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Montrose Voice, No. 306, September 12, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 306, September 12, 1986 - File 001. 1986-09-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/55/show/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-09-12). Montrose Voice, No. 306, September 12, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/55/show/26

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 306, September 12, 1986 - File 001, 1986-09-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/55/show/26.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 306, September 12, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 12, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call 529-8490 montrose VOICE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 "The Newspaper of Montrose" ISSUE 306 How Trusting Are You? Dr. Didato's Quiz, inside HOUSTON WEATHER TONIGHT: Partly cloudy and mild with a low of 72. SATURDAY: Partly cloudy and warm with a 20% chance of afternoon thundershowers High 92 Police Make Mass Arrests in Montrose Bar 'Brandi West' Trial Begins Valuable Art Found in Montrose Home Neighborhood News, inside Seduction and Scandal at the Wall Street Journal 'Trading Secrets' Morgan Pinney on R. Foster Winans, inside ---'-------. - ---------- Service Econoniy Can Bring Anierica Back to Econontic Health Franz Schurmann, inside ~-- ----------- Brothers Seek Anierican Recognition lVith Ne\V Dance Music Mardi Coleman, inside We're the Houston Newspaper with the PERSONALS. Adventurous? Place one of your own. Call 529-8490 2 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 Dailx._Specials BREAKFAST MONDAY LUNCH 3 Hot Cakes, Bacon or Sausage. 1 Egg Spaghetti & Meat Sauce . 3 25 any style 3.49 Charl1e·s Cold Cut Plate . .3 95 QQ_e~_ fac~-~ Turkey ~a_ndwich .!._~J~ BREAKFAST Breakfast Tacos • TUESDAY LUNCH • 2 49 Stewed Chicken with Rice Sahsbury Steak §_tutf_ed M~lon • BREAKFAST WEDNESDAY LUNCH Scrambled Eggs with Diced Ham 2 75 Shepherds Pie BREAKFAST Charlie's Shnmp Basket •• ~har11e·s P~st~ §_a~!_! THURSDAY LUNCH .. 350 .. 3 75 ... ~~ .350 " 4 25 . • . 3 9~ fref'ch Toast and One Egg 2 75 Creole Style Meat Loaf 3 95 Steak Fingers with Country Gravy 3_75 S~mmer $~1~_95 Pl_!_t!'_ •• -~-~? BREAKFAST FRIDAY LUNCH Charlie's Country Scramble 2-49 Fned Cod with Almond Batter . • 3.50 Beef Tips and Noodles 3_75 _9harl!e'_s _E_!u_1_~_~as~t_ 4~ BREAKFAST SATURDAY LUNCH & DINNER Charlie's Garden Omelet . • 3.95 Roast Lom of Pork . 4 95 Shrimp Creole Omelet • . . . 4 95 M!mosa~~mpagn~!'- Po1nset~ _1~ BREAKFAST SUNDAY LUNCH & DINNER Eggs Bern1ssant • 4 95 Sauteed Chicken Livers over Toast Chicken Fned Steak and Eggs •• 5 25 Pomts . .• . • . . .4 95 <;nampagne~ ~!!"__9~as _& _t>oins_E!tl_as 1.§_Q Servmg_Beer,_ Wi_ne & Champagne 1102 Westheimer-522-3332 Come In and Cruhe Westhei,,,.... from Our Newly Enclosed and Air Conditioned Wallrwa31 _ Thank you for Your Continued Support for Aid for AIDS No one does it like Lary Thompson D.J. • • • Calvin Klein Classics! 1/3 to 1/2 Off on Calvin Klein Dress Shirts and Ties September 13-28 The r:aale 1ti44 Westheimer ti~4- 7.JS.1 Eagle Leather • • • naturally Full Moon Madness' Virgo Virgin Party Wednesday, Sept. 17, '86 8pm-closing Buffett 8-10 Quest Bartender: Chula aka Rick of Chutes Virgos in and about Mary's try ing for a rebirth of their cherries. Adrian Luera ' Marvin Dennis Jerry Mulholland Rick Martin' Greg Kitzmiller Teresa Mauney Jack Burroughs Chuck l.lrban Ron Yost Dennis Dunwoody Richard Brody Larry Bagneris David Oleson Jim Bailey David Roumfort ' Event Queens Linda Wyche 1022 Westheimer Miss Camp America Congratulations on your 18th wonderful year. Happy Hour prices 1 hour before and 1 hour after the show) meet the Cheerleaders and Majorettes of The 20th Annual Folleyboll Fest Sunday Evening at Mary's ... naturally 528-8851 SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 3 Police Make Mass Arrests in Montrose Bar Eleven customers and employees were arrested Tuesday morning, Sept. 9, by Houston Police Department Vice Squad officers at a nightclub on lower Westhei· mer. According to Sgt. J.C. Mosier, speak­ing for HPD, "five or six" officers entered Michael's, 428 Westheimer, early Monday evening. After several hours of observation, Mosier said, the officers made the arrests on charges of public intoxication, public lewdness, prostitution and liquor violations. Among tho~e arrested were two bar· tenders and the club's manager, Jim Hursl Mosier said the action at Michael's was not part of a planned "raid" but was a routine nightclub investigation. A lt>levision news crew from Channel 2 'Brandi West' Trial Begins A stained, worn quilt found wrapped around Patrice L<'Rlanr's body when she was pulled from Lake Livingston is among eviden('e that will connect Hous­ton female impersonator Clifford Youens with her death, prosecutors claim. San Jacinto County District Attorney ,Joe Price told jurors Monday, Sep­tember 8, that the quilt, stuffed inside a <·omforter in which l.A'Blanc's body was found, had belonged to Youens, her roommate. The jury began hearing evidence in state District Court Judge Joe Ned Dean's court in the trial ofYouens, 32, a frmale impersonator known as "Brandi West." On Tuesday, t<'stimony revealed that 1.RBlanc was trying to end her relation ship with Youens at the time of her death. Noel Garza, a friend of Youens, testi· tied that once during a performance in a Houston nightclub, Youens flew into a Jealous rage when LeBlanc talked to another man, Also on Tuesday, San Jacinto County Chief Deputy James Lyles and a fore­nsic <'h<•mist pr<>sentf:'d jurors with addi­tional physical t•vidence linking Youens with the murder. Among that evidence w<·re concret<• chips and paint scratches found on Youens' parents boat that pos­sessed similar characteristics of those found on the cement blocks with Le· Blanc's body. The deputy also said several items were removed from the Greenway Oaks condominium Hhared by Youens and Le­Blanc. Lyles said from the stand that the apartment secmed to have been recently painted and carpeted. The Houston Police Department chemist also 1rnid that human blood found on the plywood flooring, closet door and a pair of cowboys boots could have been that of l.RB!anc's. Lenny McDaniels, Youen's former male lover of five years. testified on Wl'dnesdav that the entertainer wanted to change. his life after meeting Le­Blnn<'' s parent~. He said Youens called him to the Gr<•enway Oaks apartment on March 19 saving he was feeling suicidal. Prosecutors acruse Youens of killing Lefllanc because sh• rebuffed his romantic overtures. Youens is ac('used of stabbing IR· Blanc to death and dumpin({ her body in Lake Livingston The 20·year·old Lafayette. Lo., woman was found in th<• lake ·March 2:! wrapped in the bedding which had been chained to cinder blocks. Authorities said sh• had bl't'n stabbed ;19 tim•s. Her body was not identified until April :!. arrived on the scene shortly after police began taking the suspects into custody. Mosier says police did not inform Chan­nel 2, but often the media tune to police band radios and are aware whenever police are dispatched. Hurst said the total number of officers was close to eight. According to Hurst's accounl, at approximately 12:30 a.m., "the lights were kicked on an·d everybody was told to sit down." Hurst was not at the bar at the time the arrl'sts began. When he arrived and identified himself as the manager, he was also told to sit down. The police crew, led by Sgt. D. Lovett, told Hurst that Michael's had not been singled out and that several other clubs had been "hit that night." Once in cus­tody, however, Hurst said he did not see anyone else who looked like they "could have been employed by or run a bar." Although those arrested on intoxica­tion charges were released in a matter of a few hours, Hurst and other employees remained jailed for over 12 hours. How­ever, Hurst did add that they were treated nicely by authorities. Several witnesses to the incident said that police closed a Stop N Go conven­ience store located diagonally across from Michael's. Police denv any such involvement and a manage; at the store said it was closed for a period Monday night to wax the floors. Michael's has had problems since it opened this spring. In the last week alone, the bar was visited by Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission inves­tigators and Health Department inspec-tors, as well as the Monday night raid. And twice, suspected arsonists have damaged the club. Hurst expressed the belief that "they (someone) are definitely trying to shut us down . . .. When you're on top, they will try to pull you down." According to Hurst, who has managed several other Montrose bars, "they" could either be the authorities or competition. Some believe the "raid" on Michael's is the beginning of a new round of poJice harrassment in Montrose. It has been reported that undercover agents have increased their activity in the neighbor­hood bars. Bar owners warn their custo­mers that it is important to adhere to the new 21 and over drinking age limit and carry correct identification. Funds Approved to Provide Drug to AIDS Victims STEVE D. MARTINEZ, The U.S. Senate agreed lo give the M.D. National Cancer Tnstitute an extra $40 million to $50 million to provide the experimental drug AZT to I0,000 people dying of AIDS. Sen. Lowell Weicker, R-Conn. , on Wednesday, won approval of the amendment lo a bill providing $113 bil­lion for the Departments of Labor, Valuable Art Found in Montrose Home Houston Police Department special theft investigators are trying lo unravel a mystery surrounding the discovery of several pieces of Chinese artifacts and an expensive lithograph print in a Montrose home. Sgt. Ben Norman said police were called to a home in the 1700 block of Kipling on Friday morning after Anthony Nixon called to report the items as stolen goods. Nixon told police that hiH roommate. Rick Webb, pur­chased the items with drugs. Nixon and Webb had quarreled earlier in the day. Among the items recovered were a Bronze vase, ajade votivecandleholder, and two carved wood pieces said to be from the Ming dynasty, 1368 to 1644. These items are said to have a combined value of about $40,000. The lithograph print is the work of graphic artist Maurits Cornelia Escher and is valued at close lo $18,000, police said. Norman so.id the items have been examined closely by one expert who feels "close to positive they are authen­tic." Other allegedly stolen items reco­vered in the home included a business comput.t>r and a home computer. Police said they also found a small amount of cocaine. Police have been unable to locate Webb and have yet to determine if the articles, are in fact. stolen. No charges have h<•en filed in the case. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voi'e Health and Human Services and Edu­cation for fiscal 1987. The Senate then voted 83-2 to approve the appropriations measure. The House has approved similar legislation, and two versions now will go to a conference committee. Weicker said thedrugwasnocure, but it could provide an extra six months of life for those afflicted with AIDS. The Senate agreed to shift the funds from the $1.9 billion program to help the poor pay healing bills. Weicker said the cancer institute now has only enough funds to provide AZT to 1000 of the 10,000 people in the termi­nal stage of the disease. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON TUES. WED., FRI 8AM 5:3/JPM OPEN THURS, SAT 83DAM 12NOON Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TI< 770'27 621-n11 · --=- r·········2ai°oFF·;;;·R~~~~ci;~~;;~·;;th.ih1~········r : Coupon : ! •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• r··························~·,~::~ui~~~1:i~~~·························1 : Try our spectacular California salads at lunch and : : ................ ~~!~!~~rx.~!~!:'.~~~i.g~~· ................... : Anti-Censorship Rally CAFE EDI 520-5221 REGENCY CLEANERS 52~357 WHOLE EARTH PROVISION COMPANY 526-5226 BOOKSTOP 52"-2345 MONARCH CLEANERS 522-5101 Sat .. Sept. 13-0ld Market Square-2pm-Dark co-sponsored by The Bookstop 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 montrose VOICE ANO TEXAS•STAR HOUSTON TEXAS Morvc::ee populahon <•! 1~e· J<l.~..1l Census Tracts 401 01_ 401 02 . .402 01 40202 . .a502 403Wld40401 Z•P codes (rooghlyl nooe 17019 !POrt•onl 77098 Bounded (roughly) Shepherd Or 1wesn Allen P1rkway inorthJ. Ma•n St 1 .. 10 US 59 (S0!.111'1! L11itude rMoritrOM Brvd at Wn1he1rner Rd I 29•u TJ'"N Long•tude 95"22'.50"-W A1t1tuae 40 ELECTED REGIONAL OfFfCIALS 0.0.ge G,..,,,.,_ Hou1t0<1 Coty Co.incl !d•t Cl SW'.!! B~by f113J 211·!1913 El Fr1nc:o L•. Harn1 Counry eomm ... ooner !pc! I) 1001 Pr.,/Ott. (11JJ 1?1-6111 W11111t A.,,••'\ Conata~ (llC'I I) J01S..,.J.:1mo.1lJJJ1?f5200 O.bt9 o.n11u•o Te•• Houw o1 Rep.~ a•t 131i 1911 SW F.,,., llJJJ ~CIM Cra.g W...,nqton r ... , s-.1 .. ld•t ni n2'JC.,Oltne11IJJest-..iJ41 Jr.l~L-'- VS HDl-.ol~1!1v•(09' 18) re1t1Sll!lfffl-OO ·11JJ139-1J31 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 307th ISSUE. SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyr1gh1 1986 Office hours 1 Oam-5 30pm Henry McClorg publa""'-fii*" Linda Wyche rnett1g111g •d•I« Oa111d Aoumfort P'Oduction Scott Cutsinger R1U O'Aourke ,..,,._...~ Ste\le Warren n.t•Of>flfcou•Ponf19nt ·--------- ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston: {713) 529-8490 Eisewliete Texas 1800) 222-1537 DT 995220 Elsewh•e us 1800• 225-0227 EXT 995220 Jerry Mulholland edlten.s"'{I d·r~t"' Monte H1U ~tismg rflltuentet"'• FO&JntJ,"fl 4'<1Mtloer1 G•e•ter Mc>n!"C&e B<.StNtSS Gllt!d G1y 1no LllM>•1n Preas Assoc•&TiOn POSTM~'JTER Send •dd•ns correct.ens 10 40!1 A¥ondale Hous!Qtl. TX 77006 l029 SuOlctlpl•on r111 "' US m see-a .,,.,,1e1p9 S49 per y111r iSl ••nl S2'9 Pl"'"' mcn1ns 126 <SS~l Ot s1 2s P«" ....... fl- lhlr> 28 •Ulla) 810 •H..- S2 H'Cf'I N1t1~1 1dv1r/1S•f"l9 •ltffHlrit1f1YI .Joe 01S1blto R1"'1dell M•1<et1ng. 866 61h AYeRU* New YOfk 10011 {21212•2-6863 A~lfrl•"'l1 d~ WIOnesdey S..30pm, !Of ••ue ,..._.dFroday..,enN'lg I NOIKI IO ·~rf1s .... lOcll 1dYert1a.1119 ,.,, Khedole E•gtit·A """ ettectJ¥e Arx 11 1986 ~'°"'"Y The Monrr09e Voice don not assume rell)Onl•bi1rtr for •~I"'"" Cleima Reaoers ••ullto to o:;::,:::'.::::: '>I eny 14.dptek>n ot l11dufent or I /\.Q, 220 AVONDALE 529-7525 SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 5 Thursday Night Wet Jockey Short Contest starring Maude, M.C. $200 Cash & Prizes $100 Cash 1st Place All contestants must register before 9pm Thursday 75¢ Bourbon Drinks all day/all night Guest Bartender- Monte- Wednesday 3-Spm 75¢ Corona Beer Fridays 6-lOpm 6 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 §AME DAY TYJPE~ §ETTEJR§ A N E \\' l> J\ ' ISION Of<' ' l 'l ll•; M ONTROSF- VOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get 1t to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have 11 ready by 5pm (size of the job permitt ing) SAME DAY RA TE 560 per Hour OVERNIGHT RA TE $40 per Hour 3 DAY RA TE 520 per Hour NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT' If your typesetting really only takes 1C minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) ~1 'l'YPES'l'YLES ·ro CHOOSE l•'ROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 Lillian Halegua The Pearl Bastard "A mesmeric novel full of poetry.