtumcom Saturn of Hou,1011 '\orth Frre"ay 8355 North Frrrna} WI 847 8700 Sa1u1 n of f1011\lc>n 50111/nvi·,1 Fm} 100505oulhwest Frny 713-777-6100 Saturn of Jl.111,1011 Kai) Frrrnav 11602 Old Katy Rd 2/:il-556-1400 ..JUlUfll VJ llVU:'lolVll G11lff1ftl\O} At ross from Almeda Ma!I 7J 3-9'14-4550 _\alllrn of Ho11\lon ~'orth" C'I .?90 ll:i700 Sor1h1H:,r Fnn 21-il-K94-Jl00 Saturn of Humble 59 Sorth 2 blks 'outh of FM 1960 281-540-1-iK55 •. SJ\T~N. A Different Kind of Company. A Different Kmd of Car. wwwsa!urn <om 12 Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem $1000FF! Sale! .Voted in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 Monday to Friday 5 am - 10 pm Saturday & Sunday 8 am - 8 pm NEWS DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Health Briefs Gore supports 'flexibility' on medical marijuana CONCORD, N H.-At a New Hampshire town hall meeting Dec. 14, Vice President Al Gore gave his tentative support for the use of marijuana to relieve the suffering of medical patients, the Washington Blade reported. In response to a question from the audience, Gore said that doctors "ought to have the option" of prescribing medical marijuana. "Where the alleviation of pain is concerned, we have not given doctors enough flexibility to help patients who are going through acute pain," said Gore, whose sister decided against tak­ing the drug during a painful, fatal bout with cancer. "Many of us have seen that our­selves." Gore qualified his statement slightly during a pre!iS conference after the forum, saying that marijuana should be used to relieve pain only "under certain limited medical orcumstances." Gore's rival for the Democratic prC!>idential nomination, Bill Bradley, has also said that medical marijuana should be studied further. The Clinton administration has generally opposed efforts to legalize medical marijuana. Number of older Americans with HIV increasing at fastest rate HOUSTOl\i-Semors are the age group with the fastest-growing AIDS rates-up 22 per­cent between 1991and1996, compared with a 9 percent increase among people age 13-49, according to the CIX. But health officials warned that the increases seem dramatic because the numbers are small, the Houston Chronicle reported. Currently, about 11 percent of AIDS cases are in Americans aged 50 and over, totally about 72,000. According to the CIX, slight­ly more than one-third of older people with AIDS are gay or bisexual men, with about 20 percent infected by using a dirty needle to inject drugs. Ironically, the drug Viagra that has allowed many older men to revive dormant sex lives also has heightened concern about the spread of AIDS. "They are pretty AIDS-unaware as they venture out into the world of sex­ual actlVIty," said Sara Seiber, cxecutl\'e din.'Ctor of AIDS Foundation Houston. "AIDS was­n't really on their screen at the time they were [previously] sexually active." AIDS Action executive to head Calif.'s managed care department WASHl:-.IGTON-Daniel Zmgale, the 39- vear·old executive director of AIDS Action, announced last week that he will resign from that posihon Jan. 2 to become director of California's newly created Department of Managed Care. The move will make him the highest-ranking openly gay man in Califorma state government. In hi5 new position, Zingale will create an entire bureaucracy to e\•aluate and oversee the care that California's $15 billion HMO mdustry provides. From 1993 to 1997, Zingale was political director at the Human Rights Campaign, the nations largest gay political organization. "Nothmg short of an exc1tmg, big chal­lenge could have taken me away from this job that I love," Zingale said. Daiei Uigale is steppilg down as di'ector of AIDS Action Cound to head up a Ca&fomia state health agency, making hin the highest r11dung openly 'Ff man in state government there. Sustiva may be superior to protease inhibitors. studies suggest WASHINGTON-Two new stud1e.-; underscore the effectiveness of Sushva, generic.illy called efavirenz, in reducing the viral load m people with AIDS. One of the studies, pub­lished in the Dec 17 issue of the New England journal of Medicine, found that m 48 percent of cases mvolvmg treatment with a protease inhibitor (Crixivan) plus AZT and 3TC, blood levels of HIV fell to undetectable levels. That result compares 70 percent of those taking a mix of Sustiva and the S<1me two other drugs. Also, 43 percent of the protease inhibitor patients stopped treatment because of side effects, while only 27 percent of the Sushva group dropped out. The study was funded by DuPont, which manufactures Susti\·a. In the second study, doctors tested a drug mix with both Sustiva and a protease inhibitor on 57 youngsters who had taken only the older medicines. Youngsters' blood levels of the virus fell to undetectable levels in 63 percent of cases. The article suggests that one of the reasons Sustiva workS better is because it's taken only once a day, while protease inhibitors must be taken three times a day. One in three schools teaches 'abstinence-only' sex education WASHINGTON-A survey of high school principals reveals that one in three school dis­tricts is using an abstinenci:only curriculum that permits discussion of contraception only in the context of condom failure ratcs, the New York Times reported Dec. 15. The poll of prin­cipals revealed that 95 percent of classes discuss AIDS and other ~exually transmitted db­eases, while only 39 percent discuss how to use condoms, and only 36 percent discuss the issue of sexual orientation. In the South, 55 percent of schools teach the abstinencc-<>nly curriculum, while only 20 percent of schools in the Northeast teach it. Only five percent of Southern schools offer comprehensive sex educahon, the survey found. Much of this may have resulted from C~ngressional action in 1996 that made $250 million in federal money available to teach abshnence-only classes. -From ~taff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 24, 1999 some SUSTIVA is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. r re L toi • d.1ly. w1tr J1 avoided.Your doctor r'flay suggest taking SUS flVA dt I reduce any side effects you rr.Jy < SUSTIVA, an NNRTI', must be used in combination with other HIV drugs. SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. •duct' the Jmour• of virus 1n yaur blood anc he rurrtx e Is ">USTIVA car even be .J~ed n your~ ch dre'l. 3 yc..:rs of age or oldt'r. ...., ·~ based on resul•s from cootrolled c nrc.i t al 14 weeKs. P~ntly. t'lere are no re:; ts <rom controlled cl r c.i trals lie ng tC'fTT' effects of SUS rlVA SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Mosts dC' e' ects c1rc '1' d to rr cdn be 'Tl JgN:' rhe rnost rgrnficant ~•de pffocts Jssoc atl'<! Witt> SUS flVA tt t'r.:py rave been nervous ystt'rr sY'T'p!0'1"S l dizz re s, troublr eep1n° drow;iness. Vo.ib e corcertr dt ng dhr abnol"'T' I dre ns) Jnd r Ii. T., e usually S.Jbs1de w.'.h1r tfie fi t two to <our weel<S of tre •:-nen• In nail m .. mber of l>i-' ents. r r riay be t>nous Takng <;uS IVA at bedt mf' 11ay he p rr ke rervou ysterr ~yrrptorrs css roticeablf' ' "INRTI UC eo tde rE • ar ;cnpt.:::e I ll>ltO" fa< '"°'" inlonmaon on SUSTIVA. all 1-80().<4PH..,RMA or '"" our ...bsito at hnpJ www SUUJY>.cam fa< .,,.,. inlonmaon on the updmd DHHS Guidelin<s. a PDF ii• of the l"id<lines JS ..,.ibble at Imp www hiv.tas ori II \. • ..... W .. l l just did! Once Daily SUSY '1*A efavirenz Pregnancy should be irlO ded n WO:l'e'l rece ving '>USflVA bc{.du b r+ defcr+, t> ~ beer seen n pnriates dosed With SUS flVA Barner co; traceptJOn sholl.d !.lw:ys be .JSed :i combl wr::h ''iods of cof'ltracep• on or Talk to your doctor when you start taking SUSTIVA. >vS~VA may c ge tre e«ect of other med c nes ( nc ud nf! o Afway< te doctor f You .ire !dkmg. star L f! o er g any ,.