Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, March 18, 2005
File 001
File size: 9.98 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 001. 2005-03-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 20, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-03-18). Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5662

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, March 18, 2005 - File 001, 2005-03-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 20, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5687/show/5662.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, March 18, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date March 18, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript RYAN WHITE FUNDS: For once, they're up. Page 3 KILL THE BILLS: Lobbying against anti-gay bills. Page 3 Calif. judge nixes ban on gay marriage Bush renews call for federal constitutional marriage amendment By EARTHA MELZER San Francisco Superior Court Judge Hichard Kramer ruled this week that the state's marriage law discriminates against same-sex couples and is unconstitut1onal. "It appears that no rational pur· pose exists for limiting marriage in this state to opposite-sex part. ncrs," wrote Kramer in a 27-page opinion that was released Monda): He pointed to the overtw-ning of laws that banned inter-racial mar· riagc to argue that forbidding pro­ple of different races to marry was unconstitutional even though it was tmditional. Tradition and a state interest in promoting procreation, Kramer argued, arc not rational reasons to deny same-sex couples the benefits of marriage, which 1s recognized as a fundamental right. "The Ideas that marriage-like rights without marriage is adequate smacks of a concept long rejected by the courts: separate but equal," wrnte Krarne1: who is a Catholic appointed hy Hcpublican G<J\: Pete Mara McWilliams and Rl'.llee Mangrum. whose 2004 union was voided by the California Supreme Court. rally for marriage rights in San Francisco last summer. (File photo by Noah Berger/AP) Wilson. Gay activist Michael Pctrehs reported this week that most of Kramer's political dona­tions have gone to Republicans. President Bush renewed his call for a federal constitutional amend· ment banning gay marriage at a Wedne.<;ilay news conference. ··eowi rulings such as [the ruJ. ing in California) strengthen my position." Bush said. ':And as a mat· ter of fact, the court rulmgs are ver-ifying why 1 took the position I took. And that is, I don't believe judges ought to be deciding this issue ... and I think the best wny to do so is through the constitutional process." Kramer's opinion applied to several cases that had been con· solldated in onlcr to aru.wer their common challenge to the state's maniage law. Please see CALIFORNIA on Page 7 dish Assassin Cho Margaret Cho comes back, Houston with her trademark biting humor in 'The Assassin' Page 13 Legislation is anti-gay. Page 6 Gene Milrulenka is a real Amencan cowboy, and he happens to be gay. No drugstore cowboy Gene Mkiulenka, who is competing at the Houston rodeo, is a real cowboy who happens to be gay By JOHNNY HOOKS PORT LA\'ACA NATIVE GE~'E l\UKULENKA IS A REAL American Cowboy. He's won the Houston Livestock Show & Rodeo five times and earned three world titles in pole bending. The American Quarter Horse Association has named him to its top-teQ list six times. He owns a horse farm oubide of Conroe, the M Ranch. There's even an award winning film doc· umentary about his life called, appropriately enough, "Real American Cowbo):" Oh, and he's ga)'. Gene Mih-ulcnka stepped onto the public stage \\ith the release of that 1998 documentary "Real American Cowbo):" The documentary plays Monday's in March at the Aurora Picture Show at Dean's Credit Clothing, 311 Main SL The film chronicles Mikulenka gomg through some rough pas- Please see COWBOY on Page 19 local life Bill Clevenger's home health care agency is taking care of family PAGES Martina Navratilova cries foul over the use of her image on the Rainbow Card PAGE 18 2 MARCH 18, 2005 LAFONT C t<RIST" AN D OR C.UCCI llO er & GABBANA MOOO MAI.. MCLAS PAU FRANK FA EA FACE SIL t<OIJEn"E CALVIN KLEIN EYE WEAR ALA ""'•IKLJ BEVEL OOH LA LA PRADA RALPH LAUREN POLO HUMPHREYS OAKLEY CHANE<. E MPORIO ARMAN! GIORGIO ARMAN I GOLD & WOOD PARIS FRANCIS Kl El N E>CADA BABY PHAT PHAT FARM ZIP+ HOMME www.houslonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com MARCH 18. 2005 3 I houston news Federal AIDS funding increased for Houston in 2005 After a decrease in 2004, Ryan White funding for AIDS services increased for some cities, including Houston By BINNIE FISHER Agencies that provide services to people with HIV I AlDS submitted their requests for federal grants through the Ryan White Care Act and held their breath. Last year, the news was not good. Fundmg was cut by 6.8 percent over what it had been the previous year. \\-'hen funding awards were announced last week for 2005. those same providers breathed a sigh of relief. This year. Houston's allocation rose by 4.1 percent. To Ken Malone, executive direc­tor of the Assistance Fund, doing the math and looking at what was lost last year and gained in 2005. it feels a lot like flat funding. Still. he i~n·t complaining, especially wh('n he looks at other major metropolitan areas. "New York had a 3.4 percent decrease, and L.A. was flat-funded at a half a per­cent," he said. San Francisco. a city that usually is awarded funding increases, this year saw it's Ryan White funding drop by five per­cent, Malone said. Houston's increase is "good and bad" at the same time, he said, because it means more people with AIDS need treatment. At the Montrose Clinic. Executive Director Katy Caldwell said, the increased funding translates to about an eight-percent gain. "We had good news for a change," she said. At the clinic. she said, Ryan White Funds are dedicated to treatment of peo­ple with AIDS. "For clients with no health insurance, it pays for their outpatient medical care," she said. For those individuals. Caldwell said, the Montrose Clinic becomes their pri­mary physician and takes care of all their outpatient medical needs. Testing for at-risk populations. she said. is paid for through funding from the City of Houston and the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, and it is done at the clin­ic. in bars, bathhouses and bookstores. When a client tests positive for the HIV virus and they do not have insurance. Calwell said, they become a patient of the clinic if they choose to do so. "We literally walk them down the hall" to meet with a physician, she said. "We have a personal commitment to providing whatever care system they nef>d At Bering Omega Community Services, President Dan Snare said, he won't start counting the dollars until they are in the bank. but he has been informed that an increase is on the way. The funds at Bering also go to caring for AIDS patients but in a different way from those at the Montrose Clinic. "The Ryan White Title I funds support three of our core programs," he said. The dental clinic that provides services to people with HIV and AIDS will see an increase in funding as will the adult day care program and Bering's hospice pro­gram, Omega House. "The adult day care program provides two hot meals a day, breakfast and lunch. and nursing care to make sure people are taking their medications proper!}:" he said. Snare added that for some clients, phys­ical therapy is also provided with the Ryan White funds. kThe program is designed really for people who have needs that are not being met by their primary care givers ... he said. Care Act is up for review in D.C. Malone spent part of last week and the first part of this week in Washington, D.C., where the Ryan White Care Act is up for reauthorization. "One thmg that could directly affect us is the formula for how the funds are allo­cated ... he said. Katy Caldwell remembers being a mlun­teer trying to help deal with the AIDS epidem­ic prior to federal funding being allocated. "Everybody begged. borrowed and stole," she said. "There were boxes in all the bars, and people would put money in them. l remember just trying to help peo­ple pay their rent." The day the Ryan White Act became law in 1990 was cause for great celebra- Ken Malone. executive director of the Assistance Fund. said AIDS service providers are breathing a sigh of relief over news that federal funding has been increased this year. tion, she said. "Final}); after Ronald Reagan ignored everyone for so long, she said. "The orig­inal sponsors were Sen Ted Kennedy (D· Mass.) and Sen Orm Hatch (R·Utah). Hatch was ver:: proud of it. It's always been bi-partL~an legislation." Activists walked down Congress for a rally at the Capitol More than 1,000 gay activists answered the call to rally at the Texas state capitol on Sunday By BINNIE FISHER In every corner of Texas. Sunday was warm. sunny and the perfect day for an AIDS Walk, a fundraising brunch and a rally on the steps of the Texas State Capitol. Although numerous events competed for volunteers, Randall Ellis. executive director of the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. said more than 1.000 activists answered his call to activism. Ellis had called on gays and lesbians throughout the state to converge on Austin last Sunday for a march down Congress r~~~~ !~!,o!Tw; (LGRLI 512-474-5475 www.lgrt.org Randall Ellis. executive director of the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby of Texas, said more than 1.000 activists turned out for an Austin rally on Sunday Avenue and a rally at the State Capitol. The rally was staged to denounce two bills that have been introduced to ban mar­riage between persons of the same sex. "Anytime you get a thousand·plus folks marching down Congress. I'm excited." Ellis said. Although the rally made for good TV footage and newspaper photos, Ellis said. he asked those who participated to stick around for even more important wora on ~fonda): "What was even better was Lobby Day on Monday," he said. "The ability to put a face to our issues is what really cotmts." Lobbyists were sent out in teams Monday morning to various legislative offices. In the afternoon. those same lobbyists visited \\ith legislators from their own districts. "I tagged along with a few of the teams, and I was very impressed." Ellis said. ~we hit all of the 181 legislative offices, and a good number got to speak to the legisla­tors themselves." Ellis said, activists wanted to offer their views on the two pieces of legislation House Joint Resolution 6, introduced by State Rep. Warren Chisum (R·Pampa) would defme marriage as being between one man and one woman. House Joint Resolution 19. introduced by State Rep. Robert Talton (R·Pasadena) v·ould define marriage m the same way but also states, "Legal status for unmar­ried persons which is identical or substan­tially similar to marital status shall not be valid or recognized." Ellis said those who lobbied on ~londay were able to make their views known to Chisum but not Talton. ~we were received warmly as always with Warren Chisum, even though he is against us." Ellis said. Legislative session gearing up ·'The (legislative) session is starting to gear up." he said. "We know that within the coming weeks. they're going to hear those amendments in the House Committee on State Affairs." Ellis said he knows of three votes on that committee that will not approve the amendments. As it stands now, he said, there will be a swing vote that will decide whether the legislation dies in committee, an it will come from a Republican. "We would love to see that bill killed m committee," he said. If approved by the committee, he said, one of the bills would go to the House floor for debate. Ellis said he believes lobbyists. who hailed from as far away as Amarillo and from big towns and small towns, made a distinct difference on Monda}: At least two additional lobby events will be scheduled in 2005, he said. "The legi~lature has managed to use a stick against our communit};" he said. "Our challenge is to tie a carrot to that stick." 4 MARCH 18 2005 Maranatha Fellowship HOUSE OF GLORY SUNDAY, MARCH 20, 2005 Palm Sunday, Message delii·ered by Jason Wood ACTS INSTITUTE BIBLE SCHOOL Register now for April 5th-9th • Evening Classes Call church office for more details. CHURCH SERVICE _und.i} at IO:OC am A nursery 1s available for small children CHILDREN'S WORSH~VICE Sunday at 10·00 am ~ MID WEEK HOME GROUPS Tue5day, Wednesday & Fnday (Cal, the church for more Information) 3333 Fannin Suite 106 In the ICC Building Ample Parking Upstairs 713.528.6756 maranatha@ev1.net www.hc>us4 . Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church 2025 W. 11th. St. - Houston, TX - 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I local news briefs Houston Band goes West with gay cowboy Gene Mikulenka The Houston Pride Band presents "Out West," a tribute to the American Wild West, at 7 p.m. on April 23 at Resurrection Metropolitan Church, 2025 W 11th Street in the Heights. The concert will include special guest emcee, Gene Mikulenka, the Houston rodeo star featured in the documentary, uAmerican Cowboy." Also featured will be a lariat exhibition by mem· bers of the Texas Gay Rodeo Association and line dancing by the Rainbow Ranglers Dance Club. "Out West" explores the history and myth of the American West. The event will look at the image of the cowboy, rancher, outlaw and Native American that has been ingrained through countless movies and history books. From Aaron Copeland's "Hoedown" to Ferde Grofe's "Grand Canyon Suite" to John Williams' "The Cowboys." the Houston Pride Band plays a musical journey through the historical West. 832-265-3346. Houston cowboy Gene Mikulenka will make an appear· ance during a concert by the Houston Pride Band. Lesbians in Galveston unite for a professional women's social Lesbians on the island are organizing and will begin staging monthly professional happy hours. The first event, dubbed the "Spring Social," happens from 7-10 p.m. Saturday, April 2, at MOD Coffee & Tea (wine and beer also served) House at 2126 Post Office St. Thereafter, women will meet on the second Thursday of each month. For information, e-mail iluvvpie{a yahoo.com Broadway stars and equity actors will raise AIDS money in Houston Actl"('SS Stephanie Powrrs and the cast of 'The King and I, ' now playmg at Theatre Under the Stars, will help raise money for AIDS Foundation Houston and Casa De r:speranza De Los Nuios. Inc. Broadway Cares and P.quity Fights AIDS presents ''A Cabal"('t P.vening of Song and Dance' at 7 p.m. March 21 in the Grand Lobby of the Hobby Center. Tickets are $150 and can be purchased by calling 713-864-2660. Conference on the Mure has shifted into high gear A group of activists meeting regularly to plan a June conference on the future of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Houston recently discussed the establish ment of a gay-oriented business district. Activist Ray Hill suggested during a recent meeting that the district could be set down between Hyde Park and Meteor at 2306 Genesee. Also being discussed are provid· mg care for older gay and lesbian residents of Houston, transgender concerns, the for· mation of a group to draft a resolution for gay Muslims. gay youth, immigration equality, anti violence strategies and poll· tics. Voting on resolutions is scheduled for Saturday, June 18, with the venue and time to be announCE'd later. Pride Houston is considering tweaking the ParaJe route Jack Valinski, executive director of Pride Houston, said recently that a task force has been formed to examine the feasibility of relocating the Pride Parade that cur­rently travels through the heart of Montrose along Westheimer. Valinsk1 stressed that Pride Houston is only look· mg at the pros and cons of moving the parade, and that it will stay in Montrose. Meeting planned to examine employment/woti<place discrimination Lambda Legal has planned a town hall mrcting at 7 p.m: March 31 to examine employment and workplace chscrunina· !Ion against gays, lesbians and transgen­dered persons. The meeting at the Houston GLBT Community Cente1; 3400 Montro e Blvd., Suite 207, IS open to anyone who wants to attend. Speakers from the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby of Texas and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission will make presentations. Progressive Dinner benefiting two good causes is expected to sell out Volunteers with AssistHers and Uncommon Legacy suggest buying tickets early for the annual Progressive Dinner b<'nefiting both organizations. The event has sold out every year since its inception. Voluntc-e1-s from the two groups will guide guests through four distinctive homes in West University, Memorial Park and Montrose. Along the way, participants will sip wine. nibble on appetiziers, salad, entrce and d(:ssert. Participants will meet at Houston's Congregation Emanu El, 10C<1ted at lfiOO Suns!'t Blvd. and board buses at 6 p.m to begin the tour. WW\\.ass1s· thers.org. www.acteva.org or 7130S21·1628. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I national news briefs Lesbian UPS worker wins sexual harassment suit SAN FRANCISCO A jury last week awarded $63,000 to a lesbian former United Parcel Service worker in her lawsuit against the company, according to media reports. Kathy Hoskins, a 14-year UPS veteran, brought the hostile work environment sexual harass· ment suit against the firm after she alleged· ly was the subject of severe, widespread and continuing harassment that ultimately led to her wrongful termination, her attor­neys contended, news outlets reported. A jury agreed that the harassment led to a hostile and abusive work environment, according to media reports. "The outcome of this case sends a clear message to UPS and the rest of corporate America that harassment based on gender stereotypes will not be tolerated," attorney Waukeen Q. McCoy of the Law Offices of Waukeen Q. McCoy, who represents Hoskins, told reporters. Hoskins alleged she was continu · ally harassed because of her appearance, news reports indicate. ''.According to my for­mer supervisor, I wasn't 'feminine' enough," Hoskins told reporters. Judge bars group from using gay couple's photo in ad WASHINGTON (AP) - A federal judge last week prohibited a conservative group sup­porting President Bush's Social Security plan from using a photo of a gay couple in its online ads attacking the AARP. USA Next had posted the ad for a week in mid February on the Web site of the American Spectator. The ad portrayed AARP, the sen· iors lobby leading the opposition to Bush's plan, as opposed to U.S. soldiers and sup­portive of gay marriage. U.S. District Court Judge Reggie Walton issued a temporary restraining order forbidding use of tbe photograph by USA Next. The Portland, Ore., couple, Richard Raymen and Steven Hansen, filed suit against USA Next, saying they hadn't consented "to serve as models for a homophobic and mean-spirited cam· pa1gn for a political group with whose views they strongly disagree." The Internet ad showed a photo of a soldier with a red X over him and, next to it, a photo of two tuxedoed men kissing, with a green check mark over them. Sex-change surgery doesn't stop challenges for N.H. married pair PENACOOK, N.H. Unusual challenges await a married Penacook couple whose case provides a unique angle to the same· sex marriage debate, the Champlain Channel of WNNE-TV reported. Judi and Mikayla Howden met and married when Mikayla was Michael. before a sex-change OJ)<'ration that she says helped solve ques· tions she had her entire life about her gen· der. the news station reported. "I came out of the closet as far as realizing myself and OJ><'ning up to my family that I was a transsexual at about 37, 38," she said. Mikayla met Judi about 10 years later, and the pair married and have a child who is now 3, the news station reported. Mikayla's sex change operation later fol ­lowed, according to WNNE-TV. But the couple now have a same-sex marr;age, and officials told them they cannot change their marriage license. Former UPS worker Kathy Hoskins, who alleged that she suffered workplace discrimination because she is a lesbian, was awarded $63,000 last week in her lawsuit against the company. (Photo courtesy of Fenton Communications) Family Pride Coalition's new director is Jacques' partner BOSTON, Mass. Jennifer Chrisler. partner of former Human Rights Campaign President Cheryl Jacques, is the new execu­tive director of the San Diego-based Family Pride Coalition, the Wellesley Tuwnsman reported. Co-chairs of the coalition board of directors last week announced the selection of Chrisler to replace Aimee Galnaw, who led the group for four years, according to media reports. ''.As a married gay mother of twin boys, I am honored to be leading the Family Pride Coalition at such an important moment in our struggle for full equality for LGBT parents and their children," Chrisler said in a news release. West Point colonel issues call for end to military's ban on gays SANTA BARBARA, Calif. In an opinion piece in the current Army Times, an active­duty U.S. Army colonel who also is a pro­fessor at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point calls for an end to the ban on gay serv· ice members, Ascribe Newswire reported. In the piece, "Gays in the Military: It's a Question of Liberty," Col. Allen S. Bishop states, "The genius of democracy is in its insistence that each citizen counts ... But despite our government's claims of liberty for all, we leave homosexuals out. When we deny their right to military service, we improperly restrict the franchise of citizen· ship and give in to homophobic prejudice very like the unreasoned racial and gender prejudices of the past." Nathaniel Frank, senior research fellow at the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Militar); a research institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara, said Bishop joins an increasing number of military leaders adoptmg this opir.ion, the Newswire reported. Bishop may be the highest-ranking active-duty officer so far to criticize the military's "Don't Ask. Don't Tell" policy, Frank added, according to news reports. From staff and wire reports MARCH 18. 2005 S "ALLEY'S CURRENT PRODUCTION IS TIMELY .. IT REMINDS US THAT MILLER WAS- /S- ONE OF AMERICA'S GREATEST PLAYWRIGHTS AND THE CRUCIBLE ONE OF ITS GREATEST PLAYS www.alleytheatre.org Continental B 713.228.8421 .... ..... - - "Wit Airlines~ .. - ~ - "" ..... , ....... ~ 6 MARCH 18. 2005 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national news House Ol<s bill on religious group hiring policies Critics say measure would allow anti-gay discrimination By JOE CREA A bill that would allow religious organi­zations receiving federal funds to maintain anti-gay hiring pohc1rs passed the U.S. House of Representatives earlier this month. The measure, which pa~sed by a 224·200 vote, was approved after the House reject ed an amendment that would have protect· rd the civil rights of workers. The Workforce Investment Act, H.R. 27 now moves to the U.S. Senate where its fate is unclear, political experts said The White House has indicated that should the meas­ure fail in the; Senate, thE: president will issue an executive order. won its face it doesn't appear discrimi­natory but if you take a closer look, it clearly allows for federal contractors to circumvent civil rights laws," said Eric Stern, president of the :-<ational Stonewall Democrats. The new measure, if approved by the Senate and signed by President Bush, would enable faith-based groups receiving federal funds to circumvent local and state laws that bar discrimination based on sex­ual orientation. There is currently no fed· 'On its face [the bill) doesn't appear discrimmatory but 1f you take a closer look. it clearly allows for federal contractors to circumvent civil rights laws.' said Eric Stem president of the National Stonewall Democrats. eral law prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation in the workplace. Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, made clear in his ~farch I Washington Update newsletter that the new bill is needed to maintain the employ· ment practices of many religious groups. "The president made clear though that if these protections are not codified into law; the dangrrs of bias against the faith-based can return in future administrations," Perkins wrote. "Specifically, organizations AFFORDABLE FITNESS Feeling good about yourself and how you look is the key. We can help you get there with a program designed just for you. Call Today! $ 1800 :~~wand pay 1 18/mo. fllW. DAYS 1501 Durham 71 3.BBD.9191 www.houstongym.com CAll NOW! that oppose homosexuality and abortion often need extra protection when receiving federal aid or using federal facilities. Amazingly; there are those in Congress whose unwarranted fear of anything faith· based is more important than the tremen· dous good that is done through faith-based organizations. "The addicted and afflicted. the needy and the seedy arc all better served by faith· based orgamzations than by bureaucratic programs. Faith-based groups have a Constitutionally protected right to main tain their religious identity tllrough hir· ing, even when federal funds arc involved." The Rev. Barry Lynn, executive direc­tor of Americans United for Separation of Church & State, said social conservatives arc demanding "special rights." "They want 'special rights,' asking the government for money while requesting that they can still discriminate in hiring," Lynn said. " It's outrageous that the major­ity have removed civil rights protections from a piece of federal legislation. This protection has been a part of this statute for a long time and the majority has cho­sen to remove it." Lynn noted that when President Reagan signed the job-training bill into law in 1982, it protected the civil rights of workers. The White House press office did not return calls seeking comment. While condemning the partL~ vote on last week's measure, the National Stonewall Gay U.S. Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz.) voted in favor of a bill that would allow federal funds to go to faith­based orgarnzations that discriminate against gay employees. (File photo) Democrats chided Republican lawmakers who are considered "friendly" to gay rights issues for voting in support of the legisla· hon. Mary Bono (R-Calif.), Mark Foley (R· Fla.), and gay Rep. Jim Kolbe (R·Ariz.) among others all voted to pass the measure. Calls to Kolbe's office were not returned. It's more than just a ride It's a~ adve~tL(rel Italy France Spain Iceland HIKE Inca Trail ALYSON ADVENTURES 800-825-9766 www.AlysonAdventures.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com MARCH 18. 2005 7 I national news Calif. ruling could rekindle national marriage debate CALIFORNIA. continued from Page 1 The cases, known collectively as Woo, et al v. Lockyer, ct al were brought by Lambda Legal, the National Center for Lesbian Rights and the ACLU on behalf of same-sex couples who were denied marriage licenses, and the gay rights groups Our Families Coalition and Equality California. In 2000, California voters passed Prop. 22, which states ... Only marriage between a man and a woman is valid or recognized in California." The initiative passed with 61 percent support. Four years later, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom determined that the California Constitution's guarantees of equality and due process required him to grant marriage licenses to same-sex cou· plr.s. On Feb. 12, 2004, San Francisco began Issuing marriage licenses in defiance of Prop 22. More than 1.000 marriage licenses were granted to same-sex couples before the California Supreme Court ruled on Aug. 12, 2004 that San Francisco did not have the authority to issue marriage licenses to same·scx couples. The California Supreme Court nullified the same-sP.x marriages but did not rule on the constitutionality of deny· ing marriage to same-sex couples. .. Today's decision is a landmark for the law and an important development for the entire nation," stated ACLU Attorney Christine Sun. "With plain but compelling logic, the judge has shown us all why in a nation committed to fairness, gays and !es· bians must not be shut out of marriage. But this decision is most important to the thou· sands of same-sex couples who desperately need the protection that marriage gives, and who deserve the dignity it brings." "It was a giant step forward for our fam· ilies," said Eddie Gutierrez, communica· tions director for Equality California, which joined the suit as a group that advo­cates for the rights of lesbians and gays. "(The] ruling affirms that same-sex fami· lies deserve equal treatment under the law." "There is opposition to this ruling, said Gutierrez, but it is weakened when stories of gay and lesbian people are shared in the press, in the court and all over as they have been recently." Representatives from both sides said San Franc1SC0 Mayor Gavin Newsom's decision to allow more than 4.000 gay couples to get married last year led to this week's Superior Court ruling that overturned the state's law that limits marriage to heterosexuals only. (File photo by AP) they expect that the case will be appealed and will go through the appellate process and on to the California Supreme Court. California politics have been turning toward ballot measures and referendums of late and both social conservatives and gay rights advocates expect an effort to amend California's Constitution to prohib· it same·sex marriage. Gutierrez said he believes that a mar­riage amendment would be defeated in California. "This is still a road that we can win on." said Gutierrez, "because California is full of fair-minded people." Equality California is working to pro­mote Assembly Bill 19, which was intro­duced by assemblyman Mark Leno and will be considered in the 2005 legislative session. AB19 would restore the gender-neutral lan­guage in the part of California's Family Code that deals with marriage. Until 1977, California's marriage law defined marriage as "a personal relationship arising out of a civil contract between two persons." AB 19 would also explicitly recognize civil mar· riage as a fundamental human right. While Kramer's ruling in favor of same· sex marriage rights is a clear victory for marriage equality activists, Equality California sees the gain within the context of a broad struggle for gay and lesbian rights, said Gutierrez. "We are working to ban bias in the court room, to change the gay panic defense rule. to promote insurance equality based on gender ... this will be a landmark year for LGBT rights." In an interview on MSNBC's Hardball with Chris Matthews on Monday, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger said that if the California Supreme Court ruled in favor of same-sex marriage he would not support a constitutional amendment to ban it. National implications While marriage equality proponents cele­brated the California decision, conservatives heaped criticism on the ruling and renewed commitments to stop same-sex marriage. "For the second time in the last month, an aberrant judge has launched a judicial Your agent. Your advocate. Rob Schmerler Insurance Agency 6575 West Loop South, Suite 185 Belloire, Texos 77401 71 3.661.7700 www.schmerlerogency.com assault on the bedrock of our society," Family Research Council President Tony Perkins said in a statement. "We now look to the California Supl'~me Court to restore some sanity to t!: ;udicial process and overturn [Monday's] court decision, which if upheld will wreak havoc on our societ}; redefining the institution of marriage and denying children a mother or a father." In an online statement, Rev. Louis P Shi ·ldon. founder of the Traditional Values ~ition. an inter-denominational public policy organization speaking on behalf of over 43,rel churches. called Judge Kramer's decision an example of ~judicial tyranny" and said it proved the necessity of passing a constitutional amendment in Califorrua to restrict marriage to opposite sex couples According to Human Rights Watch, 13 states pa~sed marriage amendments in 2004 and 21 more states are expected to vote on marriage amendments in 200s and 2006. Kansas residents are scheduled to vote on the issue of a constitutional ban of gay mar riage when they go to the polls on April 5. "There i.s no question that the clergy "'ho are supporting the marriage amendn1•nt here v;ant to ll"C' what happened in California to mobilize their base here," said Cyd Slayt.m. media spokesperson for Kan.sans for Fa;..~·'SS, a group organizing efforts across Kansas to oppose the proposed marriage amendment, which would prohibit same-sex marriage. S!ayten said the coalition is working to build bridges in a tough political climate with little time and even less mone}: According to Caroline McKnight of the Mainstream Coalition. a group opposing the amendment. there is no financial data avail· able on the groups organizing around the marriage amendment in Kansas yet because they are not required to file with the Kansas Ethics Comml"5ion until March 21. McKnight characterized the compara· tive financial situations of the pro and anti marriage amendment groups as a "David and Goliath situation" with those opposing the amendment as Da\id. "Pro-marriage amendment lawn signs are proliferating like dandelions," McKnight said, "and those don't come for free." McKnight said she believes most of the money for the campaign that supports the marriage amendment is coming from out of state. HOUSTON VOICE MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 8 People who care for their family Bill Clevenger's gay-owned and operated home health service is there for HIV/AIDS patients By BINNIE FISHER When Bill Clevenger decided to open a home health care service a year and a half ago, he looked for office space in :Montrose because as he sees It, his mis· sion is family caring for family. He had been here before with a home health care agenC}; in the early 1980s when people with AIDS saw before them a debilitating life that most likely would end m a painful death. "We had our hands full back then," he said. "I lost a lot of good friends to the epidemic." Located then at 3400 l\1ontrose, Clevenger said, his busmess had few avenues to which it could turn in order to help clients. He and his patlenl~ had to wait for services like the Assistance Fund, the Montrose Clime, Bering Omega Services and others to be born and to grow." In 2005, he said. the needs are differ­ent. :More importantl}; the infrastructure is there now to help those in need. Although now as then, his agency is a business, Clevenger said he and his staff do whatever is needed whenever someone calls. It may be a matter of referring them to a nonprofit agency that can help. "We just helped a guy last week get into the Bering Omega hospice pro· gram," he said. "We're real good at tak· ing somebody and finding out what resources are available out there We're pretty good at knowing who's out there and whether the Assistance Fund or the Montrose Clime or another organization can help someone." With a staff of eight nurses, 20 home health care aids and five people staffing the office, Clevenger said, the service is equipped to take care of most needs. @ MORE INFO STAT Home Health Care. Inc. m Hyde Par!< Blvd. 713-520-9997 www.stathomecare.com RegtStered nurse Bin Clevenger (far right) Is the owner of STAT care Home Health Care. Inc. He is pictured with office staff (from right) Sarah Morris. Charles Berger and Roger Reilgelman (Photo by Dalton DeHart) In most cases, he said, "People just need a little bit of help so they can stay independent." When new clients call, Clevenger said, the stalT at STAT try first to determine what it is they need. If it appears that they may need home health care, an assessment is scheduled. A home visit is made, and the patient's needs are a~sessed. "We work with their doctor to make sure they are getting their needs met," he said. Though not all of his clients are AIDS patients, Clevenger noted that he has a working relationship with most of the AIDS physicians in Houston. "We take care of all segments of the population without any consideration of age, race or nationalit);" he said. Needs of clients range from some· one to prepare lunch and help the client bathe and dress for the day to a nurse who can administer medications to a trained profess10nal to provide phys!