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Houston Voice, No. 1147, October 18, 2002
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Houston Voice, No. 1147, October 18, 2002 - File 001. 2002-10-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6149/show/6120.

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(2002-10-18). Houston Voice, No. 1147, October 18, 2002 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6149/show/6120

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1147, October 18, 2002 - File 001, 2002-10-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/6149/show/6120.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1147, October 18, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date October 18, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Best of GayUouston Readers of the Houston Voice make their picks for the best and the brightest in this city. Pages 15-17 ISSUE 1147 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM All THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. OCTOBER 18, 2002 INSIDE A number of state political races, including gay-friendly former Dallas Mayor Ron Kirk's bid for a Senate seat. are lined up on the Nov. 5 ballot. Page 2 During a night of fund-raising, community leader Janine Brunjes accepted the Houston Black Tie Dinner Humanitarian Award. Page 5 Millicent Martin and Leslie Denniston bring their own skilled takes to the main char­acters in the stage version of 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?'. Page 19 State shifts HIV funds Health officials alarmed as prevention programs serving gay men receive less state aid By PENNY WEAVER Houston health care officials who work with gay men at high risk for HIV warn that newly reallocated state funds severely cut resources for AIDS testing for that population. Gay leaders are alarmed at the possible effects of the changes by the Texas Department of Health. "As an HIV positive gay man, I refuse to sit idly by while my own community 1s forced out of the fundmg stream and plunged deeper tnto the throes of thlS epi· demic," said Eric Roland, drrector of edu callon at Montrose Clm1c and a member of the East Texas HIV Prevention Community Planning Group. The TOH has changed the competitive process for federal funding for HIV preven tion programs this year to help ensure that the most effective programs get the mone~: according to state officials. Casey Blass, HIV· STD health resources division director for the state health department, said changes were made to reflect the shift in at-risk populations and where they are more likely to be found. Blass said the changing landscape of peo­ple at risk for HIV infection has shifted in recent years as studies show that Afrtcan­American men and women are at a dispro­portionately greater risk for the disease. Also, he said. at·risk populations are more concen­trated in urban areas and are youngei: "In almost every area of the state, African-Americans have much higher rates of infection regardless of therr risk factor, whether it's by sex, iajection, drug use, whether it's heterosexual sex or ma: · to-male i;ex, th ir rates are higher across the board," Blass told the Associated Press He said the state 1s attempting to get the most for its federal dollars by funding intervention programs that sen ice the Please see HIV FUNDS, on Page 6 F~ndinq for HIV/AIDS p event on programs t at t2 get gay men. particular those ~o are not African American has been severely cut by Cllanges m tne states a ocat1on of resources, health offic als said this week. Graph c by Bonnie ~augle) Congressional GOP record gets worse, gay Dems charge Log Cabin disputes Stonewall Democrat report comparing gay voting records of past decade By LOU CHIBBARO JR. Republican members of Congress are less likely to vote in support of gay issues than they were nine years ago, while Democrats in Congress have dramatically increased their support on gay rights issues during the same period, according to a report released Oct. 6 by the National Stonewall Democrats. • NSD, a gay group that works within the Democratic Party, called the report "groundbreaking," arguing that the analy­sis of Congressional voting records on gay issues proves "one party changed for the better while the other, in many cases, changed for the worse." A spokesperson for Log Cabin Republicans. a national gay GOP group, called the report an election-year plo): "I don't know how they crunched the numbers or cooked the books, but this just isn't so," said Mark Mead, LCR spokesperson. "Reasonable people - gay and straight - know the Republican Party is not worse than it was 10 years ago on our issues." NSD officials insist that the findlllgS and data in their report speak for them­selves. They have urged both gay Democrats and skeptical Republicans to read the 40-page document, which i.~ avail· able through NSD's Web site. The report bases its findmgs on a Congressional voting record "score card" on gay issues compiled every two years by the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay political group. .NSD notes that HRC 1s a non-partisan group that endorses both Democrats and Republicans while informing its members how all members of Congress vote on gay and AIDS-related issues. HRC issues scores to senators and represelltatives on a scale of zero to 100, wi zero denoting a failure to vote in support of a gay issue in all of the issues deemed important by HRC. A 100-percent rating, under the HRC system, repre­sents support for all of the gay or AIDS­related i sues. In some instance. , HRC bases its ratings Please see GIJ> RECORD. on Page 7 2 OCTOBER 18. 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I local news l<irk, Cornyn agree on some gay issues Widely viewed as gay-friendly, former Dallas mayor does see eye-to-eye with conservative opponent on some topics By PENNY WEAVER Among key statewide races for gay Texans on the Nov. 5 ballot is the battle for t.; S Senate between Democrat Ron Kirk and Republican John Cornyn. Staunch Republican conservative Sen. Phil Gramm did not seek re-elec­tion this year to hts Texas seat, and the initial field of candidates to replace him was crowded. More than a dozen people threw their hats in the ring in hopes of a chance to replace the anti· gay Gramm. When the primary dust settled, former Dallas mayor Kirk emerged among Democrats to make the election ballot for Gramm's post. He had announced his can· didacy last fall and resigned from his may. oral post to begin his campaign. Former Dallas Mayor Ron Kirlc (right), a Democrat known for his gay-friendly politics. opposes Republican John Cornyn (left), Texas Attorney General. in the race to replace Texas' retiring U.S Sen. Phil Gramm. Voters will pick the next senator at the Nov 5 polls. Texas Attorney General Cornyn, a former State Supreme Court justice, won the GOP nomination to vie for the U.S. Senate seat. rutow Mougfoniang that you gupport thair Voit!o. Adverti~o in tho Kirk is considered more sympathetic to gay voters. He has made several campaign stops in Houston to speak to a number of gay and gay-friendly supporters, including Annise Parker, the only openly gay Houston City Council member; Janine Brunjes, Mayor Lee Brown's liaison to gay Houstonians; and gay political consultant Grant Martin. In Dallas, Ktrk ts known for his gay friendly attitude. He was first elected mayor of that city in 1995, the first African American to win that post. Klrk, 47, who was born and raised in Austin, is an attor­ney and former legislative aide to Sen. Lloyd Bentsen. Kirk supports domestic partner bene· fits but has hedged on his support for civil unions. He told the Houston Voice this spring that he would want to study that issue more carefully. He supports federal hate crimes legis­lation to include sexual orientation and the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would outlaw bias in the workplace against individuals for factors including sexual orientation. "I want to be a senator for everyone; I want the support of everyone, and that includes the gay community," Kirk said. "I would really be honored to have as much support from the gay and lesbian commu· nity in Houston as I have had from that community in Dallas. "I have friends from the gay and les· bian community and what they most respect about me ls ihat I'm someone who first of all tries to respect the [views] of everybody," Kirk added. "I understand from a firsthand life"s experience perspec· tive what discrimination is all about. What drives me more than anything is a perspective that I have an absolutely unyielding commitment for fairness and nondiscrimination.·· Kirk has been endorsed by groups Including the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus and the Human Rights Campaign, the nation's largest gay and Jes· bian political organization. Cornyn, who took office as attorney general for the state in January 1999, previously served six years as a District Court Judge in San Antonio. He was elected to the Texas Supreme Court in 1990, re-elected to that post in 1996, but resigned the next year to run for attor· ney general. A Houston nalive, Cornyn has a polit1· cal record that includes little that might reflect his potential to represent gay Texans. One anti·gay move by the cand1· date came in late 1999 when. as state attor ney general, he ruled that county clerks are not required to accept registrations of same-sex domestic partnerships. Cornyn said state law does not require or permit county clerks to accept DP registries. The case on which he ruled came before Cornyn after a gay San Antonio resident sought to legally register his relationship through the Bexar County clerk. Endorsements for Cornyn include a nod from the Young Conservatives of Texas. a non·partisan conservative youth organization. But Cornyn's views on several gay-spe­cific issues land opposite Kirk's generally gay.friendly stances. The candidates have discussed their differences including federal hate crime legislation and ENDA. While Kirk supports both, Cornyn opposes both, the Dallas Morning News reported. Cornyn has said he supports the state's sodomy law, the so-called "homosexual conduct" law. while Kirk has given no opinion, the newspaper reported. As a Texas Supreme Court justice. Cornyn voted to throw out lower-court decisions that declared the law unconstitutional, according to the Morning News. The candidates do agree that more funding is needed for HIV prevention and treatment programs. Asked by the newspaper about his approach to gay rights issues, Cornyn said in a written statement: "Every human being should be treated with dignity and respect. I oppose discrimination and believe the way to make progress in this area is by changing the hearts and minds of individuals." But Kirk and Cornyn both agree with the current "don't ask, don't tell" policy relating to gays serving in the military. the Morning News reported. The candidates have not made clear all their views on other subjects, including whether or not gay men and lesbians should be allowed to adopt children. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com OCTOBER 18, 2002 3 Plan Your Future With VIRACEPT . Because it's strong and effective. Keep your viral load down w1tn the *1 prescribed hlV med cation of its kind: VIRACEPT works with you to keep your life on track Because it's easy to live with. VIRACEPT's easy dosing schedule and manageable side effects have been helping all kinds of people continue to ead their lives on theif own terms. Because it saves future options. When choosing a treatment plan, it's important to consider what options you will have in the future. Studies show taking VIRACEPT early on leaves you with choices in treatment for later. Ask your dodor about your future with VIRACEPT. VIRACEPT0 nelfinavir mesylate ........ ... 4 • • •• ··- ... •• VIRACEPT is indicated in combindtion with other ant1retrov1ral agents for the treatment of HIV infection. The most common s:de effect of VIRACEPT is diarrhea, which can usually be controlled with over-the-counter treatments. Some prescription and non-prescription drugs and supplements should not be taken with VIRACEPT, so talk to your docto• first For some people, protease inhibitors have been associated with the onset or worsening of diabetes melhtus and hyperglycemia, changes in body fat, and increased bleeding •n hemoph1hacs. HIV drugs do not cure HIV infection or prevent you from spreading the virus. RE>fer to the important nformallon on the next page. For rnore 1nformat1on, call toll free l-888-VIRACEPT or visit www viracept.co'll. 4 OCTOBER 18. 2002 I ~ VIRACEPT• (nelflnavlr mesylate) ~ ond Or.II f'Vwdel lnfonna1ion for Pa1ients - VllACE'l" ('lkl-apQ. lr.b ..!_ i,e,:_~ 5 f ••, Ynl OUV} lalldDll Ploa!e read hS normatm ca-ell.Cly bel!Jll ~ l'1RACS'T please 'ead hS 1eanet eadl lime,.....-lhe ~ JJSt 1ncase ll!YIW1!1 char9"i Tlis IS a summary In! nol 1 ~ b I caefLj ;llsammwtl!l yos-ltiulnl 'fOl---'lllACEPT Jl)Ustr!lalGng hSmeclcallon lnlltregt.w~ ltiu"1ol*I .-i IRl!W a _..c;n "'1en ~WIACEPT lnl !llnJd nol ctaige Cl'SICC>reatment-llsllalkingw11!1Y1U-Alert Find out lbout n-=ines Ulat sllclUld NOT bo taUn wtlll VIRAC8'T. Pleasutso read hl sedlon "MllllCMS YOU SIGlD NOT TAl<E 'Mil! YIRACEPT" WHAT IS V1RAC8'T AND HOW DOES IT WORK? WlACEPT. used In comllinallCl'! wi111 - antlrelrrNlllll dnlgs 11 the reatment of peDl)le with 11tlmallmmll>odefldenc Win.IS (HVI ln!ect>on. -wl1!lllYlelllslDlhedes1nJc1Jonofa>4Tcells.whlchse~ ID Cle imnule system AA1JI a twge llJll1ber of CD4 cells """ been ~ lhe ~ perm °""*'PS aallJllld llll!IUle dellciency l}IUDmelo\IDSl VIW:8'T"""'""' blod<lng llY P<*-13 ~ wynw). which is........., b llY ID mUt:;ly 'llRACEPT has Ileen.,_, ID S9lfic31l!y redoce the lllllU1I al HIV In h! blood. Al1l1olqi ww:EPT is 0011 are b llY Cl' AIDS, YllACEP""" help redoce - risk b dealll lnl ilness asscaaledwttll llV PaDenls who IDOi< 'lllACEPT alllo had~ ilC'SlleS 11 the 'Ul1bor al a>4 eel COUii. WIAm'T-lm-IDgi!tlmwtlll--dnlgsU'I as~~ Ill) f!M9~3TQ.Cl'~litMlh! 1141' l'al<llgww:EPT 11 c:omblnal01 with--dnlgs imas Ill! SllOIJ'll al llV 1n the Dody Mr3I Diil) 1n1 -aases a>4 CXU11s. WlACS'T maybe""""'"' ldl'1s, ~ lnl-2,.,.., of age ... - '51!des 11 i1fa1s jQJ9J..... ve:rs ago;re llM lal<'11 ... OOES VIRACEP1 CURE HIV OR AIDS? YfWE'T • nol a cm b llV-Cl' M!f,. l'lqJ!e talongWlACElf may Siii ~ IQ)Cl'ttnstit l1fedl:l1S ... - ani1llrt& assxialed llV inteclUl Some al lflese Cll1ll1larlS are Pf1kf1lll1l2. heq>es VIUI i1l«llOns, Myr:c/Jllt;!ert iMJtrJ complex (MAC) lnle<:WIS. lnl Kaposi's xna. Thera Is no i-oof l!lal l'1RACS'T cri redoce h! risk of Ra1lltting llV ID 1llll!rs 1hnJuijt sexual allllaC1 Cl' blOOd contaminatkn WHO SltOUlD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE YIRACEPT? fcgell1Jwll!lyw ID:b Jl)Ura>dlDdedOO-ww:E'T ·~ b you. In 'll3king Jl)Ur Cledslon lhe lollowltlg "1ol*l be consideract Allerglos: n,.. have had I aerbls lller;ic raclloll ID WIACB'T, JOU nulnotllUV1RACEPl ltiulllwldalsoin!Orm Jl)Ur-. 1U10 Cl' plamads1of111Y lrown a1er1J1e$ ID amtn:es u:h 83 olher modiclnes. fcolls. prasem!ives, Cl' dyes. n,.. n pngnont The c!fects of 'lllACEPT en ~wanenCl' lhel' .nnn - n nol known. I Jilli n ingB11 Cl' pm ID rieccrne iregnani, Jilli sin*! lei YIU OJdtt befDre IOl;!rQ WlACEPT ,,.. .. ---.g:'OJstald-•--h!besl'Mlf ID leedyw bolly 'OJ staid be 1Wa1 lna1 W,. ..- bOCy tlDes nol Beady -llV '-1&1 l!BlCO hll ICll be lrnmllllid hwil tnasl·~ --... -·-dtlllyhaveH!V. a.8drwt l'1RACS'T 11.-b ... reatment of-2lhnJuijt13 ,ea'1 of agowllll llV Tlwfe IS I~ bm al l'IW2PT h!Cll be miXed wttll bollybmda.Cl'b>ds ~l'ISWcll:lrlSenllOW IDl:N 'llRACEPT IXJWOer"" be bnl In • """'sedlon trial ........ "°" 'llRACEPT Oral ~ - be prepared 1,.._.__WWVThasnoll>ee!tsllJdiednl)eOlltewl!rl ...,_ .,.._ ... Jl)UshcUdlellJl)UrdoclD'befare l:lk!ng'llRACEPT Ollllr medcaJ ..-.,.: Cenaln me<lcal prclllems may lllecl the use of 'lllACEPT Some l)eOllte lal<lng protease inlllJitcrs l1M deVetopecl new Cl' more serious-Cl'""' blood aow Some P«llJle wllh ~ llMhadi'l:reased-.0.lisnol--hl imease,.,_, caused lhese problems. Be ue ID lell JW' 1b:br W Jilli 11M herncphilla types A lnl B. diabetes mdi1IJs. Cl' an wease In lfliSI lnllor hlJJenl tmallOn Omges 111 Dody lat - l>ee!t seen In some palJenls lal<lng ~ dClilDrs. Those cl8lgeS may Ira.de - - of lat 11 h! li>PI!' bKl< lnl t1eci< ("bullalo ~"). lnasl. lnl....., ... rini.. Loss ol lat 1nrn the lace, lags 1n1.,,. may also "'-1Thecause1n1 iono-tenn hea:!ll ellEds of lhese anllJons n nol tnown II llil eme CAii VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTltER MEDICATIONS'! ww:EPJ may lnllr.lct wllll-cl'ugs, lnduding hl&e you lake Wlttlcul a prescrip1lat 'OJ nut dillcuss w!:I JW' doclD' lf1YtttJgS Iha!,.. n ~Cl' n pBl1lng ID 1ake be!Cl'e Jilli 1ake VllACEPt _,.. lll!!lakl wftll VllACO'I! ~ psapride, b '1ear1lun) c.nmnee (amlodarone, b ~ hea1lleal) Qiridlne (!Cl'~ heal1bea!J. llso knoMl IS~ CWtllcqtinfl, ~. lnl D1l1et: Ergat aertratlves ~ lnl D1hell, b milJ3ne head;Jchej HalciDn9 "11z*TI) ~(rl1idaz00rnl ~ Ocwas!atln. b choltlSllrol lowel1ng) zw:.e (sinMlstllin. b dlcles!ernl IDwerlnQ) Taking 111e - 11n1gs wi1l1 ww:EPT may cue ser1Dus im'CI' me­IYeall! nlng llMrse events. Rfamp.,e (!Cl' IUbe:CIJlosls), also - • Rllnactlne4D Rlfadu1fl Miler•, Cl' Rifama~ Tl1is drug 'e<lllC8S blood levels of VfWUT Dme 1911uction ~ H you tll<e VIRACEPT wtth: ~ (ltt3tulln, b MAC); you WIJ neecl to l3kD I lower tlose of MyalllJtin A c11an1J1 of lbenpy-.S be consldmd WJO U n talUng VIRACEPT wllll: Pllenobarbllal PllenylDl1 IDitrltl'i9 lnl-. ~(l~Sldolhe<$) Tl1!sa agents may reclJcj 1he .....rt al WlAIV' In YIU blood In! 'l1al<e loss- Oral~ 1hepr' I Jilli in tal<ing the ID prM!1I P'llJWlC)' Jilli ll1ould JSe I dU!erenl type of cannceimon llnce 'lllACEPT may l1llJCe the c!ll:cllverllSS of oral~ Spocialca-1rloi1S Belare Jilli lake..,... lsildenll\ll wtll1 WIACEP1'. tal< ID JllUr 1b:br about possible drug inllnclionS n side c!fects n you 1a1<t 'lla\Ja 1n1 VfWUT tlgelher. you may be II Increased risk of side eftects of 'lla\Ja u:h IS b.v blood presue, v!sual changes, Sid penile e<edlcn lastlnQ more""' 4 ton. nan e<edlcn lasls longer 11&1 4 llOtn you lllWd seek - medical ISSIStroce ID IMlld permanent d;vnage ID YIU penis. 'tlU - "" explain - cymQtcms to you. It la nol recommeOOed to t:lke VIRACEPT Wlll1 the -.IDWCl1n0 dnlgs ~ (IOvaSlatn) Cl' lflCOl'9 (Simvastl11n) - of pasSble drug l11EractCl'ls Tller8 Is also an lncr8ased risk of drug lntl!raclicns DeMeen WWUT lnl ~ ja1DMStllll1) lnl BayaJll> IC«!Yastllin); talktoY1Ulb:brbe!NeJl)Ulakeeilherolthe3edlcles!ernl'9ClJclng drugs wllh 'lllACEPT Taking St .blll I wa1 {t!yper1cun per!(n1Umj an herbal prCCl.d sad IS a c1eay ~Cl' P<OIU:1s ccn1a1n1ng St .blll~ Wll1 wll!I VIW1PT lanolretemmended. T ---·Jl)UftW'l)CJ'lnpl;nwlg ID lake St .blll's W01 Tai.rig SL .blll'I W01 may deere&!Ol'IWE'T­lnl IQl ID Increased v1r11 b!ll lnl possible .-., ID 'lllACEPT 'It auosllSiStl'COIO>lllerllllln!lnMral~ IW SltOWl VJRAaPT BE TAKEN wrrH OTH£ll AHTl-ltlV ORUGS7 Taking 'lllACEPT IDge!te with - 11'6 llV dnlgs lnCreaSIS the< IDllgalheWus.lalaoreclasl>eClllXl'lttltrresisla'llviuseSID"°" Based an JllUr ~of lal<lng-Wd!-llV medlclre Jl)Ur OOC1D' ~ Jilli llOW ID lake 'lllACEPT lnl - antl-llV Tbeoe dnlgs llwfd be tal<an 11IcerlainOfOll'Cl'81 sped!ic llmas. Tl'.5 wilt deponc1 en loo many a day ea:ll medicine llnlil be~ I wl1I allO depe!ld en w!le11e I sh1Ud be_, wllh Cl' wtl!IOul'ood - matovues: No druQ ln1n:!icn PIOOlems wore aeen When 'lllACEPT WIS g!'ie1 wllh RelroYir (ZIOlvUdine All) Ej)ivlr llamMJdone 3TC) ler11 l$tMldil1e d4 T} Videx!> (ddanoslne. ddl) H JOU .,. laking - Vldex (ddl) Ind VIRACEPT· Viael! shcUd be !aken wtlhout lootl, en an~ SICltiadl Therefore Jilli ~lake 'lllACEPT wllh food one hcu Iller Cl' more llian two Inn belor1 ,.. 1ake Videx. ,.,..,._ - tranocr¢ise lmlll1Dn (TH!Tb~ ,,,,..., 'lllACEPT Is !aken 1Dgell8 wllh V'ranuie9~ TbellllDllllofWWUT 11Jl)Urltlocl • .n:taiged.Adose~ IS nol needed when VIRACEPT la used wl!!1 VlranU18. Sustva - jefaWer1Z) Tbe arrn111 of VIW1PT In YIU blood nay be """""'1 Adose ~ la nol 'll!eded When VIRACEPT la used wllll Susllva. Otner Nlf!lls 'lllACEPT has nol been lllJdiod w1!h - NNRT1s. Ollllr ..-lnhllHDrs: W01IxJelvnaVrIiVe(\iC1EclPlnTa ·vlr) -~ - Tbe amo1111 of ID!l dnlgs In YIU blood may be lncr!ased. Qlrentty, 111ere nnosalelylnle!lle8evdatlavallablefnrnthe11S1ofllllsCllll1lllmtion. _.. ~ The IJ!IOIJ1I al V1RACEPT In - - may be Increased. Cl.mntly. there n no sa!ely lnl oftlcacydafa .-lrom h! uoe of lllls cornll!:'i:l~ ll!Wasee~ The IJ!IOIJ1I of ~In ,.... blood may be lrmased. Cl.mntly there n no safely lnl e!!lcacy 11a1a ....-1rom 1he use of 1hls comlllnlllcn WHAT ARE T1IE SIDE EfffCTS OF V1RACEPT? Ll<B II n-. l'IWIPT.,., cue lido e!lecls Most of lhe side tr.oc1superlenadwtll1ww:El'TllM beenmld1DITllller1!e - • Ille mast ammn side on.cl In pe.ipe tllOng l'IWIPT ll1l mast alJt pallSlls had al least mild tbrllea 11 IOllll point llJ'1g - In dlrical slides, allool 1 S-2!Jll of pa!lenls r1Ceivlng 'llRACEPT 750 mg (1lne labl8i.) me 1meS dal't" 1250 mg cm ta!llels) two lines dailY had tu" more 1nse am 1 my In rno&1 c;mi, dlrr!'rl!.,., be aRoled USl10 8l1ldan11eal meOdne$. u:h IS lmxlif1t9 A-0 (tilleramide) Sid _,,wlllchinM!al>iewtl!IOula~ OCllef side elled3 trial ocnmd 111 2'llo Cl' more al pa1lenlS recaMng V1RACEPT lrQJde '13!1S83. lllS lnl 'ISll. ll1ere wore-side e!lecls l1olBd II clinlcal sl!deo flalocamd In 1eaa um 2'llo a1 patients ~l'IWIPT -·ll leSO lide o!!ects nay have been CIUe ID other dnlgs hi pallentl wn lal<i1g Cl' ID Ille illness i1sell EJcept lor cl!anllea. 1here wore ,.,. ...,., dltlerences In side eftects 11 "81ientl who bl!< VIRACEPT atrig wtlll-dnlgs compared wflll llrlse who tool< only 1he - drugs. Fu' I aJl11l(elll list of Side o!leelS_.,;.JW'lttllrlllnl,CI'~ www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE HOW SHOULD I TAKE V1RAC8'T? 'pllrResAcCrt>EeP 1Th. ea ~vaila bbleU o nVlyIR wAlClhE P-T Ta-!lleb c'M~ er as 1250 m'tglU (fi dvoec ltaCbIl'e m13a)y laken two - a clay Cl' IS 750 mg {1lne -) !aken tine bmeS a clay. • WIACfPT lhoUld alWa)'I be laken with a meal Cl' a ~snack. WlACEPT table1s are lilm-coatod ID help mal<e 1he blllels easier l> swalloW Take VIRACEPT exaclfy IS dlr8dad by your doctDr. Do oot Weall Cl' tlea!ase any dose Cl' lhe IU!'.bco' of doses pet clay N!¥J 1ak8 ... ..-.. b 1he e"3Ct ""100 of llme lfl3t YIU doclCI' "3s lns1rudec1 Do not stop taklng V1RACEPT wllllout lirll C0111111ting w1lh your doclCI', even H you m lle!ing bener. Only 1ake mecllCine Iha! '185 prescrlbeO spec 1lcally tr ,.. :;., '10I (j>e WlACEPT ID olhe!3Cl'1ak8 - prt;Crlbed ta <0111000e else The~ of VIRACEPT may be dd!mnt b Jilli um b-palle!ln - llo dinlctiDns from your doctDr, cxadly IS wrtllen en the - The lllllllll of VlllACB'T 11 lhe - - ,..,.,, somewhat ccnslS!er.1 (M!l' llme Missing doses Ml cue 1he coruntn1!10n of V1RACEPT ID decrease: !herefCl'e ,.. .....,,, not miss...., doses. - ~,.. mma dose.,.. shcUd 1a1<o.., _ • sacn •posslllo aro 111en 1ak8 VW' 11eJ1 Sdle<1Jlec! dose Sid 1u11n mses • ongona11y schetlule<I Diiiing In - (Including c:lllldnm 14 yean of oge llld older) The reccmmended alJt doee of 'lllACEPT is 1250 mg (live blllels) 1akcn two lines I clay Cl' 750 mg (line tablels) !aken One times I clay Each dose shcUd be laken wtth I meal Cl' ~snack. Dollng in cllUdren 2 ID 13 yean of oge TbeWIACS'T cbse lnchttenOC;lefldl an lhelr ~'lie~ dose Is 2Qto30~la'9to14 ~ perdose. tlkcn l!ltee limes daily wll!1 a meal Cl' IVlt anadt lJus cri be m!mlnistered el1her In lalllel tam Cl'. In-lllllllle l> t:lke tablets. as WlACEPT Oral Powde< 0ose lns!n£tions w11 be provided by u.i Cl1ild a dcclD< Tiie "°"' wm be gM10 me lmeS dally uolnO the measama scoop provided, a measumo 1easllOcn Cl' one Cl' more 1allletl dcpCndlng on 1he ~ lnl age of 1he d1lld Thtamo1111oforal~'1f-l>beg1Vei!toadild• descrlled In lhe chart below hdlatrlc Dose 11 It Atlmlnhlttd Tilrn llmn Dal~ lofyWt!pt -11 -II _, .. U 1.-1 Scoops' Lml Tt"!"""'!. T>llll!S ' measi.rlng er.: powder h! ICcoP or i_, should ie leYel • 1 1eVe1 sccop aintatns !'JO no 11 v1RAW'! Usa on1Y 11>e ocoop provided wtthyosWIACEPTbottle t ' le'le1 leaspoon ainta!ns 200 mg of VIW:EPT Nole A measuring 1easpoot1 used far dispensing medlclllon - be used tr 'll83StlllQww:EPT Oral Powde< A$i.,.... ~ID mal<c ue,.. l1M a modcation d!speilslng lc3SIJ(lOn - -VIRACEPT Orll - llt! prepared'I The oral powder may be m!ml wllh a &n:all amoll1I of walfr milk, trnua."" bmda.l!Oy dJ013rY ~ Cl'tlalry foods u:h as pudding Cl' Ice~ Once rr.l<ed. lhe ll1llre Sl1CU'lt nut be !aken ID oblainlhe"'dose Do nol rr.::< lhe powder with any acidic food Cl' jJ!ce, u:h •~Cl' ~-ll>PI )l*8 Cl' flllC)le aauce, - thll may creale a til:ar tasla Once the powder is mixed. I may be lllnd I! romn 1emperam Cl' re!l1gera1ed b up '> 6 lllln. Do not '11!81 h mixed 0018 once K 11as been prepared. Donatldd.wal«IDlxltllesofcral~ 'lllACEPT powder • supplied wmi a 81.00p tr -.mg Fu' rap 111 delelmlnlng the exact dose of powder fir - ~. piea3811Sk JW' doc1D'. ...ne. or pha'madsL 'llRACEPT Oral --aspartlme. 1 loW~ -·and lherefore - nol be !aken by di1dren wtthlJhen)1ketorula (Pl(U) HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT lnl all - mediClncs out al the rea:ll of - Keep lxl!!le ct>sed aro store at romn !Bmperaue tlletween 59'f and 86'f) ~ fl'on1 SIUtes of moisU'e u:h as I sink Cl' - damp place Heal lnl - ...... redoce 1he c!ledlvenos:s of 'llW:EPT Do nol l<lep medicine lllat IS out of d:lle Cl' 1hat Jilli no longer neecl 8e ue 1na1 w JllU ltltoW ll1Y medicine rrttay n 1a out of the reach of - °'""-""al t;UeS1lcnS lbout YIU heal:h with Jl)Ur doc1CI' I Jilli have 1JJ8SIDlS lboul VIRACEPT Cl' any-mecbtcn you n lal<ilg .,;. yw lttllr, fll'S8," IJllilna:lsL 'tllu"" m can • 888. VIRACE" (1.888.8412237) d free Cd , .... VlllACEPT ~ •tf8\l1Stered ll'ademarbof Ajμlorl ~ C2QC: Ajμlorl l'lmna:euticals, Inc.,,, rti1lls- Ajμlorll'tamaceuticalsfnc. 1.a.klla,~.92031.USA H'0117H!G HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I around houston AIDS Foundation given funds to assist former inmates AIDS Foundation Houston has received a $1.3 million grant from the Health Resources and Services Administration for an educ.'ltional program targeting the problem of AIDS among people who have been recently released from Texas prisons. Only three other such grants were awarded this year. The program, called Project Wall Talk, will.allow AIDS Foundation to expand an existing program which trains prison inmates to work as peer educators m prisons. Michael B. Mizwa, executive director of AFH, said, "We began in 1997 to train peer educators in a few prisons about AIDS prevention, and the project has expanded. This grant will allow us to add 20 more hours of training in advocacy and treatment issues to our existing training and also to expand the program to each of the 114 units in the Texas prison system. Our hope is that once released, the trained educa­tor will work in his or her local area in an effort to stem the tide of new HIV infections and secondary illness," he added. Texas has the largest prison system in the country with more than 143,000 inmates, of which 2.380 are HIV infected. Three in fom; or 75 per­cent, incarcerated offenders with HIV are from minority communities. Upon release, 40 percent of the offenders are likely to return to Houston, according to Mizwa. Upcoming conference to address bias in schools AUSTIN - Students and educators throughout Texas are preparing for the next Students. Teachers & Allies Making Progress (STAMP) Conference to be held Nov. 16-17 at the University of Texas in Austin, according to the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. The event is a skills·building and networking conference designed to organize statewide action to end discrimination in Texas schools. It pro· vides a forum for people throughout the state to share resources. work together and · empower Texans to address discrimination within their own community, according to an LGRL press release. Much of the con· ference will focus on the Non· Discrimination in Education Bill, which would protect students from discrimina· EllA TYl£R tion "on account of ethnicity, color, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, disabil· ity, religion, or national origin." Currently, Texas has no state law protecting students from such discrimination, the LGRL stat· ed. "I'm looking forward to the conference because it's just such a unique event," said Will Cowan, a student at the University of Texas. "It's really the only conference that I know of where students and teachers from every corner of Texas get together to actually organize su-ategies for lobbying and carry them out." Scheduled workshops include "Working With the Media," "How to Lobby" and more. Registration for the conference is free and open to everyone. To register, download the registration form from the LGRL Web site at www.Jgrl.org or contact the Lesbiah Gay Rights Lobby of Texas at 512-474-5475. FROM STAff REPORTS Hundreds · attend Houston Black Tie Dinner The Intercontinental Hotel was the site for the annual fund-raising Houston Black Tie Dinner. held Oct. 12 this year and benefiting several non· profit local organizations. An audience of hundreds turned out to socialize and enjoy an evening of comedy Top left: This year's dinner co-chairs. Carlos A. Reyes, Jr. and Chree Boydstun, present· ed Janine Brunjes (right) with the Houston Black Tie Dinner Humanitarian Award. Far left State Rep. Debra Danburg who 1s battling for re-election on the Nov 5 ballot, was among several politicians who attended the black· tie event. Left: State Rep. Gamet Coleman accepted the Hollyfield Political Service Award during the dinner. (Photos by Dalton DeHartl OCTOBER 18. 2002 5 TICKETS ONLY $15! • 6 OCTOBER 18. 