>res<: p• o or '1-presc pt on rg Sus WA Your docto riay ct>angC' t suet> as f'l'1ellta :iess .ubstal"ce .:.tx.: e '1ep " etc before tak "& SUSTIVA 13 We know that cop WI h HIV d flic Cl"O\i rave to tie Ask yoor doct aboif <;US"'VA. F tJO t'e tfie next page for Patit'rt I forrr c.bout Slh rlVA FOR HIV Finally, a once dally medication to tr at HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.sustlva.com ~ DuPont Phanna.:cut1cals 14 Once Daily SUSTI"~ efavirenz SUSTIVA™ ( efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVA* (SUS TEE vah} 'rH!V li lmmu odel ency V rus1 lrfect n Generic name efav ·enz {eh-FAti-v h rehnzl Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUST A rot a cure IOI HIV or AIDS Peop e k ng SUS'IVA may SI deve p ot' ' mtect1c; s i!SSOClated wr HIV Because at th s rt 1s vc;y "'POrtarl ttiat you rema n un<k the ::are ot your doctor Does SUSTIVA reduce the risk of passing HIV to others? Si.JSTIVA "35 no1 ~ snown to •educe the' al passmg HIV •o othelS Cont •o practice safe sex and do nol ~ or .,,..,. rl r::eO es How should I take SUSTIVA? • T'le dose SU ts IS 600 llY,j (three 200 'lYJ capsJ!es taken together) once a day by mouth T'le dose o! ~TlvA ior en dren may be lower see Can chi ldren take SUSTIVA?) • Taka SUSTIVA at the sarre ture ea::11 day You should ':e SUSTIVA at bedtirre durng tile first few v.reks OI t you haves de effects, such as d1nmess OI trcuble concentrating (see What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? J • Swallow SUST'VA with v.:iter, 1;1ce, m lk OI soda. You may take SUSTIVA w th or w:tlloul rreals, hov.ever, SUSTIVA should not be taken with a high fat mea • Do not P.iss a dose of SUSTIVA If you lorget to take SUSTIVA take the missed dose "ght away H you do ITllSS a ~ do not double the next dose. Carry on v. th your regt.lar dosmg schedule H you need hep n plaemng tile best tunes to laJ<j) your med cine, ask your doctor or pharmacist • Tall.; the exact ill'lOUllt ol SUSTIVA your doctor prescr bes Never chanOe the dose on your cv.n Do not slop thlS medicme untess youi doctor lells you to stop • When your SUSTTVA supply starts to run low get more from your doctor or pharmacy This IS very ~ because L'le amount ot v rus m your blood may mcrease t the med cme is stopped for even a t"ort 1 ..,. ThP 1<1rus may develop •esiStlnce to SUST-VA ar.:I become harder to treat Can children take SUSTIVA? Yes ch dr ~e to swallow c:apsules can ta! SUST VA Rash ':l<IY be a senous problem Ill some ch ld·;n 1e your child's doctor right ?1lr.l'J t ycu 'lOllce rash or any other side effects wll le ycur cht IS lak ng SUSTTVA. Tile dose of SUSTIVA for Cll ldren may be~ ll1'rl the dose tor ad:. ts Capsules conta: ng ower doses ot SUSTIVA are m lab e Your ell Ids doctcr w I detern ne the nght dose based 00 you;' ch cfS Vi'! nM Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do not talle SU "~p Y< c to SUSTIVA or any of Its ngred enls •SUSf1VA- Ind""' SUNBURST LOGO are-· ct Dul'llnl Pllamlaceutical Company ~ •999 Ouf'Onl Pharmaceuticals Company "'The brands ed are lhe ~ lr3demat1'o cl lllei1 respac!MI OW!lOfS ll'd are ""'trademarks ct OuPall PhaTmaceutJCals Company DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? K > y d qht away t you • Are pre(j, it ~ Wan• to become pregnant • Are breast-'eedmg • Have problins v.1th your hver or have had hepatitis • Start or charge any med cine • liave Side effects wt le tlklng SUS'IVA (efaviwzl • Have a history of mental llness substa ce or alcohol abuse What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many pat ents 'ave d mness •rouble steep ng draws ness troub e corxrtrat1·g and/or unusual dreams a lew he-rs at• r start ng treatment w I SUSTIVA T iese feel ngs 'llilY be less oticeable t you take SUST VA al bed! me •hey a so tend to go away atter ye ve taken t"e med etne tor a •ew weeks Ra ly pat ents have more ser ous side effects that nay affect r.ood or ab1 ':'f to 'hmk c early These 51de tH :s v.::;. '!lore often p:' ts with ah story of 'Tlellta 1 °ess or substance abuse Te I your doctor prompt y I any ct lhe<le s de effects cont o I they bother vou There s the poss1. 1ty 'Jlal 'hese ~err.; may be '10le severe I SU!> TIVA 1s used w tr dleollol or rlOOCJ d ten;-g street) drugs ~ 5h • d dr v g or operating mach nery 1 ycu are hav •g these 51de effects One ct the '!JOSI CC'.'1rl1on Sode effects s 'JSh These rashes usually go away w1trout my change m treatment 1" d sma I ;nber of patents rash niay be senc 11 you A velop a iz." call ycur doclci promptly Ot •common side effects 1"clude ti·edness uoset 5torm " vom1t1rg, and diarrhea However his 1s not a compete hst o' side effects reported w th t.s•1vA when taken w th other ant HIV drugs Do not r ty n t s teat et a one tc nlonrat on about 51de elf cts YrM dotto· can d scuss a more complete 1st of s de effects w th you Pease contael your doctor mmed at v before stopp v SJSTIVA ~ l side effects 'ell your ooct r other hea hcale p•ov1der you not ce ary ae eltects wll te taK ng SUST VA Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? SuST VA "l3V c."arge 'he effect ct other med1c1res ! ncludmg ones for HIV) Your doctor nay 'lange your med1c1res or change their dose For tr1s reaso• 1t 1s very mportarl to • ..et all yc;,,r 1ottors and pharmacists know trat vou take SUSTIVA • Tell yaur doctors and pharmacists about all r.~1cme; you take "his includes trose you b!Jy over-the-counter ard herlla or natL at remed es Br ng all your med1c1 es wtien you see a doctrr, or 'lake a hst ! tt'e r narres, how r.: " yo .. take ard •ow often you take them T" s w II g ve your doctor a complete p1ct re 'lf tre medicines ye •• ..e Then he 01 she car decide tile best app~oach tor your s1tuat on The •ottOW1ng med!Clnes 'l13y cause se11ous and I le-threaten ng side effects wt1en take'.' with SUSPJA You shou d no1 ta e any of these '!led C1nes while takmg SUSTIVA '' • HISlllana 1l> (astern zo e) • Proputs1d® (c1sap· de) • Versed® (midazolam) • Halc1on® (triazolam) • Ergot medications (for example, W1grame® and Calergol®) The lollow ng mediones may need to be chang".(I 01 have their dose changed v.hen taken with SUSTIVA ' ' • Crix1van® (1nd1nav1r) • Fortovase® (saqumavir) • B1ax1n® (ctant~rr;y1 How should I keep SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA ts av; 51 1 0 mg, af'd 200 mg capsules Keep SUSTIVA at room temperature (77'F) m the bottle given to you by your pharmacist The temperature can range from 59 -86 F Keep SUSTIVA ... 1 nl rho '""'°" n1 r1' lnren How can I team more iibollt SUSTIVA? Ta to your dol ;O'llder II you have questions about either SuSTIVA or HIV FOi add t1onat m'c. "" yw ..... v,.,, .. .e SUSTIVA webslle at httpJ/www sustiva com. This medicine was prescribed for your particulilr condition. Do not use it for any other condition or give it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. If you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emercency room immediately. ~ DuPont Pharmaceuticals W mmgton DE 19880 lssuedSepl.- 1998 Hollywood wunderkind Matt Damon breaks from his usual hard-core heterosexual characters to do gay for pay 1.-v EARL DITTMAN The holiday SC.lson packs a few surpnses tor mo\ le buffs. Directed and adapted for the screen by Oscar·wrnrung filmmaker Anthony Mmghel:.1 ("The Enghsh Patient'/, 'Tue Talented Mr Ripley" lS a bold artishc achievement. Sporting a dazzling ensemble cast that includes Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jude ww and Cate BI..mc.hett, "Mr. Riplc} IS a gnppmg talc of romance and obses~1on that shocks the cnses and penetrates the soul It's also put one of Hollywood's mmg stars m the role of a gay scnal killer And de p1te its stellar crcdenl!als, not evef} one m Tinscl Town lS convmced "\1r Ripley" \\;II pack theaters across ~llddle Amrnca this holiday season. Arc thev ready for an epic about a gay scnal killer? Damon, whose portrayal as the film's title character recently gamrrcd him a Golden Globe Best Actor nod, is clearly fmstratrd by the evcr-growmg perception that "The Talented Mr Ripley" is simply a maior studio's vcnmin of a gay movie "Ripley's ~exu,11 preference is such a small part of who he is, but 1t seems to be the bigge~t thmg that people arc focusing on," Damon says. "He's an outsider who 1s uncomfortable m the c;kin he's in. And the fact that he':; gay isn't the main thing that makes lum feel alone or desperate for a better hfe. It's 1ust a part of who he 1s. So, labeling it a 'gay movie' does the film an miusbce." But ma rL'Centintcn~cw, wasn't it long· time fncnd Ben Affleck who publicly pegged it, "Matf:>gay flick?" "That's 1ust Ben, and he said it jokingly .. I think," the 29-year-old Damon says with his trademark, ,.... Continued on page 18 From his flirtation with personal ads to placing his ruby slippers with those of other openly gay actors in Houston, Paul Hope offers light hearted insight into life behind the theater curtain by D L C.RCX)VER Paul I lope beat me to the punch. In a rccl'llt lunch with this Alley Theater actor, I was about to com­ml'llt on his strikmg resemblance to Broadway musical comedy star j,1ck C.1ss1dy, wlll'n I lope dropped his name first. It really should be no surpnse. I !opt• is quirk on his feet, full of fascinating stories and intriguing b,Kbtagt• gossip. 