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Montrose Voice, No. 29, May 15, 1981
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Montrose Voice, No. 29, May 15, 1981 - File 001. 1981-05-15. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6167/show/6150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1981-05-15). Montrose Voice, No. 29, May 15, 1981 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6167/show/6150

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 29, May 15, 1981 - File 001, 1981-05-15, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6167/show/6150.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 29, May 15, 1981
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 15, 1981
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Music, this issue Good things for The Who, reviewed page 6 MontroseVoWe THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, ISSUE #29, PUBLISHED WEEKLY Books, this issue Jo ep H e ' ' Smile in His Lifetime,' reviewed page8 Montrose news, this Issue Friday May 15, 1981 Good Evening Montrose weather tonight: Partly cloudy and mild with a low of 64 ' . Sunrise: 6:28AM. Saturday: Mostly cloudy with a chance of thundershowers and a high of 84 °. Sunset: 8:09PM. • Robbers attaeli Montrose firemen • Hanington malies suit offieial • Te*lls House passes bill to allow poliee to give tiellets for ''ga~ eonduet'' • and more, pages J and 5 PAGE 2 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15 1981 Thelma Houston May20 Tickets now on sale 'THRUST' an intense party DJ-Frank Collins Tick•ts will 10 on sole at the door for / S7 starting at 9pm May 14 _,,--- MECH ENE ~ SHOP ,A., OPENS \ __ / (Back Bar} THURSDAYS 75' SHOTS CUERVO SCHNAPPS AMARETTO Serving Montrose and Houston UNITED CAB CO. "Growing with Houston" 24 Hour Radio Dispatehed 759-1441 Viola Wills May27 Tickets now on sa y . "If You Could read My Mind," "Up on the Roof," "(There' s) Always Something There to Remind Me" Tickets In advance $7.50 United Cab needs a few qualified men and women Day lease, Week lease owner/ operator 759-1441 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM At the door $10 DJ-Otis James May25 ® The PatloOpens * Ultimate ~ 0 SUNDAY SLEAZE ~ Texas' Longest T-Dance & Beer Bust 5pm-till? FREE DRAFT CULLEN PAINT UBODY SHOP 6SO·I885 •••o Crawford Custom painting, . insurance repairs, lree estimates a (' ( e. a rr I a (( it ir H ir it b; m 01 m co g. cc Cl er se bE m ti< le; fo of m. frE do ra: c~ of SU MAY 15, 1981 /MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 3 GPC president makes it official, files suit, announces anti­discrimi­nation programs Gay Political Caucus presi­dent Lee Harrington said on the steps of City Hall May 12 that he had filed earlier a personal lawsuit in Federal District Court against the City of Houston for his loss of a city job when he was elected president of the GPC in 1980. Also named in the suit was the Greater Houston Con­vention and Visitors Council (the city agency where Har­rington worked) and its gen­eral manager, Greg D. Ortale. Harrington said, "At 9:30 on the morning of Wednes­day, June 18, 1980, some ten hours before I was to stand for election to the GPC pre­sidency, the general man· ager of the Greater Houston Convention and Visitors Council told me that if I was elected that night, I would be asked to resign the next morning (from the GHCVC). I was elected and I was asked by the (Greater Hous· ton Convention and Vis­itors) Council to begin look­ing for another job," Harrington said. Harrington was attempt­ing to gain maximum public­ity through straight media by making the announce­ment of the filing of the suit on the steps of City Hall. Two of Houston's three major television stations covered the announcement. "My concern is ~o~ just gay rights, but the c1V1! and constitutional rights of all city tax-supported employees," Harrington said. He said the GHCVC had begun to pressure him two months bE'fore the GPC elec­tion when it was said to have learned of his plans to run for the city's top gay political office. • "This is a clear violation of my individual rights, my freedom of speech and free­dom of association, as gua· ran teed by the United Sta_tes Constitution. It is a V1olation of the rights of all employee~ supported by taxpayers money," he said. Harrington did not reveal the monetary amount of the suit. The GHCVC later revised its policy regarding political activities by its employees while on their personal time after feeling pressure from the Houston City Council, Harrington said. A majority of the City Council members in the pre­vious election had sought the endorsement of the Gay Political Caucus, recogn.iz­ing its influence among voters. • Harrington also announced that two new pro­grams of the GPC were in the "final stages of approval." One would be a task force to verify greivances from persons who feel they were fired or forced out of jobs because they were homosex­ual. If verification showed an employer was guilty of firing someone because of sexual orientation, protests would be staged at the busi­ness' location, he said. The other program being planned, he added, would be taking it a step further by using economic boycotts by gay people of products and services at busineHses who would not sign a non· discrimination policy document. Arson ruled in Montrose fire A May 10 fire that partially destroyed a vacant house on West Alabama was ruled arson. The two-story house in the 300 block was partially des­troyed by the blaze about 7:30 p.m. Fire officials said it appeared vargrants were liv­ing in the building. Damage was estimated at $75,000. Art Fest represen­tative presents specific proposal for closing West­heimer A leader of the Westheimer Colony Art Association pre­sented City Council May 12 with a specific proposed ordi- Ben Sargent Montrose News nance which would allow Westheimer Street to be closed off during the twice-a­y ear Westheimer Arts Festival. John Green of 412 West­heimer also told the council that he had a petition signed by 18,000 people that would put the issue of the closure of the street on a referenbum if the city failed this time to act. For the past several years, members of the Westheimer Colony Art Association had tried to get the street closed during the festival. Mayor Jim McConn said city attorneys would study Green's propsoed ordinance. Mayor McConn said just prior to the last festival that the city would close off West· heimer during the event "if we can legally do it(but) if it violates city ordinance, no." In previous years, city government heads had made similar statements but the street has yet to be closed for the festival. "If it means changing our ordinances, we should tell them we'll do it. If we're not going to cooperate and change the ordinances, we should tell them now," said council member Lance Lalor prior to the last festival. Lalor repre8ents District C, which includes Montro•e. "We always keep them dangling," he said. City Attorney Ed Cazares was asked to act promptly in determing if city ordinances concerning street closings for such events would have had to be changed, and "if it means changing some ordi­nances we can go ahead and do it," Lalor said. The festival normally stretches for ten blocks from Bagby to Montrose and draws hundreds of thou­sands of people into the area. In effect, during the festi­val, the massive crowd in the past slowed the traffic to a trickle anyway. Texas House approves wiretap measure AUSTIN-The Texas House of Representative May 4 approved and sent to the Senate a bill to legalize wire­tapping by law enforcement agencies. The bill approved by the House would allow court­sanctioned wiretaps and electronic surveillance, including allowing the Texas Department of Public Safety and local law enforce­ment agencies to make "covert entries" to place eavesdropping devices. PAGE 4 /MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15, 1981 Now Playing at the French Quarter All new MAN-SIZED ACTION! Cream of the top