· cal therapy. Although his clients live throughout Harris County, Clevenger said he keeps his crnter of operation in Montrose because it is centrally located. "We're five minutes from the Medical Center," he said Medicare certified As a Medicare certified agency, Clevenger said, "We work with Medicare or private insurance." Recently, Clevenger said, a state sur· vey of the agency found no deficiencies. In addition, he said, the agency was praised for having its records readily available and in good order on computer. The agency operate. as closely as pos· sible to paperless. Everythmg is on com· puter, which doctors seem to appreciate. "We're very automated," he said. "We have the capability of emailing records directly to the doctor. Technically, we have the people in the office who can write the programs." When he looked for office space to open a 21st Century version of the home health care service he operated in the 1980s, Clevenger said, he decided to comP dO\rn from the upper floors of an officP build mg. Instead of office space, he went for "home space." The agency is located in a house at 711 Hyde Park, behind what once was the QwnLIAMJ. CLEVENGER ~.44 Birthplace Houston Education Bachelor of Science in Nursing from University of Houston Home: Spring Branch Occupation Registered Nurse/Owner of STAT Home Health Care, Inc. Relationship Status: Partner to Edward Rivera Pets German Shepherd named Herra clubO. "It's home);" he said. "We sit on the porch and have our coffee " The kitchen and den are like the kitchen and den in any other house, com­plete with cereal boxes and a kitchen table. "We're like a big famil):" Clevenger said. "The staff and I go out to a movie• every other week. We go out to eat togethPr:" Since he works seven days a week, Clevenger said, working in a house makes it sePm less like work. Clevenger said STAT supports gay causes that make life better for others. "We really do care about our commu· nity," he said. "We're a gay-owned and operated company. That's just us." -- : HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com out in houston (Photos by Dalton OeHart) Victory Fund Houston chairs hosted a fundraising brunch on Sunday and among those in attendance were. Houston chair Bill Coburn. Idaho State Rep. Nicole l.afavour, Victory Fund National President Chuck Wolfe. Houston City Controller Annise Parker, Houston chairs David Arpin and Janine Brunjes and Portland, Ore. City Council Member Sam Adams. Lana Schwartz and Jack Jackson helped raise more than a few greenbacks for the. Montrose Counseling Center at the annual Bring111' in the Green fundra1ser. The Material Girl was represented in spirit by Viva at the recent Madonnarama at South Beach. At a recent Women's History Month benefit Linda Morales (left) and Raquel Cedillo (sec­ond from right) presented awards to Christina Martinez. President and CEO of the Rainbow Pages and Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus President Maria Gonzales The Exclamation Dance Company performed before AIDS Walk Houston 2005 got underway. MARCH 18, 2005 9 Jean Higgins· son Travis Rhodes was among those who turned out for a recent exhibition of her artwork at Mo Mung. RESEARCH-VOL.U NTEERS NE. EDED • Did you know that an estimated 40.000 Amencans become rnfected with HIV every year? • Thousands of men, women, and children are now IMllQ with HIV d ease and there's 6tilJ no cure BETHEL EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (UCC) ADULTS AGES 18-45 UP TO $400 FOR TIME AND TRAVEL we ere looking for adults between the ages of 18 and 45 with no history of HIV infection to part1c1pate 1n an invest1gat1onal vaccine research study for HIV If you qualify. you will receive free screening tests for HIV and up to $400 for time and travel FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL CENTER FOR CLINICAL STUDIES 713.528.8818 Houston Medical Center Office 281.333.2288 Clear Lake Office www.ccstexas.com 1107 Shephenl Drtvt @ Center Streit Houston, TX noo1·113-861.a10 www.betheltlou*>n.org Sundly School Sundly Worship Wedntldly Worship 9:1IO All 10:30 All &:00 Pll l1f1iiE!'4fd1i voice EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Exearti'le Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor BINNIE FISHER Comspondents BRYAN ANDERTON DYANA BAGBY LOU CHIBBARO. JR. JO£ CREA MUBARAK DAlllR. lAURA OOUGLAS-BROWN MIKE FlEM!NG. MATTHEW H£NNlf. JOHNNY HOOKS. PH!t LAPADUtA RYAN LEE. BRIAN MOV LAN, KEVIN NAFF YUSEFNAJAfl. KEN SAIN. RHONDA SMITH. STEVE WEINSTEIN. AAU<ZEFFER ConbiJutors DON ~1AINES. JERAlAYA VEUNADU, SHANA NICHOlSON. JA CHAPMAN ANO AR.JAN TIMMERMANS ~ DALTON DEHART, KIMBERLY THOMPSON ProcD:tiol1 JAMES NEAL Webmasta' ARAM VARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION r.enerat Manager JASON WILSON jW!lson11houslonvolce.com Sales ExecutM! KERRY WALD kwald:a:houstonvoice.to Classified Sales I Office Mmstrator JOHNNY HOOKS-~houstoovoirunm National Advertising Rep'esentative Rivendell Media • 212-242-Wil Nisher- WINDOW MEDIA LtC President- WILLIAM WAYBOURN Elitorial Oil!clor- CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controler- BARNEffi HOlSTON Art Dira:tDr· ROB BOEGER Oil!clor of Operations MIKE KITCHENS Dnctor al Sales STEVEN GUERRINI Dira:tDr al Classified Sales NATHAN REGAN Mmtiig Manager- RON ROMANSKI m... .... ~~'' MEMBER ..da1iler .. ..-. ........ illiJf ....... .,_ CHARTER MEMBER Esbblished 1974 as the Mnitrw Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (7l3) 529-8490 Fax: (7l3) 529-9531 www.houstonvoice.com Office hours: 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m weekdays To m1i! a letter utters shllld be !ewe' tMi 400 wonls. We reserve !lie r9it to edt for coo!fl1t .rd length. We will wrtfl. ldl ranes 1J1X11 ~ lxJt ycu llllSl ixlO? YIXI' name and phooe rumer fer verifratin !'tease send llli!ll to Houstoo Voice 500 I.Mt! Blvd.. Suite 200. Houst<n Texas T1006:. fax (713) 52')-953} or e-mail to edtor a'hlustoovoice.c Qiinioos expressed Umin oo not reflect tOOse al the Houston Van>. editorial Califoria marriage ruling actually behind the curve When it comes to same-sex marriage, the Golden State isn't on the cutting edge. Its judiciary is playing catch-up. Still, the ruling was welcome news in a bleak season. By MUBARAK DAHIR OR THE SECOND TIME IN a year, gay and lesbian cou­ples gathered in matrimoni­al throngs at city hall in San Francisco this past week. Some were waving rainbow flags. Others held up marriage licenses in a sign of victory. But unlike last year - when the pre­scient mayor of that city, Gavin Newsom, announced his city would start handing out marriage licenses to same-sex couples because he felt the state law banning it violated the state's constitution there were no nuptials this time around. But there was plenty of gay marriage celebration. And before long. there may well be wedding bells ringing there again for same-sex couples. As the entire nation knows by now, that's because a state judge in California ruled on Monday, March 13, that the state's ban on gay and lesbian marriages violates California's constitution. County Superior Court Judge Richard Kramer wrote there was "no rational pur· pose" in refusing same-sex couples the right to marry. "The denial of marriage to same-sex couples appears impermissibly arbi­trary," he ruled. "Simply put, same-sex marriage cannot be prohibited solely because California has always done so." He likened the state's domestic partner· ship laws considered to be the third most comprehensive set of laws in the country protecting same-sex couples, after only Massachusetts, which allows gays and lesbians to-marry, and Vermont, which sanctions civil unions - to the his­torically flawed "separate but equal" racial laws of the past. Kramer flatly rejected the argument by two conservative groups that gays should· n't be allowed to marry because they can­not procreate. "One does not have to be married in order to procreate. nor does one have to procreate in order to be married," Kramer wrote. ''Thus, no legitimate state interest to justify the preclusion of same­sex marriage can be found." THE RULING MADE HEADLINE NEWS, and provided further fuel to the already red· hot flames of same-sex marriage. Anti-gay groups intend to appeal the law in California, so the ruling is far from the last word on the subject there, or anywhere else in the country. Still. the victory gave a much-needed injection of public optimism. not to mention a level of vindication, to those supporting and fighting for same-sex marriage rights. Just a few months ago, following the outcome of the November presidential election, supporters and activists on the same-sex marriage front were being scapegoated and vilified, even from with· in gay and lesbian quarters, for making such a public stand on marriage. George W Bush brilliantly manipulat­ed the issue to his advantage at the polls, voters in 11 states approved bans on same-sex marriage, and the Democrats conveniently used the issue to cover up John Kerry's failings as an uninspiring presidential candidate. All of a sudden, gay marriage was no longer hip. It was poison. This ruling, particularly if it holds - and many observers are optimistic it will has seemingly made us a popular cause again in the imaginations of many Americans. I guess everybody really does love a winner. BUT IN ALL THE HOOPLA, IT'S CRUCIAL that we note one extremely important and often misrepresented fact, especially since there will undoubtedly be other less joyous moments ahead in the long and strenuous road ahead for same-sex mar riage rights. Despite the media frenzy and the sec· ond rash of celebrating in San Francisco's city hall. the California rul· ing is not groundbreaking or exceptional. It's very good news. It's an important step. It's a reason to cheer. But in many ways, it's old hat. The fight for recognizing the legal marriage rights of gay and lesbian cou­ples goes at least as far back as 1993, when Hawaii's Supreme Court similarly HOUSTON VOICE MARCH 18, 2005 PAGE 10 ruled that discrimination against same­sex couples was more than likely uncon­stitutional. A trial judge removed the restrictions prohibiting gays and lesbians from marrying, but voters there amended their constitution to limit marriage to one man and one woman. But since then, an additional half a dozen state's courts have ruled in favor of allowing same-sex couples to marry: Alaska, Massachusetts, New York, Oregon, Washington and now, California. Furthermore, there are court cases pending in Connecticut, New Jersey, Maryland and Indiana. Vermont offers a nearly carbon copy of marriage in their form of civil un10ns, and Massachusetts allows it out right And of course, Canada, too, has come to the same conclusion on same-sex marriage rights. Interestingly, the Connecticut legisla· lure looks poised to pass a civil unions law soon, too - even without a court order to do so. Even in California, the court ruling doesn't really break much new ground when it comes to the notion of same-sex couples: In the past few years, the state legislature has passed a collection of laws that give gay and lesbian couples nearly as many rights and protections as straight married couples, without calling it by that sacred name. Here in New York, meanwhile, a judge ruled only a month ago that New York City had to allow gay marriage. Mayor Michael Bloomberg is appealing that ruling. JUDGE KRAMER'S RULING WILL, without question, boost the energy, will and determination of foot soldiers in the conservative right who want to pass a fed­eral amendment to the US Constitution banning gay and lesbian marriage. Conservatives will protest loudly that California's Judge Kramer is just another outlandish example of "judicial activism" that has veered out of control. But the truth is that, for years, not only the courts, but politicians and legis­latures have been debating and granti· ng - marriage rights to same-sex cou pies. The notion can no longer be reason­ably cnlled outside the mainstream. When it comes to same-sex marriage, California is not even cutting edge. .. Mubarak Dahir IS ~ editor of the Express Gay News and can be reached at mdahir@express­gaynews. com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com • point BEREN DE MOTIER Buster Baxter beat 'Sesame Street' in airing a gay character, and only the adults seem to be bothered. Will you be my gaybor? I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT OF ALL TllF. children's television shows, "Sesame Street" would have the first gay characte1: I grew up with "Sesame Street." I watched the first episodes on avocado green shag carpeting in my parents' sunken Los Angeles living room, fell in love with that pre-Tom Hanks "Evel'Yffian" Kermit the Frog, and still own the fuzzy and blue Grover puppet I got for Christmas in 1971. I do a mean Grover impression, which comes in handy more than you'd imagine when you have three kids. "Sesame Street" was the first show to have inner city kids, black kids. Hispanic kids, and a puppet with HIY. It seemed inevitable that one day a lesbian couple would move onto the street. or some nice gay men would buy Mr. Hooper's store and start serving mochaccinos (as well as over-sized cookies) to Cookie Monster on his daily visit. But it was Buster Baxter, the happy-go­lucky, child-of-divorced-parents rabbit co­star of the popular "Arthur" cartoon show. and now star of his own "Postcards from Buster," who introduced lesbians to children's television. Except that. sadly, very few children got to see it, since before the episode about Buster visiting Vermont (where civil unions are legal and couples with two moms not uncommon) could air, under pressure from new Education Secretary Margaret Spellings, PBS pulled the show from national distribution. GOOD GRIEf~ CHARLIE BROWN. We're talking Buster Baxter. I have a 2 year old, so I know, Buster is as benign as you can get. He travels around with his dad on the show, visiting with kids all over the nation. with all kinds of family structures and beliefs. But then again, he probably treated the lesbian family like any other family, and that message is scaring the cultural conservatives. Especially after the SpongeBob brouhaha. I'm not a big SpongeBob fan. I've seen a little of him when visiting the grandpar­ents (who have cable). and he appears to be inane, ridiculous and not terribly literate. But I do appreciate that he took part, as well as Barney, Big Bird and some other kid favorites, in a tolerance video urging children to accept people difTerent from themselves. This got the vocal Focus on the Family group up in arms. Isn't it strange that we can live in a society that struggles with violence, with hate crimes, with racial intoler­ance, and is currently involved in a war to promote freedom. democracy and diversity in a foreign land, and it is con­sidered outrageous to urge kids to accept the obvious: that all people are not the same, and it doesn't make you better than them. and no. you can't hurt them because they're different? OF COURSE. THE CULTURAL conservatives. the Bush administration. and whoever else is making a fuss about Buster Baxter and Tinky Winky, has good reason to worry if intolerance is They help bring culture to our communities, and who doesn't love theater? The theater embraces the gay community like no other branch of the arts. and events like these uplift the gay community. Plus, there are so many hot gals and guys. eve Out at the Al and Out at TUTS are important to gays and lesbians? DAVID HIGGINBOIBAM, 52 Houston Artistic Director for Masquerade Theatre !LICH GUARDIOlA. 