1 Ii~ low of thcall'r 1s ob\ious, and when he gcb on a roll he bt'Comcs a one-man parade. It's a gleeful, theatric quality that serves !um well­an old-fashioned charisma rarely seen anymore. Beguiled by show business since his Dallas childhood when he would "put on a cape and jump out of trees," Hope still has that wide-eyed enthrallment on and off the stage. His mother knew how to calm her overactive tot. She placed him in front of the TV with 'The Dinah Shore Show." "I'd be transfixed," I lope said. Show biz has be\:n delighting I lope, a graduate of Hou~ton's High ~ Continued on page 20 Paul Hope as David Attenborough in the camedy 'Mere Mortals.' The actor says being openly gay has had little impact on his career. 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 24, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print Sex theories taken to task by Al\DREA LT. PETERSO;\ Edward Stem v.TOte THE \.1IS\.1EASURE OF DESIRE m an effort to clanfy saentific, legal and personal thinking about human sexuality-and to contest the now widely­accepted new that "sexual orientations are genetic and/or biological" ", ot only 1s there bad saence being done," he said m an inten1ew, "but the media coverage of the saence exacerbates the mistakes of saence. Further, the sooal and legal concluSions that are being drawn from this science are mistaken. Perhaps the main reason I wrote this book was to debunk saentific re. earch on sexual orienta­tion and offer an alternahve view of the s1g­ruficance of re!>earch on sexual onentahon." Stem looks at everyttung from early Greek assumptions about sexuality to notions of a "gay gene" Although he explains why it is "reasonable" for us to be interested in how sexual desire develops, he wonders aloud if we really need such theories. "These theories," says Stein, "are definite­ly inaccurate; with regards to legal and ethi­cal arguments, these theories are also unhelpful." By this he does not mean to sug­gest that science is not worth pursuing. But does the issue warrant its growing cultural obsession and commensurate funding? "I think that some research on human sex­uality should be funded and supported However, I'm not convinced that scientific research on sexual orientation of the sort that is primanly being done up to now is worthwhile." Though "~ismeasure of Desire" is dense-bursting at its binding with minu­tia- the end result is still rewarding. Stein summarizes and reviews the material he has covered, allov.ing you to focus on certain parts of the book, ponng over the ethical issues, for example, without delving into the scientific research. "The problems v.1th the simple picture of sexual orientation [1s] that [it] sees sexual onentallons as coming in two and only two flavors," Stem contends. "Human sexual desires are complicated and they can be grouped in a \'anety of ways: how much sex you like to have, the sort of sex you like to have, the physical features of people you are attracted to, etc. Sexual orientation, the gen­der of the people you are sexually attracted to is just one aspect of sexual desire. "We aren't justified in assuming that sex­ual orientation, compared to other aspects of sexual desire, is especially revealing of one's inner character," he argues. Looking at the scientific evidence, Stein's position is clear: "All existing scientific theo-ries of the ongins of sexual onentation are wrong," he says. "Even if the scientific research improves over time, attempts to link theories of the origins of sexual orienta­tion to legal and ethical positions concerning sexual orientation are also mistaken." "Some gay rights advocates claim that if scientific research demonstrates that sexual orientations are not chosen, then lesbians and gay men deserve legal protections," he explains. "While this argument seems plau­sible, I think this is a mistaken ;ind a dan­gerous argument . ... It is very risky to link our basic human rights to the ups and downs of scientific research, especially when it 1s in an early stage." Stein also argues that while nature v. nur­ture appears to be an argument about whether being gay is a choice, most of what's important about being gay is, in fact, a choice. "Gay people chose to engage in same-sex sexual behaviors, to enter same-sex relation­ships and to express their gay identities," Stein claims. "The 'lack of choice' argument is basically impotent. 1o one who is against lesbian and gay rights in the first place will be persuaded by this argument. Many lesbians and gay men feel that they didn't choose their sexual orientation. From tlus, says Stein, "they infer that they were born v.ith the sexual orientation." f le points out that there are other personality traits that weren't cho:.en but, rather, developed after their birth. "This doesn't mean that I think a person's sexual orientation can be changed- in fact, I think it 1s 1mpo%ible to change .a person's sexual orientation, but this doesn't mean that people are born v.ith sexual oncntations." The Mismeasure of Desire by Edward Stein Oxford University Press, S35 Wltat your neigltbors are reading . . . 1 Comfort & Joy b} Jim Grimsley, $21 95 2 Let Nothing You Dismay by \fork O'Donnell, $12 3 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited bv John Patnck, $11.<l5 4 Way to Go, Smith by Hob Smith, $24 5 Every Time We Say Goodbye by Jane Maiman, $11.95 6 Lawn Bov by Paul Lls1eky, $13.95 7 Murder Undercover by Claire :-.1cN.ib, $11.95 8 Innuendo by RD. 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All Rentals $1.99 Videos Priced to Sale! ~~~ r -Big Daddy l Tll•SIYWHS.1111••• L •19.9s _J L $21.95 _J s19.95 arge selections o previously viewed movies starting at $4. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greet in All Ratings Available Big City is Bigger and Better! Don't Settle for the WannaBees! r:----- 1 I I I I PAGERS 12220 Mu···· ••••• SUIT~. Premier ~~w~c~~L?~~~~~o~ PAGING & WIRELESS Free phone small print - Original Phone price $99.95 & $69.95. Your cost after in-store instant rebate 1s $49.45 +tax. Your cost after $50 mail-in rebate is Free+ tax (4.12). Credit his- 1 tory and a 1-year agreement required. Hurry, offer ends soon! . Free pager small print- New activations only. $9.95 for activation. 1-year agreement required. Offer ends 1131/99 PRINTING tjfllr Rilfting Stildiolt. 713.522.1896 Fax: 713.522.0708 3400 Mont rose, Suite 105 "We Handle ALL Your Printing Needs!" Your Montrose Area Printer Since 1977 • Fine Printing • Passport Photos • High Speed Copying • Pick-up & Delivery • Typesetting & Design r--,-o-o/;-oH -w-ffh -coup-or; -1 : * One per customer ! I ~------- - ------ - ---------------· lverything you Right Here! ant Right o 2000 XTERRft 1~e NeW 2000 mftXlmft SE LONE STAR Sales Hours: 9-9 M-f • 9-9 Sat. Servke Hours: 7-7 M-f • 8-2 Sat. 12230 Southwest Freeway• Stafford, TX• 281 -243-8600 • FAX 281 -243-8635 louston 's • : l\'ism11-0ldsmobi/e Dealer 17 18 ~LE :;.... Continued from page 15 toothy srmle "Look, Ripley is gay. So what7 It just adds another dtmen~1on to a bigger pic­ture I don't want to make it sound like I'm trymg to downplay 1t because it's a bad thmg or something. It's 1ust that a lot of people .ire saymg that Middle Amcnca can stomach a mass murderer, just not a gay one." Paltrow doesn't buy into the notion that some film-goers are going to ignore "The Talented Mr. Ripley" because of its homo­erotic content. In fact, she's confident main­stream audiences are aesthetically starving for a film just like it. "I tlunk a whole lot of people have been waiting for a great, beautiful. epic Hollywood mo\lle which is totally subversive and 'un­Hollywood' at the same time," Paltrow said. "Sure, ma lot of ways it is a risky. bold project, but I thmk1t'sa film that everyone will be able to understand and elljoy." Based on author Patricia Highsmith's first m a series of su~penc;cful "Ripley" novels, "The Talented Mr Ripley" tells the story of Herbert Greenleaf Oames Rebhom), a wealthy American industrialist who has grown tired of the hedonishc, p!Jyboy ways of his son. Upon meeting Tom Ripley (Damon), a seemingly ambitious, friendly, young go­getter, the elder Green lea I sends him to sun­drenched, 1950s Italy to help convince his progeny, Dickie (Law), to return to the U.S. and take the helm of the family business. But the amiable, sensitive Ripley turns out OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE to be a bit ol sociopath, becoming danger­ously obsessed with rich, young Dickie's life~tyle and falling m love with the hand­some socialite When Dickie grows tired ol Ripley's fawning, Ripley murders him and assumes his identity. But the killing doesn't stop there. The body count mounts as Dickie's fnends and the authorities slowly start to unravel Ripley's devious, evil web. "I don't see Ripley as evil at all," Damon said "I see him as somebody who 1s deeply, dN:ply lonely Believe 1t or not, he has a great capaoty for love and is tremendously sensitive. It's easy to see why he