Ct1t)PllA~ ... he knows his place! ® Stantng VICTOR HOUSTON Rochld Jollll, Johnny Conuck. Alkon and Ryder Jones Plus, on the same screen 3201 Louisiana 527-0782 ~ontrose~ovies/'Theater Movies This Week Near Montrose (Friday, May 15, through Thursday, May21) Theaters in and near Montroee: Alabama-2922 $. Shepherd-522-6176 French Quarter-3201 louisiana-527-0782 Galleria-loop 610 at Weeth~mer--626-4011, 626- 01.tO Greenway-Greenway Plaza Underpound-626- 3339 Loew'• Sab-S. Poat Oak at San Felipe-627·9910 Mu1eum of Fine Arla-Brown Auditorium, 1001 Biuonnet-626-1361 River Oab-2009 W Gray-524·2175 Shamro(k-7017 S. Main-797-1446 Windaor-607A Richmond-622-2650 • SHOWING ALL WEEK Titles to be announced: 2:30pm (Monday through Friday), Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 Topman (gay male erotica) starring Vic­tor Houston and Savage Rides Again (gay male erotica): French Quarter La Cage aux Foiles II (1981 comedy, in French with English subtitles, rated R) starring Ugo Tognazzi & Michel Serra ult; Greenway • FRIDAY ONLY Satur n 3 (1980 f Cience fiction) starring Farrah Fawcett ind Kirk Douglas: 7:15, River Oaks Otto Preminger'• Laura: 8pm, Museum of Fine Art8 Stanley Kubrick's 200.1 A Space Odys­sey (1968, acience fiction) starnng ~eu Dullea and Hal the Computer: 9pm, River Oak.I Title to be announced: 2:15am (Sat. morn­ing), Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer, 528-8508 •SATURDAY ONLY Gone With the Wind (1939 drama): noon, 4pm, Spm, River Oaks Gertrude Stein: Wh en This You See, Remember Me: ?pm, First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin, 526-1571 Connie Field's The Life and Times o r Rosie the Riveter and Jean·Pierre Gor· in ·a Poto and Cobengo: Spm, Museum of Fine ArtB Title to be announced: 2.ISam (Sun. morning), Different Drum, l 732 West· heimer, 528-8508 • SUNDAY It MONDAY Brian de Palma's Home Movies U980 comedy) starring Kirk Douglas and Nancy Allen: (4pm Sun .. 5:45pm Sun.) 7·30pm, 9:15pm, River Oaks •MONDAY ONLY To be announced: 9pm at the Galleon, 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 llTUESDAY ONLY Couain Cousine (1976 romane<;) stsr­ring Marie-Christine Barra ult and Victor Lanoux: 7:30pm, River Oaks Yves Rovert'e Pardon Mon Affair (comedy): 9:30pm, River Oaka Lawre nce of Arabia: 10:30pm, Mary's, 1022 Weetheimer--628-8851 •WEDNESDAY ONLY Martin Scorsese'• Mean Street. (1973) 1tarring Harvey Keitel and Robert DeNiro: ?pm, River Oaks Francis Ford Coppola'• The Godfather, Part II (1974) starring Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino: 9,15pm, River Oaks llTHURSDAYONLY Shampoo (1975 comedy) starring Warren Beatty and Julie Christie: 7:15pm, Ri ver Oaka To be announced: 8pm, Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Westheimer, 528-9040 Cruisln' (1979, rated R): 9:30pm, Wild­wood Saloon. 1504 w .. theimer, 528-9040 Heaven Can Walt (1978 comedy) otsr· ring Warren Beatty, Buck Henry and Julie Chriatie: 9:30pm, River Oaka Live Theater This Week Near Montrose (Friday, May 15, through Thursday, May21) (Nina Vance) Alley Theater (large stage)-615 Texas-228-8421 William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, directed by Louis Criss and star· ring Scott Wentworth and Patrizia Norcia, 8:30pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Sat­urday and 2:30 and 7:30pm Sunday. (Nina Vance) Alley Theater's Arena Stage-615 Texas-228- 8421 Hugh Leonard's Da (comedy) starring Dale Helward and Robert Donley 8:30pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Saturday, 2:30 and 7:30pm Sunday, and 8pm Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30pm Thursday. Chocolate Bayou Theater-1823 Lamar-759-9840 George Bernard Shaw's Candida (comedy) 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 7pm Sunday, Comedy Works hop Cabaret and t h e Comix A nnex-1905 S. Sh ephe rd-524-7333 Comedy Tonight 8:30 and l!:OOpm Fri­day and Saturday, 8:30pm Tuesday through Thursday. The E nsemble-1010 Tuam-520- 0055 Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright (comedy drama), 8:30pm Friday a nd Saturday, 5pm Sunday. Equinox Theater-3617 Was hing­ton- 868-5829 Ira Levin's Deathtrap (comedy· /thriller) 8:30pm Friday and Saturday. Main Street Theater-Autrey House, 6265 S. Maln-524-6706 Edward Albee's The Lady from Dubuque (comedy melodrama) 8:30pm nightly. Stages Cabaret Stage-709 Franklin-225-9539 James McClure's Lone Star and Laundry and Bourbon (comedies) 8:30pm Friday, 5 and 9pm Saturday; 3pm Sunday. Tower Theater-1201 West­heimer- 522-2452 JesUJJ Christ, Superstar, directed by Bruce Bowen, starring J. Brent Alford, Tommy Hollis, Maria Ballas (musical), preVIews 5pm Saturday and 3 and 7:30pm Sunday; regular performances 8pm Tuesday through Thursday. Vaudeville The a ter-308 Milam- 226-9552 Urban Theater's Inner Wonder (musi­cal) 8:30pm Friday and Saturday, 5pm Sunday. The Voice, the ONLY publication in the world JUST for Montrose T,, It F F It Pt to A• re B MAY 15, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 5 Lalor "Apprecia­tion Party" this Tuesday A "Lance Lalor Apprecia­tion Party," announced by aide Johnny Peden, was scheduled for Tuesday, May 19, starting at 8:00 p.m. at the Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. The party's plans include a bar-b-que buffet. It's plan­ning on being a fund-raiser to help retire campaign debts of the District C city councilman. Distirct C includes Mon­trose and much of southwest Houston. Cost of admission will be $5, with $25 "sponsorships" available, Peden Raid. Montrose man pleads innocent to Caribbean overthrow plot Michael Eugene Perdue, 32, of the 1600 block of Marshall in Montrose, and eight other alleged mercenaries May 13 pleaded innocent to federal charges of conspiring to overthrow the Caribbean government of Dominica, it was reported. The charges were said to claim that Perdue and the others were wanting to restore to power the small island's deposed prime minister. Also, federal ~lcohol, Tobacco and Firearms agency investigators were said to have confirmed that at least 26 individuals, including two Houston police officers, had been or would be questioned about Perdue. Among the other eight arraigned with Perdue included an imperial wizard of the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, it was reported. Perdue was mitially held under $500,000 bond. The men were arrested April 27 when they arrived at a marina near New Orle­ans with automatic wea­pons, dynamite and other military gear. Proposed new law would let police, at their option, issue tickets for "homo­sexual conduct" AUSTIN-The Texas House tentatively passed a bill May 12 that would let law enforce­ment officers have an option on whether to arrest certain misdemeanor law violators, or just to issue a ticket. The bill covers those laws frequently used when arrest­ing gay people. The bill also covers prosti­tution, gamblers and mari­juana smokers. Under present law, if the officer cites the person, he must bring them to jail. Under the new law, if approved by the Texas Senate and signed by the governor, the individual offi- The MONTROSE VOICE ia published every Friday. Officee: 3520 Montrose, •uite 227, Houaton, TIC 77006. Pho~:SJ~13) 521).8490. Content. copynght Office houre: l./lpm. Henry McClurg, publisher/editor. . . Membt'r Gay Presa Aaaociation and Texu Gay Newe Auoci~bon. rte · in the Voice accredited to Copley Newa Service, San Fr me. appeChngicle Featuree Syndicate, Surburban Featuree, or United anc1eco ~n . ht.edbythoeeconcemaandarepurchuedby Featur~ 8ynd1ca~ are~opyng All ther item• in the Voice are copy-the Vmre for uae m th~gh~bs;'':rerM.on~oae Voice. , POSTMASTER: Send addreea correction• to 3520 Mon~e, 1u1te 227, Hou.•­ton, TX 77006. Subscription rate in US: 1?9 per year, 52 tseuea, or $24 for mx month•, 26 teauee. H at.on advertising representative: Randy Brown. ~u. ntativee· Jim Olinger and Wade Frey, Connec- Texaa advert111ng repreae 8 A tin 78722. (512)474-1660; Roy Hall, Metro tum•, 2401 Mn,:~ 1\;~ ~915~Dallaa 75265, (214) 528-9944 . '. tative· Joe DiSabato, Rivendell Markeb.ng, National adverti1mg repreoenN y. rk lOOll (212) 242-6863. 