· - Judith Neville, Sunday Times A haunting novel of a girrs journey from childhood into sudden adulthood, from the suffocation of city and family to the brutal mdif. ference of the sea. . This short, forceful novel, written over two decades ago, is now becoming a word-of-mouth classic. Carol Seaiay, in Feminist Bookstore News, writes: "'I picked up this book to glance through it for a few minutes one day, l .1.1n H.tlt•xu1 The Pea rl Bastard and ZAP, I was gone. The quick con- ii;;..iJll•lillil••~~ c1se sentence structure? The compell-ing story line? I read this as the story of a young dyke-to-be setting off into the world 10 make her for· tune. And encountering incredible - but all too common obstacles.· The Pearl Bastard by Lillian Halegua $3. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Enclosed IS $4.50 (includes postage and handling) for one copy of The Pearl Bastard name _________ address __ Coty _________ st.He ~--Zip---- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 CHUTES 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 Fri., Sept. 12 Beer Bust 7-11 serving munchies Sat., Sept. 13 Beer Bust 6-11 Free Food Catered by Bill Diamond 9:30 David Oleson DJ. Sunday, Sept. 14 Beer Bust 2-8 Free Food Live Band The B-Jays 6-10 David Oleson DJ Wed., Sept. 17th Dickel Party 6-10 Prizes & Specials Thurs. Steak Nite-$4-7pm M-F 1:00-6:00 Draft 5¢ Well Drinks $1 Leather Fantasy, Sat., Sept. 20 Home of Eagle Leather SEPTEMBER 12. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 7 Service Economy Can Bring Amer ica Back to Economic Health By Franz Schurmann Padfic Nnvs S('rt'ic:e Commentary Special to thl' Montrose Voice . Official worry is again growing over the "sluggish" American economy. Vete· ran columnist Hugh Sidey, writing in Time magazine, even warns of a possi· blc financial catastrophe. If America can restore its social stability and f!-VOid getting mired in military conflicts abroad, it has a good chance of staying as wealthy as it has been for so long small farms too are rapidly growing. Both small farms and businesses require capital, but even more, people wil1ing to work with each other Classical economics always assumed social fabrics could tske place. But America's social fabrics have become shredded after too much experience with economic individualism. The rapidly growing service sector can be seen not just as a new way to make money but as a way for people to recon· nect with each other. Yet, the poor aside, the average Amer­ican never seemed to have it as good as now. The Bureau of Labor Statistics announced that the average annual wage last year rose 4.5 percent to over $19,000. The money supply is rising fast, yet the Fed is willing to depress interest rates further, making even more credit available. At the heart of the worry is the sense that there is no solid economic backing for alJ this money. Pesonal income has been going up steadily since the early 1960s, yet manufacturing industries and family farms have been vanishing. The American economy has become overwhelmingly a service economy, and Americans increasingly satisfy their need for goods by buying impQrts. Goods can be sold anywhere in the world. Services, by contrast, are for the most part local. A bank teller can be replaced by an a utomatic money machine which can be marketed world· wide, but a bank officer advis ing on a Joan does so through personal contact with the client. This explains why the horrendous trade deficits the United States has been incurring are so worrisome. Unlike the Japanese, who ex Port mountains of exportable goods, the United States pro-duces mounds of non-exportable servi· ces. Yet somehow, Americans manage to get plenty of money to pay for their domestic services while at the same time buying vast quantities of imported goods. The system that dispenses and tskes money seems to be some gigantic but wispy superstructure that hangs out there attsched to who knows what. It used to be assumed all economies had to rest on a substructure of goods and pro­duction. But there is no longer such an economic substructure to account for the wealth of Americans. So one can understand the fears of the stewards of the economy that the whole house of money could come crashing down. It is not difficult to imagine a chain reaction of defaults by debtor nations who decide it is no longer worth­while to go chasing after the dollar. There then would be no bedrock domes­tic production capacity to fall back on, such as that which allowed the United States to rebound from depression dur­ing World War II. But the monetary house of cards is not so fragile as it seems, and the shift to a service economy could be a healthy development. The vast international monetary sys· tern exist.R because the key countries- ~·ts ~.,~ "-""' PRBENTA ~ ~ HOUSTON T.Y. PREMIER!! SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 • 8 P.M. For the 1st Time-Smell What You See On IV.! Get your Smell-0-Vi~on card at all Houston area ....... stores Poroon of procteds benef'n IM Huse liar Oysrrophy Assoc. ':f:1 . ONLY99< the United Ststes, Western Europe and Japan-see it as indispensible to their own national existence. So long as they work together to keep trade going·, man· age debt and contain inflation, the sys­tem will continue with an its ups, downs and frictions. The service economy means people dealing more seriously with each other than in a this-for-that exchange. Ser· vices involve people teaching others, healing them, helping them in home or office, doing customized work for them, as well as selling to them or administer· ing them. Small businesses are starting up­end failing-faster than ever before. Yet they are rapidly becoming the key source of service jobs in the cities, and while medium size farms are vanishing, But the doomsayers would ask, how is this going to help America's deteriorat· ing competitive position in the world economy? The fact is that a chief reason there is so much money in America is the stability of its institutions. Foreign investment has been pouring in since the late 1970s, and the dollar will remain the linchpin of the international monetary system, despite the growing pQpularity of the yen. If America can restore its social sta· bility and avoid getting mired in mil­itary conflicts abroad, it has a good chance of staying as wealthy as it has been for so long. Checkerboard Goes Hot Cvme 13y and Try Vne vt .,,vur ~ew ~xcitinf! ~veninf! ~ntrees All .,...vu Can l:at t3·~Pm ~~~~~~- -~~~~~~~~~~ Monday: Spaahetti with f3ar-lic Ur-ead and Salad Tuesday: Chicken & Uumplinas. Lima Ueans and Cvr-nbr-ead Wednesday: Tur-keY. Ur-essina. Cr-anber-ry Sauce Thursday: Sausaae. l?ed Ueans. Vice. Cvr-nbr-ead Friday: Lasaana. Salad. f3ar-lic Ur-ead Mother APProved 808 Lovett 521-3740 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 Estelle Getty, star of "Golden Girls." joins the campaign to help people with AIDS by using the Stamp Out AIDS seal Estelle Getty Campaigns for 'Stamp Out AIDS' Estelle Getty, star of the hit TV series "The Golden Girls," has taken time out from her current taping schedule to pro. mote Stamp Out AIDS, a campaign to seJl stamps similar to Easter and Christmas seals. The money raised will go to programs which directly serve peo­ple with AIDS. For her work on "The Golden Girls," Getty won the 1986 Golden Globe Award as Best Actress in a Comedy and has been nominated for an Emmy Award as Best Supporting Actress. Her films include the soon-to-be-released Mannequin and Mask, in which she played Cher's mother Getty's connection with Stamp out AIDS comes through Project Director John Glines, who produced the Tony Award-winning Torch Song Trilogy, in which Getty made her Broadway debut. "[asked Estelle to help," said Glines, "because she's an archetypical mother figure. How could you say 'no' to Estelle? I never could." The stamps sell in sheets of six for$1. "I wanted to create an affordable way for everyone to contribute," Glines said. "For just a dollar everyone can help." His goal is to raise $1 mi11ion with the first issue alone. Stamps can be purchased by sending SI for each set of six, along with a self addressed stamped envelope, to Stamp Out AIDS, 240West44thStreet, NY, NY 10036. If paying by check, make paya­ble to "National AIDS Network Stamp Out AIDS." The National AIDS Net­work is serving as fiscal agent and will distribute the funds from the project to AIDS service organizations across the country Stamps will also be available in ret~il outlets nationwide, as well as special events, such as they were at the benefit for the Coalition of Lesbian and Gay Rights in New York City, the Gay Rodeo in Oklahoma City, and screenings for the Showtime production of As Is in Austin, Texas; Washington, D.C.; and New York City. "I hope Estelle is only one of millions who will use the stamps," said Project Director Glines. "The stamps will not only raise money but also show we care. More information on Stamp Out AIDS is available by calling Dallas Thompeson, project administrator. at 212-354-8899. Anti-Gay Violence to be Subject of Congressional Hearing The Subcommittee on Criminal Justice of the U.S. House of Representatives will hold a public hearing on the prob­lem of the high incidence of anti-gay violence. Scheduled to be held Sept. 25 at 10:00 a .m_, the hearing will be the first federal forum on the issue. The Sub­committee is chaired by Rep. John Con­yer. CO. Mich.), and is part of the House Judiciary Committee. The hearings will focus on the scope of harassment and violenceagainstgay men and lesbians and will examine what is-and is not being done to remedy the problem. In addition to Rep. Conyers, the Subcommittee consists of seven members: Rep Don Edwards (D­Calif.), Rep. Howard Berman CO-Calif.), Rep.Frederick Boucher <0-Va.), Rep. John Bryant CO-Tex.), Rep. George Gekas <R-Pa.), Rep. Patrick Swindall (R Ga.), and Rep. Howard Coble (R-N.C.). "Violence against gay and lesbian people is a national epidemic," said Kevin Berrill, director of the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force's Violence Project. "The Subcommittee's hearings are timely and meet a glaring need. We hope they will raise public awareness about ant.gay violence and lead to con· crete action by government on all levels to respond to this much overlooked and underestimated problem." The NGLTF Violence Project was launched in 1982 to develop a coordi· nated response to violence against gay people. The project has issued several reporb; on the extent of anti-gay vio­lence, assisted local gay communities in organizing against violence, and worked activrly with criminal justice and law t>nforcement agencies to ensure that gay and lesbian victims are treated fairly. In 1984 the Violence Project of the Task For~e released the first national study of anti·gay violence, which was conducted in cooperation with gay and lesbian organizations in eight U.S. cit· ies. Of the nearly 2100 respondents. more than OORi had experienced som<> type of victimization because of their sexual orientation. • • ••••••••• . . __. HENRY'S 1 PHOTO • • I I • • • • • • • ... We Only Have One Location in Houston Buf We 'te Easy fo Find Your Photos will be BRl6HT and BEAUTIFUL In One Hou, at a Very Fair Price, OR ... Choose our optional 1-day or 2-day service and Save A Bundle­Processing and Prints for as low as ... 11.99 (developing & prints for 12 exposure 35mm film. 3x5 prints, 2 day service) 0fJen 7 /)ag9 a Week 9 AM-6 PM (Noon-S PM Sunday) 428 Y2 Westheimer ON WHITNEY. BEHIND MICHAELS, OFF 'LOWE!< \~SlHEIMER' 529-0869 ~n Jalfonwrhtm ANDREW J . CLARK, D.D.S. Andrew James Clark, DD.S .. 32, died Sept 5, 1986. Or Clark was a graduate of the University of Texas Dental Branch at Hous­ton. He was a member of the Houston, Texas, and American Dental Association and the Academy of General Dentistry He is survived by parents, Carl and Jill; sister, Judy; brother, Elliott; sister-in law, Lisa; nephews, Eli and Adam. Survivors also include beloved friends Dan Cooper and Lana Terraso A memorial service will be held 5:00 p.m Friday, Sept 12. 1986, at Rothko Chapel. 1409 Sul Ross In lieu of flowers, for those desiring. contributions may be made to the Andrew J. Clark Trust Fund. c/o The Hous­ton Zoo. 1513 Outer Belt Drive. Houston. Texas 77030. to create .. A Special Happy Place' in the children's zoo ROLAND FINKBEINER Roland Finkeiner. 36, died September 7 1986. Roland was the first resident of Omega House. Born 1n Wlttendorf, West Germany on April 10, 1950, Roland was a purchasmg agent for a bank. Graveside services and interment were held Tuesday, September9 at Earthman-Resthaven Cemetery with Michael Shuff, offlc1allng. Earthman Funer­als. 2420 Fannin. had charge. RANDY PORTER Randy Porter died August 30. 1986 in New York_ His mother was with him at the time of his death To Randy A little piece of my heart is gone It left with the death of your life's song My heart may never be whole agam 1t may never sing true love's refrain Rest peacefully in Heaven now I must go on alone I'll make 11 on my own somehow Your sp1nt its cage has flown I will love and miss you forever Rich OuR POUCY TM ~ootrou Voict1 .,,.,11 commemor11e the P9llf>9 of M<1f1trOM r•dPnt9 and Houston ;.y commututy membtrl '*''h an an~t f!lends or rNt•v• ot the dl!Cnsocl may proY.0. UI .,,.,rh f.cts lbout the~·· Ille. n-.nn ol the eio.e ...,,...,¥ors. and burial 1rrarigemeots Pfose ¥11fN can be inchM:lod Pdur• are apprec ... tea and w•ll be •Illumed N11me ol 11'111 oeceaaed l!.hould be •lladled to the pfto!O tnl0tmalo0t1 shol.dd be pi-ovldt!d to the Montroee Voice al 1"9 Hrlint poa1ble datt1 wid woll be publoahed lt\ the next 1vari.blt1 ed•t•on T~ lrt rio ctiargre lor lhd aer.•ce To place an AD in the Montrose Voice .. just phone us! 529-8490 10ain .. 5:30pm a.Bef.