would fall for someone like Dickie. Dickie's charismat­ic and has this beautiful sunlight around him. But he 1ust doesn't understand the effect that his charisma has on the people around him-and that's his fatal flaw. Dickie 1s very careless about It and that's how people are always getting stepped on by him. When Ripley kills him, it's a crime ol passion." Alter Tom Cruise passed over the role ol Ripley to appear m Stanley Kubrick's "Eyes Wide Shut," Minghella pursued Damon to discuss the part. "I had seen Matt m 'Courage Under Fire' and was incredibly impressed with his range as an actor," Minghella said. "I didn't know ii he would want the role, though, because it seemed like Hollywood was grooming him for their latest hunk or male sex symbol. I didn't know ii the role of Ripley would fit mto that 'master plan,' and I told him that." Damon says he was surprised at Minghella's concerns. Gwyneth Paltrow and Jude Law in 'The Talented Mr. Ripley,' a movie generating some fuss over Ripley's sexual orientation, something Law said is 'typical American silfiness.' "He told me I would be perfect, but he "It's hard to believe that U.S. audiences wasn't sure if I would want to take the role would make such a big deal about Matt's because ol Ripley's yearnings for other character being gay," said Law, who por-men," Damon said. "Since my other movie !rayed Oscar Wilde's lover in "Wilde" and parts had been such hard-core heterosexual a bisexual hustler in "Midnight In The characters, he thought career-wise, I Garden Of Good And Evil." wouldn't want to play a gay character." "It's almost like there's this feeling that But reading the script for "Mr. Ripley" big American movie stars should stray convinced Damon to take the part. away from any role that has anything to do "I knew I wanted to play Ripley, no mat- with homosexuality. That's so ludicrous. ter who he wanted to go to bed with. I Americans seem to be more comfortable never questioned it or thought of it as a with characters that murder dozens of peo-bold move. I just knew that I would have pie than they are with two men hugging been a fool to pass it up. I mean, if I was each other. That just doesn't make sense .... given scripts as good as this one, all the But as a society, Americans need to get time, I'd play gay characters from now on," away from the idea that you're a brave and Damon said. courageous actor just because you play a Law says he finds all the fuss over gay man. I mean, if that were the case I Ripley's sexuality silly-and typical should be a national hero with statues ol American hype. me erected all over the States." Ready willing and very able ... to give highly skilled, professional insurance service in your neighborhood. She's an expert in planning all your insurance- auto, life, home and business. And she may save you money, too. Come in and meet her and take advantage of her broad insurance experience. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @TC Jester • Houston.Texas 77007 713-961-9455 fax: 713-850..0856 Na"tive T_ a . n 's Pr iva"te Dance r s Have just" "the r ight" gift" f o r YOU!! 713 669- 9966 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEWS Trendy ironing to perform by TRAYCF DISl\.l To approach MIA BELLA, a relatively new "tr.1ttoria" downtown, is to have the sensation of living in a "re.ii" city, rn which a diverse crowd of at1Lens jockey for side­walk ~pace betwcl'n various restaurants, shops nnd bus stops bustling with riders. Okay, maybe I louston has a ways to go when it comes to having a fully-function­rng life downtown, but Mia Bella is anoth­l'r place of quality. After settling in at the bar for our hour­long wait, we ordered two appetizers to tide us over. The Crostini de Mozzarella ($3.95) arrived on a bed of basil and arrugula leaves, and the milky, pillowy mozzarella more than compensated for the unripened tomato slices. The Bruschetta alla Romana ($3.95) was less impressive, if only for the extremely salty taste of the chopped tomato mixture. The grilled bread slices and large lakes of ripe parmesan were mce, but didn't pre­vent a sodium-induced wince from my dining partner and me. The prices and quality of the appetizers made us ponder making a dinner out of such dishes as Vongole en Vino Blanco ($5.95), baby clams sauteed in white wine and the hearty Stucchi di Angnello ($5.95), grilled lamb kebob. The customary Calamari alla Fritti ($4.95) was crisp, light and meaty, and the more adventurous Funghi e Formaggio ($4.95), wild mush­room strudel with goat cheese, packs a 820 Main St.@ Preston 713 237 0505 Food: b-J t> t> t> Service: t> t. Value: t>t> t>'t> Scene: SJ t>'t> S>t b> Opt for bread, water at home S-t-rOK, of you really must ~,..,~ ~ Fine for most b> t~~S> Worth the drive, so live a Iott le smoky and rich flavor. After our wait neared 90 minutes, and the crowds around us at the bar kept grow­ing, we quizzed the hostess about our scats. "Oh," she said, and suggcslL'<i we 1ust krep dinrng 111 our chairs at the bar. After assuring her that we indel'<i planned to dine at a table, we waill'<i another 30 minutes to be seated. Scp.lratc the attitude of the staff from the quality of the food, and the meal can be enjoyable. We tried the Pesce alla Paes.:mo ($9 .95), a brick-sized filet of baked rainbow trout marinated in roasted cilantro jalapeno pesto, The pesto was delicious and each herb and flavor mingled wickedly for a spicy coating. The pesto was more of a top­ping than a marinade and slid off the fish. The rest of the meat didn't soak up the flavor, so the fish was a bit plain, if not respectably cooked. But the side scoop of nu tty, tender cous-cous effortlessly absorbed the pesto and provided a deli­cious alternative. The steamed vegetables were only mundane. The Ossobucco di Capretto ($11.95), lamb shank braised in red wine with shitake mushrooms, sun-dried tomatoes, and port wine sauce, was so tender that the meat actually fell from the bones. The sauce per­meated the entire dish. Although the mush­rooms provided a distinct taste, the min­gling of flavors was perfect. The mashed potatoes were too lightly seasoned and the leeks and garlic were nearly undetectable In true trattoria style, Mia Bella offers a large selection of pasta dishes, like the exquisite Capellini di Mare ($11.95), angel hair pasta with fresh seafood, and Papardelle al Modo Mio, ($8.95), a dish of saull~d artichoke hearts, mushrooms, goat cheese and toasted pine nuts in a rich toma­to basil sauce. The uneven and inattentive service seemed to result more from lack of efficien­cy and organization than anything else, even though the place was packed. Our service went from poor to worse after a friend finished her soft drink, served in a pint glass with no straw. After finishing, she noticed a wide crack and realized the grainy feeling she felt while chewing ice was probably shards of glass. Management made only excuses and no apologies. A lit­tle professionalism and basic logic would have gone a long way. Although the food and atmosphere of Mia Bella may be worthy, we wondered how well Mia Bl'lla will fare once it's JOined by newer, trendy neighbors. Courteous and efficient service needs to be a priority and Mia Bella has some kinks to iron out. 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 ' FAX 713.759.6812 Lunch: M-F 11am - Spm Dinner: M-Th Spm - 9:30pm •Fri & Sat Spm · 10pm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STYLE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meebngs, banquet facilities, and take-out available! Plan your Christmas party wtth a?u?N~~/ 6 _....•LrTT.J Chocolates hv ffiark Gourmet Fresh Ground Coffees for sale bv the pound ... ..................... :: t t ,\t' 't : ... .....\.. (... .(.). ~.. .......: WE WILL CLOSE AT 3:00 PM ON CHRISMAS EVE, WE ARE CLOSED ON CHRISTMAS DAY & WILL RE-OPEN AT 8:00 AM ON DECEMBER 26TH. WEDNESDAYS • 8 PM 1ouir0m Zenith Roller Rink 8075 Cook Road 181.575.7655 lfZf;J.~lj~~I· \;;:;.r~~~ IC>" ....~. I,.;;-,~~ -~-~~~--~ · 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE ,.. Continued from page 15 School of the Perfonning and VJSual Arts and the Univl?l'Slty of Houston, ever since. Hope is a frequent feature in the Houston theater scene, and he is currently adding holi­day cheer to "A Chnstmas Carol, A Gh~t Story of Chnstmas" with his giddy character- 1z.ition of Scrooge's first employer, Fezziwig. He's also been the valet Bennett in "Travcshcs," delivcnng a show-stopping three-page monologue on the slippery course of RusstJn revoluhonary theory. In the farce "~oL-.es Off," his split-second anbcs were m league with the best of Carol Burnett. Hope also has done the memorable role of John 13.lrrymore m "l flate Hamlet." With the larger-than-life presence of a silent film star, and the matinee idol looks of the "great Profile" himseU, Hope was 13.lrrymore. In additJOn to hJS Alley performances, Hope brought the South alive ag.lln while dancing with Juliet Prow~ m the touring company of "Mame," barged down the Missbsippi in "Showboat," shot bulb-€yes in "Annie Get Your Gun," looked properly sanc­timonious in nun drag in "Execution of Justice," and removed hi~ clothes for "Love! Valour! Compassion!" ''Talk :ibout a moti\•ator," Hope !'