666 6th Avenue, ew o • Advertiaing deadh.n e: Every ~'u.e-8-U,a yl, HteJ.O pm ' foriNuetobereleaaedthrt!e day• a r. cer can either write the ticket, or haul the alleged violator to jail as in the past. Austin Rep. Wilhelminia Delco campaigned against the bill, saying officers ~ould react to their own pre- 1udic1es of "racism sexism elitism and all srots 'of prefer'. ential and discriminatory treatment" in deciding who to arrest and who to just ticket. Robbery attempt made on firemen Three Houston firemen who had just helped extinguish a car fire in Montrose were then held at gunpoint by two men trying to rob them, the Houston Chronicle reported. No one was injured in the Montrose News attempted robbery about 3:20 a.m. May 12 at the corner of West Main and Hazard, according to reports attributed to Capt. J.J. Esterak, one of the three victims. According to the newspaper: Esterak said firemen aboard a pumper truck from Station 16 on Richmond had just extinguished a car fire in the 1900 block of West Main. The pumper truck had moved down the street while firemen refilled a water tank. Esterak said that he and firefighters Tommy D Olson and S.J. Campbell remained with the burned car as they waited for a wrecker to tow it away. While they waited, it was reported, a vehicle traveling south on Hazard stopped within about 25 feet of them. Twomenjumpedoutofthe car and pointed a gun at the firefighters, the Chronicle said. Olson ran to the pumper and called Houston Police, but a police car was not immediately available so the pumper truck was brought to the rescue of Esterak and Campbell, it was said. Meanwhile, the gunman were demanding money from the two freiman but quickly left as the pumper started to approach, the paper said, adding that no money was taken. The car fire was ruled arson but no link was estab­lished between it and the robbery attempt, the news­paper reported. Looking for a special product or service? Look first in the Montrose Voice Directory. PAGE 6 I MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Concerts MAY 15. 1981 Attention clubs, bands and singers Your listing in the Montrose Concerts column here is free. All you have to do is let us know. Call 529-8490 afternoons. r5= r;- Concerts This Week In & Near Montrose (Friday, May 15, through Thursday, May 21) Ab and the Rebel Outlaws (country band) Friday and Saturday evenings at the Exile, 1011Bell,659-0453; Sunday afternoon and Thurs· day evening at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192. Randy Allen and the Double Eagle Band (country band) Friday and Saturday evenings at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Brazos, 528-9192; Thursday evenin11 at the Exile. !Oll Bell. 659-0453. Richard Ellis with Wayne Lyles (piano and vocal) Thursday Fridav, Saturday VIDEO and Wednesday evenings at Jasmine (straight), 1512 W. Ala­bama, 526-0975. Paul English Group (contem· porary jazz) Evenings except Sunday at Cody's (straight), 3400 Mon­trose, 522-9747. Scott Gertner Quarter (jazz) Evenings except Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers (straight), 907 Westheimer, 527- 0595. Thelma Houston (disco) 9pm Wedne•day at Parade, 1416 Richmond, 520-9119 Justine Band Friday, Saturday and Thurs­day eveniniis at Our Place, 1419 Richmond, 528-8903. The Terry Mason/Phil Set­tle Band (jazz) Sunday and Monday evenin11s at Birdwatchers (straight). 907 Westheimer, 527 ·0595. """ I ~· I AFTERNOON I MATINEE I l:30 Mond L~ through Frid:~ ~~~ AFTER-HOURS MOVIES Friday and Saturday ~-- --------. /11 DIFFERENT DRUM 1732 WESTHEIMER Dress Code Music by L_I' after 9pm Bobby Konrad HOME OF THE AMERICAN LEATHERMEN Good things for The Who By ROBIN WEllES Copley News Service HOLLYWOOD - The Who i.s getting up in years but some new attire can work wonders, and it bas. The celebrated quartet bas a new member (drummer Kenney Jones re­placing the late Keith Moon). a new producer (Bill Szymczk who did such mar­velous work with the Ea­gles), a new label (Warner Bros.) and a new album ("Face Dances"). Plus nine fine new songs (seven Townshend and two Entwistle originals) and some new portraits (16 art­ists doing the portraits of Who members that grace the new album). Out of all of thi.s comes one of the best in a long line of quality albums by Who a musical combination that bas been around for some 15 years. It's been about two !~.since the Who's last Jones, a drummer of great enthusiasm and finess seems to have U!Stilled ~ new flair and vigor to the tno of originals. He got heavy waves of applause when be made lus debut With The Wbo ID London in 1979 It looks lite many mo~e ~: I times are ahead for Brii:~1c rock group from ALABAMA (RCA) - It's been a rough go for cousins ~d Y Owen, Jeff Cook and Y Gentry smce th sembled for the first e~: :: in 1969. They bad early ms of cracking Nash· Music ville, but personnel changes and other problems kept them down. It wasn't unW early last year when "My Home's in Alabama" broke into the top 20. Who ever said success was easy'? PEABO BRYSON · Turn the Hands of Time (Capitol) - Tlus one is a collection of some of the earlier things recorded by the soul singer who first jumped into star· dom with "I'm So Into You" in una. Brysoo i3 an exce~ tional composer, and nine of the 10 on this LP were writ­ten by him. He lights a fl.re beneath the tenth, "Piece of My Heart," which Janis Jop­lin once spotlighted. ONE-NIGHT STAND· A Keyboard Event (Columbia) - The two-record album was compiled live from a Jazz performance by various ~ts In Los Angeles. Stars included Ramsey Lewis, Eubie Blake, Earl Klugh, Bobby Hutcherson, Bob James, Ron Carter, Hubert Laws, Herbie Hancock, George Duke - almost a who's who of the jazz world. U you pick up this one, setUe back for some of the best Jazz around. DENIECE WILLIAMS • My Melody (Columbia) - Williams bas one of those super-flexible voices that can do everything from soul to opera. Songs on this LP range from subUe reggae to European calypso. The young lady bas come a long way since her days as one of the backup SIDgers for Stevie Wonder BEST OF TAJ MAHAL (Columbia) - Hi.s bluesy songs rrught sound like be drifted out of the Mississippi mud, but actually the man was a New Yorker who grew up in Sprmgfield, Mass., and beard plenty of southern­style music from Ills par. ent.9, both musicians. Fans of Tai Mahal wil reio1ce to find "Alll't Gwine Whistle Owe (Any Mo')" and "Fi.shing Blues" mcluded in this col· lection. Universe A Ironic Celestial Catalog Bl, Sherwood Harrington/ 19111 SAN FRAN. CHRONICLE FMTURF.S The most commonly used list of prominent celestial objects was originally compiled as a roster of things that astronomers shouldn't waste their time looking at. It was published by the French comet hunter Charles Messier in 1781 as an aid to other comet hunters. There was keen interest in the discovery of new comets during the late 1700s, but finding them required slow meticulous searching with the small telescopes of th~ time. Comets look "fuzzy" through mode•t telescopes, but most fuzzy pacthes are not comets. Comets can be distinguished by their slow movement against the starry background. During his searches for comets, Messier often found fuzzy patches of light which never moved against the sky. This stagnancy, he correctly concluded, showed that they were not comets; and he felt that to look at them further would be a waste of his time. To save other astronomers such wasted effort, he compiled what is now called the"MessierCatalog."Thus an object's inclu­sion in the catalog originally meant that it wasn't worth looking it. Ironically, most of the bodies on Messier's list are now considered far more interesting than comets. Comets are simply tiny pieces of interplanetary debris which are set mildly aglow if they pass closs to the Sun. Messier's objects, on the other hand, include some of the most awesome denizens of deep space that can be seen with relative ease from Earth. His first