31 Houston Actor Buster Baxter their goal. Young people do accept difTerence more easily. They don't automatically consider it bad to be dissimilar. and their automatic response to two people of the same gender falling in love isn't to beat them up or make sure they can't get married. Children are much more likely to want to pet the couple's golden retrle\'er or ask if they have any kids who can come over and play. Until they're socialized differently, that is. While gay bashing among teens sadly continues. there is a growing trend toward live and let live throughout the country. It is hard to demonize us when we live next door and shop at Target. We can't be MARCH 18, 2005 11 going to hell in a hand basket too fast if we're president of the PTA or principal of the school, and young people, and increasingly their parents, know it. Interesting!); no one seems to have a cow when Melissa Etheridge or Nathan Lane, out and proud as you can be, do a cameo on Sesame Street to sing the ABCs. as long as they don't bring a loved one along. And they will somroa): But what I'm really hoping is that before I'm old and gra); someone will finally tell me how to get, how to get to "Sesame Street." I 'm Beren deMotier fives m Portland. Ore. and ~ can be reached at demotiel@telepo Events inwlvmg and supporting the arts are a great vehicle for the gay and lesbian community. along with their supporters. to interface and show community spirit I Most importantly, I think they provide a social atmosphere based on people's common inter· ests of art and culture rather than based predominately on sexuality. Il gives the GLBT folks a chance to re-connect. This community needs so much support. and this is such a great opportunity to show Houston that these groups are very much a part of our rives. TIANNA HALL. 24 Houston Vocalist DOUG THOMPSON. 27 Houston Actor/sirq!f JOANNE BONASSO, 28 Houston Actress Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Intervlews and photo~ by Dalton DeHart 12 MARCH 18. 2005 wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE r-~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- n the record "I absolutely love women and find them incredibly sexy I have loved womrn in the past and slept with them. I think if you love and want to pleasure a woman, particularly if you are a woman yourself, then certainly you know how to do things a certain way." Actress Angelina Jolie, in an interview with a Bnt1sh magazine (OK! Magazine, .\farch 15) "Let priests, rabbis and imams decide which marriages should receive their bless· ing, but as to legal and social rights, the state has no business discriminating." An editorial in the Los Angeles Ti~s that backed sa~-sex marriage. (Los Angeles Ti~s. March 15) kThe policy has turned out to be a disaster. What on the swface was supposed to protect privacy turned into something where people were simply ignoring that and witch-hunting." Former Army Major Jeffrey McGowan. who served as a closeted gay man in the mili· tary for more than a decade; author of "Major Conflict: One Gay Man's Life in the Don't Ask. Don't Tell Military" (Gay.com, March 13) "Certainly our platform states that the party is committed to ensuring that there is tra­ditional marriage." Republican Party chief Ken Mehlman. u·ho went on to say that the GOP should let each state decide whether to allow gay couples to u·ed or enter Into cioil unions. contradicting at least in part the language of the Federal Jfarriage Amendment (Associated Press. March 14) "You cannot help [AIDS) with medicine. You must stop sodomy." Reu Jack Oliver. after leading a protest out­side a Kentucky church that had agreed to let the Annual Black Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS took place; they carried signs that read "No mercy in hell," and "No civil rights for sodomites" (Associated Press. March 14) "We were trying to inform them that God's place is for everybod}'. Everyone is imited here right or '\\TOng." Michael Hard>: assistant pastor of the Kentucky church, after he invited protesters inside the Annual Black Church Week of Prayer for the Healing of AIDS event; they declined (Associated Press. March 14) "Women. you can have it all - a loving man. devoted husband, loving children, a fabulous career." Actress Jada Pinkett-Smith and u·ife of actor Will Smith, to a crowd of approxi· mately 150 students at Harvard's Sanders Theatre; lesbian activists on campus were upset with the remark, calling the actress· remarks "extremely heteronormative." (Boston Globe, .\farch 13) "It's a behav10r; it shouldn't be a pro· tected class. I can't imagine why a behavior would be protected. I don't evrn know what sexual orientation entails. Docs that mean gays and lesbians, men and little boys? It could be people with ammals, I don't know." Oklahoma County's Budget Board Commissioner Rrent Rinehart, u·ho tool.· office after a county non-discrimination poli· cy had been approved, on why he's leadinl( an effort to repeal it (Associated Press . .\farc:h 9) ''No. 6. Ryan Seacrest is all hands. No. 5. I started liking when Ryan Seacre:;t was all hands." 'i\nwrican ldol"jinalist Mario Vasquez, u·ho u•ithdrewfrom the competi· tionfor unexplained personal reasons, in a tongue· in-check appearance doing the "1bp 10" listfor !>avid /,merman (CBS' "I.ate Show." March 15) GAY HOUSTON NIGHTLIFE, ARTS & CULTURE www.houstonvoice.com cho is a killer! Boy gets bitchy In his new autobiography, Boy George slams gay icons like Madonna and Rosie Page 18 MARCH 18, 2005 r·"" ... IC CO "[OJAN TALKS ABOUT POLITICAL HUMOR AND BEING A TRANNIE By MUBARAK DAHIR 111 ARGARET CHO IS A KILLER. She wants to get you with the laughter. On the simplest level, that's the notion behind her evocatively titled new tour. "The Assassin." But Cho. a famously caustic Korean· American comedian, is anything but simple. Known for the often biting political commen· tary that permeates her acts, Cho's choice of a title for her current tour is. no doubt. a jab at the current politi· cal atmosphere of America. Cho, who appeared in Houston a year ago, will bring her both personal and political wit to Hobby Center for the Performing arts on April 7. She took a few moments to speak to the Houston Voice about her evolving sense of humor, her political activism and why she considers herself a trannie. Houston Voice: Not surprisingly, your new show is provocatively titled. Tell us about it. Margaret Cho: Well, it is a provocative title. It's a provocative show It's about bracing ourselves in this new political atmosphere. But it's about bracing our· selves for the positive. not the negative. It's about trying to find some light in all the darkness that surrounds us. political and otherwise. I consider it upbeat. Voice: Upbeat? But aren't you famous for being caus· tic? Cho: (laughing) I'm getting older! I'm more inclined to be compassionate and not quite as sarcastic. I find I have more positive things to say now. I don't think you have to be cruel to be funny. Although, let's admit it, sometimes that can be fun. Voice: What's it like to be a liberal political comedi· an in a time when the country is turning more conser· vallve? Cho: Oh my God. it totally makes me feel like more of a renegade. What I think are really middle·Of·the· road ideas, like gay marriage and gay adoption. are now considered somehow radical by a lot of the rest of the country There's a huge moral question surround· ing these issues that I think are obvious points like. 'Can gay people be good parents?' It's so condescend· ing. Voice: So does that make it easier or harder on you? Cho: I think it makes it easier to be a political comedian these days, because the lines are so strongly drawn in the country now: Voice: Does much of the show address gay and !es· bian politics? Cho: I think just about everything 111 the show will speak to gays and lesbians. because that's where I come from , I'm defined as a queer artist. I'm part of the gay and lesbian movement. Voice: In the past you've described yourself as bisex· ual. Does that remain accurate? Cho: Well. I'm married to a man, and at home I am such a housewife! And yet I am so gay! But I'm a tran· nie, too. Voice: You're a trannie? Am I getting a scoop here? Cho: (laughing) Well, I'm a trJ.J111ie because I'm so manly in a lot of roles in my life. I'm a very demanding boss and producer. Stand-up comedy is a very male profes· s10n. So in my day-to-day work life, I'm a man. But in my personal life. I'm such a woman. I love being a wife. and I want to have a bab): Voice: What does your husband think of you being a queer trannie? Cho: (laughing) Well, he's an artist, so his life is very queer, too. Voice: So. you're a married, American· Korean queer trannie political comedian? That's a lot to juggle! Cho: Well, yeah, it's a challenge incorporating so many identities into my life. (laughing) But as an artist. you have so many facets to choose from. And you know. sometimes you can go too fa1~ but as an artist, you have to push the envelope, you can't be constrained by being too sensitive. You have to let go of societal approval and just get to the best place }OU can as an ai1ist. Voice: Do you consider yourself an act1v1st as well as an artist? Cho: Oh. I definitely consider myself an activist. .My art has the same purpose as activism. Voice: And what purpo. e is that? Cho: The political. important, ,;erious purpose of expanding minds to embrace more progressive ways of thinking. Voice: Do you consider yourself a role model? Cho: I don't know if I am a role model or not, but I'd like to be. I'm very happy with what I'm doing and how I'm doing it. Isn't that worth emulating? • Comedian Margaret Cho who calls herself a 'queer artist,' Will per­fonn at the Hobby Center for the Performmg Arts on April 7. @MORE INFO Margaret Cho The Assassin· April7 Hobby Center for the Performing Arts wwwt1cketmaster.com or 713-629-3700 JUNGLE SPINNING: DJ Tony brings cuts from his new CD to Jungle Houston's main event. Page 14 I A WASTE: ABC'S 'Jake in Progress' is a cheap 'Sex in the City' knockoff. Page 15 14 MARCH 18. 2005 Cheri A. Post, M.O., offers the following services: • Laser Hair Removal • Acne & Acne Scar Removal • Botoxf> and Restylane® • Facials and Peels • Vein Therapies • Microdermabrasion • Waxing and Tinting •Permanent Make-Up Derma Health LASER ASSOCIATES 713-270-6505 6363 Woodway Dr., Suite 850 • Houston, Texas 77057 CELEBRATE EASTER BRUNCH WITl:I US! Offering Houston's Most Extravagant Buffet with a Variety of Choices Every Bunny Will Enjoy! Easter Brunch features chef carved Honey Cured Ham, North Atlantic Salmon En Croute and Boneless Leg of lamb Choose entrees from Smoked Breast Duck, Seared Pork Loin, Fresh Guff Red Snapper and uch mur;h more. Also offering freshly made pastries and desserts, and food fun for the kids Sunday, March 27•10:30am - 3pm ADULTS $35.95 • SENIORS $32.95 CHILDREN (Ages 6-12) $17.95 CHILDREN (5 and Under) FREE RESERVATIONS REQUIRED 713.978.7400 arr1ott. www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE SI• C STEVE WEINSTEIN DJ Tony Moran travels back to Houston for an appearance at Jungle 13 that also includes a performance by Christine W More & more Moran TONY MORAN. DJ SPINS HERE AND there. Maybe you·ve heard of him. If you've gone to a gay dance club, Cir· cult party or picked up an HX or Next in the last year, you'll get the joke in the paragraph above. EverY year, it seems. there's a DJ du annee, and 2004 belonged to Moran. This New York-Miami unicoastal Cuban has established himself as a mas­ter of the current trend toward hard· driving, Latin-inflected backbeat-driven diva-yellin' percussive dance music. The CD cover of his two-disc set, released by an equally hot record label, Tommy Boy, probably wasn't intended to be ironic. But Moran's image imprinted on a bus with various parties (Winter, Alegria. Rio Carnival. CherrY ... ) pretty well sums up where we are right now. ~'hat distinguishes this compilation is Moran's experience inside a studio. A good half of the tracks were mixed by Moran, and, in at least one case, he com· posed the music as well. This distinguishes Moran from many of the pack of gay DJs currently spin· ft MORE INFO Tour de Beats Double CD Tommy Boy Records www.djtonymoran.com JUNGL.El3 Kklc-off 9 p.m.