<days Ads can be charged over the phone to a major credit card OR we can bill you later Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily Houston's Newest Pizza inn .. Delivery (Hotline) 522-5676, We Are Houston Proud In Montrose TOPPINGS TO CHOOSE FROM •Canadian Bacon • ltallan Sausage • Pepperoni • Sausage •Anchovies • Beef • Green Pepper • Mushroom • Black Olives • Green Olives • Cheese • Jalapenos • Onion ···································· GRAND OPENING SPECIAL 50°/o OFF All Pizzo, Salad and Son Drink orders. Good for dellve<y and pick up orders only. Nol valid wHh any other offer or coupon. Good only al Plua Inn, 3105 S. Shepherd. Grand opening ends 9/20/ 86. ' ' ' ' ' . . ··································· 522-5676 3105 s. Shepherd Next Door to Record Rocle SEPTEMBER 12, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 9 Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, aulhor of the Phil Andros stories, and a real· life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order b/ mail. - - - - - - - - - - - Here is $7.50 for Murder is Murder is Murder, by Samuel Steward. city state ·P------- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston. MA 02118 Direct Burial or Cremation CREIDAT!OTI SERVICE ITITERTIAT!OTIAL® prf~~~ $395 529-6666 ~-~~:__~~ ~ Prepare for tfie 'Jall ~ Season with ... ''/J\\ . ~~i.~ HSK CONTRACTING ~ ~ A Full Service Contractor • POWER W~SH: Buildings, Houses, Driveways, Sidewalks • Roofing (All Types) • Tiie/ Masonry • Remodeling • Carpet/Flooring • Sheetrock/ Painting • Cabinets • Plumbing/ Electrical • Decks/ Hot Tubs • Foundations Repaired • Room Additions • Tree & Trash Removal • Concrete • Insulation • Chimney Sweeping & • Water Proofing Repairs • Pest & Rodent Control • Pool Cleaning • Heating/AC • Fully Insured • References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 10 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 Survey Reveals Most States Will Act Against AIDS Discrimination A study by National Gay Rights Advo­cates reveals that most states will prose­cute complaints of AIDS-related discrimination under laws which forbid discrimination on the basis of physical handicap. Thirty-four states have indi- Reward Offered in Attorney's Death Tom Pelley was found stabbed to death pn August 9 A Sf>OOO award is being offered forinfor· mation leading to the arrest and convic· tion of the person responsible for the death of Tom Petley. Petley, a Houston attorney, was found in his West University Village area home Aug 9 stabbed repeatedly. His silver BMW was later found aban· doned in the 1200 block of Smith Street. Investigators believe that Petley was a homosexual who often picked up "hustlers" in the Montrose and took them to his home. Tim Wilson of the Office of Clyde A. Wilson International Investigations has been retained by Petley's family to aid police in this investigation. Persons with any information con­cerning this case may reach Wilson at 467-0483. cated that they are willing to accept AIDS-related discrimination com· plaints or have declared such discrirni· nation to be improper. Although the U.S. Department of Jus­tice issued an opinion in June stating that federal handicap law permits dis· crimination based on the fear of trans­mission of AIDS, not one of the states surveyed indicated that it has adopted this interpretation "The Justice Department's strained interpretation of handicap discrimina­tion law has been clearly and over· whelmingly rejected," said Benjamin Schatz, Director of NGRA's AIDS Civil Rights Project. "It is heartening to see that most state agencies are unwilling to allow prejudice and fear to interfere with their obligation to enforce the HOUSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA SERGIU COMISSIONA M 1( Di RECTOR Season Premiere! Still Time to Subacribe to All Serie.! Call 224-0372 Mat.a Can Be Auigned Immed1a~ly Series Premiere! Adventures in Great Music Sergiu Comissiona, Conducting Elmar Oliveira, Violinist Rouse: Etude Fanfare J.S. Bach: Violin Concerto in A Minor Barber: Violin Concerto Liszt: Symphonic Poem No. 4, Orpheus Bartok: Suite from The Miraculous Mandarin Fri., Sept. 12, Noon-I p.m. Open Rehearsal Sat., Sept. 13, 8 p.m. "Adventures in Great Music" series premiere pre-concert lecture 7:10 p.m. Sun., Sept. 14, 2:30 p.m. pre-concert lecture 1:40 p.m. Mon., Sept. 15, 8 p.m. pre-concert lecture 7:10 p.m. Jones Hall weekend •ponaorHi by Mr. a nd Mni. Hama Masterson, III CALL 227-ARTS rlr.et 'rt,•S:>1 .h geh<lr.et•by ~ biyr.·\..,.h :nl' Hou .. ,, ~e •. He °"'CONTINENTAL law." "Our survey proves what we have known all along: existing law prohibits discrimination against people with AIDS, ARC or HTLV-III antibodies," stated NGRA Executive Director Jean O'Leary. "NGRA will continue to moni­tor state agencies to make sure that the law is vigorously and fairly enforced." Results of the survey indicated that most states which have not yet made a determination are either studying the issue or waiting for an actual AIDS dis­crimination complaint. Only one state, Kentucky, has indicated that AIDS is not a protected handicap under its laws. Kentucky is one of two states with sta­tutes which explicitJy exclude communi­cable diseases from coverage. However, Georgia the other state with this excep· "r Center for A PosHive Ufestyle You're Invited tion, is unwilling to assume that it app­lies to AIDS. In its letter to NGRA, the Georgia Deparment of Human resour· ces reports that it "advises employers to continue the employment of AIDS vic­tims since the disease is not transmitted through casual contact." NGRA's survey also reveals that, while all 50 states and the District of Columbia have passed laws which pro­hibit discrimination against the physi­cally handicapped, these laws vary widely. A few laws protect only public employees, while some others protect only those with "actual," as opposed to "perceived" handicaps. Many laws cover only discrimination in employ­ment, while others also forbid discrimi­nation in such areas as housing, public accomodation, credit and state services. An evening ot EnJOyment, Music and Fellowship A Study Group to Improve your lite In areas such as: RELATIONSHIPS PllOSPEl!ITY HEALTH through growth, development. and pe1petual progress at a poslttve consciousness Every Monday Evening at Spm Downtown Holiday Inn, 801 Calhoun, 30th Floor Th8fe is No Fee, No Obligation, Nothing to Lose But an abundance ta g ain. Free validated parking In hotel garage For more Information coll Ron Davis, 531 -6600 October 9- 12 SOLD OUT November 6-9 STILL AVAILABLE Included in the Tour: • Roundlrlp Air via Continental Airlines • 3 Nights at the Sol Carlbe Hotel • Transfers between the Airport and Hotel • Mexico Hotel Room Tax • U.S. Departure Tax ($3.00) • Gratuities to Bellman and to the Maids • Friday Night Cocktail Party • Saturday Night Beach Party with Mariachi's ONLY $299 Ask tor Bob or Shella Per Person 9900 Westpal1<, Suite 115 (Double Occupancy) Houston, TX 77063 Tours Designed Especially for The Gay/ Lesbian Community o Women's Softball Rained Out, Full Slate Set for Sunday All Houston Women's Softball action was rained out Sunday, September 7, but a full slate is scheduled for this Sun· day at Heights-Lions Field. The day begins at 10:00 a.m. when Faster Women take on Coffee Beans. At 11:00 a.m., Herricanes tackle Rebels. Faster Women again take to the field at noon against Bears. Coffee Beans and Herricanes meet at 1 :00 p.m. Sport and Undercover go atitat2:00p.m. TheReb· els meet the Ducks at 3:00 p.m. The Angels play Undercover at 4:00 p.m. The day ends with a 5:00 p.m. contest between Sport and Rock N Horse. Newcomers are welcome to Houston Women's Softball. More information is available from Carolyn at 868-6256. o Hou-Tex Tennis Club Nets 13 New Members The Hou·Tex Tennis Club gained 13 new members in the month of August. Jesse V., one of the new members, played it smart by sizing up the competi· tion before issuing his first chal1enge. After being down 2-5 in the first set against Tim S., he took the next 11 games for a final score of 7-5, 6-0. [n a fun match between two other new members. Bennie D. defeated Manuel M. 6-4, 6-2. Randy Miller moved to No. 5 on the Top Ten ladder with a win over Pat Power 6-4, 7·5, At the monthly general meeting• party, the club discussed the new mail­ing address for Hou-Tex Tennis Club. Ir is P.O. Box :l,583, Houston, TX 772.53' · The club's single championships begin Sept. 14 based on the individual's Monday Sloppy Joes $2 BeerBust 4-10pm Tuesday $2 BeerBust 4-10pm • Wednesday $2 Beer Bust 4-10pm ' Thursday $2 BeerBust 4-10pm ' Friday $2 Beer Bust 4-10pm • Saturday $2 BeerBust 4-10pm ' Sunday $2 BeerBust 4-10pm ' level of tennis skills (NTRP, e.g. 5.0., 4.5, 4.0, etc.) The draw for the champion· ship will be held tonight, Sepl 12. Play· ers may learn their first round opponents by calling Donny Kelley at 789-2110 or meet at the Galleon around 8:00 p.m. Saturday night. Volunteers are needed for an AIDS Foundation benefit to be held at the Gal· !eon Sept. 28. Hou-Tex Tennis Club members are seeking buddies for friend J.C. Barrera who is expected to be released soon from Jefferson Davis Hospital. Barrera will need an attendant Monday through Fri· day until 6:00 p.m. Anyone with some available time may calJ either Ronnie Mauss at 861 ·2056, David Garza at 926- 7171 or the AIDS Foundation. o Rain Shortens Houston Tennis Ladder Play Due to a rain-shortened morning of ten­nis, only two matches wneco~pleted in Houston Tennis Club play last Sunday. Billy Green held on to his rank 6·2, 6-4 over Randy Lunsford. No. 1 Andrew Morris, fresh back from a trip to Lon· don, defended against Rick Hadnot 6-1, 6-3. Armi Alabanza is underway with a challenge from Rob Siegel and Ronnie Moss has a defense underway against Rene Ruiz. o Frontrunners Complete Dome Run Five Houston Frontrunners completed the 6.2 mile Dome Run on Monday, Sep­tember 1. The next competitive races are the Whataburger Zoo Run on Saturday, September 20, and the InterFirst Sym· phony Run on Saturday, September 27. Sports Voice Frontrunners Houston welcomes all who wish to run, whether in competitive races or in non-competitive jogs from the Memorial Park Tennis Center. For additional information, call Joe at 52Q. 8019. o New Yorkers Eye Houston Tennis Tournament Houston Tennis Club treasurer Rich Corder was recently in New York City visiting with the Metropolitan Tennis Group. Among the festivities, members and guests gathered to watch television coverage of the semifinals and cham­pionships of the U.S. Open being held in nearby Flushing Meadow. The New York netters ex pressed inter­est in planning to participate in the Houston Tennis Club's tournament. New York tennis club players brought· home six medals from Gay Games II and are eager to get into more tourna­ment play. I.._._..._._..• -.-•.-.- . ~Pl~y ~Safe! Supporting Houston's Teams oner; • u. J\dams~ Ltd. 611 HYDE PARK 528-9079 General Auto Repair Tune Ups • Oil Changes •Brakes• Tuea.-Sat. Westheimer Cafe (Soon to be The Pot Pie) Come and Eat with Friends Down Home Cookin' a t Old Fashioned Prices Tuesday and Thursdays: Special Pot Pie Days Always Open 1525 Westheimer 528 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12 1986 Munchies' "Cinderella" is No Child's Play By Bill O'Rourke Montrose Vou-f' Those with children are very strongly advised not to take them to Cmderella now being staged at Munchies Cafe. Ditch the little sweethearts with Auntie Agatha and get ready fora really intelli · gent, adult comedy It's 15 years after the wonderful ball. The happily-ever-after trip fell apart when the prince died several years ago. Queen Cinderella, though much loved throughout her kingdom. is as easily seen throu~h as her famous slippers by those in the know. The fairy godmother. having lost ht>r magical powers about the time of the wedding !Why? We never know.), is reduced to working as a char woman in the castle. Quel gy-atitude'. The ugly stepsistens are kept virtual prisonen; in a tiny, ugly room and are only fed twice a week. One of them goes out nightly trading her-ahem-favors for food. Que) mercy~ Quel noblesse! Cinderella herself admits that in her vindictiveness she has become as evil as her stepsisten; ever were. However, she does have one thing they never had­her beauty. It becomes a handy mask to hide behind Th1s is the night the downtrodd<'n rebel! ~ow if this sounds a bit heavily philo­:-; ophkal for a comedy, who ever told you thf! comic muse is necessarilv an air· head'> Max Pearson's witty sci-ipt, with its homespun :-:;ophistication, is rarely "serious" and never more than a minutt> or two away from the next jest Alan Horton·Welch is delightful as one of the stepsister!i with his thick mustache, bas8et·hound eyt•s and dehv ­ery occasionally reminiscent of Oscar Levnnt Mike Kelley, as the sexier stepsistt•r, is olmo:-;t tc"' pn•tty for the role. His sense of comic timing is spot on. If Mr Hortein· Wekh isa martini, then Mr. Kel· Icy is-a vodka sunrise? Ry the way. drinks and food nreavm able nt the Cafe. Ginny Lang makes a marvelous Cin· derella. They don 't wastf' her fine sing­in~ voice, eithE>r Philip Charlton has written her a new, musk\· ballad. If I h~ar it again. it'll prob&bly be in a smoky piano bar right aftu 'St>nd in the Clowns." Billie Duncan is the fairy godmotht•r as a little old lady. Billies little old lad1es don't change much hetw('<·n scripts. What's the rxpression? Don't fudge with success. Th<· audiences likt• tht>m and to C'arp could be lik<• trying to tf'I. Carol Channing-well. anything Audrey If thr carnil'omus plant from "Little Shop of Horrors" Love \.'8. sweets' Ont: wnrning~ there are only two per· formant<'S left-on Sunday evenings. Seating 1s limitf'd , hut it's a very fast (and free) hour o Notes Of Houston Hallt't's Sleeping Beauty, John Pt'rcival. forE.'most English dancE' rritif. said. "For tht· intelligf>nc<· of his staging no praist' could be too high for Ren Stt·venson. His cast clearly was mspir('d to do iL" very best." ... !'."ext Saturday (S..pt. 20), The Ens("m· b)(' will he giving out its annual awards. This Saturday, the pt'rformance of l.una \lista (('horolate Bayou~ turns into a special party, Comic Caper Hous­ton cartoonists .Jeff Millar. Bill Hinds and ClydE' P<·ten.on , and the show's author, will b(• there, hosting a huffrt. Tht• audif>nce is t·ncouragcd to come drt'sst·d as their favorite comic hook c-hnradn or in your favorite fifties out­fit. Then· will be a prize for thr best cost um<'. RSVP 52R·O 119 . ... Auditions ~ Rosrnfe/d',., War-political drama ahout WWII, short monologuP cold rt•adings q 1" .}('wish Comm unit~· Center, .Janet Berzins. 729-3200ext. 22:t Thr Octette Bridf(e Club-comedy· drama, eight women. one man, 9,14&15, 7:.10 p.m., Th•ater Southwest. 667-0:!04 The f'ort•l}.{ner-farce. two women Con<' 20s. one ovor 60), five men (18-48). 9/ 14 & lfi, Country Playhouse, Donna Hatch . . 1:l8.:l6l I. ... Housek<·<·ping: .Jose Turner Cantu is Stagt>s' new asso<·iak artistic dirt"C'tor Stages ahm promoted Rebecca Johans f'On to orgunization and planning man· Ug<·r Mikt· Kt·llt·y has become the C'hildrt·n's show producer at Main Street. Marti Mavo. formerly curator of thf' Contempora~y Arts Mm:.:eum , is now of \111 l 'P"s Sarah Campbell Rlaffer Gallny Sho replaced Esther de Vescl'y who's going for a Ph.D .. o Celebrate! S<·pt<·mbn 16, 19H4-Lynn Carson (on "All My Childrl'n ')became thr first les hi an Hoap 111wra c·harnc·t('rto come out of hpr closc·t R'davs; I i-MauricE:> Chevalit•r, Linda .Grny. I :J-,Jucqueline Bissett, Claud1•lto Colb1-rt. 1 l-Kat• M1lh•tt, Eric Bontll'y. l 'i-Mikhail Kuzman, Agntha Christit•. 