entry (called "Ml" in astronomers' shor­thand) is a prime example. Through large modem tele­scopes, this fuzzy patch is revealed to be an expanding mass of multicolored gassy filaments-testimony to an ancient stellar catastrophe of inconceivable violence. Also called the "Crab Nebula," it is all that remains of a heavyweight star that blew itself to shreds thousands of years ago. EXPLORING e the UNIVERSE ') The other entries form a sampling from the bizarre coRmic zoo. The 42nd, for example, is a ~wirling fluores­cent cloud studded by bright blue pmpomts of newborn stars. The 57th is an eerie pale-green bubble of g~s exhaled as the dying breath of an aged star. The 31st 1s the nearest other large galaxy to our own Milky Way­the Andromeda Galaxy-a gargantuan spiral made of billions of stars. The objects in Messier's list are so fascinating and relafvely easy to see that modem clubs of amateur astr~nomers often hold "Messier '!'arathons." In these marathons, amateurs attempt to view as many of ~ese objects (more than a h~dred m all) as poss1b!e m. a restricted time, using ~eir s.m.all telescopes._ Thats q1:11te a switch from Messier s ongmal purpose m proV1ding the list! A final twist of irony is provided by the ~1st entry in the catalog. Despite careful searching, nothmgofpart1c­ular interest has ever been found where Messier located h b. N nearly two centunes after the great ct oem e0 t Jheucnt.t er ogwa,v e us h.i s ri s.t 0 f "boring" non-comets it 1 ' seems that number 91 was, m fact, a comet. . . . h the City College of San Francisco. llamngton ts wit I SocietyofthePacificismakingavailable The Astronomies . and slides of the dramatic new views to VOICE readers pnnts d oons sent back by the Voyager of Saturn and i~ nngs 8 ti mand 8 1 price list, send a stamped, probe. ~·or more mfl'ma too~atum Pictures, A.S.P., 1290 24th elf.addresaed enve.ope CA' 94122. Avenue. San FranCJsco, MAY 15, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 7 NBC to keep King The NBC network said May 11 it would be keeping tennis pro Billie Jean King as a commentator. The network said that "unless there are additional developments, Billie will be at the microphones for us at Wimbledon." King recently admitted that she had a lesbian rela­tionship for several years WJth her former secretary, Marilyn Barnett. King won a temporary res­training order May 5 barring Barnett from publishing some 100 personal letters written dur­ing their affair. King's lawyer's got the order after presenting affidavits claiming Barnett had said she might sell the letters to the National Enquirer for $25,000, news services said. It was reported that in an affidavit filed in Superior Court, King said she "wrote the letters to Barnett with the intent and understanding that they were and would remain private and confidential." When the story first came to light, King denied she had a le•­bian relationship with Barnett, but later admitted it. Only the E.R Squibb Co. was reported to be dropping King from its list of celebrities who endorse the company's products. In addition to NBC, compa­nies making Nike athletic shoes, Yonex t.ennis rackets and a resin substance called Power Grip, were reported to have said they would be stick­ing with their current arrange­ments with King. The Nation Avon, which sponsors two major women's tennis to um a· ment.s, including one in Hous­ton, was reported as saying they were "reviewing the situa­tion cautiously. We would not be involved in anything that would hurt our image." News services said that in her affidavit on the letters between King and Barnett. King said: "At various times over the past two to three years, Barnett has told me that she was going to publish to third parties the letters I had written her and that she felt she could make a great deal of money from their publication." Barnett filed suit a week ear­lier seeking lifetime support and title to a Malibu house owned by King and her hus­band, Larry, news services said. PAGE 8 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15, 1981 'A Smile in His Lifetime' by Joseph Hansen A SMILE IN HIS LIFETIME by ,Joseph Hansen, published by Holt. Rinehart and Win8ton, 521 5th Ave, New York. NY 10175. HordC'>ver $13.95. Reviewed by Joe DiSabato Jo,eph Hansen is the highly acclaimed author of the Dave Brandsetter mystery senes, a collection of novels which led the Los Angeles Times to call him "quite simply the most exciting and effective writer of the classic California private­eye novel working today." Although the hero of the five books in this series is gay, the Brandsetter books cannot be accurately referred to primarily as a series of "gay novels." More accurately, they are primar­ily mystery novels whose main character happens to beiiay As such they have earned Hansen high praise as a wri­ter from publications such as the New York Times and Washington Post newspap­ers the Saturday Evening Post and New Yorker maga­zines, and are highly recom­mended for anyone who appreciates finely written mystery stories. A Smile in Hi,; Lifetime, however, is Mr. Hansen's first novel outside the Brandsetter series and will probably be referred to as his first "gay novel." The book concerns one Whit Miller, a writer who-as the book opens-is churning out cheap porn novels to support himself while waiting for his major novel to be accepted by some large and reputable publishing house. His marriage to Dell, his wife of ten years, is begin­ning to unravel as the novel begins, and the first third of the book (subtitled "Dell") shows how his suppressing of-and final acquiescense to-his desire for sex with another man contributes to his marital collapse. Dell was well aware of Whit's homosexuality when they married (after all, Whit's sex­ual life was exclusively homosexual until he met Dell), and she paid lip ser­vice to understanding his needs while fully expecting him to "outgrow" them once he was happily married. Whit suppressed his true nature for almost ten years, un ti! he was practically seduced by a very sexy young neighbor named Kenny. Dell had been grow­ing increasingly frustrated with Whit and their mar­riage anyway, but Whit's increasing need for Kenny causes his marriage to finally come apart. At the end of part I, Whit's book has finally been accepted and he has received a la:ge advance. Feeling that Whit will now be able to care for himself, Dell con­fronts Whit with his dissatis· faction, and Whit leaves Dell to live alone in Los Angeles (Kenny, having gotten cold feet about his relationship with Whit, has run off and gotten married). The second and third parts of the book trace Whit's increasing financial success (his book has been picked up by a major film studio) and increasing emo­tional isolation. Part II (sub­titled "Jamie") deals with Whit's obsession with a beautiful but immature young man named Jamie who is afraid to respond to Whit. By the end of Part II, Jamie has come to believe that Whit really does love him and he moves in with Whit. Part III (subtitled "Whit"-the subtitles seem to break Whit's life into peri· ods, with each subtitle indi· cating the primary center of Whit's emotional life during that period) begins with Jamie having been institu· tionalized because of per· manent brain damage he has suffered from some ha!