·2 a.m. March 24 Meteor 2306 Genesee 'Gather the Tribe' 10 p.m.-4 a.m. March 25 Rich's 2401 San Jacinto Tribal Heaf IO p.m-4 am. March 26 Verizon Wireless Theater 520 Texas Ave. After liooo 'Salvation' 3:30 a.m.· 10 a.m. March 27 M Bar 402 Main Sl Tribal Lust' 10 p.m.·5 a.m March 27 South Beach 810 Pacific Advance tickets available at M2M Fashion 3400 Montrose Blvd. ID-521-0804 WWWJunglehoustcncom Tony Moran's 'Tour de Beats' delivers exactly that - a guided tour of current club riffs. ning. Moran, it seems. has worked with nearly every dance diva around r ight now, and he pours them into this CD. The result strongly resembles a set at Alegria, which suits me just fine. In fact, it is an ideal Alegria set: all of the vocals without any of that damned drumbeat repetition. The entire two-CD set, played back to back, would give anyone an introduction into these parties. They will also indoc­trinate the Alegria virgin into exactly why these occasional parties have become the most successful gay dance events in the world. THERE ARE FEW '"DEBUTS' HERE (ironic quotes because, once you hear them, you'll recognize them immediate­ly). Deborah Cooper's "Live You All Over" is simply terrific, the kind of diva anthem we so desperately need right now: (No, I'm not going to go off about "tina music"' - although I could!) The highlight of these CDs filled with highlights is undoubtedly Zhana Saunders' "Waiting for Alegria.'' If any song can lay claim to being the theme of our time, it's this one. You want divas? TrY Kristine W, Cooper and Suzanne Palme1: There also Just to show that Moran knows his way around a record store. Ron Perkov, Chus & Ceballos, Reina and the Party Starters are here, too. As befits his origins. there's a distinctly Latin flavor throughout. Be prepared for a little hands-on-the-hips action if you're dancing by yourself at home. (Oh, come on, I know you do that.) The only question I have is, how is Moran going to program his upcoming Jungle 13 gig in Houston? Moran will be playing at the Verizon Wireless Theater downtown Saturday, .:Vfarch 26, for "Tribal Heat," the main event at Jungle 13 that also includes a live performance by diva Christine w: HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com n BRIAN MOYLAN ABC's new Thursday night sitcom 'Jake in Progress' wastes John Stamos in a cheap, comedy-free 'Sex and the City' knockoff. No signs of 'Progress' "SEX AND THE CITY" WAS MORE than a television show; it was a cultural phenomenon. That statement may seem a bit outrageous, but the now-defunct HBO comedy about four women Jiving and lov­ing in New York really did influence how America thinks about fashion, comedy and women on television. Now this successful formula, concocted by gay creators Darren Star and Michael Patrick King, is being borrowed by less talented imitators, with miserable results. ABC's "Jake in Progress" is being billed as "Same cit}; difTerent sex," which itself is a rip-off of "The L Word's" smart mar­keting campaign "Same sex, difTerent cit):" "Jake" is meant to be "Sex and the City" from a male perspective. ABC offered a preview (two episodes) of the sitcom last Sunday, !\1arch 6, before debuting m its 8 p.m. time slot on Thursday. March 17. The show stars John Stamos (who is aging quite well) as Jake Phillips, a slick PR guy and king of the one-night stand who generally charms his way through life without encountering any obstacles. For some reason that isn't fully developed, Jake decides that there's got to be more to life than quickie romances and sets out to find a more substantial relationship. While on this quest, he has to juggle his needy celebrity clients, his pregnant boss (the fabulous Wendie Malick from "Just Shoot Me"), his married best friend (Ian Gomez) and his weird, neurotic side­kick (Rick Hoffman). "JAKE" ISN'T EVEN COOL ENOUGH to be one of Carrie Bradshaw's (Sarah Jessica Parker) castoffs. The character's greatest problem is, like Carrie's Mr. Big, he says he wants to change, but he really doesn't. While he's looking for "the one" he keeps cycling through women, like in the old days. Talk is cheap, Jakey-poo. Also, the ensemble on "Jake" is not real· Jy an ensemble at all. Carrie was always the anchor of •·sex," but it was equally about her three friends and their relation· ships With men (and sometimes women) and earh othrr. But when the lead charac­ter's name is in the show's title and every­one else on screm merely serves to aid his egomaniacal quest, it all falls short. The show also suffers from severe comedic anemia. "Sex," often sweet and touching with its quirky, stylish charac­ters, who wrre always fabulous. was ft MORE INFO 'Jake in Progress' ABC Thursdays at 7 p.m John Stamos 1s the only attractive thing about ABC's new 'Jake in Progress.' which ai~ Thursdays at 8 p.m. laugh-out-loud funny Through two episodes of "Jake," be grateful if you even crack a smile. AND THEN THERE'S THE GAY ISSUE. In the second episode, Jake wrestles with his clients, "Three Gay-migos," a design trio that is obviously an offshoot of "Queer Eye's" Fab Five. One of the "Gay­migos" is actually straight and has to come out to his co-workers. The result is a cute storyline where the tables are reversed and the straight man has to come out of the closet. This plot could be appealing, but it is ruined by the "Gay-migos," who are stereotypically effeminate. even more so than their real-life counterparts. And Just to really offend gay viewers. the straight guy affects a lisp, a high-pitched voice and sashays in his role as a gay designet: Of course, he loses these quali­ties when being "true to himself" as a straight man. "Jake," my darling, if you were really comfortable with gay people, there wouldn't be a need for such simplistic and predictably offensive gags. The most offensive aspect of "Jake and the City," however is that it dared to compare itself to "Sex and the Cit):" By itself, it's just another mediocre network sitcom. Next to "Sex." it is dwarfed in comparison. MARCH 18. 2005 15 "IN A WORD MAGNIFICEN' T!'' Stefas-'\ie Po\Ne"4s ;.., RodRe.-s & The t-1c';""""""e.-stei"''s > fGh'\9 aV\dJ Wednesday, March 23 \\ould )OU lil t to minik "'ith the cast and 1i1J.ltn to q~ fabulous cahattt mlbic~ Then. Out@nrrs a.~ for )OU • .\Ru the- prrformance join ~our (:I.BT fri<nd< at ~rtista Restaurant "'the Hobb) ('mt..-. )ou'I ft\iol mmplimmtal) hors d'oruH-n •nd drinU at H•PP) Hour pri4.:CS.. '\o"' that's a •"niJ:ht on the to" n.·· '_..thy ·•1i.·iv1:.- -~ i ~dtreUnMrThe)tdO 713.558.TUTS www.tuts.com Groups of 15+ call 713.558.8888 for special discounts. Ao Audio Described: Sun.. '\1arch '1:1 at 2 pm oc Open Captioned: Sun.. March '1:1 at 7:30 pm & Thurs., l\1arch J I at 8 pm HDUSTDN_::tltRDNIClE E!/ ERNST & YOUNG ~ . oo;...._ (~ +OMOONTACU ~ Mr. &Mrs. &!word Hi<Um RE-BUILD YOUR CREDIT with easy payment arrangements upon approval. • LOW INCOME • BANKRUPTCY • RE.flNANCING • nrRT f'ONS()I ntff111N Call 1.866.83 7 .3840 Full Spectrumlending A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS DIVISION J6 MARCH 18. 2005 GRAND OPENING MARCH 17·20 DAILY SPECIALS & LIVE MUSIC 1111 WESTHEIMER OPEN for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner with a full bar 7 DAYS a week Ear1y Morning and Late Night Additional Parking Available Next to Hollywood Video 713 520.8281 1220 Taft Street Houston Texas n019 713-529-6255 info@MyCateringCompany.com Full Service Catering Corporate Events Carry Outs & Delivery From Breakfast to Late Dinners Fort Lauderdale Real Estate ANDY WEISER. Put Coldwell Banker's Top Producer to 'NOl'k for You 954-560-9667 COLDWel.L BANl(C!RC www.houstonwice.com HOUSTON VOICE J.A. CHAPMAN For outstanding kabobs and baklava as well as tabouli and scrumptious, hot pita bread, head out Richmond to Mary'z Mediterranean Cuisine Mediterranean Mary'z I LOVE GOOD MEDITERRANEAN food. So it was with great anticipation that I headed out Richmond to try out Mary'z Mediterranean. The location seemed familiar. and it finally dawned on me that this was the home of Sammy's Lebanese, before a trag· ic fire. I hoped it was a good sign that Mary'z owners were also Lebanese. The restaurant itself is like a small house, much like the old Sammy's. There's a porch out front. parking in the back. and the interior has an upscale feel. with maroon carpets and faux·marble tabletops. A split-level dining area creates intimac;; while providing plenty of seating. The menu has all the usual suspects and no real surprises. One lunch visit, I started out with a half order of tabouli ($2.i5), which proved to be an ample por­tion, as are most of the half orders on the menu. The tabouli is tangy with lemon and has plenty of parsley. More bulgher wheat might add heartiness, but that's a small quibble for such a fresh, light treat. For a light meal, try one of the sand· wiches. which are rolled up in the thin. delicious pita bread and wrapJ)(.'d with tin foil - perfect for take out. The lamb kabob sandwich ($4.25) is an excellent choice. The lamb was tender and succulent, with a hint of allspice. Lettuce, tomatoes, pick· Jes, and tahini fill out the sandwich, adding plenty of flavor. It's possible to make a meal from the appetizer selections. The fried kibbi ($0.95). filled with ground beef. pinenuts and almond slivers, are warm and filling. The falafel (3 for $1.00) was not the very best I've had. but the garlic sauce is addictive. Both the hummus ($2.8.5 for half serv· ing/$4.45 for whole) and baba gannouge ($2.75/$4.25) were strangely lacking in gar· lie and heavy on the lemon. The baba gan­nouge could benefit from a stronger egg. plant flavor. but overall both are tasty and come with the delicious thin pita bread. The platters come with salad or veg· etable and dip. The beef shwarma ($9.95) was more like a beef stew than the thinly sliced beef I'd expected. It was served on pita bread, which quickly became soggy. The fattouch salad on the side was large enough to be a meal, and refreshingly light. with cucumbers. tomatoes. lettuce and parsley in a lemony dressing. Vegetarians will find plenty to eat at Mary'z, including a good selection of veg· etable dishes, all available in half and whole servings. The eggplant ($2.451$3.95) is the standout · garlicky, tangy and ten· der. it's a real find. Order a whole serving half isn't enough. The cauliflower ($2.45/ $3.9.5) is panfried until golden brown. It's sweet and tender, but could do with some seasoning. The potatoes ($2.45/ $3.95) are pan fired as well and loaded with garlic, which isn't mentioned on the menu, plus lemon and parsley. IT'S EASY TO NOSH YOUR WAY around the menu at Mary'z, but save room for dessert. The baklava ($1.25) is excellent and the servings are sizable Both walnut and pistachio are available. Owr waitress described the cream baklava ($1.45) as "baklava with cream", which wasn"t at all what it turned out to be. Instead it was fried dough filled with a something akin to clotted cream, and served in a pool of rose syrup. It was delicious, but entirely differ­ent from what had been described. Service can be a problem at Mary'z, mostly because English is not the staff's first language and communication can be difficult. The food is prepared to order, which means it's fresh and deli· cious. but can also take awhile. Still, the staff ls very friendly and aims to be as helpful as possible. Alcohol is not served at :\1ary'z, but hookahs are available. It wasn't clear if you could order a hookah for the table, and they're not on the menu, but patrons were puffing away each time I visited. No doubt interested parties would be able to partake. Mary'z offers very reasonably priced Mediterranean food in a pleasant atmos· phere. With a convenient location on Richmond, plenty of parking, and good food, it's worth a visit. Mary'z Mediterranean Cuisine 5825 Richmond 832·25H955 Food lellelfel Service: !el let let Value: lellel'e!lel Scene: fel'91!el "= Stay home and eat cereal let 1e1 = Well. if you really must let lel 191 = Fine for all but the finicky '9! 