><lid of sans clothes appearance in "Love! Valour! Compassion!" "I had gotten m the best shape of my life We should all have to be naked on st;igc all the time I lost 30 pounds and lived at the gym and tanrung salon. "Before the Second Act, you· d see us doing crunches m the wings and pushups and lunges. Boob~, butt, and abs; boobs, butt, and abs." he said. Hope did manage to get a date out of all that physical exerbon, but it didn't tum out well­he started off the evening di5paraging Hope's car and, not too much later, his income. But being single is 1ust another role to master, Hope said. ''That's when I came to the hypothesis that actors arc caught m the middle where dating is concerned. I think this may be particularly true in the gay community, but I would like to think it's not. But if we meet somebody who's into the arts, and is well read, and witty and fun, and loves what we do, and we're on the same page, chances are, if they're not another actor, they're so A-list, they don't want to date an actor. It's like, they're fun for a dinner party, but I don't want to marry one," he said. After a qu1Ck glance out the window over Bayou Place, Hope puts another spin on his dating theory, wondering if some people don't WJ!lt to date actors because of the hours they work-they're often working when oth­ers are getting off and heading home. "That narrows it down to bartenders, drunks, pushers and hustlers," he said before a brief pause and a burst of laughter ''Well, I guess there arc wo~ things," Hope added He concedes that one had better be a the­ater iunkie if dating an actor. "And, we don't have a large pool of gay actors in town. Or, if that's the case, they're taken and are in lo\·ely relabonships .. the fuckers," Hope said with a laugh. Gay Men's Chorus of Houston Dr. J. David Faber, Artistic Director Y2 K 1s Jl!St the begmrung' The ) car 2000 ha got u busy preparing Spnng and Pride ~onccrts, hosting :-ichola Cantorosa, the Ga} Mens Chorus of Hamburg. Germ.iny for a special July performance, and puttmg together a sma hing concert et for GALA Fesl1t'lll 2000 mJuly. Consider JOmmg the Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Whether you sing, dance, play an instrument, or use a computer, yot. can be a valuable part of the chorus. If you have a flair for organizing. you can help us coordinate 'II.1th our German friends. Rehearsals are every Thursday at 7 p.m. beginning January 6, 2000 at Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh Dnve (at Missouri Street; parking lot is on Missoun) On the Internet, visit us at http://www.gmch.org or call 713.521.SI ~G Our Voices.. Entertain, Change live~, Win freed om The Gav \-le s Chorus of Houston 1s a 50l(c)(J) non-profit orl(amzauon. "There are all of the frustrabons of being a gay actor m Houston, which are probably not much different from being an actor. It's a good essay. ~1aybe it iust needs more thought." In a fit of desperabon, Hope has tried per­sonal ads m newspapers. "First, I'm going to find out if there are any people out there in the audience who've won­dered if I was datable, so I've got to make this ad ob\;ous to th~ who know who this is," he said. So he included this phrase: "Appreciabon of Victoria de los Angeles and Irene Dunne not required, but advisable." The ad received no response,~ he changed the reference to Mana Callas and Geraldine Page. Two dates came from that one, ending his attempts with personal ads. "What's interesbng about working at the Alley IS that there are fewer gay actors m 'straight' dramas thJn one might think Right now, I'm sharing a dressing room with two other Friends of Dorothy, and it's ~ refrL>Sh­ing. The ruby slippers are all lined up. I'll play show tunes and opera, scented candles, male nudes. You can always know it's my dressing room: smells good, looks good, sounds good." I lope said. Is there a downside to his current ~how, "A Chri.~tmas Carol?" "Wh;it's really bad about this show 1s that there's no time to cruise the audience. We're always so busy and in motion, we can't check out who's out there," he said. ca~ing the house is a time-honored theatri­cal tradition, and Hope says he relishes it, except when a complex script r\.'quircs con­centration. "In 'Gross Indecency,' my brain was bleed- Paul Hope, a fixture on the Houston theater scene, appecl'S ii Alley Theatre's 'A Christmas (Cl'ol' through Dec. 20. about known gay actors playing straight char­acters, than there are about straight people playing gay. But, no, I haven't found much of a challenge or obstacle where that's con­cerned," Hope added. A Christmas Carol, A Ghost Story of Christmas Through Dec. 30 Alley Theatre 615 Texas Ave. Tickets to S49 713-228-8421 ( WINNER Best Director 1999 Cannes Film Festival ) BEST PICTURE BEST ACTRESS 1999 EuropeanfilmAwardNominee• "THE BEST FILM OF THE YEAR!" - Richard Corliss, TIME MAGAZINE (International) "MARVELOUS! ALMODOVAR'S BEST FILM BY FAR!" - Janet Mas lin, THE NEW YORK TIMES "AN ABSOLUTE STUNNER!" - Peter Trav ers, ROLLING STONE THER RIVER OAKS 2009 W Gray St • (713) 524-2175 EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT STARTS WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22 Call Thealre for Showtimes www.sonycla11ic1.com community DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE COMMUNITY CALENDAR OCCASIONS • CARMART • CLASSIFIEDS BUSINESS DIRECTORY • MY STARS Fund-raiser pays big dividends for local groups by ROBERT B. llhNDERSON From heath fairs for lesbians to advocacy efforts for gay kens, more than a dozen local groups rl'ccived financial support for their efforts, th;mks to the proceeds from a record-setting dinner. Some $144,000 in proceeds from the No\'. 13 Houston Black Tic Dinner was distrib­uted to the groups earlier this month. A record-setting 1,200 people attended the event at the Geoq;e R. Brown Conwntion Center. "We throw one big party. It's a glam­orous evening where people come out. They're able to cat dinner, hear a great speaker, do silent auction and take pictures with their friends. We had dinner music and dance music at the end The George R. Brown has never looked more gorgeous," said Amanda M. Barhost, president of I louston Black Tie Dinner. The $16,000 that Bering Omega Community Ser\'iccs received will support several programs for the AIDS service organization, said Bill Kersten, executive director. "We really want to get the community to think of u~ as offering HIV services rather than thinking of our individual compo­nents," he said "That was the thinking behind asking for the money in this way. Overall our goal is to provide continuous care to people with HIV," Kersten said Some $12,166 went to the Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (11.A.T.C.H.), which will help continue funding for the group's mentoring efforts for young gays ages 13 to 20, and expand outreach efforts into local public schools, said Ke\'ln DaVJdson, H A.T.C.H. board pre:>ident. "[We will be) offering continuing education unit hours to administrators, teachers and counselors to educate on sexual minority youth issues and safe environments within their schools," Davidson said. Though 11.A.TC.H. focuses mostly on schools within Houston Independent School District, the group is receiving calls from suburban school districts. The Montrose Clinic will use its $18,120 for several programs, including specialty clinics, lllV counseling and testing, and advocacy efforts, said Todd Foster, the clin­ic's development director. "Without Black Tie, that would leave a significant dollar amount we would have to go out and ask the community for," Foster said. "One of the great advantages of Black Tie is it consolidates fund-raising efforts between several different agencies. It's really nice to see the community Bering Omega's Bill Kersten said pro­ceeds from the Black Tie Dinner will bolster the group's programs for people with AIDS, while Jackie Duva~ president of Lesbian Health Initiative, said new funding will help its health fairs. come together as one like that for a common cause." The 7-year-old Lesbian Health Initiative received $2,579 from Black Tie, which will help fund health fairs that pro\'ide mammograms, Pap smears, and screen­ings for osteoporosis and sexually trans­mitted diseases. "With the Health Initiative we're able to provide on an annual basis health fairs," said Jackie Duval, the group's president. "It allows a group of women to have more focused fairs like for Hispanic women, Asian women, and older women." The health fairs often provide the only preventative health care some women receive because of a lack of insurance or a lack oi comfort with other doctors, Duval said. "The physicians we have who come and staff the health fairs are \'Oluntt.'t.'rs who understand our community \'Cry well. The physicians are lesbian or 'friendlv,"' Du\·al said. Othei groups receiving funds from the dinner AIDS Foundation Hou,ton ($7,432), The Assistance Fund ($17, 592), Ass1stHers ($5,720), Body Po,1tive­Houston (S3,86S), Center for AIDS ($3, 79S), PFLAG ($7,829), PWA Coalition (SS,8'i2), Texas Human Righb Found­ahon ($3,5-10), An Uncommon Legacy ($6,130) and The Gay & Lesbian Victory Foundahon ($27,800). I ALEXIS&LYNN, · 1~.