· lucinogenic drug. Hansen's style is to set up a situation at the beginning of each part and then deal with Whit's progression from that point while filling in the details as to how the current situation came about through a series of flash· backs. It is a device which maintains reader interest and creates a certain sus· pense, much more so than a simple chronological narrative. With the relationship with Jamie having come to an end, Whit learns to accept his situation. Despite his material suc­cess he is unhappy and unfulfilled. Having been through at least three emo­tionally draining relation· ships (Dell, Kenny and Jamie), he now has decided to be self-sufficient and emo­tionally independent. Yet his search for non-involved sex· ual release finds him being overpowered, tied up, and robbed by a young one­night- stand, and finally being beaten nearly to death by "fag bashers" when he wanders too near a pier on the beach frequented by men looking for sex in the shadows. The end of the book finds Whit alone, having accepted his loneliness. Books Joseph Hansen, author of "A Simle in His Lifetime." While themes ofloneliness and unhappiness and love gone wrong in gay life are not new to the gay reader, what sets A Smile in His Lifetime apart from other such books is the style and craft of the author. The critiques of Hansen's writing ability are not over­stated. He has been praised by the New Yorker for his "real gift of storytelling-for character, for scene, for pace," and by Saturday Review as "a writer of taste and maturity." Rarely have the8e themes been addressed by an author with such skill and ability. One brief descriptive para­graph from the book should suffice to illustrate Hansen's craft. Whit has just returned from shopping to his new expensive Los Angele~ apartment, into which he has just moved with his cat (named Polk) from the run­down shack he had been Jiv­ing in with his now. estranged wife: "Polk is not on the deck. It looks bare, and Whit thinks he will set plants along the rail. He empties the euper. market sacke. Into cup. PHOTO BY ROGER BAKER boards where no grit falls, where no mouse nibbles. Into a big copper-tone ref rig· erator that huffs each time the door shuts. He clamps a can into the e1ectric opener, pushes the lever, and watches can and opener waltz. Claws scrabble out­side the kitchen window, and Polk is on the sill, asking to come in. Whit slides the win­dow open, Polk jumps down and starts walking in fast circles, yapping. Whit rinses a white plastic no-tilt bowl under the fancy tap where water comes out fizzing. He sets the bowl on the sleeky waxed floor, and forks food from can into bowl. Polk stops bumping his legs and eats. Whit sets the can with half its fishy contents on the refrigerator shelf. The door falls shut." In the hands of a less skilled writer, the themes addressed in A Smile in His Lifetime could easily result in a soap opera dripping with melodrama. It is due to Hansen's great skill as a wri· ter that this book avoids this trap and presents instead a tender yet unsentimental acount of love, need, pain and loneliness as they manifest themselves in the life of one gay man. s Se ;:A. F - - Montrose Classified BUSINESS OWNERS: (1) We liat free each weiPk (a) all bu11ineM etJtabliah menta lt'rving at distribution point.a for the newt1paper.:!Jcurrentdi11t~~ adver· :~<J/~1= "~~r~::~.11~1 w:n~ ~i~a"c~;;:~~W ~~~~'Ji;~r,;:~3~~~- t1s('f• (th(llt(> purch&111n.11 a minimum of !1~~~iJ>)a~:J:~~~~:~i~~i~to~~:d (7-point regular type) or $8 per inch {var· ied JarJ(t•r type) forone·bme1n14e~ion OH 20C' pt'r word or $7 per in~h per uume for thir«'f'n or morr conlM"<'ut1ve 1uue11, paid in ndvanct'. (41 Call ;';29-8490. 1-Hpm, for more information • indicatu MO.NTHQSF: VOICE diatri bution point ~~vd~9,ft,,'7!s~:~\J~c~:: ~~~~7~!ri ~ aftt:moon , May t2; Tuff .. 7pm, May 26, for it1Mue •:JI to b- ttleaM'd Fn after noon, May.·~ AUTO REPAIR Cl'LLEN Paint A. Body Shop 1610 Crawford-660-1885 Custom painting, insurance repairs, free estimates. BEDDING •HOUSE OF BEDS-2115 Nor Colk 627-9362, 629-36'§2 Special prices on Simmons & Spring Air Bedding at the House of Beds. s('t'I our ad elsewhere this issue. BOOKS • WILi>~: 'N' SH;JN ~ Wrt1the1mer-b2!- J-7014 ExdU8ively lir•Y CLOTHING •OH BOYi IA1a the r Good•- 912 Wes th e lm t> r -62·1 - 7~9 We sell Frye men's western boots. See our ad elsewhere this issue. •A f>I.ACJ.; JN TIM~;-1409 Rich~o;;J ~n LEATHEJf .4ofrW';theimM-5Zf. 0044 •s1"()Rnf1:0C·1(ER-J11 W•theimer­~" 16"'1S DATING SERVICES "A New Way to Meet Friends" J.,or information send SASE A 11 to Alternative Connection• Bos: 10, 1713 Westhelmer "c?ON~·i'bgf7n,s LAMBDA COMP-721-0683 New in Town? Problems Meeting People? Call Lambdacomp. 721-5583. EROTICA •Af)()NJS New .141 Richmond-f.23- 0494 •ASYl.UM lioolutorf'-1201 Ri~mo;cf ;uAli. 1-'ARK ~11toi?· Ts,j} W Ala· boma ;~~;S N~ wfftheimer- ;~:r::o~~la~~~:l-l'J11s~heater- "Saval'e Rides Agai~" .,and Victor Houston !n Topman" now showmg at the French Quarter. ~ our ad elsewhere this issue. G11iy men t'X<'lu•ivt>ly, full lt>nrth all-male rl'lov1('9 ~'U~BY Nf'w•tand- ..a1!5 KirbY:::i:,j} ri"'TI. ! oz Nf'w•-iT:i2 w- A-19bam• -­.1ay mf'n eac-Juipvt>ly EYEWEAR •TRF.S CHIC (eyf'wear) 520 West­hl'imer- 526-0878 FLOWERS •BLOOMERS- -:l61H S. Shepherd-524- 2937 •FRIDAY'S Flor-i1t-133ii west­heimer- 1524-6518 Flowers in Montrose, or across the country. Call Friday's Florist. FOR SALE GOT SOMETHING to 8t'IJ": 8'-11 it in the Vou·t· wheN' .YO 'II now reuch 14.((1() of your neighhon GAY BARS AJl-l<-lnn T11vf'rn li~:d mo !JOO. plM'9d1nU.11d.1""1,·,ry•til101rreq1wt • B-AiJY-L0N--:-3c)f) we.tbeimeT-1526- 6001 MAY 15, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 9 •GALLEON-2303 Richmond-522· 7616 Gay _men predominantly; movie. Mon. f'Verung; buffet Thun. ev@ning. •GRANT STREET STATION=9il Fairview-528-8342 •THE-H0i:E-"109=T'u°a-m-5"'2"11"·"9'006=~- ~rn:~i:~:~. wr;t; :~:~~~~:: spaghetti night Thura. •JUST MARION & 1.YN~ Fairview--62S-9110 Gay women predominontJ;. ·KINDREDSPiR"JTs-5245 -R-Uif&f; Speedwav-66.'>-97!i6 Gay woflen prt"dominantJy. •LAMPo--:--~ - 2417"°Tinlee. Bivd.~ ~~;women predominantly • >.MAR·v-;-S--1()22- w~1theimer.:: 528-8851 Shop Mary's after-hours 7 n ights See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gav men pl"@dominantly; la):M'd mua1c by Laiey Fought&: after· hours nightly; beer bu11t Sun. aftnnoon: .. Lawrtnot of Ara· bia"' movie l0:.30pm Tu4!9.; venereal di•· ea&e testa 9pm-lam May 2'2; Gay J>ride ~~~~ 1~~~m~Hdo~~:!!~M~::'c~~le C1Fui~ ·>:MIDNITESUN-534 w--e;-the;;;= f~~~!nation 1how1 Sun. & Wed. evemnga. ;·MONTROSE MiNING C0.-805 Pacific-529-74M8 Gay men predominantly; bttr bust Sun. afternoon -OUR PLACE-1419 H..ichmond-62A· 8903 Jwitine Band Fri Sat. & Thurs. f'Vf'­mnn: pool tourney WOO Pvf'ning. •PARADE . .:...J.f 16 ftichmond-6;ro.J6.1H After-hours always, at the Par ade. See our ad elsewhf're this iMRue. Diaoo with OU. Jam~. Frank Cnllina & ~~ifi~t~~~~(::~"~ig~w::kbe~~i~~~ Sun. even mg; clOMd Mon.·TuN.; Thelma Hou!lton oonctrt Thura. evenintc; Pabo ~~v~a:h;:~~·~~~h~;.1111 concert May •PfNK EU:PHA-NT J2i8 -1:..e...1and- 65~40 A Montrose Alternative-The Pink Elephant See our ad elsewhere th11 issue. '"Playeirl Folliea·· Sat. gay men p~ominantJy ;f{ANCH-6620...; M8i'1-528-R7:1) ~~:\.1Tuu~~;~:~ro: ;~~!:;~:al all daY Wed. &. Thum. •RbcKY-S~l6 W nan;;-f>28-H922 Gay women exclu11ively. •SADDi:ECLUB-=9tlW-o;ew-6~ 9261 Live country band Fri., Sat. & Sun. eve. ninp; color nigh' Sun. evenin1; dance ~~:U"ii~~~:vb:;~~1e~:~ne:;~~ cheet mght Thura. evening. •SolITH 4Q:"-11o:if ATmeda-Oenoa- 941·9796 On your way back from the Beach-the South 40 See our ad eh:1ewhere this is1rne. Hot dogs and bttl' •perial Sun ·TWINS-635 Weath ... 1mn-62"2.{i06.'I ~·~. ~~~::te::~a~~~i ~tu~~nh • >. VENn:-RE:N-2ti23 Main-1522- 0000 Yea Party, at the Venture-N. See our ad elsewhere this issue. Live-play DJ_ Jon David m1ehtlr,. Gay men p~ommantJy; "Un-Party · Sun afternoon & evening. Montroae Sport.a Auocialion night Mon, bartender-a night Tue. •WILDWOOD Saloon-tW-4 We.t­heime r -528-9040 Happy hour all day, all night Monday at the Wildwood Saloon. See our ad elsewhere this issue. beer bu.et & hot dot• Sat. & Sun after· noonl; happy hour all day & nifihtMon ~-;~~!:kyp~vie:~ er:~~l~\p~ i: .. ~~~ d~~~ C~~rre 9Cjlm Thur..~ home Sun· Crossword Here is the fifth in our series of the exclusive Montrose Crossword. Some clues and answers deal with Montrose people and places. The oth­ers are standard crossword clues and answers. If you're not famil· 1ar with the gay life­style. you will have trouble filling out some of the anRwers. But don't worry. You can cheat. The solu· lion appear!