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I 1ocal news Changes target African-American population HN FUNDS. continued from Page 1 target population and are theoretically most effective. He said agencies, in sub­mitting their applications for funding this year, were asked to service the highest risk populations. Of the 5i HIV prevention programs cur­rently rece1vmg federal funding in Texas, 19 will go unfunded next year. "It's a very frightening future as we look at sexually transmitted diseases and the role of public health. It's becommg no role at all," said Claudia Stravato, chief executIVc officer of Planned Parenthood of Amarillo and the Texas Panhandle, which lost more than $98,446. Health officials who work with gay men arc particularly concerned. The state department of health's HIV STD Surveillance Report for year-end 2001 indicates that 50 percent of newly diagnosed HIV positive Texans reported male-to-male sex as therr mode of exposure to the virus. acconling to leaders at the Montrose Clinic. But the department's recent allocation of state funds for HIV testing among gay men was severely cut. they point out. In fact, Roland said, in Harris County, 60 percent of the agencies previously funded to provide HIV testing and coun­seling services were demed funding. This will seriously impair Houston-area agen-cies' ability to test high-risk populations, particularly gay men. for years to come, he added. "TDH's own statistics show that gay men have the highest rates of HIV infec­tion in the state," Roland said. "I find it inconceivable that the state has chosen to disreganl its own data and cut the fund· ing to provide HIV prevention and testing to gay men." Smaller piece of the pie Each year, the state's bureau of HIV and STD prevention receives $9.5 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention to be distributed among lOcal agencies for HIV prevention programs. The CDC is allocated $320 million for HIV prevention programs administered by health departments in all states and six major cities, including Houston. Local agencies within the states then compete for funding. "We're required to conduct competitive processes. and our job is to select the best contractor we can based on the application we received, and that's often difficult," Blass said. "The problem we run mto IS when the interventions that we're funding tend to be more costly," he added. Some agencies in Texas saw dramatic increases as a result of the TOH changes. Gay health activists including Judy Bradford. a panelist on the groundbreaking Institute of Medicine Report on lesbian health. are concerned that federal support for gay and lesbian health tsSUes 15 waning under the leadership of President George W Bush and Health & Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson. For instance, Austm Health & Human Services of the Travis County Health Department secure~a :9594.194 contract for next year - a $215.096 increase. One of the most unusual shifts in fund· ing occurred between neighboring ngen· cies. The Bell County Publlc Health District's $110,349 contract wa~ not renewed. while United Way of Greater Fort Hood Area had tts contract doubled to $133,223 from $66,435. The TDH issued its funding decisions on Sept. 6, projecting where aid will go for HIV I AIDS prevention for the next four years. According to Montrose Clinic offi· cials, "minimal" funds were provided for HIV testing services for men who have sex with men (MSM) in Harris County. Officials note that the term "MSM" includes gay, bisexual and transgender men, as well as heterosexual men who occasionally have sexual encounters with men. Some funding in the Harris County area was designated to test African American gay men. but Hispanic and white gay men were virtually left out of the funding process, clinic leaders noted. "Gay men remain one of the communi· ties hardest hit by the AIDS pandemic," said Katy Caldwell, executive director of Montrose Clinic. "for now. prevention is the only cure. TD H's failure to allocate ade· quate funding to provide intense, targeted testing and prevention educahon to gay men of all ethnicities in Harris County could lead to a resurgence of the virus in this already deeply affected commun\(y." Other health officials in Houston also expressed concern. "HIV testing and counselmg has been shown to be a very effective intervention for at risk populations," said Naomi Madrid. executive director of People With AIDS Coalition-Houston. "TDH's decision to deny funding for most HIV counseling and testing of gay men in Harris County - especially Hispanic and Anglo gay men - will make it far more difficult to reach the people who most need this intervention." The City of Houston HIV Prevention Community Planning Group is currently meeting to determine the fiscal year 2004 priority populations for funding. The first draft of the group's priority populations should be completed in December: accord· ing to officiab. While city of Houston testing efforts ·are funded under a different funding stream than TOH it is expected that the limitations imposed on local Ams ser· vice agencie$ by the lack of TOH fund· 1ng will factor into the planninl.I process at some level. The city planning group is also reviewmg emerging trends that may affect the fiscal year 2003 priority populations. Texas ranks fourth m the nation of reported cases of HIV, wt th 4.241 new cases in 2001 Of these, 1.215 were in Harris County, which encompasses Houston. Harris County currently has 10,814 people living with HIV/ AIDS, the largest popula· tion in the state. Bush administration trend? Reallocated Texas resources for this important gay health issue accompanies recent news that the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services withdrew $75,000 in funding for a national lesbian health conference. Members of the National Coalition for LGUT Health met two weeks ago Wlth offi. clals from the HHS in rrsponse to that funding change. Coalition leaders said exactly what happened to funding for the conference remains in dispute. At least one conservative believes the change was due to the Bush administra· lion's targeting "radical" programs. "Slowly but surely, the Bush adminis· !ration is weeding out so-called health care programs that ... promote radical agendas," Ken Connor, president of the Family Research Council, wrote in an Oct. 4 e-mail. "Though they originally agreed to sub­sidize a conference on homosexual issues, federal officials took back their offer, say. ing, 'The conference on lesbian health did not fit with the secretary's vision,"' Connor wrote. "We welcome the adminis­tration's change of heart." Gay health activists are concerned that this incident is an indication of more fed· era! cuts to come. "Gay and lesbian health issues were clearly on the agenda during the Clinton administration," said Judy Bradford, 11 panelist on a grotmdbreaking Institute of .Medicine report on lesbian health. "Now, it's as if they've vanished. They're off the radar ~creen. Kathi Wolfe contributed to this story. The Associated Press contributed to this story. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.corn OCTOBER 18. 2002 7 I national news Log Cabin GOP: Findings biased, used as 'scare tactic' GOP RECORD. continued from Pagel on whether members of Congress co-spon­sor bills considered important to gays. One such bill is known as ENDA, or the Employment Non-Discrimination Act. The HRC report cards aren't free from controversy, however. Log Cabin officials have often taken issue in recent years with the HRC ratings, either based on the issues selected for inclusion or the HRC's interpretation of a "yes" or "no" vote. NSD examined the HRC voting records for the 103rd through 107th Congress, which spans a period from Jan. 1993 through Dec. 2001, and measures the col· lective voting records of the two parties in three specific areas. The first compares the percentage of Democrats and Republicans who received a 100-percent HRC score. The second compares the percentage of Republicans and Democrats receiving a zero. The thll'd category compares the percentage of members of the two par· ties receiving a score at or above 50 per· cent versus those receiving a percentage below 50 percent. The report's findings show that the per­centage of Democrats receiving a "perfect" 100 percent score from HRC increased from 27 pE>rcent in the 103rd Congress to 72 per­cent in the current 107th Congress. The findings show the number of Democrats receiving a zero score changed from 5 per­cent in the 103rd Congress to 2 percent in the 107th Congress. According to the report's findings. just 1 percent of Republican senators and rep­resentatives had a 100-percent HRC score in the 103rd Congress and only 2 percent had a 100-percent score nine years later. in the 107th Congress. Conversely, the findings show that 46 percent of GOP senators and representa­tives had an HRC score of zero in the 103rd Congress and 61 percent of Republican lawmakers had a zero score in the first half of the 107th Congress. which· continues until the end of this year. The NSD report's findings show that in the "above or below" 50 percent cate­gory. 69.9 percent of Democrats had scores 50 percent or higher in the 103rd Congress while 88.5 percent of Democrats had scores above 50 percent m the IO'ith Congress. The findings shO\\ that 30.9 percent of Democrats had a score below 50 percent in the 103rd Congress compared to 11.49 percent who had less than a 50 percent score in the 107th Congress. The findings show that 11.16 percent of Republicans had a score above 50 percent in the 103rd Congress while 10.86 percent of Republicans had scores above 50 per­cent in the 107th Congress. The findings 31188 Westhelmer, Highland Village • Houston, TX 77027 • 713·822·4411 show that 88.83 percent of Republican lawmakers had scores below 50 percent in the 103rd Congress and 89.13 percent of Republicans had scores below 50 percent in the 107th Congress. Gay groups differ on report ··This report challenges the common assumption that Republicans. in recent years. have increased their support of lesbian and gay Americans." said Chad Johnson, NSD's executive director. "In fact, these results separate the reality from the rhetoric. "When it comes to gay and lesbian issues. party matters." Johnson said. Mead, of Log Cabin Republicans. and other gay GOP leaders have said the HRC rating system often fails to reflect behind-the-scenes actions by key Republicans. including actions to block anti-gay amendments and coalitions with Democrats to defeat such amendments. • "This is a scare tactic," said Mead of the NSD report. "This is what they do in an election year. Two years ago, they said the heavens would collapse if George W. Bush won election to the White House." U.S. Rep. Barney Frank (D-!\1ass.), the openly gay congressman who helped found NSD. said information for the report was gathered in an accu­rate and impartial manner, based strictly on publicly recorded voting records collect­ed byHRC. Frank noted that Republicans such as former U.S. Rep. Steve Gunderson (R-Wisc.) Barney Frank are members of the HRC board of directors. "He's acting like Chico Marks," said Frank, referring to Mead's dismissal of the report's findings. "What he's saying is, 'Do you believe me or your o'l'm eyes?"' Lou Chibbaro Jr. can be reached at lchibbaro@wasltladcorn ft MORE INFO National StonewaD Democrats PD.Box9330 Washington. 0 C 20009 202-625-1382 wwwstonewalldemocrats.org Log Cabin Republicans 160717th Sl NW. Washington. O.C. 20009 • 202-347-5306 wwwlcrorg .-------------------, H.G.L.P.C. pac Endorsements Vote Early to avoid lines with the new machines, Sat. Oct. 19th to Nov. 1 The Caucus encourages you to vote FOR the HISD bond issue. Ron Klrll US Senate Dem Sheila Jackson Lee• US House District 18 Dem Chris Bell US House District 25 Dem Tony Sanchez.- ...... - ... Govemor ........... ..... Dem Kiri< Watson Attorney General Dem Marty Akins State Comptroller Dem Chartes Mauch Railroad Commission Gren 8rad Rockwell State Supreme Court Place 2 Gren John Whitmire" State Senate Distnct 15 Dem Debra Danburg. ........... State Rep District 134 ... Dem Scott Hochberg State Rep District 137 Dem Joe Moreno State Rep District 143 Dem Gamet Coleman • State Rep District 147 Dem Jessica Fam1r State Rep Distnct 148 Dem Denise Crawford 14111 Court of Appeals Dem Lee Arellano 55th District Court Dem Diane Feller .................. 152nd District Court. ... Oem Antonia M. lng.oeBen 129111 Cnm District Court Dem Grant Hardeway 182th District Court Dem W. Robert V<>1gt 183th Cnm Distnc:t Court Dem Ron Johnson 338th Crim District Court Dem Rick Molona 19Dth Civil District Court Dem Wayne Slaughter Jr .•. 208th Crim Dostnct Court •. Oem Hert> Rrtchle 232nd Crim District Court Dem Biii Connolly 245th Family District Court Dem Robert Hinojosa 246th Family District Court Dem Lydia Clay Jackson 248th Crim District Court Dem Ruben Guerrero 263rd Crim District Court Dem Tasso Triantapllyllis 27Dth Civil District Court Dem Maoy Kay Green ...... 3D8th Family District Court.Dem Richard Moore 309th Distnct Court Dem Donna Kohlhause 31 Dth Family District Court Dem Teresa Ramirez 313th Juvenile District Court Dem Debra Shafto Harris County Judge Gren Bruce Mosier .... - ....... County Civil Court #!.- . .Dem Dinah Weems' County Civil Court 12 Dem Mitd!ell Contreras County Covil Court 13 Dem D1a11a Musslewhite County Civil Court 14 Dem Sylvia Pubchara County Clim Court #2 Dem Blanca Lopez County Criminal Court #5 Dem Al Leal County Crim Court #8 Dem Randy Roll ............... County Cnm Court #9 ..... .Dem Yolanda Corny County Criminal 1111 Dem Leslie R1bn1k County Crimi Court #14 Dem James 'Jim' Downes County Probate Court #3 Dem Marc s. Whitehead Hams County Attorney Dem SyMa Garcia Commissioners Ct Precinct 2 Dem David Patronella JP Precinct Ct 1 Pl 2 Dem Mark Wood, Treasurer. HGLPC PAC, P.O. Box 66664, Houston, TX 77006 Caucus meets 1st Wed. each month, 7pm, at 803 Hawthorne L Visit our Web slte: www.HGLPC.org -------------------~ 8 OCTOBER 18. 2002 City Plaza will refund SOI of your last six months· llnl - so it's easier than ever to buy into Houston·s smartest intown condo lifestyle~ I Live Smarter to kiss your landlord •1_-1..1.1,1.2. -­• 1llM kidloo 1111 llllb • toW-surllct _...,.. ......._........ - ...... ...... .,.,._.. ...... goodbye ~ l!!!!J CITY PLAZA •condominium ·--~ 713-790-7907 .... djf ....... _ID° IJIO S"pm$,ll h_i ~.,.-.1·. s..r,..s . C.m 8:* 1-BR from mid $90s 2-BR from high $130s r-------------------, Congratulations! Your vote will count seven times in this election! * -Pick out six narrow-minded, bigoted people, then vote in place of them. The lines will be long on election day, due to the new electronic machines, and it's so easy to Vote early Oct. 19th to Nov. 1st *less than 15% of eliglble voters will vote, so your vote really counts for our community. Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus PAC's list of progressive GLBT friendly candidates are on the other side. L-------------------~ www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com La. pastor campaigns against New Orleans gay festival NEW ORLEANS A Jefferson "Pansh pastor is gathering the support of conservative churches and political candidates m his cam· paign to banish an annual gay festival from New Orleans, according to the Associated Press. Rev. Grant E. Storms has circulated a videotape of men having public sex at the Southern Decadence Festival. arguing that police and city officials ignore lewdness at the gathering. Storms bought an advertisement in the New Orleans Times-Picayune on Oct. 9 urging Mayor Ray Nagin, Police Superintendent Eddie Compass and others to banish the festival "due to the inability of the police and festival organizers to stop such acts of lewdness. nudity and sex from occurring on the streets of the French Quarter." Southern Decadence began about 30 years ago, and now Rev. Grant E. Storms. an anti-gay pastor in New Orleans. is lobbying city officials to ban· ish Southern Decadence from the city. The popular gay event draws an estimated 100.000 visitors each Labor Day Weekend. attractsl00,000 visitors from across the country, with a handful of French Quarter bars acting as informal sponsors, festival organizers said. The New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corp. began a campaign to promote the festival two years ago. Organizers estimate the party brings $30 million to the city each year. Gay psychiatrist appeals order to repay Air Force SAN FRANCISCO A gay psychiatrist ordered to repay the U.S. Air Force $71,000 for his education argued to an appeals court Oct. 8 that he doesn't owe the government anything, according to the Associated Press. John Hensala, 38. attended medical school at Northwestern University, served his three· year residency at Yale University a"nd received a two-year fellowship at the University of California at San Francisco all with the understanding that, in exchange, he owed the Air Force four years of active duty service. Shortly before he began his service, he announced he's gay. The Air Force promptly discharged him and demanded its money back. saying Hensala voluntarily failed to complete his service commitment. In June 2001, a federal judge ruled in the Air Force's favor. di~missmg the case. Ray Hawkens, a