- - 1 \Naq 'to Entertain you in . style--at~ ~lsW YEA· -S EVE _- --t:·-m HH 1u m P.n_ ._h_ Tu_~ _FAVOR._'S ----------. PURCHASE YOUR TICKETS NOW!!! 713.-522.-j . 6 LIMITED TICKETS A VAII.ABLE l~·Ei>-1 Place: Date & Time: Music: Admission: Catered Food: Club Rainbow 1417 B Westheimer Houston TX 77006 Last day of The Century!!?!!! 9:00pm - S:OOam Top Dance Hits, Latin, Country & many, many hot hits!!! DJ spinning ~ii dawn $25- Single $40- Couple Breakfast bar, including Menudo & many other items 1417 · B Westheimer • Houston • 713. 522. 5166 22 Occasions Birthdays Happy birthday to Texas Renegade Greg Gordon on Dec.24. Mary's one and only Jerry Jones toa:;ts in his birthday on Dec 24. Rick, member of the Houston Area Bears wants a fuzzy buthday on Dec. 25. Puppet Master Alan Gibson motions m his buthday on Dec.25. Travel Diva Rich G. hopes for a cruise for his birthday on Dec. 25. Chances superwoman Lisa celebrated her birthday on Dec. 26. COMMUNITY ,\tr. Magic hands Randall massages h!S birthday on Dec. 26. Nationwide Insurance Agent Tony May pays his birthday premium on Dec. 27. Mark Muckelroy puts down a down payment for his birthday on Dec 29. Anniversaries Billy and Dan celebrate six years toi;ether on Dec. 24 The Houston Voice welcnmes your srec!EJ: OCCJ1Sicns. Send e-mail to croberts@l1011stonrou:e.a:m1. Fax: 713-529-9531. Mail: Occasions, Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006. Pl.ease indude a telephone number so occasions can be uerified and considered far publication. DECEMBER 24, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Pet of the Week: Ruby is a collie. She Is full grown but could stand to gain a few pounds. Her hair Is long and needs same grooming ta keep her pretty. She Is okay with other animals and with children. She will need some exercise like lang walks in the pork. Ruby ls an Inside dog. For adoption informa­tion call Houston Humane Society at 713·434·SSSS. Car Mart 2000 Volkswagen Jetta • Only 4.000 low miles. PW, sunroof, and much, much more. Stk #26296-1 • Sl9,975 • Call Salum of Hoos1on - Southwest Ftwy .. 713.m.61CKl. '96 Nissan M.mm:i GLE • Whue. lca1her. BOS<! Premium Sound Sysrcm :ind many exc11mg oplrons1 • S 11,98 • Loncslar N1ssan-Oldsrnob1le. 28124.l 8600. '94 Isuzu Arrugo Coml:rt1ble • Cnnsc, uh. ra~1c. lo<s of fun 10 drive go :in)'\\ here • S5,988 • To find out more, call Loncstar N1ssan-Oldsmob1le, 281 24H600 '96 lnfiniu 1-30 • Gn."Cn, sunroof, lc;i1her, full power pkg • low rn1k>s • Sl6.29~ •For more mfor­m: it on, call Henry Crnft at Archer MO!or Sales. 281 .i45.6400 '97 Jeep Wrangler • Black. lors of fun to dnve. go .inywhere' • SI 5,120 •For dcta1ls. call Henry Crafl Ill Archer Motor Sales. 2814456-IOO '99 Dodge Grand Caravan SE • Fully loodcd w11h :ill the bell, and wlus1les' • Only S 17.295 • To find out more. call Salum of llous1on Gulf Frw> , 7B9444550 '9 SJium SL-2 • Pearl "hi1e. le:r!hcr, alloys. spoiler, 5-s!"-'Cd. only HK rrules • $12.700 • For detiils. call Saturn of Houston - Nonh Frwy. 281 847 87t.X>. '97 Saturn SL-2 • 46K rrulcs. tilt. cnnsc gn::u fun-dnvmg 'chicle. Stk#Sll07 • SI0,975 •Call SJ!um of Houston Sou1hwes1 Frwy. 111m6100 '95 ISs:lll Kmg C'ab •Only 52K low miles, great dnvmg truck wnh plenty of room• $6.995 •To dme today, call Saturn of Humble Hwy WN. 2 I~ 55 '9~ Pontiac Grand Am • 4-Door. auto naroon. dc.n t miss this one' • $4,9 •for your ICSI dnve. call Lonest- 1ss.in-Old mobile, 2 I 2-l l RfiOO ----- '97 Nissan Pathfinder Champagne, ready lo go w11h lots of equipment• • Sl9.290 • For more information, see Henry Craft al An:hcr Molor Sales, 281 .445.6400. 'JJ Saturn SL-I • Au10, NC. low miles, very economical and dependable vehicle • Only ~5.995 • For details. c-all S.~lum ol Houston - Katy Frwy .. 281 556.1400. '95 Chc\TOlct Suhusban 1500LS • Only WK miles, dual 1VC'. CD, lowing pkg.. must sec'• Sl9,995 • Call Saturn of Hous1on J'l;W290. 281 8941100 '95 ford F150 fa1endcd Cab • Custom C'om"efSlon "' ground cffocts. donl 1111 s tlus one' • S 11.995 • Sec llenry Craft 111 Archer Motor Sales. '.!SI 4456400 '88 Acura ln1egra • Black. 2-door, •porty, nice' • S2.488 • For more mfonna11on and a test dnve, call Lonest;ir N1ss:111·0ld;mob1le, 28 I 24l8600. '97 ToyOla L:mJCrurscr • The Cream of 1he Crop! A one of a 1.md licauty • SJO.W~ • For all the <k.·tads, call Henry Craft at Archer \1oror Sales. 281 445.6-100 '97 llonda !'=port 4X-1 • V6, PW. PL. uh, crursc, ncrfm and more' • S:ilc pnccd at onl) Sl5,760 • Ask for Henry Craft Ill Archer Motor Sales. 281 445 6400. '97 f-onJ \\ mdstar GI. • Great roomy v:m with many features' l.oad up :ind go'• SI 1,995 • F'or all the details. C<•ll Saturn of Houston Gulf Frwy 711944 4550 '96 Saturn SW 2 • Green. ault\ NC' I'\\. PL. only 4lK rnr~. Ccmfled S.11um \\ ol1T3111) • SI 0,800 • Call S:uurn C'f Houston Non Frwy 2 I 47 8700 ''f'J Otcvy Tahoe LT • Leather intenor. power package. great vehlcle at a great deal! Stk.#S 1139 • Call Saturn of Hou,1on - South\<e'>I Frwy., 713. m.6100. '98 Dodge Avenger • Leather, •unroof, PW, PL, and much much more! • $13,988 •To lt:l>t dnve. call Loncstar Nissan· Oldsmobile. 281.2418600 '98 Toyota Corolla • 4-door, au10. sull under faclory warranly, very alfonJable and economical vch1 clc • $9,995 • Call Saturn of Humble • llwy 59N, 281 540.8855 '99 Saturn SL• Very economical, dme .inywhere1 • Sale pnccd m only S9.995 • For <k.'lalls and n lest drive. call Saturn of Houston Katy Frwy. 281 556. I 4f0 '93 G\IC Sonoma P/U • 6- Cylinder, only 69K 1mlcs, NC, hcJlincr, very clean truck' S5.995 • Con1ae1 Salum of Houston NW290, 281 8941100 '9] !';iss:in Palhlindcr4X4 • 4. Door, black, a musl sec! Great. go anywhere sport uuluy1 • S-1.988 • Call Loncslar Nissan· Old,mobtle, 281.241.8600. '99 Chrysler U-lS • I 7K • Super clean vehicle w/ lot> of op11ons. Let's do bus111<.-.,.s' • S24, I SO • Call Henry Craft ai An:her Motor Sales, 281 445.641Xl. '96 ford Probe SE • V6, a must sec. gre-.a sporty \Chicle. save thousands • Only $9,995 • To find out more, call Saturn of llouston Gulf Frwy. 713. 9444550. '96 Sarum SC-2 • Aulo. ,VC, leather. PW, PL, CD, 11100nroef, trh. cruise, Mxxtgr:un ml . must sec' •56.950 • Call SJtum of Hous1on - :"orth Frwy. 281 8478W> % Saturn SL-2 • Power package, rear spoiler, sporty and lots of (un to dmc. Stk #90987-1 • S8,675 • Call Saturn C'f Hou ton - Sou!hwes1 Frv. y • 711777 61(X) ·92 N1Ssan Scnlra •Grear cle:in car, Our Chnstmas Special! Wow'• Only S2.988 •To dnve away today, call Lonestar Nissan-Oldsmobile. 281.2438600. '97 Ford F 150 Ex1ended Cab XLT • 3rd door, many greal op11ons and features • S 18, I 20 • For infonnation, call Henry Crafl al Archer Motor Sales, 281.445 6400 '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee • \\ hne, real clean. low miles • S 15. 790 • For more mfonna­Uon and a test dnve, call Henry Craft ac Archer Motor Sales. 2 I 445 6400 '96 Saturn SL • 4-Door, great cconorn1cal \'Chicle. dnvc any­where • Sale priced at only S'i,995 • To test dnve, cont~cl Saturn of llumblc - llwy 59N 281 540.8855 '98 Satum SL-2 • Po,.er sreer­ing, power brakes, cassellc, 11nd much more • S 11,795 • for further dc1a1ls, cnll Sarum of Houslon Kary Frwy. 28 l.556. I 4CXJ. '98 Ford Mu\lilng Convertibk • Mec:ilhc red "' black top and m1crior, aura. CD • Sl6,995 • For your test dnve. call Saturn of Houston ;o.;W290. 281 894.3100. '97 ;o.;1ss:111 Palhfinder • PW, PL, Al this price. this one won't stay around long • Only SB,988 • To dnve away 1oday, call Lones tar ['; 1ssan­Oldsmob1lc. 281.243 8600 '98 Jeep Grand Cherokee • Red, real sharp vehicle "' lots ef room • S 18.860 • Call llenry C•afl for details ~• Archer !