=! else­where in this issue. DOWN Poems Body condition at the 2306 Unsettling Mediterranean Strange smell of grass and poppers A gay one of these might join Gay Nurses and Physicians of Houston Atlanta entrepreneur Turner SpaniRh exclamation 9 Arab chieftain I"' A hard liquor (pl.) 11 Candidate Soliz, endorsed by G PC in Jaat race again~t Councilman Goyen 17 Well. how--! 19 Charged atom 22 Put the graSB out of sight when mom visits 24 Australian animal 25 Do wrong 26 Places '27 Author Turgenev 28 Barnyard bird 30 That trick you had 188t night was even more --than the one last week 31 Barnyard sound 82 ColJege athletic all love dearly group (abbr.) 35 Metric volume 20 Bear {Lat.) (abbr.I 21 G.-..k letter 38 School 23 Squeezed out organization 26 Means of (abbr.) livelihood 39 Ch. 11 sports 29 Beaver state announcer 33 Latin poet Patrick 34 Actor Sharif, 41 Stare, ae at starring in this Mining Co. week's movie at bartender Mary's, 10:30pm, 43 Allow Tuee. 45 Seeps from 36 --cup 47 What CriACO does 37 Beer container betwetn }'OUT 38 Opinion register finger.1 · that made 4~ Pretiident 1abbr,) V.'hitmire early 49 Am not (al> mayoral front 51 Aa well runner 53 Good lLaL) 39 Actor Andrew' 54 Eye infection 40 Gold form GS HPD answer (pJ) 42 Last frontier when told by 44 Scot Ray Hill they 46 :\oun suffix tohould hire gay 47 Iridescent gem cops 5C Activiiy at the 57 Chinet< Steam Table philosophy 52 Pounds (abbr.) 58 Insecticide.- M Chinese and Japanese ACROSS 58 Proper exercise 1 responsibility and a good -- 5 Aware of '2 wds.) will give you that 9 Inner eelf Jim's Gym look 12 Galveeton sand 59 Buddhism type hill 60 Tree kind (pl.) 11 Comb.. 61 Refuse 14 Thouaanu. '=? Superlative 15 Authoress Feru.:. suffix 16 Instructing, 63 Mediocre (comp. forcibly wd.) 18 Perceive 64 Christmas 19 Tai agenC'y we decoration RETURN WITH US TO ... PAGE 10 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15, 1981 RodEzzio Keeping Up by WilliamHamilton 19.'ll San Fran. f'hrcJnit: ~ f'.U.11rw And what happens when we come back down out of the metaphors? The Voice, the ONLY publication in the world JUST for Montrose GAY BATHS •ARENA-2700 Albany-620-1522 The Arena: a Man's Experience. See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gay. men excl~s1vely, membf'rthip required; open l''n. & Sat night.a only. -er.us HousT~-220s Fanni~ 659-4998 Gay men exclusivf'ly, membt'n1hip required, open 24 houn. • llir.YI'OWNF. SPA-31-00 Fannin- 5:l'l 2379 Gay men exclusively, OPf'n 24 houni. • 2306 cLifB-~f300Gene1111Ce-=:52s­a2as Texas' first. The 2306. See our ad elsewhere this issue. Gay men exclusively, mt>mbership required, open nightly, HAIR CARE • LIONEL Hair I>esiirn-S220Yoakum­li26- 4494 •SALONDANJEl-1644 Weelh('lmPr- 52tJ.9:fl7 HELP WANTED HOMES & APARTMENTS FOR RENT & FOR SAL~: LANDLORDS. Got an apartment ~~~; ~or:t ti~~?<t..\d~!!UfJ !~i;;a.i;,~ ttach our 14,()(X) readen-the prl'f('fred ttadl!"T for Mont..roae apartment rentmtc. Our rt111earch aaya that our reade111 llre mo~ stable, have better job.. Call 6~ 8490 aflftnoon• to place your apartm«-nl listings. HEIGHTS Whitt> Oak. Upper duPfex 2' 1 Cent. A&H. new C8rpt'1. $295. /Wl. 1869. HOME FURNISHINGS • BY MA!"li 'S In terion ( h ome furn i• hingii)-608 West heimer- 629-8002 Byman's fine furnishings, custom interiors. See our ad elsewhere this iuuf. KEY SHOPS R~ED'S Key Shops-1612 WeHt­~~ 3~~2.f 1620 Commonwealth- Reed's Key Shops in Montrose, 2 locations. LODGING •HOUSTON Gl:EST HO!:SE-106 Avondale-520-9767 Houston Guest House: "Where the world meets Houston." MAIL BOXES • KWIK-KALL Mail 8011:u 1317 Montrose---522-1"'% MOBILE DISCO Houston's Music Man (mobile disco) 880-1481 Th«! nn«!•l in mobile party produe­tion •• Arran1emen ta for any •iu event. Al•o available-proft"•­• l~nally mixed dill<'O caHrttf'•. 90 minute. 110, Thebe-•lSJartyln to•n.. MOVING & HAULING SERVICES Movin~, hauling, deliveries 520-7744 MUSIC • DOWNBEAT Records-2117 Rich· mond-523-B:J48 • Rf:coRilRACK-3109 &- Shepherd- 524-.1602 MONTROSE ORGANIZATIONS A1'1:""t:s-111s mu;ANIZATI·>SS Tiw"' ,.aio .. .J~;i:s:....,~ . ...... ACLU-: 236 w Gray-Fi24-69:l.5 cTherAO-Vo('ATBEXPERfE:-;C1-:- 665-2560 Seminar June 20-21 AMERICAN-LEATHEID.fE:r-.;- 1IMK"lal rlub)-<' o Different Drum .n4 WNthf'imf'T-'l28-8508 Club night Wed fil(Rf NG MemoriaT Meth;;di.st Church- 1 HO Hawthome-626-1017 ~~~!nt~~i~~-~i~~f:h~mF~'.:y ft:i~t:i Mt>th~~IKl wonh1p tervice: 1 lam Sun. i~~~:~~~~8 ~Gay~u~~n:fthfM~~ lrruw CounKehng Center 1peaker Hi..A('K&-wHfTF.MENTOl(t.th-;r-:- r~ 5006, 774 3691 IMontro..eJ CHURCH OF CHRJST- 520·K Westhe1mer- 774·236X CHl:Rft.f OF CITTiJSTIAN-FAJTH- 413 Wf'tltheimer-629-8005 Gay Young A~ultl meetin$1' Fn. enninK; wonih11\i, •rv1<"ee Sun. morning Ir: eve-- T~!.& e~:i~~~~"ct,~;b'~:~~._.·~~J t>venmg. riT~~~f~an~ni\l~~~~JJjUALl- Board meeting June 9. ('01.T 4$'S ~al cJubH o lirazoa Rivt'1' &ttom, 2400 Brazo. -528-9192 Skate nia-ht June 9 OONcl Hf:Ttt cmAMi°;ay -iew--. ml"f'ta at MCCR, 1919 D«atur 7"}. 4M761 6:.!4....")180 St•rv1ce & aorial flpm May 22. 1)ATA PROFESS"iONA-1..S:.mtti. al La ~?!~~~!'i2'~7~ Inn. 401.~ Southwest Metting June q DEfHJTAN'f1-:S -1';0R ~HUM-A.~ RIGHTS 'lk>butnntre Hall" at the Copa June 26. JHGNITY -62J1.'iG44 ~' ting Thu.rs. f'!Vf'ning, Catholic Stu· dmt<enter. ~PISCOl'AI. ISft:GRIT'Y meets at Autrey Howie. 626b ~llln4ID-8298 MedinK 7:JOpm June 9. FAMILY &: fo'Hl1':~ns or Gay1- mttta ~!1u~~ u1;~ ~l>ttawr }IJ RST lJ N iTARIAN Church· 6210 Fennin--'52&1571 I..amhda meetinR f'ri . eveninR; wonhip aerv1ce Sun morning; Unitarian / llniverHlu1t Gay Caucua mttt Su.n aftt"moon; "Gertrude SU>in: \\'hen Thi. You SN•, Remembt-r Me" movif' 7pm M(1n GAY ARt'HIVF.SofTuaa-c olntqn· ly' Hou•ton. :i405 Mulberry-629-"OU GAY ATJH:Jihl~:AGUE .. American Atheil't Hour" 6;30-7:30pm June 25on KPFT. FM.00,d«-vot~ to gay athNalil. GAY lllSPANll'CAUCl's Gay Pnde Wttk, 'We The Pr<1ple," Hmt Iliff" J)11;y Junl' 26. GAY .JO(;(;ERS AllBOCiation-623-8788 GAY Ntffi.'iES &. PHYSldA~S or ¥n~::t;~ ~o GPC, 4fi00 Main •217- GAY-PARJo:NTs~: fH49, 6lfJ.702fJ f.A v ro1.rrffA1. cAucuS: •Boo Miun W.ll7-6~HOOO 'Lt•Jl'el Srrvin .. " ed.ucauon forum 7:JOpm Wed , Kl'neral bumne .. m~ting 7:30pm .Junt• :l; Gay Pnd'" WHk, •·we1,,e r:tl'i'~;~ri~u~(!~~~~~.'52i0..-~~~fn~:; l'ride WN>k, ··we Thi' Peopl'"· · rally .June 28. GAY l'Hlllf: wn:K PUHl.ICITY CommitU't'---627-0890 GAY J>R11>1'; WEEK GlilDl-~mm1t­ie.- 6~HH'~ dAY JIRllH~ -WEEK 11AHAL>I=: Commilttt-1647 Park-621-0295 Gay Pride Week, "We The Pw.-oplto." parade lj 10pm June 28. ''I CES ng, -17 Rich lfpherd-tNS ~~:: brn-llrazoo 9192 at La thwnt ir Z'h> at -11210 orship rian t Sun Thi> 7pm n~n- 7014 o30pm lo gay ·s or 217- orum 'e"T'"h"~ ti at .Gay Jun~ 'ITV <fl if The South 40 11034 Almeda Genaa, 941-9796 Sundays: 254 draft, 254 hot dogs Beer, Wine, Setups (BYOB) Horseshoes, pool, darts, backgammon On your way back from Galveston, stop by and see our bar. It's in the middle of the woods! Pink Elephant "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland, Houston 77002 659-0040 with your hostess, Laura Lee Love Every Saturday, 10:30pm (f' cover will go to performers) HAPPY HOURS Saturday Midnight-2am Sunday: noon-Spm Mon-Fri: 4pm-8pm open IOam Mon-Sat, naan Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE :•s MAY 15, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 11 FREE PARKING ACROSS THE STREET AT FIRE STATION HOME OF THE SUNDANCE CATTLE COMPANY MAD MONDAYS HAPPY HOUR PRICES ALLDAY AND NIGHT BEER BUST FREE WEENIES ANDFIXINS NOON·7PM SAT-SVN THURSDAY MOVIE 9:30PM CRUISIN' SNEAK PREVIEW SPM FREE BUTTERED POPCORN WELCOMING OUR NEW NEIGHBOR-THE MONTROSE PUii EX~::.~~CE m -r..~:·. 2700 w 1l ALBANY 520-1522 rn 2 Open7 nights, fram 9pm ta 6om weeknights, Q]]]nI 3 ta9am li lli ...... .. WEEKENDS 2306 OPEN m 6PM- 8AM 1 Genesse FRIDAY NIGHT rn I 3PM-8AM SATURDAY NIGHT BATHS (Fairview at Tuam) 528-6235 PAGE 12 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15. 