Department of Justice lawyer arguing for the Air Force, told a three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that an internal investiga· lion revealed Hensala intentionally revealed his homosexuality solely to avoid military service. But Hensala's lawyer, Clyde Wadsworth. argued that when Hensala came out in 1994, the military's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy was untested. Hensala has con­tended all along he was willing to serve. Lesbian couple sues prosecutor in Calif. county REDWOOD CITY. Cali[ - San Mateo County District Attorney Jim Fox faces a lawsuit from a lesbian couple who claims the DA's office illegally revealed one woman's sexual orientation to the father of her child. Bay City News reported. In 1999. two female police offi· oers who had both dated Ramona Gatto got involved in a fight at her home. According to Gatto, Fox then disclosed information about her sexual olientation from a police report on the incident to Timothy Gatto. who had not seen her or her daughter for several years. He then unsuccessfully sued for custody of the child. leaving Gatto and her partner, Arzu Akkus·Gatto. with legal bills. The Gatto fami­ly has now offered to settle the lawsuit for $85.000. which they say is not even as much as their legal bills. The San Mateo County Board of Supervisors has rejected the deal. Okla. City settles lawsuit over gay banners OKLAHOMA CITY Oklahoma City lead· ers and a gay rights group have approved a settlement over the display of banners on utility and city· poles, according to the Associated Press. The Oklahoma City Council on Oct. B voted 8-1 to abide by a fed· eral judge's ruling last month that declared part of the city's banner ordinance unconsti· tutional. Under the agreement. the city will pay "nominal damages" of $3, plus attorneys fees. The city also must give the Cimarron Alliance perm1SSion to display banners for its sununer parade and delay consideration of changing or repealing the ordinance until Januar): Cimarron Alliance sued the city after the group's banners promoting gay his· tory month were removed from utility poles. Gay Hispanics gather for national conference in Fla. MIAMI - Gay, lesbian, bisexual and trans· gendered Hispanics gathered in Miami Oct. 10-14 for El Encuentro. a conference dedicat­ed to facilitating "the development of cuJtur. al, political and community resources through institutes. workshops. caucuses, ple­naries and social events." The conference. hosted by LL.EGO, a national gay Hispanic group, drew about 1,000 participants from the U.S., Latin America and Puerto Rico, according to the Miami Herald. "This is the largest gathering of its kind," said Martin Ornelas·Quintero, LL.EGO executive direc­tor. This is the first time El Encuentro has been held in South Florida. and earlier this year, LL.EGO threatened to move the event if voters in Miami-Dade approved a ballot mea· sure overturning gay rights protections. The measure failed Sept. 10. From staff and wire reports OCTOBERIB. 2002 9 instJ.antJ P.OSSIOn theclogstore. com 1-800-948-CLOG Alone again? Life After Separation, Breakup or Divorce 5-Week Workshop Thzs workshop 1s about picking up the pieces after it all fi11ls apart! Learn how to: • Deal ·with anger, fear, guilt, rejection &: loneliness • Rabe ~elf-esteem • Improve communication & relation~hip "kills • Build trust • Get up, let go and move on • Understand what a good relationship can be And have "Orne fun along the way! \\"e will start at ground zero on :--:ovember 6th and wrap it up with dating and ~x on December 4th, Wednesdays 630 - 8:30 pm. 4040 Milam, Suite 310 001111/f MY, (abot,.. F1Ws5 Exdumgt) JIQSOIML COACH REALITY THE'RA,, CEJTIREO CALL~ MOllE lllFORMATIOll & RE~TIOll: 113 .• 61.11., OR E-MAIL: 001111/EOl>Ollll/FIM'f.COM l1fdliSitd 1i voice STAFF ExecutiYe EdilDr ~"RIS CRAIN ElitDr PENNY WEAVER editor p;hous!onvolce.corn Procb:tion BONNIE NAUGl£ CoobiJutors STEVEN EWING Al.fORO. J.A. CHAPMAN. LOU CHIBBARO JR. EUA TYLER Webmastef JED DEMPSEY ~ DAtTON DEHARI KIM&Rl.Y THO.\IPSON ~Sales BRETI CUUUM-Aa:rult ExeartNe bcu1hm:a.houstcnvcice.co DONNA Hl.U-Aa:ount Executive dht41 a.houstonvoice.oo Nisher· WIN!Xm l.IEDIA UC Presidetrt· WIWAM WAYBOIJRN Elihlrial Dndllr· CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Conlroller· PATRICK SUMMERS Art Director· ROB BOEGER Marbtilg !n:tor· ERIC MAY ~~-MICHAEL KITCHENS MEMBER tt.de1Eer .. ......... iilii™il- CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 as the Mcntrose St.u. 500 fJMtt BMl. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 11006 (7l3) 529-8490 Fax: (7l3) 529-9531 wwwhoustoovoice.com Contents copyright 2000 Dffia! Inn: 9 am ID 5:30 pm~ To sibnil a letUr utters shoofd be ~ than 400 wools. We resene the right to edit for cootent and length. We will will1hold ~upon ~t. but you must tndude yoor n.1ll1e and phone rnrnber for \'mfic a· lion. Please send mail to Houstoo Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd. Stile 200 Hot;;ton, Texas 11006, fax (7l3) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor'Jrhoustonwice.com Opnons ~ ther!in do not reftect ~ of the Houston Vilte Issue 11.47 u guest editorial War with Iraq • • 1s a gay issue Ever since Stonewall, the founders of our movement argued against unjust foreign war, but in the debate over Iraq, national gay groups have failed to speak out against war. By FAISAL AlAM N SATURDAY. OCT. 26, thousands of people from across the United States will descend on Washington and voice their opposition to a U.S.·led war with Iraq. In the last few weeks, similar rallies have drawn millions of people in cities around the world. Protesters will call for an end to Iraqi sanctions, implemented more than a decade ago, that have cost the lives of more than 500,000 men. women and chi!· dren across Iraq and have brought extreme poverty and malnutrition to thousands of others. They will join hands to express out· rage at the United States government and its unilateral and imperialistic foreign policies. Groups that have endorsed the protests represent a cross-section of liber· ationlst movements, all united under one anti-war umbrella. But one group is notably missing from this coalition for peace: the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender movemmt To date, no major national LGBT orga· ruzat1on in the United States - except for the Universal Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches - has spoken out against an impending war with Iraq. And no national LGBT organization has endorsed the Oct 26 anti-war rallies. Meanwhile, our progressive allies who often work hand-in-hand with the LGBT movement ln our common cause to achieve social justice, have taken a firm stance against any military action and have called for a peaceful solution in Iraq. WHILE OUR ALIJES MAKE NO ISSUE out of their position, many in the LGBT community will ask the question, NWhat does a war with Iraq have to do with queers? And why does opposing a war with Iraq, or any other country for that matter. have anything to do with the 'gay agenda?"' The answer is everything. Since Sept. 11, the United States has more than tripled its national defense budget in the name of "security" and the "war on terror." Our national focus on war has led many to sacrifice attention to the critical issues facing sonui.of the most vulnerable in our society, including Jes· bian, gay, bisexual and transgender peo­ple, people living with mv and AIDS . homeless youth and low-income families, among others. Federal resources are already being limited every day under the Bush admin· lstrntlon. Government funding for HIV prevention and education remains stag· nant at a time when more and more of our young people are being infected with the virus that causes AIDS. While rates continue to rise in an alarming fashion. our government insists on cracking down on organizations that provide safe sex messages, and the Department of Health & Human Services has officially taken an abstinence-only policy, making the sex lives of most queer people almost invisible. Low-income LGBT families remam a low priority, as though all of us can affonl to attend $250 tuxedo dinners to watch a straight celebrity receive an "li:quality Awanl." Universal health care that would guarantee every LGBT person the right to live a healthy life is also denied. Our inner cities remain destitute, where thousands of young queer people of color live, grow and thrive. Social and economic justice, basic human rights - life, Uberty and dignity remain a dis­tant dream for these people, whose lives are a million miles away from our black· tie dinners. HOUSTON VOICE OCTOBER 18. 2002 PMElO ONLY A FEW DECADES AGO, AT Tm; birth of our movement for freedom and liberation, lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people understood that single-issue politics Y.'Ould not win us anything. Decades ago, when we took to the streets to fight police brutality, we understood that fighting multiple oppressions through a multi-lateral, multi·1ssue platform was the only way to gain our liberation. But today, few of us remember this history, as we live com­fortably in our "freedom." Queer people have been at the fore· front of social and economic justice struggles since the beginning of our fight for equality. The feminist move­ment, the labor movement. the struggle for African-American civil rights. the struggle for immigrant rights and eco· nomic justice for poor people all have actively involved lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people. Only a few decades ago, LGBT people were likened to Communists, and the Department of State was on a witch hunt to weed out queers from its ranks, liken· ing them to Cold War spies. MEANWHILE. THE BUSH administration continues to beat the drums of war, rallying allies in our fight against "terrorism" that perpetuate hor­rendous abuses of human rights against sexual and gender minorities living in their countries. And while we sit happy and free in our bars and tennis clubs. in our LGBT centers around the countr;; the real fight for freedom and struggle still continues around the world. Gay Americans have abandoned their roots. When national lesbian, gay, bisexu· al and transgender organizations fail to voice their opposition to government poli­cies that clearly impact the lives of so many queer people, our movement has failed. When we as a community cannot join together and ally with the wider pro­gressive movement, a movement that so many of our elders have come from, we have collectively failed. The war on Iraq Is a queer issue, not only because it will affect LGBT people in the military, an Item high on our "gay agenda," but also because it \Cill take away from social welfare programs that we as a community rely on the most, and becausr it will Impact each and every one of our Jives. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com point ELLA TYLER Early voting starts this weekend, and every single ballot cast is an important one Let the politics flood in THE RAIN LATELY....,. ESPECIALLY ON Tuesdays - makes me think about reasons to vote. Not who to vote for. which is what political activists like me spend many hours focused on this time of year. and not the mechanics of voting, which I am trained on, but reasons to vote. Why bother? When I worked for the county attorney years ago, I redrafted the flood plain man­agement regulations for Harris County Because of a delay in their adoption. I spent one rainy October afternoon flying - to Dallas, then driving to the Federal Emergency Management Agency in Denton to have the regulations approved just before FEMA withheld authority to write flood insurance in unincorporated areas of Harris County. I've been interest­ed in the politics of flooding ever since. And there are a lot of politics, particu­larly at the city, county and federal level. Politicians can't stop the rain, but they can make it go away. They decide how much money will be spent on flood con­trol and where it will be spent. Votes on land use issues - even something simple like how much of a lot may be paved - can have a substantial impact on flooding. Perhaps I'm getting carried away with the metaphor, but if each raindrop stayed home, we'd never have floods. So think about what issue matters to you. Is it discrimination against gay, les­bians, bi~exuals and transgenders? Politicians can't stop it. but they can make it unacceptable and potentially expensive. Discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations because of someone's gender, age, race, '>/1.1\1.f>y ku•roV11cd10ucf or. n•t handicap or national origin violates a variety of laws: federal, state, and local. Why aren't you protected? \\'hat about your child or your niece and nephew? There's a Houston Independent School District bond election on this ballot. It might fix up their school. Have you been named their guardian? A court, with an elected judge, could decide that you are unfit anywa~: I recently heard Judge Bill Moody, who is a District Court judge in El Paso Court and a candidate for the Texas Supreme Court, say that courts all across Texas could be changed entirely, and overnight, by this election. He said, "I have to do what they tell me to, even if I don't like it." and said there are five con­tested seats on the Texas Supreme Court. If all five Democrats beat their Republican opponents. they would be a majority. This is the first time in at least 20 years that there have been so many contested seats, Moody said. Usually, only three members are up for election at any one time, but there were some vacancies. IF YOU DON'T TIIlNK IT MAKES A difference, look at the Republican platform and what it says about gays. It is on their Web site. The Harris County Republican site is www.harriscountygop.com, and just go from there. This was drafted by the party activists, the people who run the office and put out the endorsement sheets. These are the people from whom a candi­date needs help to survive the primar;: If you don't think it matters, why do you think we are waiting to SP.e if the Texas sodomy statute will be considered by the U.S. Supreme Court? It was found unconsti­tutional, under the Texas Constitution, by two of three appeals judges. Then the Republican activists talked about sending a letter protesting the decision. It was never sent, but word went out, and. then. all the rest of the judges decided the first two were wrong. Coincidence? I think not Assuming that you've decided to vote, here's how to do it. If you are not already registered, you may not vote in this election. To check your registration, the easiest thing to do is to go to the Tax Asses.<;0r Collector (you used to have to pay to register, a poll tax. which is why this office handles voter registration) at www.tax.co.harris.tx.us.gov Find your certificate or print out the one on that Web site. You may vote at any early polling location at various hours beginning on Saturday, Oct. 19 and contin­uing until Friday, Nov. 1. Locations include the multi-service cen­ter on West Gray and the Fiesta on Kirby near the new stadium - which we (some of us) voted for. If you vote on Tuesda): Nov 5, it must be at your neighborhood polling place. The county clerk runs the election. OCTOBER 18. 