\1otor Sales. 281 445 f.-100 97 'latum SL-2 • Loaded v./ leather sunroof. .ind many ex.nmg options • Only Sl2,49~ • For all 1he de1a:! • ~atl Sa1um of Hous1on - Gulf l·rv. y. 711 944 4 550 -~~~----- '97 Toyota Tercel • Green, auto, AJC, only :JOK low miles, much more' • SS,950 • For more mfor­m: 11ion. contact Salum of Hous1on North Frwy., 281.847.8700. '97 Mazda M1llcnia • Lnruled &htmn w/ all the bells and wh"­tlcs. a mu.'t sec' Stk.#S 1144 • Sl7,975 • Call SJ!um ol llou,1on - Southwt:l>t rrwy .• 71J777 61 (XJ. '96 Pontiac Gr.ind Am • PW. PL. Only l8K miles, very mcc. clean \'Chicle! • $6,988 • For further <k:ra:l • call l.onestar Nrssa11- 0ldsmob1le, 28 I 243.8600. '95 Maz.d:I 626 • PW, l'L, nl1, cruise, nnd many gn:at f<"atures • Sale pnced at only $8,595 • Call Henry Craft at t\rchcr \fotor Sales. 281 445 6400 89 Volvo 240 SIW • Extra clean, extra safe vehicle',\ lruc mu I sec to npprecrate' • Sale pn.:cJ UI $3,995 • Call Salum of I tumble - Hwy. 59N, 281 540.8855. '96 Lexus E~<; 'llXJ • Pearl while, IOO<lcd. CD & Cil.'\.'«:tte. lc;dt.:r, all the optmns. cxtr.s clean! • S 18,595 • For infom•dion. CJll Salum of Hou ion Kary Frwy. 28 1 -~56 l 4<Xl '94 Inlimu DO • Roo "' beige leatlx.'I' mtcnor. CD, sunroof, only 62K nulcs, musl sec' • Only S 12,995 • Ju\I in lune for Xm.'IS, Salum of llouston NW290, 2818943100. '98 Jeep Wrangler • Auto. AJC. soft top. ruggrJ 1111d fun 10 dnvc. save thou'>31ld 1 •Only SI 3,588 • Dclalls? C'.all Loncstar N1'5all- 01Jsmob1lc. 28124J86<Xl '97 GM(' Br.svada • Low 1111k>s, leather. Cl>, l'W, Pl., 1111, :ind much more' • $1'1,'.\60 • Ask for Henry Cr.1fl nt Archer Morar Sales. 28144~.6400 '96 Saturn SL • Grear dnvmg. \Cl) P'onilblc nnd econorn1cal o, ga<; .ind go' • Sale pnccd at onl) S6,995 • C'<J.11 Saturn of llou ton Gulf frwy. 7119444550 '97 Honda CRV 4X4 • Red, auto, NC. PW, PL. 47K miles, must sec' • Only SI 5,900 •For more infonnahon, call Salum of Hous1on - North Frwy., 281.847.8700. '98 VW Beerle • 17K mile•, alloys, PW. let this car take you back' Stk #S 1117 • Sale priced al S 15,975 • Call Saturn of llous1on • Southwe't Frwy., 713.777.6100. '97 Nissan Maxima • Pearl white, PW. PL. tilt, crui,e. snappy vehicle 1 • S 17 ,260 • To test drive, call llcnry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281.445.6400. '96 Toyota Camry • l'W, l'L. Trh, cruise, greal \Chicle' • A great deal at only S 12,350 • For details. :t k for Henry Craft al Archer Molor Sales 281 445.6400. '97 Sa1urn Sl.-1 • Sunroof, many great op11ons, Sa1urn Cer1ified Warranty • Sale pnccd at only $8,250 • Co111ac1 Salum of Humble - llwy .. WN, 281 540.8855. ·9s Toyola Camry LE • Au10, PW, PL, till, cru"e. and llK>rc. Dcpendahle and reliable' • SIJ,995 • for more. call Saturn ol Hous1on • Katy Frwy, 281 556. 1400. '95 Salum SL-2 • Aulo, alloy wlK.'Cls, spoiler, black gold w/ ran mterior • Only S7,995 • 'lo test drive to.Jay, call Saturn of Hou Ion NW290, 2818943100. '99 GMC Yukon •The one anJ only, 9,875 lo" mile~. musr drm: IO npprecia1e1 • S26, W.5 • Call llenry Crall al Archer Motor Sales. 281.44 ~ 641Xl 99 B!\!W 3 I 8Ti • Avus Blue. sunroof, c,1ss, Slk #10067 • ~!SRP S25,975, th1 \<CCk's special S2 I ,969 C'all Maunc10 Hussrnann Advantage BMW 711 653 8100. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 24, 1999 COMMUNITY 23 community calendar (Some events may be changed due to the holiday.) saturday, dee. 25 After Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM, 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713-526·5738. 0-Patrol walks the streets at 8,45 p.m. 713-528-5AFE. Visual Arts All1c1nce. 10 a.m. 281-58l·8408. D1gn1ty mass at 7 30 p.m. for gay Cathofocs. 713-880-2872. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary at 8 a.m 1805 W Alabama. 713-528-6665 Houston Lesbian and Gav drop-in hours from noon to 4 pm 803 Hawthorne 713-524-3818. sunday, dee. 26 The Womc:-'s Group. 10 45 a.m 711-529-8571 Housto" Arca Teen Coalition of Homose:xuals me-eu. 713- 942 7002 llilonbow Riders A bicyc e c ub for wome1> 713 869 1686. Church of the XII Apostles Anglican Rote Old Catholic Church Hoty Communion 10:30 a.m. at 239 Westhtimtr. 7131665-7903. St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rate Eudlartst I at 7:45 a.m., Holy Rite Eucharist II .at 8;55 am; Education hour at 10 a.m., Choral Euchanst .:it 11 a .m. 1805 W. Al.:tbama. 713-528-6665. M.aran.atha fellowship Metropohtan Church. ·Preaching the Gospel· Bible study at 9:30 p.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713·528-6756. Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection. Services at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m 713-861-9149. Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages at 9:30 a.m. Ser.ice at 10,30 a m 713-528-3269. F1nt Unitarian Un1versalist Church. Services at 9:30 a.m. and 11.30 a.m. Community Gospel. Service at 11 a.m.; 7 p.m. Sunday School for children 4305 Lolhan. 713-880-9235 or wwwcommun1tygoipel.or9 Houston M1ss1on Church. Service at 10:30 a.m. 713-529· 8225. Covenant Baptist Church. Service at 1 ;JO p.m.: education hour at 3 p.m. 713 668-8830. Bering Mc-monal United Methodist Church. Services at 8 30 •.m, 10:50 a.m. Sunday school at 940 a.m. 713-526- 1017. MCCR. Handbell Choir rehear,.I at UO p.m. 713-861-9149. Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 402 Church St. in Galveston. Service at 10:30 a.m. 409-765-8330. Faith and Hope Fellowship. Service at 11 a.m. 713-520· 7847 First Congregational Church (Memorial). Service at l t a.m. 713-468-9543 or fcc-hounon.org Church of Kindred Spirits (Beaumont). Service at 7 p.m. 409-835-4765. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston Adult forum at 10 a.m. Service at 11 a.m. and noon. Open Circle Family Support at 12:30 p.m. 1504 Wort. 713-686-5876. Interfaith Worst11p Celebration. 7 p.m. 2515 Waugh Or. 713-528-3601 Thoreau Unrtanan Un1versahst Congregation: Adult discus· s1on at 9:45 a.m.; service at 11 a.m. 3945 Greenbriar Stafford. 281 277 8882 www.neosoft coml-thoreau. monday, dee. 27 Gay Fathers/fathers Forst support group, 8 p.m 713 861 6181. Calend.lr/Computttr workshop ~or Pnde Week,. 7 pm 713 529-1223. Gay Men Survivors of Domestic Violence support group 713·526-1017. Bering S1.1ppcrt Network Gnef and Divorce Groups at 1 pm. 713-5261017 Frost Eye C11n1c free eye exams for people W1th Htv 7''3 830-3000. AIDS Careg1ve'1' Support Group. 6 p.m. 713·732-4300. HIV te.i1n9 Free from AVES from 1 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. 713· 626-2837 FrontRunner1. 6'30 p.m. 713-522-8021. Kolbe Proiect Eucharist at 7·30 p.m. 713-861·1800. Integrity Houston. For gay and lesbian Ep1scopal1ans. 7:30 p.m .• Autry House, 6265 M.i1n. More light Presbyterians. Meeting_ 1110 Lovett. 9:30 p.m. 281-444-8861 Xl09. Black lesbian and Gay Coalition's weekly meeting at 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713-524·3818. Houston lesb1.in and Gay Community drop-fn hours from 6 to 9 p.m., 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3818. tuesday, dee. 28 FREE HIV testing at Club Houston at 8:30 p.m. to m1dntS;ht. the Montro" Clinic. 713-830-3<X>O. Helping Cross OreHers Anonymous. 7 p.m.., 239 Westhe1mer. 713-495·8009. Gay Men HIV+ Psychotherapy. ·rhe Survivor's Circle• cer"" many and celebration. Montrose Counseling Center at 4'30 p.m. 713-529-0037. Youth-Rap. 6'30 p.m. 713-822-8511 Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center at 6 p.m. 713·529-0037 AIDS Alliance of the Bay Area. 7 p.m. 713-488·4492. A fresh approach for restoring the skin you are born with. Available NOW for men and women. SPECTACULAR RESULTS! improve skin tone, clarity, elasticity effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS PROTECT. An HIV-negative support group at 7 p.m. 713· 526-1017 Women Survivors of Childhood Abuse. Montrose Counseling Center at 6'30 p.m. 713-529-0037. Bering Support Network. lunch Bunch Gang at 11 a.m. 713-526-1017. Gay Men·s Process Group. 7 p.m .• 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713· 526-8390. Men's Network_ 01scuss1on group for sooal. educational development of gay and b1sexua' men. 7 p.m Montrose Counsehng Center. 713-529-0037 More on Relations.hips 01scuss1on group. 7 p m 41 SW Gray 7•3·861-9149 Uimbda Skating Club sk.ltes at 8 p.m. at the Tradewonds 713.523 9620. Gay & 81 Male Support Group suppart gro~p ~arming Sponsored by AVES 713-626·2837 Houston lesbian and Gay Community Center drop-in hours 6 to 9 p.m .. lesbian Coming Out Group rneets at 7 30 p.m 803 Hawthorne 713-528-3818. wednesday, dee. 29 Fret HIV testing by the Montrose cfm1c at Ma,Ys (4-8 p.m) and Midtown< Spa (8 p.m. to midnight), and Ripcord (9 p.m. to modnoght).713·830-3000. 81Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. Social meeting at Cafe Toope-es. 1830 W Alabama. 713-467-4380 Women's Nttwork. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center, 701 Richmond. 713-529-0037. HIV survivor support group. 7 p.m. 713-782-4050. M1ndfBody Connection: Alternatrve Approaches. 7 p.m. 1475 W Gray. 713-524-2374. Proiect: Caesar. 7 p.m. AFH, 3203 Weslayan. 713-623-6796. Out Skate Rollerskating Club. 8 to 10 p.m. at 8075 Cook Road. 281-933-5818. Houston lesbian and Gay Commur"11ty Center dr,:,p--in hours noon to 9 p.m. Computer Class 7 to 8 p.m. 803 Hawthorne 713-524 3818 thursday, dee. 30 Free HIV testing at Toyz (9 p.m. to midnight) by the Montro\e Clinic. 713·830-3000. Art Labs. The Art League at 1 p.m. 713-225-9411 Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsal at 7 p.m. 713-521-7464, HIV+ Men Psychotherapy. Montrose Counseling Center. 1:15 p.m. 713-529-0037. Relapse Prevention. Montrose Counsehng Center, 2 p.m 713-529·0037 Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counset.ng Center, 6 p.m. 713·529-0037. Women's Therapy Group. Montrose Counseling Center. 5:30 p.m. 713-529-0037. Center for the Heahng of Racism. 7;30 p.m. 713-738-RACE. FrontRunne" at 6·30 pm. 713-522-8021 HIV Art Course Program. l to 4 p.m. Patrick. Palmer at 713· 526-1118. Women's 01mc. Montrose 01mc. 713-830-3000. Faith and Hope Fellowship Bible study 7 p.m. 713·520. 7847. Community Gospel. Chou practtee. 630 p.m.., semce at 7 30 pm. 713-880-9235 or www.commurvtygaspel org. HlV/AtOS Suppart Group. 2:30 at Family Servrce Center 7' 3-861 ~849 Women's HIV/AIDS Support Group. 4 30 p m. Family Service Center 7'3·247-3810. HIV/AIDS Support Group, 7 p m Famtly Service Center in Conroe 888 247 3810 Houston lesbian and G.ay Commumty Center drop·tn hours 6 to 9 p.m 713 524-3818. friday, dee. 31 Houston Area Teen Coaht10fl of Homosexuals (H.A.TC M) meets 713 942-7002 Aftercare Group l"reatment. Montrose Counselmg Center at 6 p.m. 713·529-0037 Frost Eye Clinic Free eye exams for people W1th HrV. 713· 830-3000. Lesbian Avengers. Cafe Toopees, 1830 W Alabama at 7 p.m. 0-Patrol walk1 the streets at 8,45 p.m. 713-528-SAFE Kolbe Pro1ect Park Pl.Jza Hoip1tal v1_s1tat1on. 713-861-1800. Positive Art W01k.shop. 1 p.m. to 4 pm. P•tnck Palmer at 713-526-1118. Lesbian and Gay Voices. KPFT90.1 FM, 7 p.m. 713-526- 5738. Movie Tome at the Kolbe PrOJect 7,30 p.m. 713-522·8182. life Begins at 40 Pot lutk dinner 6:30 p .. m. 1440 Harold 713-526-1017. M1shpachat Al1z1m Shabbat Serv1c~. 8 p.m. 71 J..-748-7079. Co-dopendents Anonymous 730 p.m. at MCCR. 713-861- 9149 Houston lesbian and Gay Commurwty Center drop-·m hours 6 to 9 p.m. 713-524-3818. Healing Eucharist at Chnst Church (athedral. 7 p.m. 1117 Texas. 713-222 2593. To /tst an e""nt call Catefyn Roberts at 771-519-8490, fu at 713~529-9531. ore-mad ed1tor@houstonvoKe.com. Dead/me IS fflday at 5 p.m. TRANSDERMAL HAIR RESTORATION All natural transdermal skin and transdermal lace technology MILLENNIUM SPECIAL 1 System ... $650 2 Systems ... $1200 reg. $990 each Offer valid ONLY January 1 - February 1, 2000 WE SERVICE AND REPAIR ALL lYPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. FULL SERVICE, $30 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 24 DECEMBER 24, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Business & ervice Directory A Life's Pleasure Roland Nicolaides 713-942-2399 \\0eliday•1. \\OOtends & Ewnings ll.m and Af~rCIJni Accepl8d Centro I Locatiun NOT YOUR BASIC STORE Unique Clubwear & Undergear "For Men & Women• Leather, Lubricants Adult Toys - Gifts r ----- - -, 125% Off Sale I 'Wt!!~,. I Mens Club Shirts I Ladies Dresses L-~'~·~ -.J ~9¥.J.1i£7 E-llflil: tro< IZ070holmailcom 1207 SPENCER AT A.LI.EN GalOA. _ t....,. ... 'Tl( nw Uic Gutt f9".,.y .M Airport /Cdk1c:.1'kii 1!oua l Moks ()pc:ft Dail) JO an Mic!n..Jht • MJil Onku Wckcwc G e t 0 n 1'-1 y T a b I e ! Tim of L.A. !Uassagt• Therapist 713-508-7896 DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APPOINTMENT ONLY T£\k £ Our .i\\YST ERI ES Mystery Cafe Has Perfonned Hundreds of Private Shows for America's Most Prestigious Companies. Bring Your Company To Us or We' ll Come To Youl u\Il 71 J-944-CLUE American & Foreign TAFT STREET AUTO 713-526-3723 1411 Tait Houston.TX. 11019 AMT# TR23477 .... ••• THI 11 a I PLACI •Alignment •Brakes • Inc 1 307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 71 3-529-141 4 Full Auto Repair & Service on Foreign and Domestic Cars GET PAID TO CRUISE THE INTERNET! for info please email lazwizrd1 @yahoo.com General psychiatric evalua~ons • Appropriate medication management • Cash transactiOn receipt provided for insurance purposes • Medicare also accepted • Conf1dent1ahty strictly respected • Se habla Espa~ot 500 Lovett Suite # 275 Houston, Tx 77006 713.521.3334 FAST CASH! Highest Price Paid! 11Anything of Value11 Houston's largest cash buyer of antiques, estates, furniture, col­lectibles, jewelry, automobiles, and glassware . FREE PICK-UP! 713-994-5986 281 -391 -7515 Call An ime • 7 da s a week • AUTO • HOME • LIFE • LOW COST AUTOS LOW COST RENTERS MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS TONY MAY INSURANCE AGENCY NATIONWIDE INSURANCE 713-807-8264 In Business Since 1991 Perfection Plus Domestic Services Specialists i11 Detail Cleaning FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED BONDED FOR YOUR PROTECTION MOVE-INSIMOVE·OUTS •SPECIAL PROJECTS WEEKLY· BIMONTHLY· ONE TIME ORGANIZATION OF CLOSETS & DRAWERS CLAIRE BROTHERS FUNERAL HOME ~ Crcmat1• 1n S4 lO 00 Burials Y.lth Metal Chkct $995.00 Trad1t1onal Funcrul Y.1th Metal Casket Sl ,795.0U "Sen:ing all Faiths with Compassionate Care" 790 I ll illcroft I louston, Texas 77081 (713) 271-7250 +!IAC l~IllS'I1 AID+ Speaakzrig in .Apple Computers and Perpherals • Onsite Service •Repairs • Network Troubleshooting • Hardware Upgrades • Software Installation "We Make House Calls" 281-53 7-2842 HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 24, 1999 M Stars! YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE by JILL DEARMAN Dec. 24 - 30 a-.~ w ARIES {MARCH 21 - APRIL 20) This is the right time for you to make a big statement to the world about your intentions in love and in career. Don't keep the enthusiasm to yourself. Everyone is getting sexy vibes from you now, especially an Aquarius. Don't play coy TAURUS (APRIL 21 - MAY 21) The moon will be in your house of love as 1999 turns to 2000. There's a sense of adventure that surrounds you these days, so different from your usual stay-at-home vibe. Give a Cancer a great big kiss. Give your­self a pat on the back. GEMINI (MAY 22 - JUNE 21) Jupiter is going forward in your house of friends, so you are apt to be surrounded by all the right people as the clock strikes midnight on New Year's Eve. Put your cold and clever front aside, and welcome in a warmer version of yourself. An Aquarius will certainly give you a warm welcome. CANCER (JUNE 22 - JULY 23) Generous Jupiter is moving forward in your career house and will only pick up speed as we settle into 2000 So what do you want to be when you grow up? Expect to make some important decisions about relation­ships A Taurus can help you be true to yourself. LEO (JULY 24 - AUG. 23) The Sun is giving you extra strength and vitality. Take this as a sign from the universe that the next century will be a powerful one for you. For now, stick close to home. You don't need all the hangers-on distracting you from your true nature. let a Sagittarius guide you back to your roots VIRGO (AUG. 24 - SEPT. 23) The moon will be in the chattiest sector of your chart as the ball drops in Times Square, so pay attention to the cocktail chatter. You'll get bril­liant ideas and make important acquaintances, including a new version of yourself-one with a healthy ego. A Pisces can help build you up. LIBRA (SEPT. 24 - OCT. 23) Jupiter is moving forward at a fast clip in your house of love, so enjoy the ride. Don't think too much about your love life; instead try a few lovers on for size. All work and no play should not be the way to go in 2000. Have more fun in bed with a Cancer. SCORPIO (OCT. 24 - NOV. 22) The moon will be in your sign as the clock strikes 12 on that special night Pay attention to how you feel. Whatever you do, don't be phony and try to "balance" everything out. That's just not you. Draw your life in bold colors. A Libra would love to do some body-painting with you. SAGITIARIUS (NOV. 23 - DEC. 22) It's time for you to believe in yourself, and stop taking a back seat to people who are better at self-promotion. The Sun in your money sector bodes well not just for your financial plans, but
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