1981 SIMMONS & SPRING AIR Designer Sofa/Love Seat Sleeper by Norwalk, 5 yr. guarantee. Double & Queen size. Reg 695• to 895•, Sale 395• to 525• HOUSE OF BEDS, INC. 2115 Norfolk 527-9352 529-3652 VISA MASnRCARD DINERS AM.IXPRESS Open 9am-8pm Quality Boots, Belts, Clogs & Accessories (l'Kro-ne/ n pl cronies: a close friend, esp. of long standing) Le Bar & Cafe Dinner from 5:30 After-Hours from 11:30 Sunday Champagne Brunch noon-5:00pm 1322 Westheimer 522-1521 Cronies new summertime menu includes COOL GARDEN FRESH SOUPS CRISP SALADS w ith all the extras, LIGHT and ® MEN'S WESTERN BOOTS SPECIAL SALE 912 Westheimer at Montrose 524-7859 FLUFFY OMELETS 708 W. Alabama 529-6584 Meet and eat with your friends at the Good Food Place Breakfast 7-11 am Lunch 11 am-Spm Dinner 5-1 Opm Montrose Stanford Monday-Saturday 7am-10pm closed Sunday s .t,} H Cc at Ct ga v·e~ ml Ch • tes MAY 15, 1981 /MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 13 su~e!~" Tu~ald C~!e~~e~at MAY MAY 15 16 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 17 18 19 20 21 Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Integrity, Houston's "Community Coffeehouse" 7:30pm-midnight at Bering Memorial Methodist Church, 1440 Hawthorne •SA TU RDA Y: Venereal disease tests 9pm-lam at Club Baths, 2205 Fannin •SUNDAY: Montrose Sports Association afternoon softball games at Levy Field •SUNDAY: Unitarian/Uni­versalist Gay Caucus afternoon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin •SUNDAY: Venereal disease tests 5-9pm at the Different Drum, 1734 Westheimer • MONDAY: Final league playoff games for Montrose Sports Association Bowling League, evening, at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Lance Lalor (City Council representative from Montrose) Appreciation Party and fund-raiser at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos • WEDNESDAY: Gay-Politi­cal Caucus's educational forum on "Legal Services" 7:30pm at 4600 Main #217 with attorney Victoria Powell • THURSDAY: Integrity/ Houston's educational forum on "Gay Needs" with speaker from Montrose Counseling Cen!Rr at Bering Church, 3405 Mulberry, 7:30pm Selected Events Later • IN I WEEK: Montrose Sports Association hosts first annual International Gay Bowling Organization Tourna­ment with registration (7pm­lam May 22) at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos; games (teams 12:30pm May 23; singles 8:30am May 24; doubles 1:30pm May 24) at Big Texan Lanes, 440 W. Little York and awards (5-!0pm May 24) at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos • IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week Planning Committee meeting 2:30pm May 24 at the Copa, 2631 Richmond • IN I WEEK: Memorial Day May 25 UN I WEEK: Mr. & Ms. Gay Pride Week Contest May 28 at Babylon, 300 Westheimer • STARTING IN 4 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week, "We The Peo­ple," June 18-28 with ... DMary's 1980 raid commemoration June 18 DCity-wide gay club night June 19 DMontrose Sport.a Association soft· ball games wiUt Houston police and fire department teams lpm, June 20, in Memorial Park field #1 O"Salute Da1laa" day June 21 O"Word ia Out" and "A Very Natu­ral Thing" gay film1 at the River Oaks Theater June 21 OEducational forums June 22 DNational Day of Rememberance June 23 OGay youth day June 25 DHeritage Day June 26 O"Oebutante Ball" at the Copa June 26 DFred Paez Memorial Day June 27 OWeetheimer parade 5:30pm June 28 DSpotts Park rally June 28 • IN 5 WEEKS: The Advocate Experience seminar June 20-21 UN 5 WEEKS: Dallas Gay Pride Week parade June 21 • IN 10 WEEKS: "GayRun '81" in San Francisco July 26 • IN 11 WEEKS: Reno Gay Rodeo July 31-Aug. 2 • IN 16 WEEKS: Texas Gay Task Force Conference VIII Sept. 4-7 Mother Ruth's "Montrose Clinic on Wheels" this week: Venereal disease testing 9pm-lam Saturday at Club Baths, 2205 Fannin Venereal disease testing 5-9pm Sunday at the Different Drum, 1732 Westheimer Compliments of the City of Houston Health Dei>artment. _ MONTROSE COUNtiELING Center- 900 l.<weu •209-529.oo:J7 Speech 7:~ Thur•. et lntttgrity1Houa­ton educational forum, mfftinK et Ber· ~~~.urch, 3405 Mulberey, on ··Gay MONTROS_E_PATROL-3329 ·Rich mond-.."i28-2'l73 MONTROSE SPORTS Jruociali0n CAMPING-fi6S.J7J.4 New Breurufel1 outing May 29-31 MONTROSE sPORTSAaaociatiOn SOFTBALL-play1 at Levy Field Softball games 1th team1 from the Galleon, Briar ' MONTROSE S~ORTS Aii-oCiation TENNIS-meet.I Ul Memonal Park Ten· ni• Center-621-0837 PractiCf' "';3()..I0pm Thun.; Cheap Sin ~~e:nc:e&~1":'c~:n .. ~~;3c~v¥0~!~ manet May ~31 MONTROSE SPORTS Auo'Ci&tio""ii: VOu.EYBALL-mf't't& in Cherryhurt1t Park-522·3487 Gamee 2pm Sun MONTROSE· BAND-meet• al Cockatoo, 3400 Travi•-627-9669 MUSTANGS (aot'ieT rTub)-clo lhP Barn. 710 Pal'ific- 52.8-9427 Color night Mon. OP~RATION DOClJMf:~i'ATION-;_ proJect of GPC, 4600 Mam •217-521 1000 ~Fred} PAEZ TAS"K FORC1-:-c10 GPC: 4600 Main "217-521·1000, 621-911".6.623- ~ Pridf' V.'.eek, *We the Peo le," f')>ed Pan Memonal Day June 27; ~red Paet ~eKP1W. ~~1=~mb5u~~r111 ORALMAJORITY I022We11the:imer- 527·9669 SUNDANCE CATTLE COMPANY (fJOcial club)-c/o Wildwood Saloon, 1504 Wtsthe:imer-528-9040 Club nia:ht Wed TEX.AS BAY AREA Gaya-332.3737 Meetina: Thun. e:ve:nina: TEXAS GAY TASK FORCE-521h'l636 Conference VIII Sept.. .f.. 7. TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Founda­tion- 626-9139 ~~e~Rtf~n~ club-c10 Color Jli&"ht Mon. M!~~~~~Utfn~~~~~~~.~~~ Fannin-524·7524 Meetina: Sun. afternoon WESTHEIMER COLONY ARfa Auociation-908 We11theime:r--621-0133 PERSONALS To advertiM in th11 Met.ion, phone in your ad to 529-8490 daily, 1-Spm. Editor f'MttVM right to edit word1ns on .•II advertiaina:. Rate 25C per word u~mlJ .tan de.rd typf11tyle or $8 percolumn·mch uama: bold tYJ>Mtyle. Gary Larson PAGE 14 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15, 1981 TEXAS JUNK COMPANY TAFT & WELCH HOUSTON 524-6257 e'!-ting away with a group, a l"riend or just by yourself. Let us help. Be••lfle fCit,a~el Serving the travel needs of Montrose. ... Tour Travel Experts 522-1922 3205 Montrose Houston GIFfS, FINE FURNISHINGS, ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ~ 12?)-,-' "60 4-608 WESTHEIMER, HOUSTON, TEXAS 77006 10-6 MONDAY-SATURDAY FREE PARKING 529-8002 "NEON-LIT, FREON AIR-ZONED HIGH, METALIC FIGURATIONS MYSTICALLY TRANSFORMED INTO VARI-HUED WOODEN RAILS AND BARS MEANT NOT TO IMPRISON OUR IMAGINATIONS' BOUNDARIES, BUT RATHER TO GIVE SCOPE AND DELINEATED LAUNCHING SPACE TO OUR UNITED FANTASIES FOR EXPLORATION INTO BROTHERHOOD'S SUBCONSCIOUS AND THE SPECIAL EXPANSION OF THE TRUE LIFE FORCE, BROTHERHOOD ... " OBERON'S GRAFFITO VENTURE-N 2923MAIN GROOVIN' • CRUSIN' • BOOZIN INN 93.13 •Mo •22 le De M oub Wallflowers AIR­CONt'ITIONEl' 0ANK~ KEEP ~ ~ C 1981 Suburban Features Answer to Pun!• ONUI ONTO fOO DUNf DUEL MIL 0 R 0 f R I N 0 a f t: I R I U R S A R H 0 f K IE 0 l I V I N o- 0 R f 0 0 N OVID OMAR MIC CAN l'Oll DANA I N 0 0 T I - A l A I K A 0 A f L f N T OPAL fAT LIS ORlfNTAl DIET ZEN OAKI OfNY EST 1010 HWMT, HI.ACK & WHITE Men Togf>lher, A aociaJ 11roup for ''cl'rt.ain" mt'n. For information C'all Stt've. 529- 500fi, or Carl, 714-.3591 ffiH wJ1iTf: males -onfY; M8.118a1:te. rulxfown, l'lC'. in your home by white malt" health attendant. 493-4R50. Previoua dit'nt.8 SIO. Future ~ients $10 Wf'C'kdaya, $20 evening, $:l0 weekend1 WANTEli:-People w~tumee to be in your Gay Pride Parade. Must have ~~':te: ~~~~ 0~:1!~J oo1~chwth~e ~:!:, have touched us. Call Hou11ton <'ommunity Clowns, Wayne, ""62-8314 HOT MWrROSE MAN. 30. Gk ac'live, ~!i~~ilC~~r':d1~~i~te :tii:~.~n':~i~~ phone: 3317 Monttoef' #126, Houston, TX 77006. PLANTS MONTROSE Pl.ANT CO., commercial. rtaidt'ntial. ~ltttiun and iruita1lation of :!:ilaCJ!.ns~1.