1e1 • • =Worth more th.in a 20-minute drive • * * • • =As good as you'll find in this city JOHNNY HOOKS A Loft Party heats up, art gets auctioned to benefit the Community Center, and an erotic bakery in (of all places) Sugar Land Erotica outside the Loop WELCOME BACK TO HOVO ON THE Go-Go! Can it be that Spring is on the way? The weather is warming up and the kids are getting out and about. This week we'll check out erotic cakes, a home tour and of course the GLBT Center Art Auction! FIRST UP THOUGH, TfflS JUST IN. Well not just in, but wanted to let you know that the new Montrose Diner is now open 24 hours! Perfect after food for sopping up all the liquor you conswned. Make sure to try the meatloaf .ywnmy! Montrose Diner is located at llll Westheimer. IF YOU MISSED THE QUEER collective show at the Meridian last week, for shame! The Butchies put on a frenzied !X'rformance as always, but HotGG was there for the stunningly hand· some gay singer/songwriter Eric Himan. Himan is so hottt with arms inked to the shouldc>r and the smoldering good looks of Dylan McDermott. And did we mention he can sing like an angel? His new CD is called "Dark Horse" and arrives in stores this week! Check out www.erichiman.com for more info and look for Eric to return to Houston some· time later this year. We should have known one queer who would be in attendance, as he is always present for the hippest events, and that's Houston's own poet "queer-lau­reate" Todd Gresley. Visit his super cool website at www.toddicus.com to see what he's up to or order his first book of poems "Indiana the Island." SO IT'S FRIDAY NIGHT AND WHAT IS there to do'! Glad you asked. HotGG received an e-mail about a new monthly party starting this Friday. It's brought to you by Zeke Ziliak and DJ Surain of Berryhill on Sunday's fame. The communique reads in part, "DJ Surain and I are bringing his house revival music from the Sunday daylight hours to the Houston night scene. There's nowhere el e where you can dance to Olva House music from the 1990's like Robin S, Juliet Roberts. Christine W, and D:Ream. Our concept is simple, a roving once-a-month party in Houston where house revival music lovers can dance to their favorite songs on a Friday mght. Tht• name of the party? Loft'" The first Loft party is at Six Degrees Lounge, 911 Franklin Street, betwt•en Travis and ~lain. The music starts at 9 p. 111. Beers are $2 and cocktails are $-1 until 11 p.m. No cowr and plenty of free street parking. www.theloftprojcct.com o,. www.sixdl.com for more. 'l'lllS SATURDAY A NEW EROTIC bakery has its Grand Opening in Sugar Some of the art to be auctioned off to raise money for the Houston GLBT Community Center borders on erotica. Land (Hey everyone can't be inner-loop-­ers!) Nooky's Erotic Bakery, located at 10140-C Highway 6 South in Sugar Land, is a place where adults can purchase cakes as wild as their imagination. choco­lates in fun shapes, cookies and other goodies. Visit this delightful establish· ment's website at www.nookyseroticbak· ery.com 281-5684000 or toll free 1-877· 4NOOKYS. ALSO ON SATURDAY (AND SUNDAY) is the annual Woodland Heights Home and Garden Tour. The reason we know about this tour? HotGG lives across the street from one of the homes on the tour, but we're not telling which one! Why not take the tour and see if you can figure it out! Featured homes are located at 603 Highland, 418 Byrne, 117 Payne, 515 Woodland, 2615 Thelma and 1018 Highland. Go to www.woodland· heights.org for ticket info and details. DON'T FORGET AHOUT "AN ART Affair," the Houston GLBT Community Center auction fundraiser this Saturday night from 6-9 p.m. The event. which is open to the public. will feature a silent and live auction of art Proceeds from the auction. held at 1 U5 California, will support OjX'rations and programming at the Center. Miss Nancy Ford 1s the hostess with the most! I 'If\ If you have any club announcements or ~ events, email them to jhooks@houstonvoice.com or call 713·529.-8490. See you on the Go-Go! MARCH 18. 2005 17 "MAMMA MIA! IS TERRIFIC FLJN!" BfN BRANTlfY, THf NfW VORI< T1MfS Bf:NNY ANDffiSSON & BJORN ULVAflJS' MAMMAMIA! THE SMASH HIT MUSICAL:.";".., A8BA: MARCH 22-27, 2005 • JONES HALL BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com or call 713-629-3700 Groups of 20 or more: 713·693·2692 ~c1ngular -··-·-----=::-=..·:.~.::.-=-·-- -- IROIDWAY.HouaToN Just because the state does not recognize it. Does not mean you can't. 11-IE GALAXIE JEWELERS - wt> Create the Unusual I 2511 Suns~t Blvd. (near Kirby) 1111111 -u.s211s11 ~ 200 I MCAF Diamond Star Award ... lloustol' \rncc Readers Cho cc Best Je"dcr of the Cm 20<» The(;alaxieJe"lVelers.cotn 18 MARCH 18. 2005 We specialize in cosmetic laser procedures. s~ &~aissance LASER CENTER Hair Removal Enhanced Skin Rejuvenation - removes blemishes and wrinkles, an alternative to facelift. Acne (Active & Scars) Rosacea, Shaving Bumps Face & Leg Veins Laser Peel/Resurfacing Restytane® Botox® Gay owned and operated! Free consultationsl Se habla espaiiol. Octavio Barrios, M.D. Carol Donnelly, P .A.-C 106 Westheimer at Bagby and Westheimer 713.942.SKIN (7546) See before and after pictures at www. kfnrenalssance.net www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE dis There's a Fine Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash Boy oh Boy! Boy George gets bitchy, Martina cries foul and Reichen gets weepy REMEMBER WHEN ALL THE GAY people would band together to fight for truth, justice and the betterment of mankind through dance music? Yeah, Dish doesn't remember that either. But now BOY GEORGE has gone and blown the very idea of that all to hell. In an interview with the London Times to promote his new autobiography, "Straight," which just hit stores across the pond, Boy George has disparaging things to say about a number of gay celebrities, including MADONNA. "It's ironic that she's joined an orgamzation that says homosexuality is a d!SC3SC that can be cured and no one picks her up on it," he said, referring to her devotion to Kabbalah, that oh-so-trendy form of Jewish mysticism. ''.After making all those millions of dollars out of gay people, pretending to kiss girls, pretending to be a lesbian! I think she's cynical." In response, Madonna's rep, Liz Rosenberg, reminded the New York Post's gossip column Page Six of "Madonna's long-standing passion, love, commitment and devotion to the gay community" adding that Kabbalah "does not discriminate against homosexuals." She's right. they'll take money from anybody. In the same interview, Boy George calls ROSIE O'DONNELL a "Pottery Barn lesbian" and says that she ruined the Broadway musical "Taboo" because she's not gay enough. The O'Donnell-financed $10 million musical starring Boy George and based on his life. closed last year to disappointing returns. He also castigates GEORGE MICHAEL for not coming out earlier in his musical career and chastises ELTON J OHN for singing a duet with EMINEM in 2001, after he made homophobic remarks. O'Donnell responded to the comments on her blog (onceadorded.blogspot.com). "My knighted gay brother [John) called to tell me. we laughed," she said. Bad credit Lesbian tennis great MARTINA NAVRATILOVA is crying foul over the continued use of her image on the Rainbow Card, a credit card that gives money to the Rainbow Coalition, a Philadelphia· based nonprofit that fights for gay civil rights causes. The Associated Press reported that Martina Navratilova Navratilova began working with Do Tull Inc., the company that runs the With an eye toward selling copies of his new book. 1980s diva Boy George is talking a lot of trash about gay icons. (AP photo by Jennifer Graylock) credit card, in 1995, when her picture was used in advertisements for it. Near the end of last year, she was not happy with Do Tell's continued campaign and called it "inappropriate and repugnant" and asked that they no longer use her picture. When the company didn't comply, her lawyers sent them a cease and desist letter in early February: When her image was still being used after that, she filed a suit seeking $75,000 in damages. An advertisement featuring Navratilova has since been removed from www.rainbowcard.com, but the suit has yet to be settled. Poster boy Former reality star and beefcake REICHEN BURKE (nee Lehmkuhl) is da1mmg that a printer who makes the hunky poster sold on his Web site (www.reichen.org) discriminated against him. United Press International reported that Burke recently received an e-mail from the printer saying, "I can not continue to help promote a homosexual community, lifestyle Reichen Burke or individual." Burke, who won $1 million on CBS's "The Amazing Race" in 2003 with his former partner CHIP ARNDT, says, "Emotionally, it ruined my day . . I had tears in my eyes.'' The maximum fine for such discrimination in California, where Burke and the printer reside, is $4,000. So Burke has decided not to sue. 6f. 1 Send comments. suggestions to '-W Dish@houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com MARCH 18, 2005 19 I arts cover story He may be gay, but he's a hundred percent cowboy COWBOY , continued from Page 1 sages in his life. He breaks his leg during a bull ride, his beloved horse dies and .Mikulenka's comes out to his family. Just like all good cowboys he's got a tall tale or two to tell about borrowed cowboy boot~. broken bones and the price for his 0\\11 15 minutes of fame. Gene Mikulenka was raised by a rodeo family in Hallettsv11le, Texas. He has four older siblings and one younger one. "I was raised on the rodeo since about age five. ~ly dad rode bulls," he says. Horn on August 13, he coyly demurs when asked what year "A real cowboy never reveals his true age'" he laughs. "Thl' first bar I went to was Numbers, the original one. The first time I went it was like a big light went off," he remem· bers, but Mikulenka remained semi-clos­eted for many years afte1: He was a succcs.~ful Houston runway and print model in the 1900s after completing three years at Victoria College and the University of Houston. He also gained recog­nition in national advertising as a hand model. The only people who knew he was gay were "the men I was going out with." Certainly Mikulenka's family did not know. Staunch traditionalists, his mother and step-father (his father died when he was 17), now both deceased would not have approvecl. "I loved them so much. My mom died on Mothers day. The doctors had always said not to do anything that would upset her heart, so I didn't," he says. He recalls an oft' told tale of when he first learned what the word gay meant. "I was 17, working as a waiter at this little place. One day a couple of guys came into the restaurant and asked me if I was ga):" he recalls. "Well I thought the word gay meant that you smoked pot, that you were cool. So I told them I had done it a couple of weeks ago on a bridge with my friend. but I wasn't going to do it any· more because it hurt my throat." A friendly waitress informed him that the word meant that you were queer. That word he knew. The good and bad of a life on film Mikulenka looks back on the experi­ence of having his life documented for a film as "a good thing and a bad thing." The director, Kyle Hen!'); had been searching for a cowboy who competed in both the gay and straight rodeos and one who did well. l'vlikulenka was featured in Out magazine around the same time a lengthy Houston Chronicle article ran. The dll'ector contacted him through a friend, and Mikulenkn decided he had C)MOREINFO 'Real American Cowboy' 9 p.m. M.irch 21 and 28 Aurora Picture Show 311 Mam $5 admission some soul searching he needed to do. Leary already at the idea, would he be able to deal with the repercussions that would come from such a high profile experience? "I didn't want to out any of my friends, or have it be guilt by associa­tion," he says. '"Then there's my famil}:'" Finally he decided he could no longer live a lie and accepted the film. He could have had no idea that the con­stant filming would capture a devastating broken leg and most importantl); the death of his belovt..'<I horse, Marta. to colic. Th this day Mikulenka still finds it near impossible to watch the scenes where ~1arta dies. "That was the worst part," he says. Another aspect that Mikulenka shares exclusively with The Houston Voice, is that with his new-found fame. came a stalker. "I was stalked for almost six months," !\iikulenka says. "He walked up to me at the premiere and said. 