16-Wilhelm von ...---------1'1 The ~~oom I!.,___ __ __, Thank you to all our former patrons at Driscoll St. Cafe. We invite you to come and see us at our new location. !..~· · ······················································································································-:.. Buy One Dinner and Get Secofr~e~nner of equal or lower value i .. .. : ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 1 3404 Kirby 521-9838 Gltx•dt•n. John Knowles, l..aurC'n Bn<"all, 17-W•ndv Cn<•• Wiliam Carlos) Willi · r:lmar Olt1·f'tra. c·mlinist. Joins Comissiona and the Houston Symphon.v on Sn1ll'mher /,'/ urns , Dorothy Loudon, Roddy MeDo· wt•ll. 18-Greta Garbo, Eddi(' •a •ro 1420 westhe1mer Houston. Texas 77006 522-4485 WE DELIVER VIDEOS Yout Gay Video Expetts -Lage Selection ol All -Mole VHS lopes -Tues Thurs ond Sun Rentals $2 for Our Members -Now Open Sunday 2 to 8 OPEN 7 DAYS• Amex . VJSo. MC "Rochester" Anderson, Jesse Shepard. "Prudence keeps life safe, but does not often make it happy."-Dr. Samuel Johnson (born Sept. 18). Texas Chamber Orchestra (Miller, 12)-Sergiu Luca conducting. Freebies. Photographic Collectors of Houston 20th Semiannual Camera Show and Marily11 Thibodaux (left!. Bret Cu•ter a11d Dianne Caponi in a scene from "Kf'Y for Two," a sexy bedroom farce at Theatre Southwest o Openings Big Mountain Support Group Benefit (Tam O'Shanter, 12). ONO! (One Night Only!) German Life Along Big Cypress Creek (Gallery of Texas History, Sam Houston Park, 12). Goinp Bare (Country Playhouse, 12)-new comedy by Houstonian Mary Jane Taegel. A doctor without malprac· tiC'C insurancr• is sued for child support by a patient who got pregnant after a tubal ligation. Key for Two (Theater Southwest, 12)-Hritish bedroom farce. Parking Lot Party (Houston Center for Photography, 12). ONO! Angels to Zebras J pical Fish World Come see our fabulous display of tropical fish and birds. ~ Th"-'·5-~ ~ 5% Off Any Bird and Cage Combination KC Toy Poodle $225 Open Mon. thru Sot llbm to Bpm 11725 Eastex Fwy. at E. Mount Houston 590-0471 a!!!i • Sale• (Holiday Inn-Greenway Plaza, 13, 10:00 am.). Bazaar and Block Party (The Art League of Houston, 13}-last event in their old headquarters! ONO• Michael Dogu, David Vickers and Chuck Sherlock (Onwaugh Gallery, 13)-three from the Huntsville area. Sandria Hu (Watson Gallery, 13). Jesus Bautista Moroles (Davis/ MeClain Gallery, 13)-Abstractgranite sculptures. KPF"I' Benefit (Red Lion Inn, 13)­traditional Irish and Scottish music by Terry and the Pirates and Three Bricks Out of Hadrian's Wall and the Men of Houston Morris Dancers. ONO! GENERAL REPAIRS CJ) a_ :J ~ wz :D :J () I- 0 z (.) z 0 :::j 0 a: AUTOMOTIVE 0 I- Electronic AC z (.) z w Gl w-' Service $21.95 Oil Change Special $21.95 1411 Taft 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Montrose Live Elmar Oliveira, violinist(Jones, 13)­Comissiona and the HSO compare two violin concertos and two programmatic works, with preshow lecture by Ira Black. Sleeping Beauty (Company Onstage, 13)-for children. Telemann and Vivaldi (Christ the King Lutheran, 13)-Houston Baroque Ensemble. ONO! little Shop of Horrors (Tower, 16)­tour of the New York Drama Critics Cir­cle's Best Musical of the 82-83 season. Rock version of classic fright film. The Sleeping Beauty (Jones, 18)­Houst. on Ballet. Must See Gripping Chronicles of HistOIY and Freedom There Is a llltle p iece of you in: The Lenny Brue& Show and The Times of Harvey Miik Also gel ready for October Fright Anniversary Specia ls Coming Soon Where the Eyes Have II! 2016 Montrose Kouston, T•m 77006 529-55'4 The Best Little Guest House in Town Reasonable Nightly & Weekly Rates Private Baths Free Parking For Reservations Call (504) 566-1177 1118 Ursulines, New Orleans, LA 70116 --------iiiiiii----------~ S~s ···~'''' /f'ff \1011 1/r lr/r./fl' I~ rt'f. " Co /m'\t'lllt·d 1uth The Montrose VoU:e goi•n g strong! lalt Mght hrfop.mancn S;uurda~ llpm sunda,, Hrm All performances ... ~X (lurxt• IK:l.t• IO \l;&....tt·rc.ml. \ l~-\ ur .\mt"ncan b~ c.t«>l P R\Tl~.., \\\IL"\ll: 14 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 Books A Washington Insider Spins a Tale of Intrigue By Andy Laventure Special to the Montrose Voice Sitting in his backyard, Krandall Kraus looks like anything but a Washington bureaucrat. He is cordial. relaxed and wears vintage grey pleated trousers and a black t-shirt. "This is my new look." he says, grin­ning. "I call it 'reformed gangster'" Kraus has just published a new novel which has Washington buzzing. It's about a popular entertainer who rises which some critics say are direct paral­lels to events that have taken place in the Reagan administration. Since the author moved in Washington's inner circles for over 10 years and at one time worked in the White House, the rumors have been given much credence by those "in the know'' within the federal government. "Actually," he continues, "the book started out as an exercise in plot. I had written poetry for about 12 years and Kranda/L Kraus, author of "The President's Son" through the political ranks to become President of the United States. He happens to have a gay son (convenient· ly married to a female friendJ and when re-election time rolls around problems develop around the son's male lover. who has had it with the charade they have a11 been living for four y!"ars Before long, the White House finds iL,elf in the middle of a murder. blackmail, international intrigue and assassins· tions. Kraus is a handsome man with salt· and-pepper hair and a mustache which always Sef'ms a little crooked. His face is distinctively set off by his penetrating green eyes and a Roman nose which he says comes from his mother's side of the family. I ask him why he has chosen San Francisco after the glamour and intrigue of a political life in the nation's capital. "This i.s home," he says, pour· ing more decaffeinated coffee into my .cup. ··1 grew up in Calistoga and Benicia 8.nd spent my summers here in the city working in my aunt's hotel on Nob Hill I never really meant to stay away.• AftRr completing graduate school in Ohio, Kraus moved to Washington, D.C. "I sat in Washington for 16 years with my eyet; trained west. Finally, after my first two books sold last winter. I made my escape." "'Then there's no truth to the rumor that you are hiding from people after publication of The President's Son?" I ask. "Absolutely not." he answers emphatically. ''Any similarities between characters in my book and the First Family are purely coincidental. But there's nothing wrong with people making comparisons Readers are :::,~n.? to do that. My book is pure fie· Kraus' novel 1s filled with events wanted to broaden my literary horizons, so I decided to try fiction. When I start<d the book I had no intention of trying to publish it, but when it was finished and a f!"w of my friends read it, they con vlnced me to submit it to publishers on my own. The first publisher who read it called me from his home one cold Novl·mber night and told me he want.E>d to puhlish 1t. Naturally, I accepted ... Kraus call!o> that week in November his "Truman Capou.··· week. Capote had his fiN't three published pieces acceptRd for publication in the same week .. On Sunday evening the novel was accepted, the following Wednesday my agf'nt sold my nonfiction book. Hou· to Get a Federal Job, and two days later a Tuc!ion paper bought a newspaper arti· cle I had sent them. These were the fin;t fiction pieces I had received money for in my adult life." In Wa~hington. Kraus taught at a community college before going to work with Nelson Rockefeller at the White House. "People always want to know what Washington. D.C., is really like. They want to know if it's as corrupt as people say it is. I tell them to read my novel; it's exactly like that. .. I'm just an average guy who fell into the right place at the right time and got an infiide look at how the government is run-at least in the Executive and U.gislative branches. I have no axe to grind, no vendettas. I loved my work for the mo!it part and liked living in Washington. But after a while you have to ask yourself if it's really living_ Peo· pie are easily seduced by power and once that happens they lose touch with reality. People in Washington tend to forget the other 200 million people in the country_ That can't be allowed to happe~ Americans work too hard to be abused or ignored by the people they elect to office." Kraus says he left the White House after a trip to China. "We were driving along a dirt road in a motorcade and came upon a group of people riding home from work on bicycles. Instead of moving over and giving them room, the motorcade ran them into a ditch. I'll never forget turning around in the back of the limousine and seeing all those people lying in the dirt. I thought, 'This is abuse of power. We're supposed to be helping thoRe people. not running them over.' So before I became further seduced by the power of the White House, I resigned " A good friend of his who was with him on that trip to China describes it this way: "There are two kinds of power a person can achieve. Power of poRition and power of person. Power of position is given to you and can be taken away. Power of person is something you build for yourself. It is character and integrity and no one can ever take that away. Krandall decided to devote his energies to increasing the power of the person." Besides working on a new novel about an Indian woman who lives in the Sono· ran Desert and begins to have divine revelations about the end of the world. the author is nearly finished with a book on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It is a book with pho­tographs and interviews with people with AIDS, their loved ones, the health care professionals who serve them and pubJic officials in the cities where they live. It has been an intense experience for both him and his partner in the pro­ject. "We've met some wonderful people during this project, young men and wom<•n fighting valiantly for their lives. Som<.• of them will make it because their altitudE>s arE> EOO positive. Others simply give up as soon as they hear the diagno­~ 1s." Meanwhile, Kraus is enjoying his new home. "I love being back in the City, especially after nine months in Pht'>f'nix where I was doing research fur a novel. San Francisco and the Napa Valley will always be home to meand I hopt> this is going to b<- my final move. I intt>nd to prove Thomas Wolfe wrong: you can go home again." QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) Al .:of..,_ ' ?.4 4· AIW Hou ,. -i9·'J.211 AMBULANCE. 911 C.y tial '" 30 I Do-tor ... adtlOt .n.1211 FIRE , 911 Ciey Po 1 C.uc ~ - 1000 G.-, & L•b.,.11 -.., t11\bo.&rd "19·"211 L•11ryer s.ee•ds.:11!.: 3211 '-A<)(lltON Cl lC ~~HS~I MonlrOM CounMI .fig Cir ~0037 MONTROSE VOICE 5n-.,_.OO POLICE, 911 (LOwl!IW~t~trWrP.)I COmmun•tyCtr 519- ')lOOJ .... , U"'Ted 6.J-0000 0< Y~llow 2'36-1111 •me1ernpwNll'lefaA41171 YOl«rerg .. 1'•1~ 2:'4·1919 edJIO Don Bye Is Back! Upstairs bar on Fridays, Saturdays & Sundays ... Can We Talk? ... Win 2 Tickets to Joan Rivers Concert (Sept. 14, 1986) Receive a free chance for the drawing with each drink Fri. and Sat, Sept. 12. 13 from noon to 8pm. Drawing will be held Sat.. Sept. 13. at 815pm. You must be present to win 7 Days a Week BEER BUST 5-10pm $3 Sundays: Uquor Bust 5-10pm $7 Open Noon Daily Happy Hour 12-Bpm SIP LEA1HERS 2923 MAIN 522-0000 ROCK "N" HORSf Fri. & Sat. 9pm-lam Justine (All Girl Band) with Shannon, Susan, Susan and Mystery Guest PARKING ~~~~)~;!~k A~~et~::~er09f'P~~~~ Pollo, aft"r lOpm use the com­plete lot. Pl east• try to kf.'eptheir parking lot dean. Now Open Mondays Happy Hour 4-7 with 75¢ draft and $1.50 well. Open Mon.-Thurs. 4pm-2am Fri.-Sun. 31>m-2am 5731 Kirby 520-9910 SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 Seduction and Scandal at the 'Wall Street Journal' Books Trading S•crets Seduction and Scandal at the Wall StreBI Journal by A Foster Wmans SI Martin's Press. S 17 95 By Morgan Pinney Special to th" Montrose Voice Foster Winans is a gay man with big prob1ems. He faces more than a year in prison for doing something he never thought to be a crime. His lover has had to move away because he was not a) lowed to work in his chosen profession after being convicted along with Winans. He is unemployed. He owes huge legal debts. Now, some people are angry that he might make some money on a book he has written about the whole sordid mess, published by St. Martin's Press, called Tradin11 Secrets. But it's lucky for us that he did, because now we learn the very personal story behind all the screaming head­lines of the "Wall Street Journal Insider Trading Case," as the Winans story was known in the press. And it's very much a gay story. It's the story of a young gay man, newly arrived in New York City, who finds himself very quickly rubbing elbows with rich and powerful people as he interviews them for his work as a writer at the Wall Street Journal. Mean· while, back at the office, we learn that the working conditions are primitive, the pay is low, and the pressure is int<'nse at America's largest circulation daily Foster Winans is the firstjournalistin America to be convicted as an insider trader, but he is unlike any of the other inside traders who have made so much ing when the story broke and reparters began to stake out their apartment building. · Winans knew he was jeopardizing his job and he knew he was violating all notirms of journalistic ethics when he disclosed upcoming column topics to Brant, but he had no idea he was break­ing any law.So,hespilledhisguts.tothe Securities and Exchange CommlSSIOn when stock exchange computers started to notice that Brant's huge trading volume coincided \\-'1th companies men­tioned in the Journal column. He told them much more than they already knew and his confession later became the basis of the charges against him. At first, the SEC wasn't inclined to prosecute him, but then abruptly changed their mind. SEC head John Shad, a Reagan appointee, has made the prosecution of inside traders his number one priority. The Winans case offered the added possiblitiy of extend­ing the government's pcwer into the nation's newsrooms. They indicted Winan's lover too in a vain attempt to get Winans to admit guilt. R. Foster Winans, author of "Trading &crets.