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Houston Voice, March 18, 2005
File 012
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Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 012. 2005-03-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-03-18). Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5673

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 012, 2005-03-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5673.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, March 18, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date March 18, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com MARCH 18, 2005 11 point BEREN DE MOTIER Buster Baxter beat 'Sesame Street' in airing a gay character, and only the adults seem to be bothered. Will you be my gaybor? I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT OF ALL THE children's television shows, "Sesame Street" would have the first gay character. I grew up with "Sesame Street." I watched the first episodes on avocado green shag carpeting in my parents' sunken Los Angeles living room, fell in love with that pre-Tom Hanks "Everyman" Kermit the Frog, and still own the fuzzy and blue Grover puppet I got for Christmas in 1971.1 do a mean Grover impression, which comes in handy more than you'd imagine when you have three kids. "Sesame Street" was the first show to have inner city kids, black kids, Hispanic kids, and a puppet with HIV It seemed inevitable that one day a lesbian couple would move onto the street, or some nice gay men would buy Mr. Hooper's store and start serving mochaccinos (as well as over-sized cookies) to Cookie Monster on his daily visit. But it was Buster Baxter, the happy-go- lucky, child-of-divorced-parents rabbit co- star of the popular "Arthur" cartoon show, and now star of his own "Postcards from Buster," who introduced lesbians to children's television. Except that, sadly, very few children got to see it, since before the episode about Buster visiting Vermont (where civil unions are legal and couples with two moms not uncommon) could air, under pressure from new Education Secretary Margaret Spellings, PBS pulled the show from national distribution. GOOD GRIEF, CHARLIE BROWN. We're talking Buster Baxter. I have a 2 year old, so I know, Buster is as benign as you can get. He travels around with his dad on the show, visiting with kids all over the nation, with all kinds of family structures and beliefs. But then again, he probably treated the lesbian family like any other family, and that message is scaring the cultural conservatives. Especially after the SpongeBob brouhaha. I'm not a big SpongeBob fan. I've seen a little of him when visiting the grandparents (who have cable), and he appears to be inane, ridiculous and not terribly literate. But I do appreciate that he took part, as well as Barney, Big Bird and some other kid favorites, in a tolerance video urging children to accept people different from themselves. This got the vocal Focus on the Family group up in arms. Isn't it strange that we can live in a society that struggles with violence, with hate crimes, with racial intolerance, and is currently involved in a war to promote freedom, democracy and diversity in a foreign land, and it is considered outrageous to urge kids to accept the obvious: that all people are not the same, and it doesn't make you better than them, and no, you can't hurt them because they're different? OF COURSE, THE CULTURAL conservatives, the Bush administration, and whoever else is making a fuss about Buster Baxter and Tinky Winky, has good reason to worry if intolerance is their goal. Young people do accept difference more easily. They don't automatically consider it bad to be dissimilar, and their automatic response to two people of the same gender falling in love isn't to beat them up or make sure they can't get married. Children are much more likely to want to pet the couple's golden retriever or ask if they have any kids who can come over and play. Until they're socialized differently, that is. While gay bashing among teens sadly continues, there is a growing trend toward live and let live throughout the country It is hard to demonize us when we live next door and shop at Target. We can't be going to hell in a hand basket too fast if we're president of the PTA or principal of the school, and young people, and increasingly their parents, know it. Interestingly, no one seems to have a cow when Melissa Etheridge or Nathan Lane, out and proud as you can be, do a cameo on Sesame Street to sing the ABCs, as long as they don't bring a loved one along. And they will someday. But what I'm really hoping is that before I'm old and gray, someone will finally tell me how to get, how to get to "Sesame Street." Beren deMotier lives in Portland, Ore., and can be reached at clejiwtier@telepwtconi. Out at the All and Out at TUTS are important to gays and lesbians? DAVID HIGGINB0THAM, 52 Houston Artistic Director for Masquerade Theatre The theater embraces the gay community like no other branch of the arts, and events like these uplift the gay community. Plus, there are so many hot gals and guys. ILICHGUARDI0LA31 Houston Actor Events involving and supporting the arts are a great vehicle for the gay and lesbian community, along with their supporters, to interface and show community spirit! TIANNAHALL.24 Houston Vocalist Most importantly, I think they provide a social atmosphere based on people's common interests of art and culture rather than based predominately on sexuality. DOUG THOMPSON, 27 Houston Actor/singer It gives the GLBT folks a chance to re-connect This community needs so much support, and this is such a great opportunity to show Houston that these groups are very much a part of our lives JOANNE B0NASS0,28 Houston Actress Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Interviews and photos by Dalton DeHart
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