2002 11 See www.cclerkhctx.net for details. The new machines will take some get· ting used to. but don't leave until you i;ee the flag waving at the end. If you think have done everything you needed to do to be reg­istered to vote, and are denied the right to vote, don'tjust go awa}: There are proce­dures for you to vote on a contested ballot. They take some paperwork. but it can be done. Your favorite candidate's office will be able to help or point you in the correct direction. The earlier you vote, the easier it is to handle any problems or Lo;sue,,. Gay, lesbian, bi.sexual and transgender voters can make a difference in a close race. if they vote, and if they vote for candidates who support equal treaonent for gays. I love the song from "My Fair Lady" which goes. "Don't speak of stars shining above, if you're in love, show me." I feel that way about claims that a candidate is "gay­friendly" - show me, and I'll vote for you. ~ Ela Tyler is a freelance writer for V Houston Voice and a longtime political activist in Houston. She may be reached via editor@houstonv 12 OCTOBER 18. 2002 practically anything! l y ' I www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on the record "I think if anything I had underestimated people's homo­phobia. The tabloids have been like piranhas round a rotting corpse .... You get all these male journalists asking you what it's like to kiss a girl. I just think. 'You're a bloody man. you tell me!'" Rachael Stirling, who plays a young woman whose se/fdis­covery includes a lesbian love scene with Keeley Hayes in the new BBC drama 'Tipping the Velvet' (The Guardian, Oct. 8) "Your suggestion that I am sending the 'wrong message' in not filing a hate crime is irresponsible and panders to a vigilante mentality inconsistent with due process. I took an oath to uphold the law as chief prosecutor of Los Angeles County. I am responsible to the people, not the politicians." Los Angeles County District Attorney Steve Cooley, in a letter to L.A. Mayor James Hahn, responding to criticism of Cooley for not prosecuting as hate crimes two recent beatings of gay men in West Hollywood (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 12) "In high school I was big enough to get past the gay thing. Freshman football. I went out to hurt people. I found the biggest redneck and went for his knees side· ways, stomped his face when he was down. I was a monster, a legend. And then I could go jump rope with the girls." Rodger .UcFarlane, 47, competing next month on a team with three middle-aged lesbians in a JO-day adventure race in Fiji that will be filmed by producer Mark Burnett, creator of the "Survivor" series (New York Times, Sept. 22) "I met a gay man and became very good friends with him Then I met his friends. He kept saying. 'What is the Catholic Church doing for my gay friends and sisters?' I said I didn't know, and he said. 'Why don't you do something?"' Sister Jeannine Gramick, rebuked by the Vatican for her ministry 10 gay and lesbian Catholics, on her original motivation (Toledo Blade, Oct. 5) ''I'm excited about the fact that I could make history, but I recognize if I'm elected it's because I'm best·suited to represent the values of this district." John l,aird, former mayor of Santa Cruz, Calif., on his bid to become the first openly gay man to serve in the California General Assembly, which has had several out lesbian members (Santa Cruz Sentinel, Oct. 13) "I would never do anything to turn against my raising. Marriage is intended to be between a man and a woman. Period." Ccngressman Mike Ross (D·Ark.) in a recent televised debate (Associated Press, Oct. 13) "Mr. Ross is on loan from the liberals to our conservative cause. He will turn over the agenda to the gay and lesbian lobby. He's accepted money from them He's accepted business from them." Former Congressman Jay Dickey (R·Ark.), in a televl~ed debate with Mike Ross, the man who s11cce.ssfully challenged Dickey in the 2()()() election (Associated Press, Oct. 13) "I'd have nothing against anybody if they were gay, but really, I don't want to know . .. I don't want to know what so and-so did with his wife last night, so why would I want to know if hes smoking the pole?" Veteran NF!, run· mng back .lfarshall Faulk, of the St. Louis Rams (Playbo:,; November issue) HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com KALETRA IS indicated for the treatment of HIV 1nfect10n in combination with other antiretroviral agents 1n patients 6 months of age or older. KALETRA does not cure HIV infect10n or AIDS and does not reduce the nsk of passing of HIV to others. Safety Information KALETRA should not be taken If you have had an allergic reaction to KALETRA or any of its ingredients. KALETRA must not be taken with certain drugs due to the potential for serious and/or life-threatening side effects. Discuss all medicines, including those without a prescription and herbal preparations, you are taking or plan to take with your doctor or pharmacist. Pancreatrt1s and liver problems, which may cause death, have been www.kaletra.com Abbott L.aboratorieS Abbott Park. 11. eooe.i Cl1002 Abbott L.oboratones reported in patients receiving KALETRA Tell your doctor if you have or have had river disease such as hepalltis. Your doctor may want to monitor your liver function. In patients taking protease Inhibitors, increased bleeding (in patients with hemophiria) and diabetes/high blood sugar have occurred. Changes 1n body fat have been seen 111 some patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Some patients receiving KALETRA have had large increases 1n tngtycerides and cholesterol. The most commonly reported side effects of moderate or severe 1ntensrty are: abnormal bowel movements, diarrhea. feeling weak or tired. headache, and nausea. Children most often reported diarrhea. rash, taste aversion, and vomrting KALETRA oral solut10n contains alcohol. Please see adjacent page for Patient Information. 02~1 May2002 Printed in USA OCTOBER 18. 2002 13 14 OCTOBER 18. 2002 KALETRA"' (lopinavir/ritonavir) capsules (lopinavir/ritonavir) oral solution ALERT: Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with KALETRA. Please also read the section "MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA." Patient Information KALETRA"' (kuh-LEE-tra) Generic Name: lopinavir/ritonavir (lop-IN-uh-veer/rit-ON-uh-veer) !lead this lea1l!t carefully before you start takinO KALETRA. Also. read h each time you get your KALETRA prescriptiOn relilled. 111 case sometlling haS Changed. This mtonnation does not take the place ot tllkin1l with your doctor when you start this medicine and at Check ups. Ask your dQdor It you have any questions about KAlETRA Wllat Is KALETRA 1nd how don h wort? KALETRA 1s a combinalJon of two meaicines. They are 1oo1nav1r and ntooavtr. KALETRA is a type of medicine called on HIV (human lmmUnOde!ldency virus) prole3Se {PRC>-leHsel IMibilo< KALETRA IS alWays used In ccmblnation wtth other 111!>-HIV medlCil1es to treat ~ wtth human lrnmunOdeficiel virus (HIV) 11fedlon KALETRA IS for adullS and for c:llildren age 6 months and olde1. HN lllfectJon des!roys CD4 (T) ceDs wl1lch are tmportant to the rnmune system After I la'll'l number of T ceDs are destroyed, acquired tmmune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) dM!ops KAl.ETRA blocks lllV protease, a Chemical wllich IS needed for HIV to multlply KAl.ETRA reduces the amount of HIV In your blood Ind increases the number of T cells. Reduclna the amount of HIV In the bloOd reduas tile Chanc8 of deatll or lnfectiOnS that happen when your Immune system IS weak (oppartunlstiC ln!edlons) Don KALETRA cure HIV or AIDS? KALETRA don oat cure HIV lnfectloa or AIDS. 'l1lt long-term efllcts ot KALETRA ire oot known at this lime. Ptopl1 taklllf KAlETRA may still get opportun1stlc Infections or otlllr conditions dial h ppen - HIV Infection. Some of 111111 conditions are pneomonla. llerpes virus. Infections, and Myco/Mct1rlum ,.,um compl11 (MAC) Infections Does KAlETRA reduu the risk of p1111no HIV to others? KALETRA does not reduce the risk of passlnQ HIV to others throtJO~ sexual contJtt or blOod contamination Continue to pr.act.a sale sex and do not use or share dirty needles. How sllould I take KALETRA? • You Should slay under a doctor's care when taking KAl.ETAA Do not Change your lltatmenl or SIOll lleatmenl wilhout fir:t talklllo wtth your doctor. • You must take KA1£TRA f/Very day ent!IY IS your dOctor pre­scnlled it The dose 01 KALETRA may be dolferent for you than for otller pa!lellls. Follow the ditecllons from your doelor, ~ IS wrtl!en on the label • Oos1nQ ., adults (lnduding Children 12 years OI age and older) The usual dose for aduhs IS 3 capsules (400/100 mg) or 5 0 ml of the oral sotulion twiCe 1 day (morrung and night) ., combination with otner an!HilV mediclnfS • Oos1nQ., Children from 6 months to 12 years of ZQe Children from 6 months to t 2 yea11 01 age con also take KALETRA. Thi Child's doctor win decide the rJghl dose based on the Child's weight • Take KAl.ETRA With food to l>elp It worti bettat • Do not Change your dose or stop taking KAl.ETllA wlthou1 f r:t till< Ing With your doctor •When your KALETRA supply starts to run low get more from your doc!Or or pharmacy This is very unportant because the amount OI YllUS m your blood may lnerease U the medicine Is stopped for even a short time TM virus may devtlop resiSUnce to KAlETRA and become harder to •nat. • Be sure to set JP a schedule and follow • careMly • Only lalce medlCllle that has been prescribed spedfJCafly for you Do no! give KALETRA to others or lake medicine p~ tied ror someone else Wllat sbooh:l I do It I miss 1 dose ol KAlETRA? ft IS lmpQltin! tha1 you do nol miss any doses U you l1llS$ I dose 'lf KAlETRA. l3l<e I as soon as PQS!lble and t!len tlka your nex1 Woeduled dose ar IS leQlJlat bme. n n 1S almCs! time tor your nex1 dOSe. do no1 lab Ille missed dose. Wail ;ind take Ille nex1 dose • Ille "Ouf3r lime Do nol doullle Ille nex1 dose Wllat bappens H I take too 11ucb KAlETRA? n you suspect that you too< more lllan tile prescribed dose of this medicine. contacl your local poiSon control center or emergency room immediately As wtth an prescnptlDn medicines KALETRA slloukl be kept out of the reach or young Children KALETRA liquid contains a large amount ol alcohol If a toddler or young child accidental!'; dnnks more lllan the recommended dose of KALETRA, 1t coufd make hunl!ler sick lrom too mueh lleohol. Contact your local poison control center or emergency room Immediately 1f thiS happens. Wllo should aot take KALETRA? Together with your doctor, you rieed to decide whether KAlETRA is noht for you. • Do not take KALETRA W you are taking certlJn medidnes. These could cause senous side elfects that could cause death. Be!ore you take KALETRA. you must left your doc!or about all the medidneS you are taldr.g or are planning to tak!. These lncluda other pmcriptJon and non-prescriptlon medlCllleS and herbal supplements. for more lnformallOn about mediclneS you should not take with KALETRA. D1ease reac1 the secllllll blled 0 MEOICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETAA" • Do not take KALETRA u you have an lllergy to KAl.ETRA or any Of Its ingredients. llldudmg rltonavir or lopinavir Clft I take KALETRA wltll od>er mlldlCIUoa?• KAlETRA may lnteracl with Other medicines, incfudlllg tnose you take without a prescnptlon You must tell your doc:lor about all the medl­cmes you are taking or plaMlng to take before you takll KALETAA MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA: • Do not take the foDowlng medicines with KALETRA because they can cause serious problems or death If taken with KALETRA 01hydroergotam1ne. ergonovlne, ergotam1ne and methyler gonovlne such as Calergot", Migranal9 0 H E. 45•, Ergotrate Ma!eate, Methergine, Ind others Halclon9 (triaZolam) - Hismanat9 (astem12ote) - Orap" (pimozide) - Propufsi<!" (ctsapride) - Rythmol9 (propa!enonel - Seldane9 (ter1enadine) Tambocor"' (flecainide) -versecie (midazolam) • Do t10t take KALETRA with '1lamptn, also ~ as Runactane" Ritall n9. Rita~. or Rifam3te9" Rifamp111 may lower the amount of KALETRA In your blood and make tt less effectNe. • Do not lake KALETRA With St Jolll'l's wort (hypericum per1oratum) an herbal producl sold IS a dlelary IUPl)lement. Of product$ contallllng St John's wort. Talk with jOUI dOctor • you are taking or planning to take St John's wort Talang SL Jolln's wort may decrease KALETRA leVelS Ind lead to Increased viral load and possible resistlnCe to KALETRA or cross-<esistlnce to Othe1 antH!IV medicines. • Do not take KAl.ETRA with the CllolesteroHowering medicines Mevacore (lovastatln) or loco,. (simvastltin) because of possible serious reacllons. There Is llso an Increased rtsk of drug Interactions =betweuen KA LETRA Ind ~ (lloMS1llin), till< to your doctor take any of these Cholesterol-reducing medicines with Mlldlclnn th•l require dosage 1d1uslments: n IS possible that ~ doctor may need to inerease or decrease the dose of ot11er medicines w1!en ~are also taking KALETAA Remem­ber to tell your doctor an medicines you are taklng ., ptan to take. 111011 you take Vl1gr.a• tslld1naflll - KALETRA. talk to yoor doctor 1bout problems-. two mlldlclnn Cll Cl ... when taken together. Y°" moy f9t lncre1111d side Ill- of VIAGRA. soch 11 low blood pressurt. YISIOI ClllllfH, .... ''"Is 1rectloa 11111119 more 1111• 4 hours. If 1n erlC!loo lam looger Illa• 4 !tours, get mlldle1I help right away to 11111d perm1nut damage to '°"r penis. Yo111 doctor Cln 11pll11 these symptoms to yoa. • n you are taking olil contracep1Jvts ("the pilr) to prevent pregnancy. you should use an lddltional or different type or contraception Since KALETRA may reduce the effectrveness of oral contraceptives. • Efavtrenz (Sustiva"') 0< nevtraptne (Viramune") may lower the amount of KALETRA m your blOod Your doctor may increase your close of KALETRA u you are also takmg efavtrenz or nevlraplne • If you are taking Mycobut n9 (r•fabutm). your doctor wil Jwer the dose of Mycobutm •A ch1nge In therlpy moold be considered ii you 111 taking KALETRA with: Phenobarb1tal Phenytom (011antin9 and otr:ers) Carbamazepme (Tegretol" Ind alher.s) These med11:mes may IOwer the amount ot KAlETRA In your blood and make h less effec '8. • Other Special Consldtratlons· AAlfTllA ora so!u!IOll contains alcol1 Talk with your doClor U you are taking or plannf"9 to ti!< metronidUole or diSulfuam Severe 'lausea and vornltil1g can acc.: • If yoo 111 bklllf bclb dldanoslne (Vlde~ and KAlETRA. Old.lnoSine (Vidix9) Should be taken one hOur before or lwlJ hOur.s after KA1£TRA. What are 1111 pqsslble side 1ntc1s ot KAlETRA? • TINS fist of side effects IS nat complete f you hive qUIStiOns about side effects. ask your doctO! nurse or ph3rmaclsl You stiould report any new or contmu!ng symptoms to your doctor rlghl ~ Your doctor may be able to help you manage these Side effects • The most commonly n:ported side effects of moderate seventy that www.houston voice.com are thought to be drug related are: abnormal stools (bowel move­ments). diarrhea. leellng weak/tired. headache, and nausea Children taking KALETRA may sometimes get a skin rash. • Blood tests in patients taking KALETRA may show possible l""r prob­lems. f'9ople with liver disease SUch as tlepatrtJs 8 Ind Hepatl!IS C who take KALETRA may have wor.sening f""1 d1Sta3e. Liver protllems ~~~~~:is.. ~. ~t= patients had otller linesses or were tak!ng o!llef medicines. • Some patients tak.'nQ KALETRA can dflVtlop serious problems with their pancreas (pancrtabllS). wtilch may cause death. You have a higher Chance of hiving pancreatillS H you have had It belore Ten your doctor H you have nausea. vornltil1g or abdominal pain. These may be signs of pancrealillS • Some patients have large lnaeases tn trtglycendes and Cholesterol. The ionq-term ChanC8 01 getting complicabOflS suCh as heart attacl<s or Slloke due to Increases 111 lllglycertdes and Cllolesterol caused by protease lnhlbltO<S Is not known at thiS bme. • Diabetes and hiqh blood sugar (hyperglycemia) OCCllr tn patJents taking protease inM>llOrs such u KALETAA Some patients had diabetes before startmg protease 111hibltors, others did nol Some patients need Changes In their diabetes medicine. Others needed new diabetes medicine • Changes tn body lat have been seen In some pahenls taking anti· retrOYlral therapy These changes may Include Increased amount of fat in the upper batk and neck (°buffalo humP1, brtast, and around the trunk. Loss ol fat lrom the !ells. arms and lace may also hap­pen. The cause and long term health effects ol these conditions ue not known at this ttme • Some patients with llemO!Jhilla have Increased bleeding with pro­tease lnhiblto11 • There have been other Side elfects In patients taking KALETRA However, these Side effects may hive been due to other medicines tha1 patients were taking or to the Illness hseH. Some of these side effects con be serious Wllat should I tell my doctor belore taking KALETRA? ·~::::.