~~'.ntt'nance servicn PLUMBING MONTROHE PLUMBING COMPANY, 1ay owned and opt'r~ted, work dependable, pnce1 competitive. Day or night call 620-1997. PRINTING •KWIKKOPY Printing· -3.117 Mon· tro ·522-1896 PUBLICATIONS INNER VIEW ·520 Weetheimer-522· 9:133 •Monll'09e Voice-3620 Montro8e •227-629-8490 The "Montrose Voice," the newspaper of Montrose-the leadinl' publication in your neiirhborhood. Deadline '"for next iHue: Tues., May 19, 7:00 pm. Call 629- 8490 for advertising or subscription&. Next issue to be released Fri. afternoon, May22. T\\<f- 32i1Smith 11!0~9-11_1 _ RESTAURANTS MAY 15, 1981 I MONTROSE VOICE I PAGE 15 •{'HAPUI.TAPF.C Mexican Reetau­rant- 813 Richmond-522·2:l65 •CRONIES-1322 Weltheimer- 522-1521 Cronies has new Summer Menu! See our ad elsewhere this issue. After-hours Fri. & Sat. evenings; champagne brunch Sun. afternoons. •HOUSE OF PIES-3112 Kirby-528- 3816 •STEAMTABLE-708 W. Alabama- 528-8245 Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner, at the Steam table. See our ad elsewhere this issue. •STEAK·N1 EGG---4z:ii Mont~28- 8I35 ROOMMATES Roommate Connections Share expenses, build a We proviJ!i~~~S.!!W;ral• with ~;~~:P'!.ia~! • info~~!~~n.8 f::or~!~ 11onal Screening. 526-8002. SCHOOLS •BLUF. WATER DivinK School­Weetheimer at Montr~· !l2b-OG:W SHOPS •ALL THAT Gl.ITIERS ll?ifil'>-H2.."> Montl't.lfle----522-6976 •FACETS -,gift.1-)-14i2 \\'etithe;m~r= !l23-1412 •TEXAS JUNf{ C6.-T9ft al Wekh-624-62157 Come Shop With Us-Texas Junk Comnanv. See our ad elseWhere tllis issue. •TREYMAN(gift.8)· -407 Weffih~r= 523-02'l8 TALENT AGENCIES GARY CHASON & AMociatN-2620 Fountai.nview #222-789-4CXl3 LONE STAR SyndiCa\;-(i&fent agency}-527 Westheimer-528-65.'>6 Lone Star Syndicate Texu co-op talent referral & directory tours, promo concepts, career direction. full phaEie production, roncerta, theme Prnrtf:;:p:::;::i~~~j:;:;i;;~~ ::~~ Call Tina, 628-M56, 10 to 6 ~~~1!:,r;,:~~~~hr;:!1~~~::,14 ~d' campaign&, by appomtment only TAXI UNITED Cab-769-1411 United Cab, in Montrose and throughout Houston, 24 hours. 759-1441. TRAVEL AGENCY PRESTIGF. Travel-3206 Mon­troae- 622-1922 Prestige Travel Agency in Montrose. See our aa elsewhere this issue. TYPESETTING & GRAPHICS ~~oNJ:n~~~~~~~~~K-Fast, accurate, computerized typesetting-and Small andJ?a~!~!!~~blicationa, =:!~:ff:~ i~r:,ti;;,1~~1:3,r':!~.:.~ projecta. Let us 1ive you a bid. YARD & GARAGE SALES Montrose Art Art This Week in Montrose (Saturday, May 16, through Friday, May 22) Art League ofHoueton-1953 Montroee-623-9530 All Media Open Show noon-4pm Saturday, 10am·4pm Monday through Friday. Boulevard Gallery-1526 Heighte Blvd.-869-8733 Helen Orman collages, Elizabeth Hedley paintings, Tina Escudero weavings and Gary Huntoon pottery 10am-5pm Saturday, llam-5pm Sunday and lOam· 5pm Tuesday through Friday. Contemporary Art1 Mu­seum- 5216 Montrose Blvd.- 626-3129 The Americans: The Landscape photography exhibition in the Upstairs Gallery; Syl.v1a Mangold: Nocturnal Paintings in the Downstairs Gallery, 10am-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and !Oam-5pm Tuesday through Friday. Harris Gallery-1100 Bis­eonnet- 522-9116 Larry Samuels paintings and prints 10am-6pm Saturday, !-6pm Sunday, and !Oam-6pm Tuesday through Friday. Hooke-Epstein Gallery- 1200 Bieeonnet-522-0718 Polychrome wood sculpture and watercolors by Jacquehne Fogel daily ell:cept Sunday and Monday. James-Atkinson Gallery- 2015 W. Gray-527-8061 French and American lmpres· sionists 10:30am-4pm daily except Sunday and Monday. L'Atelier-1513 W. Ala­bama- 522-7988 Works by Dan Allison, Gary Huntoon and Marie Letermie llam-6pm Saturday, Sunday, Thursday and Friday. Mancini Gallery of Photo­graphy- The Plaza, 6020 Montrose-522-2949 Joan Myers photographs 10am-5pm Saturday. Museum of Fine Arts-1001 Bissonnet-626-1361 Herbert Ferber: Sculpture, Painting Drawing 1945-1980: Upper Bro~n Gallery;New Accessions in Photography: Lower Brown Corridor; Early Chinese Art Selections from the Asia House Rockefeller Collection: Lovett Oriental Gallery; Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Selections from the Beck Collection: Jones and Masterson Galleries; !Oam-5pm Saturday, noon-6pm Sunday, and !Oam-5pm Tue.day through Friday. SamanthaReads Your Stars If you were born thi1 week: You are one or those people who can easily do two things at once. In fact, you usually have a number of current irons in your fire. You have an excellent mind and your moods and interests are. like quicksilver. You have the gift of gab and can be very persuasive. ARIES (3·21/ ... 19): Use this week to get back to basics. Aries. Establish prime direc­tions with careful planning to make the most of all your assets. Think before you speak so you won't have to retract your words later. The clink of coins ends week TAURUS (4-20/5-20): As usual. Taurus. you know where you want to go. This week. though. you may not be sure of exactly how you're going to get lhere. Several avenues are open to you Be sure you don't shut one off prematurely. babe GEMINI (5-21/~20): You can put yourself in a leadership po5'11on this week, Gem, if you don·t vacillate. Choose your goal and pick your perspective and stick with ·em. Be consist­ent! MOONCHILD (1·21/7·22): When in doubt, Moonbeam. go with the flow There's nothing wrong 1n following someone else's lead and that w1U give .your own thoughts time to gel, too. Before days are through, you let 11 au hang out .. Goody' LEO (7-2311·22): Act1v1hes with fnends and groups are really hopping this week. Leo. The old adage about two heads being better than one is proved once again. as exchanges of information play a key role WM closes with a pause VIRGO (1-23/9-22): A fresh approach to an old chore can add zest. Expenment. Virgo. and !ind an unexpected bonus, look for a meeting that may seem to muddy the wat8fs instead of cleanng them Don't worry; lhey"ll settle out! Trend LIBRA (9-23/1~23): An influx of your new ideas contributes to a general feeling of restless­ness New and different options abound. Libby. Con­sider them all this week SCORPIO (1~2•111-22): Give cohorts your game plan and allow them to run with the ball in th&ir own ways. It's not nec­essary to supervise every l1t0e detail. Scorp Your days include a bit of fhrtallon and a proposal made on the Q.T SAGITTARIUS 11-23/12-21): Lots of talk this week, SaJ, not to ment•on a fair amount of action. too. Keep an commun~ cations lines open. Domestic matters may profit from a fami· ly forum. Cupid V1S1ts and latter days bnng a spot of work CAPRICORN (12-2211-19): A llexible schedule is a must this week. Cappy. to take advan. tage ol spur-of-the-moment opportunities. Be prepared for one with l•llle patience to try to prod you into speedy action. Kisses complete your week. AQUARIUS (1-20/2-19): Man­age routine affairs this week. Aquan Tend to budget. bills. correspondence and errands And don't worry about bore­dom aettmg 1n; Cuptd provided lots of stimulation' Creative capers end news are big pluSM PISCES (2-20/3-20): A lack of orgamzalton can be a real ene­my 10< the next several weeks. Pisces. You need to have eve­rythmg at your fmgert1ps because you'll be so busy you 1ust won"t have time to search Get your act together. babe1 •cl 1~ t SYbul"ban FtNlllures Priorities will change "Trend" is column that each issue gives you a final thought to ponder. This column is a joint effort by the staff of the VOICE. Today's gay world offun and thrills will, to a great degree, give way in a few years­perhaps five years-to a more serious gay world of "truth-seeking." The World War II baby boom homosex­ual population that created the gay ghettos of major American cities will see such unheard of popular things as gay science groups and gay ancient history organiza­tions in a few years. Gay people-more than other people­will organize to seek the truth about the universe and human existence. Why gay people more than others? Are we more inclined to intelligence than oth­ers? No. It's just that we're now becoming settled in life. We understand ourselves bet­ter. There's less frustration in our daily liv­ing. We're more aware of the difference between "love" and "sex" than straight society. Therefore we're more at peace with ourselves. And thus, we've the time to pursue higher goals-goals of the mind. PAGE 16 I MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 15, 1981 REMEMBER WHEN YOUR NEXT SLEAZE ATTACK HAPPENS I 0 2 2 · Westheimer As Always-Sunday Beer Bust Tuesday Movie- "Lawrence of Arabia," IOpm Next Friday, May 22- ''Mother Ruth and Her Band" 9pm-1am
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