· Seduction and Scandal at the Wall Street Journal" When the case came to trial, Winans took the stand and steadfastly held to his conviction that he had done nothing illegal. Winan 's Jover based his defense squarely on his role as a "spause," unin­volved in planning any of the activities. Peter Brant had turned state's evidence in an attempt to avoid jail for some other hanky-panky with client's money. Naturally, he denied hatching the plot and blamed it all on Winans, despite the fact that Winans gained only $30,000 from the scheme, compared with the million dollar trading profits made by Brant and his cronies. news r('('ently. He didn't know any inside secrets about any company. All he knew was the topic of his next day's n•portingin the Journal's "Heard on the Street" gossip column, and he passed that information to a golden boy, millio­naire stockbroker Peter Brant, a Gatsby-like character whose posh life­stvle seduced Foster more than the pros­~ ct of making big bucks. Tradin!f Secrets is a touchingly mov· ing story about Winan.s and his lover living modestly in New York's lower east side in contrast to Peter Brant's Hfei-;tyle in a luxury condo, a Long l.sland estate, and an exclusive club. At one paint, the loven; had to go into hid· The mainstream press never fuIJy reported the important gay angle of this story. although l~1ontrose Voice readers followed the case every step of the way. Now the whole world -.;11 know all the details of this very gay story -.;th the publication of Tradin~ &crets. Place a 'Personal Ad in Next Week's. Montrose Voice TO PLACE A 'PERSONAL' IN THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, JUST CALL 529-8490 16 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson "I've seen this sort of thing before, Baxter ... ond Ifs nof a pretty slghl." The old "fake harpoon" gag. "Well, I'm not sure . .• You doni carry any other slyles?" "Guess whol" "I !ell you she's drlvln' me """ ••• I come heme at night and Ifs 'quacll quaclc quack' .•. I gllt ~ In Ille mamtng and Ifs 'quaclc quaclc qlG:i<.'" "Grog _ They play our song." Fortunes Taurus Keeps a Secret By Mark Orion For Frtdt1y. Sept 12. th1ough Thursday. Sept 18. 1986 ARIES Tread lightly on the feelings of others. You are known for your sensitiv­ity Others appreciate you r friendship in time of cris is. Remain patient through the ordeal TAURUS A close friend confides in you Although you are tempted other­wise. keep the trust. Respect for the wishes of those close to you often changes the nature of the relationship and improves emotional health. GEMINI -Cond1t1ons on the JOb may requ1re a conference with a superior Communicat1on is the key Use your tact and strong verbal skills to get your point across Stay calm and expect good results CANCER Like the Phoenix, you are able to r ise from the ashes. Don't let a crisis on the homefront get to you. Think about the root of the problem and the solution comes easily You never were one to give up LEO-The middle of the month pres­ents an opportunity for you to roar like a llon Let the world know you are here. This week lends itself to assertive. posi­tive action both at home and in the work­place. VIRGO An opportunity to renew an old relationship should be considered The time apart has done some good for all parties involved Your forgiving nature helps you overlook mistakes made in the past Remain open-minded LIBRA ·Close scrutiny of a business opportunity may prevent a financial pit .. fall. Look at the offer in the long-term. but when considering substantial capital out .. lay. look for some short-term return SCORPIO - Yourthoughts turn to your intellectual needs Consider continuing your education. or on a simpler note, pick up a good book The quiet time helps you collect your wits on other matters as well SAGITTARIUS ·Although this week­end may be a quiet one, not so for the coming week Prepare for an exciting full moon period Be slightly adventurous and enioy. but maintain. good health pnont1es CAPRICORN Resist the temptation to make ma1or purchases at this time Seek less expensive channels for enter· tainment and recreation Fiscal conser .. vat1on pays off when holiday purchases strain your budget later this year AQUARIUS When presented an 1nv1- tat1on to a special event. don't hesitate Your charm and keen sense of humor help you make new friends The change of scenery helps break up the monotony and also relieves some of the pressure brought on by work respons1b1llt1es PISCES You can expect some form of travel in the coming week The trip may not take you far but will open up the door for some new expenences Enjoy but keep your eyes open SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Music Brothers Seek American Recognition with New Dance Music By Mardi Coleman Sp"rwl lo tht• Montroi;e Voicr Although they'r(' relative newcomers, Miki and Paul Zone, a.k.a. Man 2 Man, have already begun earning much attention in the American dance music scene. Originally from, and currently based, in New York, the Zone brothers hnve been performing and recording together as Man 2 Man for just over a year. Th(•ir first release. "Hottest of the Hot." was successful in the European dance market but lacked the label back-decision, Reca Records was born. This decision proved to be a wise one as their first release on Reca, "All Men 'are Beasts," scored big in several national dance markets including the American dance music meccas, New York and l..os Angeles. It achieved even bigger success international1y, receiv· ing radio airp]ay in Mexico, heavy club action throughout south Europe and was picked up for European release by Germany's leading dance label, ZYX. It also C'arned them the much sought after recognition and credibility within Aflt•r a ronct•rt at Houston's NRG, the Zone brothers (Afan to Afan) pose m their dn•.<;8mlf room ing to muk(' a significant impact. in the intensely compt>titive AmC'rican market. But it was an important and practical t•clucntion for the duo, earning tht•m many con tads and recognition in the int<•rnational r<'<"ording and mm;ic mark<'ting industry. Bol!-!t<•n•d by their initial European sucC'ess, the group now realized that equal Amt•ricnn success would mean assuming full control of a ll aspects of th<•ir n•cording. and marketing. The inevitahl<• ded~non was made to form their own dom<•sti<· label. From that the American music industry and caught the attention of producer and recording artist. Man Parissh. This collaboration proved to be exactly the boost Man 2 Man needed. Undrr the careful production guidance of Mnn Parrish, a new, playful, upbeat keyboard flavor was added to the dis· tinctive, driving Man 2 Man rhythm programming style. The resulting project, "Male Stripper," was an almost overnight international smash hit, and is sti11 climbing the charts wor1dwide. It was Looking for Love in All the Wrong Places? ~ TEy ClassiPhone Texas' Newest Way to Meet Others Hear Hot Uncensored Classified at 526-4669 Leave Your Free Classified at 526-4423 We assign your ad a personal ID code for complete discretion A DIVISION OF TECHNOLOGIC ENTERPRISES •••••• •••••• so popular in Europe, in fact, that sev­eral new remixes are already scheduled for re lease including a German, an Ital­ian, a Dutch and a British mega-mix by England's leading high energy music producer, Ian Levin. This is, however, on]y the first of many future collabora­tions between Levine and Man 2 Mnn Work is presently underway on an American remix of a Man 2 Man sing1e presently available in Europe, "Who Know• What Evil Lurks (in the Minds of Men)," although no relea•e date orlabel contract have been announced. Man 2 Man's immediate future plans include promotion of their newest.single release, "Sex Symbol," on the Rera label, to be followed by "Eurobeat" (also on Rera). Both cuts feature Man 2Man's characteristically simplistic structure nnd a straight-forward rhythm pro­gramming style. Their sound is reminiscent of the "San Francisco high-energy" sound of many of American's Megatone Records releases. And although much of their lyric content makes subtle gay referen­ces, the group does not labe1 their music as gay-aimed or oriented. Rather, as the Zone brothen; state, "We're the future of American top 40. We're a dance band and dance music is for everyone. We're aiming at American radio airplay" ATIENTION NIGHTCLUB ENTERTAINERS Singers, Piano Acts, Impersonators Pteose make sure the Montrose Voice hos a good quahty (preferably 1n block and white) pubhcity photo of you 1n our files tor use when our odver· tisers ore engaging your services It wouldn't even hurt for us to hove seve­ral photos of your smiling face Thank you E;i.-,gi.-,g h~r hit:E> : ''SAY GOODBYE'' "SENTIMENTAL LOVE" "'BABVLOVE" THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 18 1986 FREE DRINKS BPM-10PM RD• HDUSTDN TION 863-0010 901 N. SHEPHERD• HOUSTON NRG INFORMATION 18 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 Good reading for you ======from====== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS COWBOY BLUES, by Stephen Lewis, $7 .00. Jake Lieberman 1s a gay detective m the typical California tradition. When a 45-year-old cowboy comes into his of­fice tO report that his younger partner is missing, Jake's first impulse is to gently explam to the guy that he's been dumped. But soon is investigation shows that Andy Jones's disappearance is only part of a much wider scheme. The only question is: Will Jake live to uncover it am SAFE STUD The: Hfc:su chronicles of Mex Eundc:r SAFESTUD: The safesex chronicles of Mu Exander, by Max Exander, $7 .00 Max Exander's first reaction to the idea of safe sex is disappointment. But with ume, be finds that the change from his old habits can be mvigoraung in unex4 peered ways .• THE TWO OF US, by Larry J. Uhrig, $7.00. A pracucal handbook about how to make a gay or lesbian relationship work, with special emphasis on the reli­gious aspects of gay unions DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CAUFORNIA KID, by Willyce Kim, $6.00. lo Bangor, Mame, Little Willie Gutherie renames herself The California Kid, stocks up on Rubbles Dubble bubble gum and her father's best Havana cigars and head~ west '•Willyce Kim has created a wonderful, rip-roaring Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled and hoprng she writes a dozen more. I loved it,'' writes Judy Grahn. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7_()()_ This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B, Tok las sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, SS.DO. Who says heroes can't be gay~ Jn the fourth of the "Mission of Alex Kane" c;eries, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelh head for Houston There, they take on a media baron who is intem on using homophobia to build bis tabloid's circulation Also available Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies; each star­ring Alex and Danny· SS.00 each EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan , $7 00 . Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day stanc; at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muc;cles to die for. This story of their love affair is one of the most engrossing and funniest - you'll ever read THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Fnedel, $6. 95 Burton Raider's problems begin in high school when he realizes he's in love wtth his friend Roman As he gets older, the problems increac;e - and so does the humor of bis Situation, rn what Chnstophtr Street calls 1'the funniest gay novel of the year " MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, S7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros st0ries THE LIONS' DEN, by Larry Howard, $8 .00 As a closeted college professor, Daniel has resigned himself to a life of loneliness. He even fights off the ad­vances of a gay student, Matthew Reid - for a time. Finally, however, be decides to risk all in order to be faithful to himself HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe sex, edned by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS cns1s bas closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression . Here1 over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers erotically describe those new possibilities. STUD, by Phil Andros, with an introduc­tion by John Preston, $6.95 . Phil Andros is a hustler with a conscience, pursuing every form of sex - including affect ion - wlthout apology . L111i.in Halegua The Pearl Basta rd THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4.00, Frankie is fifteen when she leaves her large, suffocating Catholic family in the inner city for Momauk, work, and the sea . Th1s story of her sud· den entry into a harsh maturity is told with a s1mphc1ty of style reminiscent of The Color Purple. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, SJ 2.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback) ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high school, share their coming-out expenenccs. IN THE TENT, by David Rees, $6.00. Seventeen-year-old Tim realizes that he is attracted to his classmate Aaron, but, still caught up in the guilt of a Catholic upbringing, he has no idea what to do about it. Then in the middle of a camp­ing trip, a storm traps the two of them in a tent with two other boys, and the issues can no ·longer be avoided .... ........ TO ORDER· ·· ........ . Enclosed is$ Please send the books I've llSted below. {Add $1. 00 postage when ordenng 1ust one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please send me these books: L __ 2. -------- 3. 4. -----------~ 5. - Visa and mastercard accepted; please send acct number, exp. dale , and signature. name addrcs"i City state zip ALYSON PUBLICATIPNS Dept P-5 40 Plympton Si Boston, MA 02118 SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz How Trusting Are You? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to the Montrose Voice The swre sign which reads, "In God We Trust-All Others Must Pay," tells the story of a wary merchant. Like it or not, as members of the human society, our trust in others is necessary for our survi­val. Even in so simple an act as munching a candy bar, we must trust that it hasn't been tampered with. The botwm line is: enjoying the benefits of societal living demands that we build a trusting dependence on one another. And in our impersonal world, being trusted may weH be a greater compliment than being loved. Interpersonal trust has been studied by psychologists C. Johnson-George and W. Swap of Tufts University in Massachusetts. Their extensive research hs found, for example, that females show more trust in others than males do. Trusting others, they find, exists as a personality trait, much the 8ame as assertiveness or sociability. Jf you wonder what your trust index is compared with others, the following quiz might provide some insights. It is based on the research at Tufts. Answer each item ahead true or false; then read on for explanations. I . I am reluctant to lend money tooth­ers beC'ause of the hassle involved in getting it back. 2. Most people would intentionally misrepresent their point of view if it benefited them. 3. Most people who borrow a valuable item and return it broken probably wouldn't offer to pay for it. 4. Most people today are too depend­ent on others. 5. If a company told its employees that profits were too low to grant pay raises, I would tend to be suspicious of the firm's honesty. 