==~~"'=~~ . w~ .fo':f=: ~east~:WV::~e:!f J: tt'~u~ woman who has or wtn have a babv. tall< with your doctor about the best WrJ to feed your babv You should be aware that It your baby does not already have HI'/. there ls a chance that HIV Cln be trans­mitted through breast-feeding • ff you h3vr liver probltms II you hive liver problems or are Infected With Hepatitis 6 or HepabllS C, you Should tell your doctor before taking KALETAA • "you hM di4bttes Some people taki.-.g protease tnhlbtlOIS dMIOP. new or more senous diabetes or high blood suoar. Tell your doctor rt you have diabetes or an lnertase In thirst or lrequent unnahon • If you have hlm(lflh1/1J. Patients taking KALETRA may have Increased bleeding How do I store KAlETRA? • Keep KALETRA and al1 other medldnes out of the reaeh ol Children. • Re!ngented KALETRA capsules Ind oral solution rernam stable unlJl the explratlDn date printed on the label. II stored at room tem­perature up to n"F (25-C). KALETRA capsules Ind oral sotutlOll Shook! be used w!thlll 2 months • Avotd PjlOSUre to excesstve heat Do not keep medicine tll3l ls out of c:ate or th:!! ycu no longer need. Be sure that i you ttvow any medicht ntZi. I ls Gd~ Ille "3Cll ~ Cflildn:n. Gentr.11 1dvlc1 1bout prescription medicinn· Talk to your doctor or alher health care prDvlder U vou have any questions about this medicine or your cond !IOn MedlClnes are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than lhOse listed In a =~~f~= ~~'v~r~~r'r%:i~'=~~ 11forrl13t1Dn about this medicine Iha! was wnnen for health care pro­fessionals. Do not use thiS med ne for a cond1tton for wtueh h was not prescribed Do 'IOI share this medicine with other people • The brands listed are llldemarks of the r respective owner.sand are not trademarks of Abbon lilboratorles The makers of these brands are not att ~ted W1th and do not endorse Abbon lilboratortes or Its products Ref 03-5177 ·R6 Revised January 2002 028-03&2825-1 llASTl:R 020-03&3555-t PRllTEDl:lUSA HOUSTON VOICE - - best of dining BEST BRUNCH READERS' CHOICE: Baba Yega Restaurant 2607 Grant St. 713-522-0042 With an extensive brunch bar, beautiful patio and tranquil atmosphere. Baba Yega is the ideal location for a memorable brunch. EDITOR'S CHOICE: 1415 Grill (formerly Sonoma) 1415 California and Mesa Grill 1971 W. Gray 713-520-8900 Both 1415 (formerly Sonoma) and Mesa Grill offer upscale, urban atmospheres in addition to traditional good brunch foods. BEST OVERALL READERS' CHOICE: Barna by's Cafe 604 Fairview 713-522-0106 Houston Voice readers dub Barnaby's a nice chic restaurant with prompt service and a great menu. Farrago Resta uran t 302 Gray 713-523-M04 www.farrago.tv Make a short drive to Midtown for this funky, fun eatery with a hip, modern style that helped Farrago tie as Houston Voice readers' Best Overall choice. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Barnaby's BEST DESSERT READER'S CHOICE: House of Pies Restaurant & Bakery 6142 Westheimer 713-782-1290 The name says it all. House of Pies is the place to go to sat­isfy your sweet tooth, and it's a great after-hours rest. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Empire Cafe 1732 Westheimer 713-"528·5282 Drop by Empire for a cup o' Joe and a to-die-for piece of cake. BEST VALUE READER'S CHOICE: Barna by's EDITOR'S CHOICE: Karo's Fine Chinese Cuisine 4500-C Montrose Blvd. 713-529·5057 and Riva's Italian Restaurant 1117 Missouri 713-529-3450 Both Kam's and Riva's serve up ethnicity along with delicious foods in generous portions. MOST ROMANTIC READER'S CHOICE: The Brownstone Restaurant 2736 Virginia 713·520-5666 www. brownstone­houston. com The elegant atmosphere and excellent food are two of the reasons Brownstone is a sure­fire romantic pick. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Sambuca Jazz Cafe 909Texas 713-224-5299 www.sambucajazzcafe.com Located in the heart of downtown, Sambuca Jazz Cafe offers a great dining experience with jazz music adding to its ambiance and charm. MOST TRENDY READER'S CHOICE: Mo Mong Restaurant Houston HOUSTON VOICE OCTOBER 18. 2002 PAGE 15 1201 Westheimer 713-524-5664 Let's face it Mo Mong is the place to see and be seen. It's hip, fun and offers great food and good value. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Aries Restaurant Ltd. 4315 Montrose 713-526-4404 www.ariesrestaurant.com On your way to the museum district, stop at Aries and enjoy the ever-changing menu full of complex dishes. the trendy decor and prices to match. BEST LATE NIGHT READER'S CHOICE: Katz Deli & Bar 616 Westheimer Rd. 713) 521 ·3838 www.katznevercloses.com Houstonians never have to worry about what time Katz's closes, and the restaurant always serves up huge amounts of food. EDITOR'S CHOICE: House of Pies Restaurant &Bakery Late night may be the best time to discover why this eatery also is informally known as the "House of Guys." TRIED AND TRUE READER'S CHOICE: Baba Yega. Need we say more? Houstonians have come to expect the good service and great food that Baba Yega offers. EDITOR'S CHOICE: The Ruggles Grill 903 Westheimer 713-524-3839 This popular landmark has been around for decades, and continues to serve up style and delicious dishes. BEST DANCE CLUB READER'S CHOICE: South Beach won the Houston Voice Readers' Choice as Best Dance Club. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) South Beach 808 Pacific 713-529-7623 www.southbeachthenight· club.com With kickin' DJs. a bar that never runs dry and dry ice that's blown across the dance floor as speakers blast, South Beach is the spot to dance the night away. And the guys appre­ciate those hot dancers. too! EDITOR'S CHOICE: Rich's Houston 2401 San Jacinto 713·759·9606 www.richs-houston.com For a tried and true good time and a mixed crowd, put on your dance shoes or boots. as the case may be - and step into Rich's. Brazos River Bottom Club 2400 Brazos 713-528-9192 For both Houstonians who hit the dance floor and those who chat on the sidelines, BRB offers plenty of space in a coun· try-themed atmosphere, right down to the neon moon over the dance floor. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Brick's II 61i Fairview 713-528-8102 This neighborhood country bar puts on no airs. Houstonians stop by for a friendly game of pool in a homey atmosphere. BEST LESBIAN BAR READER'S CHOICE: Chances Bar 1100 Westhetmer 713-523-7217 www.chanceshouston.com Readers call Chance.", The New Barn and The Other Side fun and diverse with the advan· tage of three bars in one. Reasonably priced drinks are a big draw as well. The fnerd'nes.s d teida 'Mela" QrinR; is jJst In! d the reasalS lbJStoo le!bans stqJ ~ Mel.15 CUI. Tiis year, Qrlreras was re<XX}izl>d fer her kn;Jtire axmuity service wl-ei ~was Mm! fm\lle pd nmtial d the lbJStoo Prik! ~ (Ptrlo ~ D.lltm DeHart) EDITOR'S CHOICE Mela's Club 6104 w·ucrest Drive 281-564-0466 Thisleibiml teylm lnr~ patrons in a country atmosphere. BEST NEIGHBORHOOD PUB READER'S CHOICE: J.R.'s 3435 S. Richey 713-910-7733 Comfort and fun are easily found in this Montro~e bar that has become a local-institution. Please see BEST OF on Page 16 • 16 OCTOBER 18. 2002 I best of gay ouston BEST OF, cootmued from Page 15 EDITOR'S CHOICE: Mary's ... ~aturally 1022 Westhenner 713-527 9669 and Club 611 611 Hyde Park 713-526-7070 Mary's JS infamous for its exte­nor decor and changing wmdow scene. not to mention its neigh­borhood, friendly feel But don't m1SS out on the 611 atmosphere, remmiscent of a hunting lodge with good friends all around. BEST HAPPY HOUR READER'S CHOICE: Meteor 2306 Genesse 713-521-0123 Great bartenders are just one of the features of this trendy club with a cool video bar. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Mary':. BEST LEATHER BAR READER'S CHOICE: The Ripcord 715 Fairview 713-521·2i92 wwv.:theripcord.com Infamous for its back patio scene. many gay Houstonians consider the Ripcord the leather bar of their dreams. EDITOR'S CHOICE: The Ripcord BEST DRAG SHOW READER'S CHOICE: Cousins Drag fans can find a showcase of the best m thJS art form rverv week at C'-0usms. EDITOR'S CHOICE: The yearly t.tss ~ America fund.raiser offers some of the best drag moments in Houston. (Photo by Dalton OeHartl Miss Ca.mp America This yearly event is fun. exciting and professional. • MOST INTERESTING CROWD READER'S CHOICE: Brasil 2606 Dunlavy 713·528-1993 There is something - and someone - for everyone at this coffee shop. Brasil is defmitely a people-watching paradise. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Houston"s annual Gay Pride Pnle offers the biggest sample of the Bayou City's gay, lesbian. bisexual and transgender crowd. Gay Pride Parade 713-529-6979 www.pridehouston.org. Dykes on bikes, leather men and drag queens galore are just a few participants in this annual event. Don't forget the religious groups. non·profit organizations and more. It doesn't get any more interesting than this. BEST PLACE TO MEET MEN READER'S CHOICE: Montro:.e Mining Co. 805 Pacific 713-529-7488 Get a view of most of Pacific Street and its flocks of men from the patio of the Minmg Company. Need we say more? EDITOR'S CHOICE: Ripcord BEST PLACE TO MEET WOMEN READER'S CHOICE: Bocados Restaurant & Bar 1312 W. Alabama 713-523-5230 At least once a week, this unassummg restaurant becomes a favonte hunting ground for Houston's power dykes. Yununy. EDITOR'S CHOICE. Comet's game Houston Comets 2 Greenway Plaza i13-627-9622 www.wnba.com/comets The Comets have something for everyone: athletic women in uniform. passionate fans and that cute little Haley. BEST PLACE FOR LIVE MUSIC READER'S CHOICE: Keys West 817 W. Dallas 713-571-7870 www.keyswest.com Sing along with friends and other patrons at Houston's newest piano bar, with favorite talents tickling the ivories each night. EDITOR'S CHOICE: The Briar Patch 2294 West Holcombe Blvd. 713-665-9678 Houston's original gay piano bar surrounds patrons in eclectic decor at an unlikely location that works. BEST GIMMICK/ SPECIAL NIGHT READER'S CHOICE: Cafe Adobe Monday nights 2111 Westheimer 713-529-9830 Loyal revelers pick Cafe Adobe's Margarita Monday as the Montrose favorite. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Meteor's Monday nights Combine martinis, manicures and movies for a unique Monday a! this Montrose video bar. BEST BAR OUTSIDE MONTROSE READER'S CHOICE: Guava Lamp 2159 Portsmouth 713.524.3359 Richmond's only gay video bar, populated with a young. friendly crowd, ls home to bartenders as infamous as the establJShreent Itself EDITOR'S CHOICE: Dianmd Jllll!l's, located near the lnter­COlllmentaJ Airport, IS a rrust-Y1S1t bar out­side of Montrose for gay men and lesbians. Diamond Jimm's 13331 Kuykendahl 281-875-3330 Lesbians and gay men outside of Montrose enjoy this new choice on the north side of Houston. People BEST DJ READER'S CHOICE: Rick Taconi Spinning at JR's for years. Taconi keeps the crowd alive with tunes all night. www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE EDITOR'S CHOICE: Michael Kessler at Pacific Street John Simms at Montrose Mining Co. Chris Sills at Rich's BEST BARTENDER READER'S CHOICE: George Konar at J.R.'s EDITOR'S CHOICE: Reid Mitchell BEST DRAG QUEEN READERS CHOICE: Kofi www.misskofi.com Chances are, if you've seen a drag show in Houston. you've seen Miss Kofi. She is the drag queen in Houston. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Crystal Rae Lee Love Drag is never so fabulous as when Love performs as the blonde bombshell for the RSIC­SS, a.k.a. the Royal, Sovereign & Imperial Court of the Single Star of Houston. LOCAL HERO-MALE READER'S CHOICE: Gary Teixeira So many fund-raisers that involve gay Houstonians find Gary Teixeira behind the scenr.s. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Gay Houston attorney Mitchell Katine is helping fight a case that would thew out the Texas sodomy1JW. :\Utchell Katine. John Ul\\Tencc, Tyrone Garner Attorney Mitchell Katine and clients John Lawrence and Tyrone Garner made our pick for their persistence in fighting the Texas sodomy law or so­called "homosexual conduct'" law. The case of Lawrence and Garner v. Texas may be heard by the U.S. Supreme Court this fall. and Katine has worked on the issue from the start. LOCAL HERO-FEMALE READER'S CHOICE: Marilyn Meeker-Williams This committed gay Houstonian is a stalwart at Bering United Methodist Memorial Church. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Janine Brwtjes Lesbian activist Janine Bnlljes, Mayor Lee Brown's liaison to gay Houstomans, recently received the Houston Black Tie Dinner Hu111c1nitarian Award Serving as Mayor Lee Brown's liaison to gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Houstonians, Brunjes is a consis­tent leader on the gay civil rights and community service fronts. UP&COMING BUSINESS PERSONALITY READER'S CHOICE: Danny at Hollywood Food Store EDITOR'S CHOICE: Coy Tow Coy Tow, exec· ut1ve director of the Greater Houston GLBT Chamber of Commerce, is a familiar face on the busi­ness scene in Montrose. The energetic and practically unstoppable executive director of The Chamber, Tow helps bring GLBT business owners and operators together. COMMITTED ACTIVIST-FEMALE READER'S CHOICE: Annise Parker www.c1.houston.tx.us/ city· govt/counclltl The first and. so fru; only openly gay person on the Houston City Council. Annise Parker con­tinually battles on behalf of gay civil rights In this city. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Ada Edwards A consistent ally to gay Houstonians, Edwards has just begun to show her activism in the capacity of a Houston City Council member. COMMITTED ACTIVIST-MALE READER'S CHOICE: Don Gill A tireless volunteer and fund· raiser for dozens of good causes in Montrose, Gill continues work Please SN! BEST OF Oil Page 17 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston VOlce.com I best of gay houston BEST OF, continued from Page 16 as an activist who never expects recognition but always gets the job done. Think 'fund-raiser' in Houston. and the community is just as likely to then think of Don Gill as the man for the job. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) EDITOR'S CHOICE: Don Gill Honorable Mention: Tim Brookover In his capacity as leader of the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Brookover is a quiet but persistent force in help­ing keep the center operating and available to all gay Houstonians. COMMITTED ACTIVIST-TRANS READER'S CHOICE: Phyllis Randolph Frye Longtime transgender activist Phyllis Randolph Frye is a Houston institution and megaphone for the voices of trans rights. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Vanessa Edwards Chair of the National Transgender Advocacy Coalition. Edwards is a constant in the nationwide battle for trans equalit}: Community Life BEST COFFEE SHOP READER'S CHOICE: Lobo 3939 Montrose 713-522-5156 www.lobobookshop.com Located in the heart of Montrose, Lobo is the best local coffee shop to see. be seen and catch up on the latest gossip. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Cafe Artiste 1601 W. Main 713-528-3704 Board games and a comfort­able atmosphere distinguish this coffee shop from the rest. BEST GYM READER'S CHOICE: Fitness Exchange Health Club 4040Milam 713.524.9932 www.fitnessexchange.com This establishment strives for a comfortable. community atmo· sphere. making it a clear favorite for gay Houstonians. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Houston Gym 1501 Durham 713-880-9191 Well known for its trainers, Houston Gym gets serious about fitness. BEST BOOKSTORE READER'S CHOICE: Lobo With the largest local selection of gay and lesbian·themed lit­erature. Lobo is the clear favorite bookstore of Houston Voice readers. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Half-Price Books, Records, !Vlagazines 11920 Westheimer .. 281-558-4968 www.halfpricebooks.com A wide variety of books available at reasonable prices make this business a popular stop in Montrose. Don't worry about your pets when you have to travel without them. I provide in-home TLC for your pets. They get daily walks and play while you vacation without worry! Plan ahead I Call now for a holiday sure to be stress-free for both you and your pets! Established 1995 BEST VIDEO STORE READER'S CHOICE: Hollywood Video 1201 Westheimer 713-520-1883 www.hollywoodvideos.com It's convenient, it's near and it has a large and diverse selection of popular and artsy movies. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Q Video 1415 California 713-522-4485 Recently relocated, Q Video stocks a selection of hot flicks with gay and lesbian themes. BEST MUSIC STORE READER'S CHOICE: Sound waves 3509 Montrose 713) 520-9283 www.soundwaves.com Stop by this shop for a huge sel, -ction of both new and used CDs. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Record Rack 3109 S. Shepherd 713-524-3602 wv.•wrecord rack.com Step outside of mainstream music and locate hard-to-find tunes at this unique establishmmt. BEST CLOTHING STORE READER'S CHOICE: Basic Brothers 1232 Westheimer 713-522-1626 www. basicbroth· ers.com This business consis­tently offers the most trendy and sexy clothes. The Basic Brothers Fashion Show is one of the most popular eveiits at the annual Empower business expo. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) M2M Fashion 3400 Montrose 713-521-0804 www.m2mfashion.com For very gay friendly clothing with a unique flail; M2M is the place to shop_ MOST EFFECTIVE LOCAL NON-PROFIT READER'S CHOICE: Montrose Clinic 215 Westheimer 713-830-3000 www.montroseclinic.org With services like free mv testing, literature distributlon and public seminars. the Montrose Clinic provides urgently needed health services at little or no cost EDITOR'S CHOICE: Q Patrol, Inc. 239 Westheimer 713-528-7233. Walking the streets to help prevent hate crimes, members of Q Patrol are a valuable asset to the Montrose community. BEST SPOT 1U CRUISE READER'S CHOICE. :'l<lemorial Park. Cute guys in little running shorts with their dogs. Athletic lesbians contributing to Nature's beauty. It's the best place to find a potential mate. EDITOR'S CHOICE: Disco Kroger 3300 Montrose 713-521>-786.5 www.kroger.com You can sum a guy or gui up in two minutes based on what they're buying at the grocery store. It's the ideal place Arts BEST ART GALLERY READER'S CHOICE: Betz Gallery 1208 W. Gray 713-523-3765 Bronzes! oak Furniture! Kitsch! And lots more! OCTOBER 18. 2002 17 www.betzgalle11:com River Oaks homes \\ooldn't look the same without the selection of fine art fowld at this popular galle!Jl EDITOR'S CHOICE: Galerie Mado Chalvet Impressionist French Gallery 1706 Westheimer ';13-522-0475 It's small. quaint and has a wonderful collection of Impressionist French Art for the expert and novice alike. BEST THEATER READER'S CHOICE: Alley Theatre 615 Texas Ave. 713-228-8421 www.alleytheatre.org Houston's biggest and oldest professional theater company continues to win over audience.~. EDITOR'S CHOICE. Stages Repertory Theatre 3201 Allen PJ..'W): 713-527-8243 ~.stagestheatre.com Theater-goers know Stages for its edgy productions 1n an intimate atmosphere. LOCAL ARTIST READER'S CHOICE: John Palmer EDITOR'S CHOICE: Kermit Eisenhut LOCAL MUSICIAN READER'S CHOICE: Man.ha Carlton and Jerry Atwood • This pair is almost unstop­pable with great tunes and talent at numerous fund-raisers and community events EDITOR'S CHOICE: Scott Gertner With R&B and an enthusias­tic crowd, Scott Gertner enter­tains routinely at his OW'l Sky Bar in Montrose. Compiled by steven Ewing Alford Locuted m~ade C & T Antiques • Open Tues - Sun lo-5 62s w. 19th Street • 113-861-lsoo 18 OCTOBER 18. 2002 an Inclusive Christian Church Services are on Sundays at 11AM Rev. Thomas Martin 3712 Broadway (across from Star Furniture) Galveston, Texas (409) 765-8500 October 20 • "Self Control: 'What Do You /~~ U Mean - NOT NOW?"' ~4., ~~ Rev. Janet Parker ~,. ~ ~l~ Maranatha -.r Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion• Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/ Children's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group· services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1.net www.maranathamcc.com www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE * Bible character or Veggie Tale character costume contest along " .. with door prizes. * A Cake Walk, Let's Go Fishing Booth and lots more fun! * Refreshments will be served. * Free and open to the community! 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Loop South, Ste. 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 SCHMERLER AGENCY HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.corn STEVEN EWING ALFORD Theatre Under the Stars successfully brings famed story to the stage 'Jane' a theatrical delight WHEN I HEARD THAT THERE WAS golng to be a stage production of the book "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" by Henry Farrell and the film starring the legendary Bette Davis and Joan Crawford. I was highly skeptical to say the least. Who could deliver the deranged wit and spiteful spirit of Baby Jane like Bette Davis? And who could play the helpless damsel in distress like Joan Crawford? They had pretty big shoes to fill. Such an ambitious project could not escape the scruti· ny of the throngs of fans who loved the film. As the Theatre Under the Stars play begins. the audience is serenaded by an adorable 11-year-old Baby Jane as she sings and dances with her father in the bright lights of Broadway. As young Baby Jane exits stage, she is replaced by mid· die-aged Baby Jane, played by the distin· guished Millicent Martin. Still wearing the same costume that she had worn 40 years before, Baby Jane has regressed to the childhood stardom of her past. Weaving from her age-appropriate char· acter to her alter ego, Baby Jane has become two people in one. Jane amusingly croons of returning to the spotlight with a revue in Las Vegas. She places an advertise­ment in Variety Magazine for an assistant and she proudly performs her sappy child· like act for his approval. Unimpressed. but eager for work, he indulges Jane. But the assistant doesn't stick around long. He expresses too much interest in Jane's sister Blanche and Jane runs him off. Jane is con· sumed with envy for her once-charismatic sister who received critical acclaim in Hollywood. Perpetually in a drunken haze, Jane has lost the ability to reason and her sister Blanche suffers as a result. Leslie Denniston co-stars as Blanche Hudson, the once beautiful and talented younger sister of Baby Jane. Onct! an MGM superstar, Blanche also feels that her time in the spotlight was cut short. Blanche longmg. Iv &>.arches for her youth through her films ;n television and she remembers the days that she was considered Hollywood royal!): As a result of a tragic accident that happened years before, Blanche is con fined to a wheelchair and must rely upon the demented Baby Jane for her every need. Jane withholds food from Blanche for days on end and cruelly presents her with a rat on a silver platter as her din· ne1: Baby proceeds to fire the maid who was the only confidante that Blanche had. Blanche is haunted by a promise that she made to their father before lus death to care for her lunatic si.stet After much consid!!ra· lion, Blanche reluctantly decides to have her sister institutionalized. As Blanche drags her flaccid legs down the grand flight of stairs and telephones the doctor, thi> uni.mag· inable happens: Jane returns whil~ Blanche Millicent Martin plays Jane Hudson (right) and Leslie Denniston plays Blanche Hudson in the delightful Theatre Under the Stars production of What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?' is telling t}le doctor that Jane has flipped her lid. The light dims as Baby is consumed '\\ith rage and hate for Blanche and a chilling scream is echoed through the theater. Baby Jane's world quickly begins to crumble as she makes one blunaer after another. Though the sisters eventually call a truce, it's too little too late. The demise of both sisters is imminent. ASIDE FROM THE OCCASIONAi. LAPSE of her English accent. Martin's portrayal of insane Baby Jane is exquisite. and Denniston gives a stellar performance as Blanche. While the acting is nearly first class, the true triumph of this piece is its state of the art production. The play suc­cessfully paints a multi-dimensional por· trait of the Hudson sisters through a com· bination of dazzling lighting techniques created by Richard Winkler, lavish cos· tumes designed by Eduardo Sicangco. and perhaps most importantly through an ensemble of three actresses representing each sister at different stages of their lives. The relationships between all sisters are complex but the relationship between the Hudson sisters is further complicated by the fame that they both long for. The tragedy is that both sisters are obsessed with the very thing that brought them fame in their youth and the very thlng that no¥: eludes them. "What E\'er Happened to Baby Jan~?" IS a beautifully creepy melodrama of how ugly delusion and obsession can be. It's the epitome of fame gone terrib1Y wrong. With Baby Jane's boozing, bitchy lyrics written by Hal Hackaday and O\'er·the-top mUSlcal numbers, this play is a delight. @MORE INFO 'What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?" 8 p.rn Tuesdays·Fridays • 2 & 8 p.m Sundays 2 & 7:30 p.m Sundays • Through Oct 27 Tickets $25·$68 • Theatre. Under The Stars The Hobby Center for the Perfonning Arts 800 Bagby @ Walker • 713-558·2600 www.luts.com OCTOBER 18. 2002 19 Plays Fridays and Saturdays at 8 P. M .• Sundays at 5 P. M. -- through October 27 Tickets $15 adult~ $12 studerts -- all tickets $10 on Sund"'s Unhinged at Atomic Cafe, 1320 Nance Call 713-547-0440 for tickets or more info! Before you buy ... Pre-Qualify ·~ ........ I *"''• 713-446-0303 Conventional, FHA, & VA loans 0 Down Payment loans • lo Closing Cost options •!• I 07% Financing Available •:• 10 Cost Refinancing! •:• 80% Cash-out Loans 5°0 down investment/rental property loans Available 7 days a week IOam-lOpm 5444 Westheimer • Suite 1560 • Houston, Texas 77056 20 OCTOBER 18. 2002 Me>lert;At;t ASSe>tlArts e>I- rtXAS' !Virts Al(£ t;/l!.£Ar.1 When you think of buying or refinancing a home ... think of Mortgage Associates of Texas! LINKS L 0 N We' re the largest and oldest mortgage company in the community. We've always been here for you - and we always will be! Houston's Choicel Referred by fine Realtors ... Preferred by knowledgeable consumers!!! Sterling Silver Cuffi1nks Prices from $125. to $270. 1wmark1 ,.,.,,.....,,.~~ ..... ...., .. ....,,....~ 3841 &llaltt Blvd. • Hou1ton, Tcxu n025 • 7~5000 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE dining J.A. CHAPMAN Tel-Wink serves up generous portions with mostly successful tastes Good hot diner food I WAS ON A QUEST FOR THE PERFECT waffle. As we walked into the Tel-Wink Restaurant & Grill one Sunday morning, I took a quick look around. Nice long count­er with sw~l stools. Turquoise colored booths. Quirky memorabilia on the walls. It defmitely had a promising waffle vibe. Taking our place in the 12-deep line, we were exchanging guesses on how long the wait would be when the hostess hollered back to us, "Smoking or non-smoking?" When we replied non-smoking, she motioned us toward an empty booth and we bypassed everyone in line ''Well," said one of my friends, "that's different. The non-smoking section is the only thing available." It was different, but typical of this down-t<>-earth restaurant in the middle of a blue collar southeast Houston neighbor­hood. No Sunday brunch or nou~u diner food here. The Tel-Wink serves breakfast, and boy does 1t serve it right. Our waitress arrived promptly to take drink orders. And you know what' She actually said "hon," as in "What'll you have, hon?" We momentarily entertained the thought that the wait staff might be trained to say "hon" to add an air of authenticity, but quickly discarded that idea. No manufactured kitsch here - the Tel-Wink is the real deal. It was a good thing we arrived hungry. We decided to order some pancakes (two for $2.10) for the table. sort of as a starter. They arrived quickly and disappeared Just as fast. Although not quite as piping hot as we might have wanted. they were light and tasty and as large as the plate. Next up was my watne ($2.50). There had been some discussion about how I wanted my watne cooked. Our waitress recommend· ed crispy, and after canvassing opinions from the table. I went with her suggestion. It arrived straight from the watne maker. an inch and a half thick, hanging off the edges of the plate. and slathered in butter. AND THEN THE FUN BEGAN. MY friends' breakfasts hadn't yet arrived, and they looked lon!tinj:ly at my watne. I made a tactical error of reaching for the syrup. They pounced. Corners then sides of my waffie disappeared. I fought them off with my fork. poured some maple syrup and dug in. Oh, man. was it good! Crispy and gold­en on the outside, lusciously light and creamy on the inside, it was crunchy and smooth at the same time. Now this was a waffle! I kept trying to deter my friends ("Hey. this is my breakfast! Order your own waffle!") but to no avail. My waffle was gone. and I'd only had a few bites. Our waitress returned to inform us that everyone else's breakfast was on the way out. And then she had some good news for me. It turned out that the watne we'd all just devoured was a medium watne, not a cnspy one. And they wanted to give me a crL~py watne to make up for it. Oh happy day! And suddenly the table became a blur of food. A cheese omelet ($2.5.5) was nicely done and accompanied by buttery grits and toast. The two eggs scrambled ($2.2.5) came with toast and thickly shredded, nicely crisped hash browns, which were clearly made from scratch. The side of meaty bacon ($1.5.5) won rave reviews, but the biscuits and gravy ($1.4.5) were a disappointment - the bi<;CUits were lost in a sea of bland gravy that was lit­tle more than a white sauce. And then there was my crispy wafile. We dug in, and this time I had the waf· Ile to myself. It was good, but the medium waffle was better. I longed for that tender souffie·like middle that made the other waffle perfection. The Tel-Wink also does lunch. I stopped by one weekday to check out their fare. and found the restaurant hop­ping and the food just as good. I ordered the chicken fried steak special. For $4.95 I got a platter of salad, two generous sized pieces of chicken fried steak with a huge scoop of mashed potatoes both smothered in tasty peppery gravy (where had this been hiding when we ordered biscuits and gravy?), a side vegetable and toast. I polished all this off with a slice of lemon mermgue pie ($1.75) - not too sweet or too tart and melt· in-your-mouth smooth and waddled out the door. The Tel· Wink Restaurant & Grill is a straightforward kind of place. You get large servings of good, homey food at cheap prices. But the waffles, oooh, my mind wanders. My quest is over - I've found the perfect waffle. ~ Tel-Wink Restaurant ~&Grill 4318 Telephone Road 713-644-4933 Food. !e!!e!!e!i. Service: lei le! le! le! Value: le!le!le!le! Scene: le!le!le! • = Stay home and eat cereal * '91 = Well. if you really must •••=Fine for all but the finnicky ,. ,. le! le! =Worth more than a 20-mmute dnve *!el~ 191 le! =As go00 as you'll ffld in this aty HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com ELLA TYLER The wise consumer is wary of some so-called good deals, and takes advantage of the right ones Shop around A FRIEND BROUGHT ME A CLIPPING about a Sept. 11 commemoration in Jersey City, N.J., which went seriously awry dur· ing the relea~e of white "doves." The birds got tangled up in onlookers' hair, fell into the Hudson River and crashed into office windows. Others were found dead. It was revealed that, instead of renting homing pigeons, which are commonly used for "dove" releases. the organizers bought BO white pigeons at a poultry shop in Newark. Using "off-brand" birds saved the city several hundred dollars and saved the birds from the soup pot, a member of the organizing committee said defensively. I do not consider this a good deal. My definition of a "good deal" is that is one that saves you time, money or aggrava­tion. Here are some of the best deals around. A library card. City of Houston cards are free to all residents of Harris County and the five surrounding counties - even people who do not live in Houston city lim· its. Harris County cards are free to county resident.