'You're a famous cowboy now. Your life is about to change' It was creepy. My friends standing with me still remember him, how he walked away and would turn around and stare with these dead eyes." Mikulenka moved three times to try and out maneuver the stalker. "He always knew where I was, what I was wearing," he says. '"Finally, I was at Crossroads having coffee and he walked in. I just freaked. I went over and told a police­man inside about what had been happen­ing. The cop took him outside and spoke with the gu): Never heard from hun agam." ~1ikulenka has no regrets about "Amencan Cowboy." H:) says that \\hile he understood the focus was on him being a "gay cowboy," he wishes the film had portrayed a more accurate reflection of his competing. Gene Mikulenka's fifth Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo wm came Thursday in pole bending. 20 MARCH 18. 2005 I cartoon I servi• ces buildyourbusiness CONTACT OUR SALES TEAM 713 5298490 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Alignments Brakes 2314 Washington 713-88().4 7 4 7 !CLASSIFIEDS Visit houstonvoice.com to place your ad. Up to 25 words only $12.50 per week. 504 each additional word Fax toll-free 1.888.409.6768, or call toll-free 1.877.863.1885. Deadline for online ads: 8am Wednesday. For other submissions: 5:30pm Tuesday. REAL ESTATE SERVICES STAND OUT FROM THE CROWi> IS you-home ipecial?Tell cu readers about 11. <i<aanttt ll1ey Set ~ with cu new feature. Bold :x box you- ad b added at?1acll0n Contact cu wsu:mer SeMCe reps tor mere details. (81n 863 1885. SALE I HOUSTON THE TIME IS RIGHT ... ADVERTISE NOW!! Advertise with the HOUSTON VOICE CLASSIFIEDS! Call to pla<e your ad! 1 (177) 863-1185. RENT I HOUSTON 11D MONTROSE SMALL quiet complex WID onsite central AC/heat diswuher 5550 rent SSSO deposit 211-435-31171817-834-5999 MONTROSE 111 LARGE. RENOVATED. small QUJet profeCt AU BIUS PAl!>I Spedal S635.00 No dtpOSll d qua! lied 713 213:::::::: ALL llUS PAID ' BR 59 SotJ!h lo Gessner) fum.shEd 0< unftJrNhed. WO & otrase 'lladune S500lmo. 0 deposit. ~plell Cl! Anlhonye<Sid.(7'3)270-6853 INNER LOOP GARAGE APT Garden o.m. I BR. wlcomputei <. Restncted 'lelgl-bolhood & parking S450/mo + elec & .~ 17131 862 2849 MONTROSE AREA 1 BR. 1 BA apt fe< •ent on second flOOl of beautiful ViaONn Hardwood floors, WO 1nc.;;ded Qi et reighborhood S 595/mo plus deposit Cal Jason. 832) 541 9801 RENT IT FAST with CU" new fearures. Draw a~ennon to JUUi ad by (ISll1Q cu bold ?r bcx lea•ure Contaet our cus· tomer seMCe reps f01 mllfe deta s. (877) 863 1885 PLACE YOUR AD · NOW! AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM WANTED TO RENT INTERNATIONAL POSTDOC RESEARCHER at Medical Center Look:ng for affOldable housing (month to month or 5 'llOOth max. lease) around Mootrose!Mu~eight~ Contact a1111rosenmannChotmai .com ROOMMATE SERVICES SGWM SEEKS ROOMMATE TO SHARE 2 BR. 2 BA condo 1n River Oaks. Security gates, pool. all appls wlWO, cable 1'1, pma:e bedroom Non-smoker & no drugs please (713) 520-7662 SHARE I HOUSTON SE 610 LOOP AREA lrg 3 BR house to share llg SW>tnmrng pool S400/mo. (713) 94' -4646 COMMITMENT CEREMONIES ANNOUNCE YOUR UNION "lie Houston Voice IS proud to announce the addillor' of a • Commrtment Ceiemonres • cate­gory to our C'.assified lisnngs. When mating arrangemenis for yo..- Unron. don't forget to include the most mponant aspect o! a announcing the date Publislwng your uraon s easy & simple Call 187n 863 1885 ext 223 to put the finishing touch­es on JOUt ceiemony ANNOUNCEMENTS NSOMNIA FURNITURE & GIFTS! 'lewl Furr ture lo Manresses sold to benefit local cha111y \"Sit the Diamond M.lttress Factory Outlet "4iaofiber lo upholstered sofas, solid wood bedroom fumi ~ mat:cesses and more• Grand Opening~ Doltile pr Vii top Queen ruess set S329 w 15 year ~ty ~Foam S499arnfopw feumewarianty All net proceeds donated to A OS Housing Coal1110n Houston:West Heights House 433 610 N loop West Houston 713 869-3'00 EMPLOYMENT r----------------------------, Adecco- HOSPITALITY ADECCO HOSPITALITY Is hlrlnq por t tim e loc•I positions and permanent jobs w ith NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINES POSITIONS AVAILABLE INCLUDE walt•rs. bartenders. room att•ndanh laundr y . chefs, cook s, and surveillance personn•I Call ( 7 13 ) 627· 0471 for oppolntment. Immediate openlnqs. experience a plus but ell levers consldu ed , FREELANCE REPORTERS NEEDED to covei har : r- w· Send resume and tlvtt dips to. Editor Houston Voice 500 lOvetl '200 Houston T""" 77006 INSURANCE CUSTOMER SERVICE I I I I I I I I I help '"" f . l(f ~. - ~ ~ ~ phone skills. P's call Rob Schrnerler (713166. 7700 TEXAS SHIRT co · nng at our Heights locauon. llt of , , ·· .- · . • " , 1b0n at www txshin~corrJemploy .,,. 1; CLEANING SERVICES TERRY"S HOME SERVICES! · y< ~ · • · oo valuable to spend q dtanmg > ~' , ,..., : with anemJ011 to detail and dependabi 1yn1 Ciil Terry. (832) 630-66391 (Also seeking e.penenced PT bool<ketpei willing to travel outside !tie loop) HOME IMPROVEMENT HOMEWORK A+ QUALITY HOME REPAIR! CARPENTRY • DECKS • FENCES • TRIM/MOLDINGS • NEW CONSTIUCTION • PAINTING • PllESSUIE WASH Local References • Immediate Response Free Estimates • On Time Call KERRY at 713.493.9646 DEADLINES Barn Wednesday for online submissions only. 5:30pm Tuesday for all other submissions. THE TIME 15 RIGHT ••• ADVERTISE NOW!! Acl 1e1 · . wtth the HOUSTON VOICE CLASSIFIEDS! Call to place your ad! 1 (877) 863·1885. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I CLASSIFIEDS PHOTOGRAPHY I VIDEO david TuWISIMAGES MASSAGE BODY MAGIC • STRESS RELEASE • DEEP TISSUE • Montrose. In/Out. 9am-midnight. (713) 857-1009 nREWARD YOURSELF A NICE TOUCH ELAXATION OF BODY AND MIND BY LEE 832 978-7017 CENTRALLY LOCA fD 7 OAVSfi:VENINGS OUTCAlLS WELCOME MASSAGE IN GAllERIA AREA •Hot Stone • Deep Tissue • £:rotK Nude •Sensual 713.244.0393 Jane's World THE ART OF GIVING PLEASURE 'I, ma• · l!'USCI 1,. >late •(ensed. AMTA certified, 11 )• rs exp. '' " : ble, f"I bwy tutal release! S75 IMe< Loop/ SW Mike, (713) 963-9603 Professional ~~ Set your body.free/ from strsss,tsns1on,achss and pains 1wedi1h ncuro-muscular sports massage deep tissue Rc1ki 0 n college guy • tkr.,..Ji< • ,..JiJI,_ • """" ·~---~ -~·""'"FY NEW Jteam Rc<>m!!I Montro1e Jtudio 713-5215100 _,.JA!''!;;mt com MASSAGE BY BIU AJI knotted up? Let me help! lflCdlls/01 C;:m 7days week. Excellent rates. 81 (281) 530-47~1 MASSAGE IN ONTROSE • SU>t!dislr .. Gift • Dup TI Silt! ce • Rda:ration BODYWORKS BY LOU ProfeSSl ~I •elaxlng massage by Expener~ed ~MI & Certified Peoonal Tramer. Memorial Park & Clear .ake locatJOn~ S60/hr Call Lou (713) 204· 2885. Visit http·1Jhometown.aol.com/bodyworksbylou. SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK Relaxanon. Myo!herapy. deep llSSUe (RMI #024589) (713) 739-0087 (7'3) 501 9852 deepnssueman2Caol Clllll 713-52-METRO 526-3876 Tue-Sat 9-9 Sun Noon-9 2606 Grant Street Houston Texas 77006 WWW.METROSPA4MEN.COM THE ULTIMATE MASSAGE for Today's Businessman '4 Hands' Massage Body Waxing and Bady OJTs AYOlloble NC~'E MALE LOPEZ KENNY 281-844-7456 713-515-2882 MARCH 18, 2005 Zl COUNSELING I SUPPORT THE TIME IS RIGHT ••• ADVERTISE NOW!! M. tllf HOUSTON VOICE ClASSIFlEDSI Call our friendly claulf~ staff to place ad! 1 (877) 863-1885. Paige Braddock VON 'T LOO¥- AT~ ... J.'ft\ NO\ 11\E. Ot*: WttoS GAA1Efllt, ··· ~'...;:;:::::::;:i 22 MARCH 18. 2005 ~-,,,,.~·· :1ill ~ ~-Q~~?~~l stevenu derblll.co 415-978-2463 WWW.BADPUPPY.COM (321 )631-9500 (800)21 9-5650 THE LEADER IN ONLINE GAY EROTICA SINC Webmasters, make money on your website with W.W PUppyCash com www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I ADULTCLASSIFIEDS WEBSITES OR MR.RIGHT NOWi WWW.SPANKTHIS.COM Being spank.ed, real disopl ne I young punk~ New movie each 'llOnth Instant access 0t purchase WWW.HOTSTUDS.COM New hot ong nal Bare9ack v1d­. as. Hot St ' : . '""'Y lw,c>ks & Latin Boys do1119 n a raw View onl111E · r: · '···· l1screetly ESCORTS BARELY LEGAL! featunng male 0t she-male esroru. Inca outcall/2 4-7 StltctM! hiring Cash and all rnaior aedit cards wetmme (713) 526-ISll TREVOR I HOT YOUNG SEXY! PRIVATE M Guaranteed . In/Out Calls Ca 101 flat rate. (713) 627 3000 BODYWORK SPANK YOU! Spank you very much! Or ... for gentler stimulation, check www.DaddyBlade.com. Daddy Blade and/or Maverick. (713 ) 864-2233. MASSAGING GUNS! lf•tY•wOr.....,. D••,TlaHe 111/o.t 10•-••- Nick 71 :S-:SO:S-4t4 I 1'2 • 200lll DEADLINES Barn Wednesday for online submissions only. 5:30pm Tuesday for all other submissions. HOUSTON VOi CE www.houstonvoice.com WHY DO MEN SAY THEY WILL DO something and then don't? If you say you're going to call me - do it! If you can't, call as soon as you can and simply explain. When you don't call, I chalk you up as an inconsiderate loser wasting my time with stupid head games. BECAUSE GAY MEN ARE MEN, THEY have an innate expectation that their sex­ual partner will be perfect, or at least per­fect looking and perfect in the bed. I'm glad to be a lesbian! TO ALL THE ELITIST QUEENS WHO parade around with ego and pretension: Your number is coming up. IT'S A MYTH THAT GAY MEN ARE ANY better at expressing their feelings than straight men, especially the more mascu­line the gay guy is. I can relate to a 36 easy-to-surf categories Cruising • Erotic Art Bodybuilders • Solo Bears & Cubs Twlnks Celebrities • Voyeurs Adult Stars • Athletes Amateurs · Galleries Escorts· Exhibitionists woman's frustration in trying to get a man to open up and say what he feels. What the hell are you afraid of? BITCH BOY RESPONDS: Hell yeah! Beat the feelings out of him! SINCE WHEN IS IT OUR BUSINESS what Clay Aiken's sexual orientation is? He's a decent Southern Baptist man who is against homosexuality, which he very well should be. He is in the world, not of it. He does not conform to the sexually immoral behavior of this world. CROTCH TRIMMING EFFEMINATE? I trim because it's comfortable. WHY CAN'T THE GAY SEX BOMB GO off in my house? TO ALL THE BOYS I AM TOO AFRAID to say, I love you much. Stay well. PORN Tlte Frn Gay Directory 28,000 Websites Usted 1,000s of Free Sex Pies I'm tired of straight people who judge them­selves by their best behavior, and judge us by our worst behavior. TO THE GUY WHO COMPLAINED, "Anybody who looks at you, will instantly know you are gay": Dwnbass, that is exactly what we want. Some of us don't want to hide in the closet. I THINK IT'S WRONG TO PRETEND you are something you are not if you are gay. Be gay, but don't marry women and hurt them cause it hurts like hell. From a woman who knows. SO READING "BITCH SESSION" makes you feel like kicking your dog? To you, that may say something about "Bitch Session," but to me, it says you need anger management. IF YOU DON'T WANT TO BE CALLED A bitch, don't say you're going to "bitch slap" someone. You can always say you're going to "kababa·slap" the crap out of the little nancy: I FEEL SORRY FOR THE JUDY WHO doesn't understand English or etiquette. MARCH 18, 2005 23 When someone offers you a "drink" it is not required to ask for alcohol. HE HAS A NEW BOYFRIE!\1). SO HE can­not be himself. He has taken it so far as to stop reading "Bitch Session.· What a messed up little fag he is. BITCH BOY RESPONDS: What kind of guy lets his boyfriend forbid him from reading "Bitch Session"? That's spousal abuse! JUST BECAUSE I'M LIVING WITH A suc­cessful wealthy older man doesn't mean I'm a gold-digger' So, next time you see us at the grocery store, don't ask if he's buy­ing me organic baby formula! TO THE GAY SOLDIER WHO HATES hearing homophobic remarks: Please don't tell those jugheads that you're a homosexual. They are looking to give those like you friendly fire the moment you're identified. REALITY CHECK! HOW CA.'-: YOU SIT in the chatroom telling me how I am wasting my life in a gay bar? At least I actually get out of my house and risk rejection in the real world. Unplug your computer and hold a real conversation, face to face, some da}: f.citors' oote. These are real bitches, sent in by real reader;, aboot gay fife's ~ttle amoyances, and the big ones. too. Got a bitch? Call HI00-858-8088 or e-mail: bitch@expressgaynews.com HOUSTON.TX MARCH 24-27 2005 dav1d LCWISIMAGES {1ROUP ledletlll IR llll llUIL In a popular London eauna, class and culture are stripped away and replaced by a clean white towel. Follow Rost, the popular towel boy, on a tour of the eauna 's facllltles and ltB many patrons The atmoephere or expoted mulcles, steamy whirlpools, and hot showers get these seven hot guys to 1UCCUmb to their most bulc lnltlncts. In seven different sensual encountera, you will experience the delights await· Ing you on your next trip to Landoni do W hf. rP to ro h lt to S( ( wh,lt to o hon how to drl s who to d· t ' time to bloom? what to do \X o what to E ) uv whet c dr( s8 wh• spring guide '05 deadline: march 25th to advert1. e call jason wilson 713.529.8490 · wilson@houstonvoice.com april ist I if•i' t:1f1i ii voice
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1273.pdf