6. Most politicians have taken bribes. 7. Most successful people get ahead because of who they know rather than what they know. 8. People today have lower moral standards than people did a generation ago. o Explanation Interpersonal trust involves risk. The question will always be, will the gain outweigh the chance of betrayal or rejec­tion? Dr. Carl Rogers, founder of the humanist movement in psychology an director of the Center for the Study of the Human Person in La Jolla. Calif., concludes after much study that appropriate trust and acceptance of oth­ers usually go along with self­acceptance and are indicators of a well·adjusted personality. o Score Give yourself one point for each false answer. 6 to 8 correct-You are a trusting per­son who accepts others as you see them. Have Pests??? Put Them to Rest!! Save$$$ Professional Advice and Products for All Your Pest Control Problems Free Flea Dip Sat., Sun. 1-5 (Please, no friends, lovers or new acquaintances) RE5ULT5 Pest Control 2513% Elmen-Westheimer (Behind Chutes) TPCL#6155 Sales 524-9415 Service 223-4000 You may have a tendency to be so accepting of others that you are gullible or naive. 4 to 5 correct-You have a balance between trust and caution. You are open to new relationships, but can maintain a fair amount of objectivity when it comes to trusting others. 0 to 3 correct-You are more guarded and suspicious than most people. You probably analyze others' motives too much. You may find it hard to lower your sui:;picions when dealing with hon­est people. •Chance to win a free movie (First Drawing Sept. 16) BETTER LAWns & QARDEns Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential • Landscape • Trash Removal • Chimne4 Sweep • Tree Se rnice • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN John Paul Barnich ATTORNEY • Criminal Ref,resentation •Automobile njury • Wor~~8cS~W8~"F~~if~ 1T1AL CONSULTATION NOfC... tJrTXBd ofSOK'8W:•ton :l:ll7 ~lontros<'. Suit<• :111-1 52;J-300() 1~1~~mo- . of nT Country f1. Hibernation Party~ Sept. 19 10pm-1am Happy Hour Prices w/Bear Pin Sept. Special sl5° Margaritas Mon.-Fri. 4 to Bpm Thank You MSA Monday Night Bowlersr Tuesday & · Thursday Beer Bust 6 to close Dance Lessons Every Tuesday 8:30 • • • 9150 S. MAIN 666-3464 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 Previewing Those Fabulous Fall Films By Scott Cutsinger Muntroae Voice I searched through the movie ads in vain, hoping to find something of inter· est. The new films that opened were so incredibly bad, I knew that! could never make it through them without leaving. We had Texas Chainsaw Massacrell (very messy murder), Bullies (home­town violence), Reform School Girls (good ad, but just another sleazo), and Thrai:;hin-a skateboard movie. Wow, ju8t when we thought it was safe to go back to the movies. Guess we'l1 have to go back and see Stand By Me and Top Gun (No. 1 and no. 2 at the box office and going i;trong). Anyway. I guess that instead of a review I'll whip up some of the new fall filmti using the tons of publicity mate­rials I receive. Looks like quite a few comedies for a traditionaHy drama­laden season. How~ver, major dramas and action/ adventure look to be filling a lot of screens soon, many with ol' Oscar in mind. Can we possibly be saved? There are some interesting films in the lot. Highlights include an erotically acclaimed film by David Lynch called Blue Velvet, Mosquito Coast (one I'm dying to •ee), and The Co/Dr of Money with Paul Newman and Tom Cruise. Great stars Clint Eastwood, Whoopi Goldberg, Richard Gere, Harrison Foprd, and Robert DeNiro will once again grace the screens. There's even a teaming of old timers Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas in Tough Guys. The following is a list of the major films due to be released from Septem her through November We'll have to wait for the Christmas flicks untill later, and there are some goodies. Hope you see somthing you like, o September Blue Velvet-Director David Lynch (Dune) gives us a sadomasochistic look at a possibly dangerous relationship. Critics have already hailed it in some areas, so be watching. Down by Law- Another oddity from the director of last year's Stranger in Paradise. Set in Louisiana, the film sets up a tourist, a pimp, and a disc jockey as they are chased by the law. Night, Mother-Anne Bancroft and Sissy Spacek are mother and daughter in this serious contemplation of suicide and life. She's Got to Have It-All black, black and white feature about a young girl's promiscuity. I'll be reviewing next week, but I tell you now, it's marvelous. Crocodile Dundee-Paul Hogan of Australian t.v. fame plays an explorer from the bush who must face the wilds of the big city. A traitor for the movie showed promise. Name of the Rose-Epics return with two feuding monks working on a murder in the monestary. Murray Abra­ham (Amadeus) and Sean Connery star in this film directed by Jean-Jacques Annaud /Quest for Fire). Othello- Placido Domingo stars in the classic opera about jealousy. Franco Zeffirelli directs this sumptuous ven­ture. Shanghai Surprise- Madonna and Sean Penn in a movie panned badly in the east by critics and the crowds. This Another DUi1fJ £allgA Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Now All You "Fun Lovers" On The Norths1de Have it Made . Happy Hour Everyday Noon til 7 (except Sunday) Bar Drinks $1.50, Beer 75¢ • Friday & Saturday: Party, Party, Party! No Cover! • Sunday: Free Bar-B-Que 4pm •Monday: Crazy Hour 9 til 1 Bar Drinks, Schnapps, & Beer $1 • Tuesday-Zodiac Party (Kim's Birthday) • Wednesday All Day All Night Happy Hour $1.50 Well Drinks $1.00 Schnapps • Thursday-Amateur Strip Night Anyone Can Enter-Cash Prize 10:00 11830 AIRLINE (2 Blocks South of Aldine-Bender) 445-5849 adventure pie may well be attended only by Madonna's Wanna-B crowd. Children of a Lesser God- Much· awaited film about breaking through to Sigourney Weaver is Doctor Lauren Slaughter, an intelligent woman whose part-time job with an escort agency leads her into the world of international intrigue and embroils her in a perilous romantic liaison with Lord Bulbect, a high-ranking diplomat played by Michael Caine in "Half Moon Street" Where the River Runs Deep- A young man is taken from his Amazon home where he was raised by dolphins in this strange, mythical adventure. o October That ·s Life- Blake Edwards tries some­thing different after a series of bombs like A Fine Mess. This one stars Julie Andrews and her daughter, and Mrs. and Mr. Jack Lemmon. Peggy Sue Got Married- Francis Ford Copola takes the reins as Kathleen Turner gets her wish to return to high school in 1960. Jumping Jack Flash- Whoopi Gold· bert gets involved with European spies after she leaves her computer job. A summer film that is just now getting released. Solarbabies- MGM's sci·fi pie about a place where water is everything is also a promised summer film. Takeover of MGM caused all releases to be halted for a while. The Color of Money- Tom Cruise challenges an older pool hustler (Paul Newman) in this sequel to The Hustler directed by Martin Scorsese. Tai-Pan- The epic novel by James Clavell makes it to the screen with Bryan Brown from Thorn Birds being directed by Birds director Daryl Duke. ' Half Moon Street- Michel Caine and ~m:a:t,411§ Announcement Out of Africa Gung Ho Young Sherlock Holmes Salvador Now Available 3939 Montrose 521 -0704 Helping Montrose Be Unique Sigourney Weaver are lovers with Weaver becoming a hooker on the side. deaf student>; with William Hurt as the teacher Hoosiers- In case you don't know, Hoo~iers are people from Indiana. This film has Gene Hackman as a high school coach who takes his boys to the state finals. Toul(h Guys- Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas are two old guysjustoutof prison who decide to rob a train. Charles Durning co-stars in what looks to be quite a fun time. True Stories- David Byrne of Talk· ing Heads directed and narrated this series of weird stories which he des­cribes as a "comedy with music." Soul Man- This one does not look great. C. Thomas Howell tries to get into Harvard University posing as a black. A picture I saw of Howell in makeup was a howl. Bedroom Window- Isabelle Hupert, Elizabeth McGovern, and SteveGutten· berg star in a Hitchcock-like murder mystery. We'll be getting more of this with the success of Jagged Edge. MISS Mary- Set in 1930's Argentina, Julie Christie is a governess who charms a family. Shades of the Sound of Music? Mission- A Cannes Film Festival winner, this drama is set in 1750. Has Robert DeNiro trying to stop the slave trade of South American Indians. FREE INfoRMAtioN About BIOFEEDBACK G.t.iN GREATER MASTERY OVER STRESS ANd Rd.t.nd pRoblEMS suck AS headache .t.Nd Insomnia C,tNcl IUQU\ I\ JO: Dn. NickoLu Edd Psyc holoqiSJ Bl•lock P•olmio••l Bldq. 9J20 Wut ~ it: w, Suin T, HouJtON, TX 770SS 411S - SOSS MoN1Ron Offic£ 2128 Wdch, HouSlON, TX 77019 n7- 81180 Films Sean Connery (left) is Brother William of Baskerville, a brilliant English mon~ ~urned sleuth. and F. Murray Abraham is his antagonist, the cruel l nquisitqr Bernardo Gui, in "The Name of the Rose." ~~';·'t Everett is featured in "Duet for o November Wanted Dl>ad or Alive- Bounty hunter Rutger Hauer hunts terrorist Gene Sim­mons in this action adventure. Streets of GoW.- Klaus Maria Bra­dauer (Out of Africa) is a Russian immi­grant boxer teaching a young man the ropes. No Mercy- Hopefully Richard Gere can have a hit with this cop thri ller co­starring Kim Balssinger. Seems a policeman is after the mob when they :I,~ . vesterd~s World lm. Antiques Weekend Sale :~ Refinished Art Deco Cf) Armoires & Dining Tables ~ Some Occasional Pieces 1709 Westheimer at Dunlavy ~ (Look for Orange Tent) Small Shop- Small Prices ~ 526-2646 {'.f.j sk tor Robert .... ~ ~ kill h is partner. Mosquito Coast- The best seller about a man who packs up his family and heads to the wilds of the Honduras is sure to be a smash. Witness director Peter Weir directs Harrison Ford in this adventure1 drama. Duet for One- Julie Andrews is a violinist who gets multiple sclerosis who is helped by Rupert Everett and shrink Max Von Sydow. SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 f MONTROSE VOICE 21 • 7 Days a Week •Happy Hour Bam-Bpm •Lights, Sound, Video •Never a Cover Charge •Secure Lighted Parking •VHS Video Courtesy of Videoscope MON.-TUE.-THURS. Happy Hour All Day/All Night 1.50 Well $1.25 Beer WEDNESDAY with MC MAUDE Amateur Strip Show 10pm. $100 1st Prize FRIDAY Michael's Men Showtime 10 & 12_ SATURDAY MC Sher Powers. 1st Runner Up Miss Gay Texas Muscles in Action Showtime 10 & 12 SUNDAY SUP.er Sunday Show w /Veronica Lake, De1tra Allen, Ramona Sims. Bronzy De Marco, Joey, Sher Powers & Winner of Wed. Amateur Ni ht 75C Cape Cods & Screwdrivers All Da & All Ni ht Sunda 75 Schna s All The Time 428 WESTHEIMER - 529-2506 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12 1986 We Cover the Wortd of Monlrose! The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 Montrose Classified (MISC.) FOR SALE ANNOUNCEMENTS Don't you want as much sc1ent1flc research behind your vitamins as even your pharmaceuticals Only one com­pany puts the health food scandals to shame So 11 shouldn't surpnseyou when you show detectable results in your stam­ina Anyway call !or free info_ Mone 524- 5499 POOL TOURNAMENTS at Cousins with cash prizes on Thursdays 9PM Fridays- 9PM, Sa1urdays -9PM LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice. a general circulation newo;paper havmg published continu­ously for over 5 years. 1s qualified to accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's circula!lon area of Montrose CARS & BIKES 1977 Triumph TR7. good cond1t1on. $2500 1964 Ford station wagon. $4800 1980 Honda motOfcycle. $500 or best offer Ask lor Lnlda or Chuck 522-2190 Tall Automollve 1411 Tait Triumph Spitfire convertible '76. Sold as 1s S3.600 or best otter, or will trade. 270- 1828 DAVE. 3701 S Shepherd. 529-3849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE ALL GENDERS FAVORED 2 bedroom. 2 bath, microwave. washer/d ryer Near 610l290 responsible person to share hOme Very comfortable. Ken 68o- 8286 Chelsea Market house for rent. 2-1-1 r.~~.hw:;1$2oo,.~g";~7~~rs. ce1hng MONTROSE: POOL & GIANT PATIO Lounge poolside or retreat to your 400 sq ft private patio in this small apartment complex lor •du/ts Central A/C, alt ~=i:;:t~ ~u~:~ & CF~~E~,rs'~~iT• Small pet OK r335 wtth pat10,S315w1th­out 306 Stratford at Tait. 523-6109 Htghruae roommate to share 2 bedroom luxury apartment on 20th fk>or in down­town Concte<ge. secunty, cable, panting garage, lood store, pool, sauna, exercise room, theatre and more• $275/ month, all bills paid 659-6453 MONTROSE LUXURY TOWNHOME 2-2'h> on Tuam St Will sell for mortgage balance, $87 ,000 523-9796 For rent apts Weekly. monthly rates. lurnlshed-unlurnished, 2 bedroom duplex, $270 mo 529-9867 or 523--0455 GWM into country weet8fn music. wants to share large 2 bedroom home on nice • street 1n the Heights. Must be employed and respans1ble. No drugs $200 plus 'h btlls 864-4982 fn;.,~dig:~i~t~~';;~b:'et~~~s Roommate wanted. 2 bedroom duplex 1n W U area. partly furnished bedroom. oll street parking. $250 plus ~ ulll1t1es. qwet ~~ere~~!in8~i; ~~:1~~~~ p~:~e 521-3644 leave message Weslayan/Alabama. attractive, redeco­raled one bedroom condo in beaut1lulty landscaped executive complex Pool. security and more $365/mo. 526-3566 Garage apt. 2 bedroom. AIC. carpet. cable. dishwasher. garage Telephone Rd f Lawndale area Five minutes from U ot H mam campus Call 921-4703 aller 7pm M-F or weekends S300 plus electnc1ty 1 br apt small qwet complex with pool S285 plus electnc 529-8178 NAPOLEON SQUARE, 6001 riulflon. 667-7593 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD GREENWAY PLACE APARTMENTS. 3333 Cummins Lane, 623-2();34 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Montrose Voice Class11ted Call 529-8490 And charge 11 on your Amencan Express. Diner's Club. Carte Blanche. MasterCard or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Need 5 or more !le1f-mot1vated 1ntelhgent. mature md1v1duals interested in catering proiec1 (comm1ss1on) Must have trans­portation Contac1 Davtd Ktng at the Checkerboard Oeh. 2-5pm daily. M-F 521-37-40 M1dtowne Spa Houston 1s currently accepting apphcallons tor cashier & floor postllons 3100 Fannin 522-2379 PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel sought fulV part tune Excellent verbal skills required Base plus comm1ss1on Call Mr.Schwartz a lier 11 am. 526-5323 The Roman Hair Styling & Tanning Salon has a space open for lease 522-8576 or 522-2263 TRADITIONAL FLORSHEIMS like new lmpenats $10 (713) 524-5449 M8ie. adult Beta videos Co1iect1on of-20 All top titles $300 or best oller 332-3108 after 7 FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end ol the Montrose Class1hed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS WANT SOME FUN? Call now for massage by hot young model 965--0313 Close to Southwest Free'"ay. Greenway Plaza, The Galleria, Sharpstown Center. The Medical Center and Downtown. • Flexible Lease Terms • Corporate & Furnished Apts. Available • Individual Security S ystem • Door to Door Tras h Pickup * STUDENT & SENIOR CITIZEN DISCOUNTS * Leasing Office Open: Mon. thru Sat. 9-6 Sun., 1-6 NAPOLEON SQYARE 600 I Gulf ton 667-7593 SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 PLAY IT SAFE with Search 86 male escorts Call 24 hours a day tor all occasions Paul 464- 1945 SENSUAL SWEDISH MASSAGE Fantastic for bodybuilders and ath1e11cs 7pm on by attractive GWM 498-4014 STOP Gening rubbed the wrong way Cart 622- 3942 Late mg ht Also sell massage tables FREE HALF HOURI - Your every 10th hall hour free-• Sensuous massage lrom the hands of a master 8111 869-2298 ~aik·s sensuou_s massage 864-186.4 En1oy my touch with a very special rub­down. weekdays. 