~. You can borrow books includ· ing audio, large print, and some foreign language - videos, CDs and, from the downtown library, art. The various branch· es offer different lectures and classes, too. Houston Buyers Club. The club was started to provide discounted vitamins and supplements for people with AIDS. but the stock has expanded to include nutritional products that help with a variety of chronic conditions and discounts on prescription drugs. You do not need to be low income to use the service, nor do you need a member· ship. Call 713-.529-5288 for more information. Montrose Clinic. In addition to a wide variety of services for both men and women, the facility offers a women's health clime on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Services include well-women exams, treat· ment and referrals. Services are reasonably priced and the providers l).re competent and sensitive. You do not need to be indigent. For appointments. call 713-8.10-3000. Also, keep an eye out for events spon· sored by Lesbian Health Initiative. They host health fairs from time to time where womE'n can get a variety of services for reasonable fees and lots of mformation. I stopped smoking almost two wars ago with the help of n rrsearch study called ProjE:'ct CASSI at M.D. Anderson. The project is stilt nmnmg call 713·792·2265. F..ady 'l>Oling. Early voting in Harris County begins Oct. 19, earliE:'r than some other counties, and continues every day until Nov. L There are more than 2.5 ealiy polling locations around Harris County, and all you need to do is walk 111 - preferably but not necessarily with your voter regis­tration card - and vote. For details about times and specific locations, see the county clerk's Web site at www.cclerkhctx.net. Fixer-uppers. Clothes with cigarette burns or tears and shoes with holes can be fixed. Check your yellow pages for a re-weaver or a shoe repair shop, or ask your dry cleaners. These services can mean amazing transformations and are often less expensive than one would expect. Besides. shoes that have finally become colnfortable are priceless. Travel deals. I have become very fond of Hotwire.com for hotel reservations. I've stayed with them for five trips and have been pleased with the quality of the hotels and prices. They advertise a four-star hotel at a two-star price, but what my budget allows is two stars at Motel Six prices, and sometimes I've found even cheaper rates. The room is prepaid. so late arrivals are not a problem and the staff has been as nice as if I were paying full price. Stay close to home. The traffic and construction problems that ~m to be everywhere have made shopping and ~ting out in my neighborhood a much better deal than they were before. Driving less makes up for spending a few more cents at the gro­cery store and more restricted selections of restaurants. I've also put a city map back in the car. Not a key map - a street map so 1 can figure out alternate routes. I had an out· side sales job years ago, and know the city well, but the map is still helpful. Don't skip the fine print. Reading the directions and reading the fine print can be a real money saver. As the insurance crisis gets worse 111 Texas, more and more unreg­ulated policies will be sold. Read them care­fully, and if you do not understand. ask for written clarification. You can't negotiate the terms, but you can fmd out what is and is not covered. and what you must do to make a cla1m. Insurance regulation is a state issue, for the most part, so policies can be different from state to state. Shop around. Next weekend's Texa~ Home & Garden Show gives you the chance to see a huge vartety of products and sE:'rvices for your home, all in one place, so it's a good deal. The Reliant Center will have more than .500 booths offering products and services for the house and yard, and plenty of seminars. Sambuca Jazz Cale, Flordita Seafood Grill and Berryhill Tan1ales are among the restaurants doing cooking demonstrations. General admission is $8. The show is runs from Friday to Sunda}; Oct. 25-27. The Web site is wwwTexnsHomeandGarden.com, so check 11 out for more details. I use events like this as an easy opportunity to comparison shop - and that's the best way to get a good deal. OCTOBER lB. 2002 21 HEALTH & BEAUTY Men & womel' who are currently using ~ cocaine needed to take part on a ••• • ,,, , •. treatment r~arch study at. The T FX A S UniverS1ty ofTcxas • Houst0n Mental Sciences Institute Qualified subjects should be In good health W1th no preexisting medical or psychiatric conditions. and at least is years old. You will be compensated for your tmie & tree substance abuse counseling will be provided. Call 713-500-2840. CHIROPRACTOR Or. Richard W. Fletcher • Neck/Back Pain •Auto/Work Injury • Medicare/Medicaid 1245 Yale • 713-862-3897 In The "Heights" at 13th & Yale fYaM;. 1 BlocJt w.. , .-,.,.,,. • HDGHrS aWJ.I Tell them you found , them in the direcf or:y! Support our Advertisers! If your hair Isn't BECOMING to you, then you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APl'Olh'TMOIT OHLY NATIONAL MASSAGE THERAPY AWARENESS WEEKI OCTOBER 21).-26, 2002 SPECIAL 1"' HOUR RATE $45.00! (this_... only) MASjAGE bym.tU, BACK FROM NEW YORKI Gift Certificates also available at this price •GIVE THE GIFT YOU'D LIKE TO GET!• 713-527-0400 or 832-524-7700 Customers are out there! Help them find you by advertising here Call 71 3·-529-8490 . . ~-I Get results! Call now at 713.529.8490 to place your ad in the directory! 22 OCTOBER 18. 2002 I appts a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL SATURDAY AND SUNDAY, OCT.19 AND 20 "The Wmrtfl? A Yil-Ya Mootrose Sist1'l1100d' will be pr?5ell!ed tlis weekml 17/ the Halloviem Magic Playl!r5. The arniaf nlJ5ical event benefits eqit Houstoo non­IJ'Qfit HIV/AlDS ser'lice org.Wations. ~open an Im' and a half llefa-e each perflJmm:e fur a ive in­sillw art auctm rmts: $75 fur Sa!lrily. S25 fur Sood.?J. 9 p.m Saturday, Oct.19. all 2:30 p.m Sood.?J, Oct. 20. Edwin Ha1ilerger Conference Center. 2151 West HolaJmbe. 713-~2342. UPCOMING "Tell Me A Story' is a cabaret everul1;l Wlth Deborah '* Bolly and Annalee Jefferies. who present stories in song and verse. Also, the new Gay Men's Chorus of Hcuston Small Ensemble wm debut 713-521-7464 E-mail: tidcets@gmcltorg. www.gmcltorg. UPCOMING "8ewftched Ball' is a night of lllJSIC, food and fun to benefit the Houston Lesbian & Gay Coommity Center The everul1;l will include live music. a DJ and c!Jncing, a costume contest silEnt auction and right fare Wlth a cash bar. T ICkets: S20. 8 p.m to 2 a.m Holiday Im Hotel & Suitfs. Galleria. 713-569-2021 E-mail: bewitchedball hotmailcom FILM THIS WEEKEND Tm Gon;i Herne" IS the latest 1ilm frtxn the prolific Manoel de Oliwira. stl going strong at age 93. The story centm on a successful theater actor. his family tragedy and how he deals with the grief and attempts to go on with his career 7 p.m Frictly. Oct ia and Saturd.1y. Oct 19 TICkets: $6. Museum of Fne Arts Hooston. caroline Wiess Law Building. oomer of Main Street and Bissm1et/Blnz. 713-639-7515. www.mfah.org. THIS WEEKEND "loolc Back In Arqer° IS based Oil the famous play 17/ John Osbourne and features Richard Burton in one of his finest perlonnances. The actor plays a poverty­str1dcen young man who Wees his aggression out on the world l1f seducing his best friend"s wife 7 p.m Saturday Oct 19. and 5tJnday Oct 20. Tdets: S6. Rice Cinema. Rice University Campus. Entrance ~lo. S. UniVerSlty Boulevard and Stodrtoo Orne. 713-348-4853. wwwrtlf rice.edu/-onerna. GALLERIES OCT.16-31 "PhoneWorlcs" on these dates features Glorla Vando at D1verseWor1cs. The celebrated Puerto Rican poet is the author of "Shadows and Silpposes and Promesas: Geography of the Impossible," and this rive recording .s brought courtesy of Arte Pubfico Press. Free. 713-335-3443. DiverseWoro Inc.. lli7 East Freeway WWW diverseworhorg. ONGOING Gilt Coast Ardives & Mll5elll1 Ii GlBT listoly Satelite Extilition. Tue rm exhilition m.n the r.cAM collection presented at the lbzston Leslian & Gay Coomrity Center ~ the NAMES Project Houston. Coomrity Center 803 Hawthcme. 713-524-.381a Positive Art Worlcshop Photography ExhiJition. Artists riving Wlth HIV/AIDS created these pictures Wlth accompanymg text Houston Lesbian & Gay Con ·· · .. A "'er, 803 ~ 713-524-38la MUSIC UPCOMING •An Evrilo of Elingtal" will be pr?5ell!ed next week­end 11/ the Tex.;s T.ip Ensemble. The~ reveal the l!'IClution of two of Americ.l's greatest art 1orms: 1ap dan:ing and iazz l!llSIC, an showcasirJ.J the talents of ~ Eilingtoo. Tooes featLred wil i1Cide "Sa!i1 Doll" arxI "Mood lrdgo: 8 p.m Oct 25-Zl Miller Outdoor TheJtre in Hennam Parle. 71J.686.'1l84 community calendar SATURDAY,OCTOBER19 Houston Outdoor Group. Monthly social at the home of Jon and John 111 Oak Forest 7 p.m 713-290-0220. EVERY SATURDAY All-Spanish Wriip Se!vice/Noche Espiritual. 6 pm. Resurrection Metropolitan Conummity Oiurch. 2026 W 11th. 713-303-3409 or 713-861-9149 After H;olJl'S. KPFr 901 FM 1-4 a.m D9litY mass. 7.30 p.m for gay Catholics. 713-880-28n. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic.11 p.m-2 a.mat Viviana's. 713-830-3000 Gay & Lesbian 8r!akfast CkJb. 9".30 a.m 281-437-0636. Houston Wresting CkJb. Practice-130 pm 713-453-7406 (}Patrol Volunteers w-a!k the streets to help prevent hate cnmes. 9".30 p.m Convene at eonmmity center 713-528-SAFE. E-mail: qpatrolb1c@aolcom Sl Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary 8 am. 1605 W Alabama. 713-528-6665 Hrustm Le!tiian & Gay Cormuity Center. ~ rroi-5 p.m • FirTln.M>r Kyte FtJ hosts ''Meet the Go-Go 6ajs' as a f1nHa6. er for the center. 7 p.m Tu! Milt feallns samW-qs of lis 15- mrte doam:ntry. "Crissioffi d a Go Go Pn{ stM1YJ EdJ.llOO Costa SS dcmtKii1 at the cbr. Li1Jrt refreslJT1ents v.I be served • 003 Hawthcrre 713-524-38IB WWW~ SUNDAY, OCTOBER 20 Hrustm ~ Men's Wi. Gl1l4> for l:ig ~and their atiirer5 p.-risa soca at 4 p.m ~ 8622 Stela Lit at Sooth Elraes'MlOd. WWW~ 281·534-8747. Monln1se Mia Democrats PAC. Ftnl-raiser featiring cab.iret singer De!Jorah Blliy. avad-wiTing poet MJr1c Doty and carddate Diane Feiler, pkJs other elected officials. 1415 Grill 1415 califonia. R2servJtions reco1111eded: www.mad­tines. crWPac. E-mail: ~ 713-942-0494. EVERY SUNDAY Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 6:30 & 10:50 a.m Sonday school 9:45 am. 713-526-1017 Cormuity Gospel Ser.ice at 11 am & 7 p.m Sulfay Schld for chlimlOam ~Sorwww~~ ConmMy of Kindred Spirits In Beaumont. Worship at 6 p.m 1575 Spindletop Ave.. BeaumonL Texas. 409-813-2055. E-mail: cksrevla;netzero.net Cownant Church. Erumenical. LileraJ Baptist Serv1C:e 9:30 am & education hour 11 a.m 713-668-8830. ~ Unitarian Cluth. Adult education. lD am Semce, 11 a.m Lunch at noon www.emersonhou.org. Fnt Caveg;ilialal Ovd1~SeMceat10 am Oristm &il:alm 11:30am 71J.46S.9543 or~ Frst lkitsian Uiwrsaist Cluth. Servas at 9".30 & 11:30 am. Bnn:h at 10'.30 a.m 713-526-5200. cfuth:a;futworg. Free HlV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 9 p.m.-midnight at Club Inergy 7'13-l00-3000. Gay Cathofic.s at Sl Ame'~ 5 p.m wmhip serv­ice Dinner and social alexcarna;,wt.nel 713-623-0930. GLOBAL Gay leslllan Or Bisexual Alliance l.Wiemy of Houston GLBT student ~ meetirJJ. 2 p.m at the Houstoo Lesbian & Gay Conmmity Center. 803 Hawthorne. 713-524- 3818. wwwuh.edu/~ E-mait global@bayoo.uh.edu. Grace Lutheran Church. Sonday school for all ages 9 anl. SeMCe 10-.30 a.m 713-528-3269. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m-noon. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center. houstonteMisdb(a;aolcom Maranatha Fellowship ~ Church. lo am service. 3333 Fannin. Suite 106. 713-528-6756. Resmdm MCC. Services. 9 and 11 am Cltim and YMh Sood.?J Sdlld.10 am OiOOtS service.11 am 713-861-9149 Sl Stephen's Episcopal Clvth. Holy Eucharist. Rite l 7:45 am; Holy Euchanst Rite Il 8:55 am.; Education hour 10 am; Choral Eucharist. 11 a.m 713-528-6665. Slnlay Bn.n:ll Rlr HIV-positi'le men 11 a.m Riva's. lli7 MlSSOUl'I Sl Pall. 71J.880-0690. e-mail: f'llznBuff a;adaxn The Women's Gr~ Meeting and discussion. 10:45 a.m 713-529-8571. ThreaJ l.Wtaia1 lkiYersaist Coo;regatioo. Mllt discus­sion, 9 am Ser.ice. ll:l5 a.m 28l·m.a882 www twc.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church Sl Service, IQ-JO am 409-765-8330. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum, 10 am Service. 11 am 713-686-5876. Houslm Lesbian & Gay Conmrity Center. Drop-ir\ 2-6 p.m • GLBT Conmnty Cluth with Rev. Mclissa Woof. !We study.10.10:45 am. woolip 11 a.m www.geocitjes.oonV • LOAF <LesOOns Over /;qi flftyl. 2 p.m •STAG <Soo-e Transgenden /Jn Guys>. 1 p.m • Dinner at the center potLd. with donations ~ fa the cen­ter, b p.m '603 Hawthorne. J13.524-3818. WWW~ MONDAY, OCTOBER 21 EVERY MONDAY Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Community Services 9 am-noon at Joseph-Hines Clinic.1710 West 25th St 713-526-0555, exl 231227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m-midnight Keys Wesl 713-830-3000 Frost Eye Cinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000 Gay F~athers Frst support group. 8-9:30 p.m Grace Lutheran Church. Tom. 713-721>-8736. www.geocities.com/gaydadshouston/ Grief & DMlra! Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, exl 208. Kolle Project. Eucharist 7:30 pm 713-861-1800 Queer Voices Radio Show. 8-10 p.m KPFr 90.l Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 2·9 p.m • 803 ~1wtMr"". 713-524-3818 www.hlgcc.org. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22 EVERY TUESDAY BeJi'g ~ NelwlJk l..Ln:li a.-d1 ~ 11 am 713-52b-101Z Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Community Services. 10 a.m-2 p.m at Joseph-Hines Clinic.1710 West 25th SL 713-526-0555. ext 231 227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose cnnic. a pm.-midnighL Club Houston. 713-830-3000. Gay youtll New program for young gay males. ages 18-29
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