6pm and on. all day weekends 784-3705 THE CADILLAC OF RUBDOWNS by David. D. ol ET '713)520-8232 Relax Deep muscle therap! 461-8490 Massage by Dan. Retaxing Safe $20/hr 523-9821 Sensuous massage 862-4058 Joyful rub by a mce person Ben 270- 1828 RELAX AND ENJOY The BodyWorks M ~sage-- teg1t1mate expenenced Cal B1 )26-2470 JUST FOR US Finally an escort service by and tor tes­b1an women B1-women and couples. too Give us a cal for fun m the big c1ty (713) 484·6068 P1easuretUl intimate. rubdown given by vivacious md1v1dual. 784-3705 SILVER FOX SERVICE Luxurious body rubdowns David ol ET (713) 520-8232 PERSONALS GwM ·s·s·· 130. attractive. Lt ~kmg !or mascuhne. attractive. well-endowed top GWM. 20-35. athlellc or swimmer bUlld Picture and phone number to Blind Box 307-S Clo Voice 26 yr old. genuine. slightly clever. attrac­tive. ophm1st1c. masculine and independ­ent. well-traveled sell-motivated drive-to-adventure. informal people­onented. dreamer. very heatthy Seek rather 1deal1st1c. unconventional stimu­lating GWM 21-33. mascuhne. enterpns­ing_ cosmopohtan stud who is more interested m romance rm a sem1- proless1ona! who generally en1oys the compamonsh1p of someone more solvent than myself Yet. who knows. maybe we could go on to exploit my ideas. too Nevertheless I like to share commercial ventures and hobbies Let's "rope"' the world Reply Bttnd Box 307-AZ C/O Voice p;;sons with ~rtinent inf0rmat1on abou-t Best Professional Movers. reply Bhnd Box 307-G cJo Voice GWM_ 24. 5·10· 155. impulsive but sane You 19-30. daring, fun-loving. gay male Call 468-5208 My maSter waniS ii secOnd b(i:y~ fOr' safe sex 3-ways Call Hank at 713-623-2608 belore 11 pm any day Lover. respons;tlie. profess1on°';1. 35-50. mascuhne. hairy body body bwld_ GM share extravagant house in Hyde Parli; Send description to Bllnd Box 307-Z Clo Voice or call 523-7751 Looking for hot black male for leather or lace Paul 464-1945 Mature professional black male. 37 not mto bar scene, drugs or fems Wants to meet serious-minded white male for :~~8,,~~~~·P ~;:iy orB~s1~~x1a~g~.i r~~ Voice Hairy menTHa1rlS";;s 8d11st tnfo s2 00 Hair 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 GwM -22_ 6·2-·· blond. attractive -Seeks attractive. masculine, GBM 21-25 tor friendship and possible retat1onsh1p I ltk~ music. sports. dancing and good conver­sation Photo appreciated Reply Bin d Box 305-D clo Voice NY. FILM CO. LOOKING for Houston talent for 'S<»o' fllms Well ~~~~?ul 1~~~~~: t:~~~~~I ~~~. phOne to 1420 Westhetmer. Swte 120. Houston. Texas 77006 GwM. 2i -6~ .. -brown. green. 180 1bs professional fun and extremely good­looking. l•ke outdoors. 1ogg1ng. golf. woni: 1ng out and travel Seeks very hand­some men onty. straight. bi or gay. 27-38. with gOOd bOdy. with similar interests Especially want to meet married men. Sate. straight appearance & discretion a must Ad 3Q5.M. Clo Voice G-ay wresU1ng1 Uncensored infop1xpak $3 00 NYWC. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 VACATION PARTNER WANTED for wee«end travesl. also tor week-long vacations. Hxlgmg free. you pay air Call 579--0202 Asian architect needs lovmg fnend Are you 20-30. 5·s" 140oriess. senous. alfec- 1t0nate. but k>nely? Interested 1n senous re1att00sh1p? Wnte: PO Box8942 Hous· ton 77249-8942 J.0.E. Play safe BUT PLAY J.0 E. 1sa Sate Sex erotic encounter group for adult gay men Memberships are hm1ted to those who are secure w•th 1rie1r gay male sexuahly All members must be reasonably attractive and in good cond1t1on for !hell" bOdy type Hours FRIDAY and SUNDAY only Doors open 8pm. Close 10pm {new members must arrive 8-9pm) Foraddresscall5?0--0206.6-10pm.Fn or Sun Membership fee $1_ Dues per v1s1t $5 H1. rm Lisa. need someonetota!kto?Calt 1-900-410-3600. 1-90()-.410-3700 5()( toll first minute. 35¢ each add1t1onal minute CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Whoa' Don't take those pictures ol your boyfnend or girlfnend to the drug store You might get back blanks and the expla­nahon. ·we11. there must have been something wrong with your camera ~~~to~~~g ~~~!~~~ ~~n~,~H,,:~ photo developing and prmltng We prom­ae Big. Bnght and Beautiful Pnnts as clear and sharp as possible OUR pQLJCY onSexui11Y-Ex°phc1t Adv8f­lising The Voice beheves that humans engaging tn consenting sexual acts with one another 1s healthy Our readers are wefcomed to adver1rse here to seek rela­tionships or encounters All ad'vert1s1ng should. hOwever. not contain language that would offend an unsuspecting reader Also, because of the health cns•s we strongly urge our readers to practice ·safe Sex ·· Use condoms (with water­based lubncants such as KY. not with pet­roleum or vegetable-based lubricants) and avoid the exchange of bodily fluids - --- --,; cUsSIF1ED AFFAIR-?·--- - John Preston and Fredenck Brandt can show you how to have actrve fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their book. "Classified A.Hairs.~ they'll tell you hOw to wnte an ad that really stands out. what to expect when you place or respand to an ad. and e\len what all those lunnv little abbrev1a11ons mean Send S8 to ""Classihed Affairs ... Atyson Pub. Dept P-5. 40 Ptympton. St . Boston. MA 02118 (Also inciuded will be a coupon lor SS off on your next P8r$0NIS in your chOlce of 25 publications. 1nclud1ng the Voice PHONE FANTASIES CLASSIPHONE. 526--4423 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD LISA'S RECORDINGS SEE OUR DISPLAY AD LONE-STAR JOCKS. (713) 526-4962 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD REAL ESTATE M( 1tro 1 ~ 'lhts. from the 40"s al type pr.,,._. rty w1 . ..nd what you want' Gary 880-5174 Of sao--.150 24 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 12, 1986 Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory 1fl cx;t..tertrse 1n this page. col 529-84QO durrng business hour~ PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep •t hSted here in the Montrose Voice where l•leralty thousands turn each week - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Vo1ceC1ass1fted Cati 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Amet1can Express. D1nefs Club. M terCard. Visa or Carte Blanche AIP. CONO!TIONING - MIDTOWN AIR AIC & Heating Residential • Commercial Central & Window Units Sales • Service - lnstadat1on ~ ..;;.. 521-9009 ~ YESTEADAY'S-WoRLO ANT10Ues 1709 Weslhe1mer, 52&2646 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD 13TH STREET ANT10ues. 309E 13th SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ATTORNEY ELAINE SHAW 222-1112: 645-3159 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ELAINE SHAW : g~r~s.r,c:f.,~i: • Pos.ses.sion • Family law • Accident 222-7772 or 645-3159 ,.,,.,. '"•BCI ··-·ozUlft MONTROSE AUTO REPA1R. 2516 Genesee (101 Pac1l1c). 526-3723 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BRUCE SAL VIN 524-8219 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BRITISH AUTO BODY Rf PAIR. 2001 Harold, 526-1940 ~E~ OUR DISPLAY AD DOWNTOWN AUTO. 124 W Gray 521-2113 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Tait. 522- 2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD NEARTOWN KARZ. 1901-Tall 5.24-8601 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (101 Pacific) 52~3723 ,orbui . •h <;p .. 101ist Etectr1ca1 Repo1"s Ar. Brake W<xk Worried About Your Car Let Brtl< ,. ·heck 1t OU! Mobile Mr< " 1n , Dependable RHSO(lable Ra1es A"'•""t'IQ Macl'h_. 524-8219 FREE TOWING ON ALL REPAIRS Acctdenl Rf'patr .';p,'c1all.'it Frame Machin" Lead Work Frn~ E .. ,11malt• BRITISH AUTO BODY REPAIR 2001 Harold 526-1940 THE PARTY BASKET 2015 s She­pherd. 528-4405 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BARBrn SHOP. HA:P. SALON THE ROMAN 2602 Whitney. 522-8576 522·2263 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Tommy's Barber-Shop. haircuts s1ffand up 2154 Portsmouth Appomtments528- 8216 BARS BACCHUS. 523lovell 523-3396 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD BRAZOS RIVER BOTTOM 2400 Bra­zos. 528-9192 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHEERS. 2654 FM 1960 East 443-2986 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CH-0TES. 1732 Westhe•mer. 523-2213 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD DIRTY SALLY'S. 220 Avondale. 529- 7525 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO THE GATHERING. 106 Alfondale. 522· 1213. 523-90().if SEE DUR DISPLAY AO EXILE. 1011 Bell. 65~53 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD KJ~s. 11-830 A1t1me. 445-5849 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MARY'S. 1022 Westhe1rner, 528-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD M1C::HAE:lS. •28-Westhe•mer. s-29.-2506 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD NRG 901 N Shepherd 863-0010 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO NUMBERS. 300 We$1he1mer. 526-6551 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE RANCH 9150 s Main. 666-3464 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RIPCORD. -,15 Fa1rv1ew 521·2792' SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ROCK 'N' HORSE, 5731 Kirby, 520-9910 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE 61i. 611 Hyde. 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD VENTURE-N 2923 Main 522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE ZOO. 2212 Conyer 528-9256 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ----- 81G TOM-· -~3 Milam 529-'J533 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD n PARTYKEGS ~"J BIG i oM'S -2323 Milom- 529-0533 l:!l&l:f.im!ij 81 10 'STOP Al.ASAMA THEATRE 2922 s ,n kt )29-2345 SEE 01/R DISPLAY AD OH BOY• _fATHER GOODS 912 We'. l­he1mer at Montrose- 524· 78.59 SEE OUR DISPLAY Af"' Oh Boy Quality Bl ots 912 Westheimer at Montrose Blvd Boots. Shoes & Accessof/es llfilU;O~lft DIAL-A-DINN EA GOURMET CATERING Custom C•ler1ng · Fr.,. Dehvery Inf! mate dinners. picnics. receptions One of our spec1alhes sugar tree •II natural homem•de rce cream •II flavors made w•th lresh fruil per your request Please call Nan at 784-2120 REGENCY CLEANERS. 2103 W Ala­bama. 523-6357 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MONARCH PROFESSIONAL CLEAN­ERS. 2815 S Shepherd. 522-5101 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CONSTRUCTION/ CONTRACTING HsKciJNTRACTING. 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO JON-ROB CONSTRUCTION GROUP. 1625 Richmond. 529-9755 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Quality Home 1lepairs Fast Honeet Service .•~ ~.R.o.f.l . JU·\~Chmt • ninYW'llOnl • hnllll • ShllllltOCk 998-3988 Small Jobs Welcome John Rob Construction 529-9755 All Phases of Construction Decks, etc. Reasonable Rates References on Request Remodeling & Home lmprovments Room Add1t1ons Garage Conversions. Driveways Sidewalks. Kitchen Cabinets. S1d1ng. Pa1nt1ng. Pa11os. Roofing, Sheetrock Formica Financing Available All Types of Small Repairs 25 Years Expenence Releren•:es Upon Request 354- 3732 !Bmllf.i4!111d PRIMAL THERAPY and deep·feelmg coun!Y'ling available Flexible hours Female therap1 ,1 Very acceptmg 525-1774 - MAsTERs DEGREE THERAPIST In personal recovery lrom eat ing dis­order Work also w11h relati0nSh1p se.-ual 1den11ty. religious abuse counseling Ind•· v1dua1 or group Very reas(')nable rates Robert Odom M Div 951 ·5933 CENTER FOR A PO!=:ITIVE LIFESTYLE ·11-66('r SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Uf!J RUtJi#;\!IUt# .AMBDA. JNLIMtTED DATING SER· VICE. P 0 Bo.- 74 Houston 17248 496-3371. :)28-2~.Rl SEE OUR DISPLAY AO Lambda's Unlimited Dating Service P.O. Bo1 7411 Houa1on. TX 77248-74111 (713) 528-2236 RONALD M BUTLER DDS 427 Westhe•mer 524 0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westheimer Housron, TX 77CXL> Monday thru Saturday Hours by Appointment (713) 524-0538 ~BR-AN-CH-ES nO--weRS-. -1408 we·st· he1mer. 521-0848 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO Cornp .. l•florelS.,...k:•. ~=::':.~:!:~"'· " l F1Mo1n11-~c . ,. . ,. branches nowers r . on IN Curve ~ 1408 Westhttl"* -521.()148 10"lli Off TO MONTJtOtt VOlct } J READERS ri li!WifiD!l!l;!Hl1!;l-souTHwEsT- FUNERAL -01-RECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CREMATION SERVICE INTERNA TIONAL 3400 Montrose. 529-6666 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD LEATHER BY Boors. 111 Fairview 526-2668 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD LfATHER BY BOOTS Custom Design Room 711 Fairview B Adams. lld.-The 611 Leather By Boots-the Ripcord 1 SIR Leother - Venture-N Houst~, Texos INSTITUTE FOR -IMMUN0L0GiCAL DISORDERS. 7407 North Fwy 691· 3531 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD STEVE 0 MARTINEZ. MD 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621-7771 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ROBERT CHIROPRACT-fC-CuN1C. 1305 Waugh Dr 521-2003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ROBERT CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC A1. Alle1r>.1/•ve /(;Pam DOWNTOWN MONTROSE 521-2003 - 1305 Waugh Dr. NORTHWEST 466-3648 - 2901 Jones Ro•d FURNITURE RESTORATION I ll!l!llHil ALLEN WADSWORTH CO INC 9010 Sweetwater. 445-4141 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD urmlure ref in shlng and re-uphol1lery • P1ek~ p encl o.t 1.,_,,- • C111tom OH1gn Finl..,.. 2()0!.. OFF WITH THIS AO 445-4141 • Since 1975 lml!l!mil--· WINSTON HA\JUNG. 52" ·7944 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD WINSTON HAULING CO'l'IERCIAL/RESIDE.'TIAL HOME AIP. CONDITIONING AJC Cenlr•I •nd window units. S•I• • •nd Service. MIDTOWN AIR. 521 -9999 MIDTOWN AIR. 521-9009 5!1-9999 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD o·R P cOoPEA. ASTRO­REFLECT10Ns. 2470 s Dairy Ashford •17u 77077 1-800-824-7888 operator 837 Astro Reflections Personal. Sex-0-Scope & Compatab1flty Horoscopes 1-800-824-7888 OP ~RATO A 137 HOTELJGUEST HOUSE - LONE ·TAR GUEST HOUSE. 104 Avondale 522-1213 523-9004 SEE 01/R DISPLAY AD 11!\',Y~llf!l;H BETTER LAWNS-& GARDENS 523- _AWN SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MOYEMASTERS BoxEI!. too'' Visa. MC. Amex welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 l~llJt$$1f!UIU§ KIRBY NEW~STAND . 3115 Kirby Dr 524-4214 Sff OUR DISPl.AY AO 111111;1011111 YOU CAN PROSPER A• ·1ar letchnd" as it may sound. aome of the tmest chn1ca1 Mudies now indicate you can raise your immune response. energy level. propensity to optimum health and even 10 simply by balancmg your diet Cati Monte or Larry tor free mtormat1on at 524-5499 especially 11 you·re 1n an exercise program 1a3'11Bmu:m1 RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 2513' Ehnen. 524-9415 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD TOM PRE""TY FISH. 224 Westhe1mer. 0-644: SfE OUP DI iPLAY AD ,ARI l..)LE PW$ & POOCH 2"41 Rtch· I lnd. 528-498. >EE OUR DISPLAY AO K·9 CUP JOINT DOG GROOMING 1828 Fairview. 528-4064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD K-9 Clip Joint & All Breed Dog Grooming School Boarding, Dipping, Pet supplies 1828 Fairview 528-4064 Carlisle's Puss & Pooch Cal & Dog Grooming and Board ing at Its Best 12 Years Experience m All Breeds 24 Hour Boarding Care. Home Away from Home A~~~~ni~:X1'o~Yv 2241 Richmond 528-4988 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALLt Printing and developing enlargements. 1umb0 prints. trim. Kodak paper. 2615 Waugh Dr 520-1010. HENRY:-5· 1 HOUR PHOTO. 428' West­he1mer. 529--0869 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTOGRAPHY KEN-GOLD-PHOTOGRAPHY' 591-2819 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO mumil--· SPEEDY PRINTING. 5400' 8eila1re eiVd 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ljl\11ilm!llfdf.1i DA NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 weiCh. 527- 8680 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD RECORDS. TAPES INFINITE RECORDS. 528-Westhe•mer 521-0187 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD f• l;,,,..,;f,t, 529 WHtholmer r IHllU Hou•;; TJl~~~ MOST$ NEW, AL· 5 99 USED& BUMS • COLLECT· J@ •• :,a~~~ !;IMUmWll'i CAFE CANEEL, 515-W-Aiabama. 526- 0793 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CAFE EDI W Alabama at Shepherd 520-5221 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHARLIE'S. 1102-W9sthe1mer. 522-3332 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CHECKERBOARD DELI SPEC-IALIST 808 Lovett SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PIZZA 1NN·_-3,05 S Shepherd. 522-5676 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD THE PLACE. Montrose at Wes1he1mer. 524-0084 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD WESTHEIMER CAFE. 1525 W'"i!sthetmer 528-4350 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD biilMlil!I!l!l' SPA TO GO. 172·d646- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD -~Ofio e SpH e Po~ & Sp• Service e Chemic.ls (Free computerized water analysis) 5816 SW FrHwey (Chimney Rock e1ul\ DIAL SPA-TOGO (772-8646) THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 F-81N1ew 529- 1414 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD .•,•, • 0 .,. 529-1414 ~ TME11~f PLACE ALL BRAND& 1307 Fairview 3 Blks West ol Montrose GLC TOURS. 9900 Westpark #115. 977-9322 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD fRA\/El RESERVATIONS_ 523·3444 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ...................... ~ t Win a Free Trip* : t MEXICO : ii Acapulco P. Vallarta ,. t .$239' $139 sm $139 ,. • lxlapo Cancun : • ~ $179 .$loW $139 ,. •t Cozumel Mazallan ,. _$2W$189 ~$159 ,. ii 'Call far Details it • 523-3444 : ! Travel Reservations, Inc. it t NEW REDUCED PRICES : ••••••••••••••••••• 111u,11111ue GIBSON TY-PE TECH. LAB9005 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD SAME DAY TYPESETTERS. 4o8 Avon· dale. 529-8490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD MAO V1DEO. 3939 Mo;t;'ose. 521-0704 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD WE DELIVER v1otos_ 1420 we51- he1mer. 522-4485 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD V1DE0Sc0PE. 2016 Montrose. 529: 5544 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word." you can purchase space here "by the inch·· When buying by the inch. you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE , .. $34 2·· $44 3" $54 4 WEEK RATE ,.. $29 2" $39 3·· $49 13 WEEK RATE , .. $24 2" $34 3" $44 26 WEEK RATE , .• $19 2·· $29 3·· $39 STORES iMISC. ITEMSl - QUICK ~f.Dfs°t5BRIDE 1534W Alabama, REFERENCE SEE OUR DISPLAY AD (Tear Out & Post by Phone) THE EAGLE. 1544 Westhetmer. 524 7383 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD WHOLE EARTH PRO\llSION CO 2934 S Shepherd. 526-3883 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO UNITED CAB CO 699·0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD UNITED CAB CO. .~ peptmdabl/11y. Courtesy & Service KflOW the color of ,Your Ciff). blue amt wh•te ll'f'<lln g l he M~Ceflltr•r• .. OrHnw•r Pi.u. Monlros• •nd Hou11on 699-0000 AIDS Foundatoon52•~•37 Atos HC";t1oni.Sn-3211 AMBULANCE, 911 Cuy Hall. 222-J011 60Cioi '"am o-r 'S~3211 FIRE, 911 GayPn 1t•ca1 C11uu.11. 5:t1-1000 Gay & l han ·:;w1tchboard_ 52i-.3211 L,...;;yer s-. adl or 521-3211 M.:tntr09eCllntC °528-5~1 Mont•oae C•>ul'IHitnQ Ctr 5~7 MONTRQ•.t VOICE 519-8490 POLICE, 911 ~~~t'W"th9UnerPQa.i.eCOmmut111yCtr 529· T11u Un1IPd6~0000orYell1>w236-1111 Time. lf'mp_ Weith•. 8 .... 7111 \101er reg1 1ra110n 224-1919 e•t310 The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 MONTROSE VOICE 25 MONTROSE RESOURCES ....................... . g____ - ------ -·-- Aflormatl(Jfl !gay M0tmons1. D1vod 523-9821 mee1 8pm Aug 9 A.diOrAIOS-POB66.t ii -11266~ 52i:6077 AIDS FoUndit.on. ·3317 M0n-tr0si"BO'k11S5 77006 52•-2437 AilA ·caPeo&ChOrUI MciOl,-01eCtlUrCh01 Chnst. POB 8673'1 77266. 52&-1852 ~ th8SU0.522-:-f695 ACLU. 1236 WGrii"524:S9i5 AIDS Hothrle. 529-321-1-(G&L Switchboard) American Gay Aihe-;-sts-POe 66'7"1 i"f1266-52f. 9255 An~o~ston i953Mon1role(i;mpor· anly mowing to 3209 Mon11ose Sep 12). 523- 9530 balaar Se!!_ 12 Astro Raonbow Society for the Dffl 5~ (TTY( A;o,,d;i;" Assn~roe--.. 77266 meets 7 30pm 2nd Thurs. Womens Ctm1toan Ctr. 310 Pec1roe Aiu1.0-Womyn:;·M-a9aztt;i~-6130SwFwy •:i35. 266-5237 !ll Bayou 8·11.1 Singers.Rob41n Mooro. era~ 209 Strll lord. 861·3084 8~1;;g M~rr·I U0tted Meihocrts1 Chu7Ctil•-.O Harold. 526-1017 swc 10 '°'m Sun !I! _ _ Choices Unhm•lecl~S29----=3211 (G&LSwotehboerdl ChMl,in ChurchOi- tile Good -Sh;phl!rd 1707. Montrose svc lpm Sun Bible study 7 30pm Thurs ChUfCh -01 Chr"11!1IO- Fi11h. 1840-westtie.mer 529-8005 svcs 10 451m Sun. Bobl• 1tudy 7 30pm Wed. Rev Chns A Rice. pastor Church ol lhe-R0Ck. 590-:-1456 t;c;s Sun ;·o JOam c11izensktt""H~m1n-Ecl~11110CHEJ:-POB30.45 77253. 68G-33A6. 937-.1516 "'"'2nd Tun. 241• Gramercy C..~rS.-342-&02 COu -4s·$. O'irren Bu11er pres. meets 11 -Brazos Rovf!r Bollom. 2400 Brazos_ 528·9192 roners~al­• ng C1r01.1sel Ronk off 1·10 3td Tue C()l;",.,,11ee 10,-p--;-;bric -Hea1th Aw1rerieu PQe 3045. 77253_ 528-6333 522-6084 "Shanng Group for the Wotrl9d Well~ meet Fri. 7-&pf'I, MontrOM CounMtong Cir eomm~n1ry--fi0i,t1cil Action Comm111H "1c­PAC1. POB 200S 77252 236-8666 cc,mmun1ry Go9i)elC1r 3207 MontrOM - 521- 0511 Svcs 111m Sun. 7 30pm Thuf'I Congr~~h1Y,m.728-S""iil.588-ii97 meets 2nd & 4th Fri HQt•dly Inn. D11tas Room M11n & BIOdgt'tt COOp1es ..au- M9e11 ·o;on•ty Ctr ~-.SH01i."ni-22a:J-S-05'"~ II Demo Comm•llM oiGPC.526=--883.t Ohifma·s1udy Gr'QUp_ 4o6 AVondii&. 52-,.:g5~ B•g Mountain Support Group "The Wrong Sode ol the Fence·· 7pm Aug 10. 520-6765. •51-4109 Q.lfi&f0Unda1;o;:;-2700 Muon. m-5791 Di<i-,.;,ty Clr.32-17F·,,;n,n: s28-0111 tiOme10DIQ­n11y. Hou. Couplets Hou. Gay & Lnbo•n Hitpen­oes Uriodos Gay Fathers. Gay Moll\erl. Hou Gay Pr•de WWII Comm•llM. MontroH Acl1voty Ctr Hou Women's Sof!ball LNQu• o,g;;-1ry Hou lgiiC11h01ocli."i2iff1nnffi: s2a- 0111. 52'.J-7644 mns & IOCial 7:30pm Sal DD .E,S,O. PS Pr1va .. Profesti.,)(181 Soc111 Club 961· F-ed9r.110n Oi""Ctiartl- Un•tlld lor Soc111 Servi· ces ~FOCUSSJ. fOlnt IW!dr11t•ng ••m ol G&l S""otchboard AIDS Foundation. M0t1tr01e CMIC. Montroae CounHhng Ctr ~ .. lnChuidi--s2-10faM-1ri.529--:1s7i swc 1115am&l"t F'iCWilrunne'1~JOe5ro:i019 or-§t.1w~5i9- 12aa runs 9-m SUtl. 8 30pm Tun & Thurs. from ~~oa1P1rkT~sc_,, __ _ II ?3~~. ~~8~hsrlng b:per1el'IC8 (GASEJ,528- a.,y-& L11b!an-AtCh1wft01T11 s11i1i11eOlllHl;c; GeV-&Lffb,.n-1i11ormO"n1- -17i3wH1hiomer "6040. 77098. 568·1413 G.Y'& le;b.in"S~dent Assn 11 U01H: BOxli• 4800 C•thoun_ 529--3211 (G&l Switchboard) oa;·& Lei'o.'in Sw·t~h-bolrd POe 6651ff 17'266 529-3211 mlorrnat1or1 counh11n9 reh>rrals TTY. AIDS Hotllne Gay-A11•nl&Fr;endf 785-3633orG&LSw1tch· ""'"' G1Y- Fiittie'1 3211 F1rrun °528-0111. 271-1761. 391~53 G&Ltt;ap1nic"S.Unielos POe800921 11260.521- 3641 meoPts7'30pm2ndMoo Dog11rtyC1r st11t<1- w1de ne1 .... 01k ol o•y l•sb•1n H11p1n1e orgat1•llhOftl '" Te.as ~aderstHp COl'lle•ence Aug 31-Sep 1 Houston Gi; Mo!~ mMts Ci;My Cir Giy NLJl'ln A 11nu 880-946-0 G:iiv People ,n Chritt •n Se1efl(• Bo• 613 Be4· laore 77401. 86.1-2642 G.y -Po1i1a.1 caucus rGPC1. POB 6eeM 77266. 521·1000-ollocos900Lowell•101 ~lsHoliday lnn 4840 Main. 7:30prn 1•1 3rd & 5th Wed <HOu!Gav-Pncte WMk cOmm•llH -P08 68821~ 77266 Grei'ter MontfOMI Bollf\"' Guild Phy1L19 Frve pres, 528-1111 general rneelrog 7pm 1111 Wed Back1t•eel Cafe 1103 S Stle9hefd. board meet· 1ng 2ner or Jrer Thurs AsUodOITle 01.1l1ng Aug 9 1'r\e(iroup theater ... o,ksl'IOp. Joe Watts 522: 2204 meets 7pm Thurs. Dogn.tyCtr.3217f1nr"n Gul1d11n Angeots 415 WM!ne•mer m Haze1 .... ,1ct1 P~~s POe 11&2•2-11266 * blan concens . ....,,s. lrH m1J11ng "" .H.O,.m opMe 1tllflrlarth Alllal"IC9 729 Menor. !al­H~ Ar" G&L Eng•rieen & Scienbsll POB 69631 77006 •&1819 mNtS 7pm •th Tues HOu Area women·s Ctr" 4 Ch.1- 52H volunt- onenta1ton 2nd Mon 6 30-8 30pm P01- rt1ca1 toumll<SI Molly Ivins keynoln 7th 1nnu1I ~r:'~~d! ~=;:.~~~1;;~.:a~ 26. 6pm. Hou Bar Owners Assn !HOBO~. ctoB.r.ZOIA---:w.­Boltom. 2400 Brazos_ 528-9192 m.ets 2pm 3rd Wed (Aug 20. flJ"s. 1213 Rochmond) Hou Commurnty Clowns. 882--=831•-- Hou Council of Ck.rbS.~, - Hou D111 Profess1ona1s 523--692i' -&64~59 mets 7 30pm 2nd Tln!I Hou Flag & Drill Corps. Daw•d W1iker prff.-952. 2776altef6pm Hou Grt G.nleSSoft~1io;g fHGGs61 ·'Poe 22272. 71227. Pat V1ct'lon 86'--0039, M•ke Har ~~58-3983 Gay Gamet u Aug 9-17. San Fr1n· Hou G1;He;.11h"ActvocaieS"Ste...8 Burlo" 7i): 9448 meets 7 30pm 111 Sal H~ GiiySt~SAun. li7:3iii ~Au,.nce con1iC1 through nt• gr1ty'Hou HOOMo!OrcycleCt\.lb C.IOMlfY'S 102'2w.S1,_. mer. 52fHle51 Hou ~~IS. POB 38'0-Humttte 77347. 8• I •t 821-7126 m4'<!lt 7;30pm 21\d Sat H~OutdoofGrO...P fHOGl--521-3641 OJ J m 680-31..,. roller skating w•lh Colt 451 Carousel Rm~ oft 1-10. 3rd Mon. 2nd 1nn,...ersery er1nner & pool pany Aug 16. Aslroworld 1np6 30ptnA~9 Gu1da1Upe Rower Raft Tnp pr&-tnp "'fft1ng Aug b~t~u8r~~11~:.e~.~;0&'b~t1YJe~8:= 116 Camp T•mb«hrie. Ontario_ Canada Aug 30- Sop I H'OustonTenn-;;Giub.-St1awn-1181S:1~ play 9am-noon Sun & 1 30-9pm weer_ Mtomor111 P1•k Tennis Ctr. pool pany Aug 2• Houteo; Tourney Vt Nov8-10 HO'v-Te..:- Tenms Club"" ~•d 9~71 Pl•y 10309m-1 30pm Sun. 7 30-9pm Wed Homer Ford Ten.ms Cir HOO.ex Te-;;'n.$To:Ur'~C-B1rrer1 ct1rec1(ij :29-7487 N~1~~ T~ll C~b_.!"efll a Hine. POB"i6CM1.71222_6'4-li32 52!}.-701• 1tf1t11ted groups 1r• •m•1C1 8 uarno·s A P11ce 1n the Sun. MontrOM An All .. nce G&L AfCh1vff of Tx. G&L Sw•!cttbOllrd. lllontrOM SymphoNc Bend bo9rd meet 7 30ptr11st Ttlun(v•ie(llOC:. ltonsJ. eckleation•f forum 7 30pm !rd Thul'I ;qt.riOIJSp;111•1' B;,";""MU POit 391 Bel1a1r9 77~1. 869-4064 1r.ieqroty Hou !Ep11COP11l11ni-POit &eOOe- 77266 524-1'89 meets 1 30prn 2nd & •th Mon. Autry House. 6265 M•"' 1rite..ae1ioVS"4ogr~p1.·roe-16041.11222~94. 1732 frs Ok1"v7rankSk--;nner 5mii60r AIDS {o~ ~~~h524-AIOS rneetsWedallernoons e.nng 111111 JOE~ KPFT Rad1;--F"M.~-i19Covett 81:..d. 5ig:4000 ~~;:11t~~~h:~ '~t~1~~-'='"~,.,~~;;· ~ ~ 900pm KS..-Ai"OS"Found.100 former name ol" A.105 Founerat>On Jeny Kauftmlin Cincer F-ut1~778-• 106 K"°fewioiHydri8i1Graeei•rtcs.B;" Mt!reer725- 002 • lambda Cir Gay AleotlotlCI & All"<)fl. 1214 Jo Anme 521-9772 league Oi Women Voltrf"I. 3400 M0ntf'OM •~29. 529-3171 Leiab"n C'ouPI• . Mon1rOM CouN.1.ng Cit group l.Sb-;an.G.Y A.OU;c'eS-:.-c.. Un1';erw11y Of Hou. 4800 C11tloun. bo• 309. 77004. 7•9-12SS mHls 2 30pm 111•1'11te Tues Spondle1op Room. 2nd !loot Unrvers•ty Ctr LetU. eniertai7r!You Wff!Oen<i" proi.dofHou COunclt ol Clubs. 5~8054 ~ MontrOM Cou.uel"mgCtr grO..,p lheli1ue Church. 522-7695-s-:.-C12JOPms-;m Cw•ng W•I• Church. 271-6472(s..1opn:l1l.;;(i 6pm Sun. Hohdey Inn M1•n & Bloclgett Re¥ ~~,tC';o,:--c-;'7.~,~G,~ou~,~,~oe=1.to512. nl"i• lower Wfftheimet Pohce Sub-Stit•On: 9o2 W"ltltltmer. 529-3100 LUihclrans Conc:•T•f inffts it GriC.Luth-erln Church. 2515 Waugh. 931..()648 rnMI 3rd Tuel eYenr"!'! L_ll ___ -- ~- lllcACSOry HoUM! Clo AIDS Foundal•on. 3317 MoPtroeeB0111155. 52•-2437 ~~7~~1;;:,..~r,1 ~~,1esl. ..~. T ITltM'hb•·W-'ily MtotrOPom•n communt; Cnutch of the Resur· rec11on ~MCCAJ. 1919 Decatur 161-9149 potluck C!lnf\91' 1 30pm 1st Sat monthly svct 10 •Sa,., & 7 151>m Sun & 7 15pm Y.«l memtlel'· shop •flQUlren c~6pm 1st & 3rd Sun national prayerwigilorPWA1Sep6-7 MetropOl41n -Pemecostai Cn~h &86-02m wvc. 2pm Sun Benng Activ•t• 8'd;. Mulbetry 11 H•w1horne 1~1 Metr09ol t.al'I Wind E-n .. mtti. ~2-ri61o Meet1 St Stephll'ls Epitc:0091 Clwteh. 130 Wee! MontroMI Acl.Y-,ty Ct• c:O D1gn1ty Ctr Mont•ose Ari Au;;nce -694-1732--:-868-9314 169- 5:"32 alf1!1ate VH inc; meets 2no Mon Montrose e~.,_.Gl •kl seeGrHll!ll Montrose Bui Guild MontroseC:tiurchofChriat 320JM()l'llrCJM 52•· 9281 svcs 2 3Qp"1 Sun MontroteC1v•eCi~b- see Neerto .... 1'1 AUro MonlrOHCi1n1c'80iH1wthorne 528·5!131 ol)en Mc>n T .... Thur10 6-tpm ~~~,J"c~dt~ri~'1a_9i91194= lnffl 1 Momroteeoun.M1.ngC1r QOOLM'l-1203~529- 0037 Psycho!hefapy indMOU•I. COUpl9I & group counM!Jng AtOS proorem & •14'POl'I gr0!.11)9. wo"'9n·s program & l\.IPPOM 9f0Up; llCOhOf out091..,.,1 progr1"1 .M.~.l.r Montr~ Ne.ghborl'lood Awer,,..s Group. 529- llWJ Mot1troee so1ti)';u League. ~77227 52•-314• blt'lquel & awan:ts cefemony Aug 22 Gey SottbaUWorld Serres X. N-YorkC1ly. Aug 24-30 .M.O.f.l!.rO M SPc;;il-Assn 1MSA1· 5ee spec11.CS~ Montro&e $ymphonoc Band POB 66613. 77266 527-9454 rtthears.111 MCCA. 7 JOpm Mon.alf• l­• ete l'H lt1c. Lesb1•n & Gay Bands of America logo cont•t deadline Sep 1 MOnt~oM-wi1••• G•Ol.lp. POe 21084 11221. 621-3008 MORE_ 526-MOAE 529-0037 11coho11sm oUti);' t1ent ll'Htment pg"\ proiect MontroaeCo.rosel· ongClr Mciih'er-sGr~. 96&-5502. 58H926 ,;;;i; 7 30pm ~II & 3rd Tue. Oogn1ty Ctr MSA.Mon N gt'll eow,1,ng play St1o""'m-l1,,.. 8200 8rHSITll•n. St~ 973-1358 ~:"!":'eN,t;t~1•::~~t~~" 't!':S~ 8200 Bre•rneon MsAPOO'i""IS.u8rds)L .. ;ue 0ebii.Sco11 eT~ 13511 or Dennis LOfO 156().6752 MSA. vo-.eyball. ;,,an 522~69- prKt.ce ~­WJ& on Elem8tltary F11tv1ew & Yupon 3pm ~o,_?! Watetl~OUPNN'rtown~n Ill Na!AnnLestNn&G1yA1cOt\olis,.,Prof.U.or;:. ... {NALGAP) T•xas chllptf!I' Ron Covey 921· 3132 meets 7pm 2nd Sat Momrose Counsetong Cen!O< ,N,,.!o.o r<aiG1yH8iithEduclt10n-FOundii1on."S23= ~!~~~~::}t~~'.i;tso=~~~'fd,.;es- NeaitoWrl Alln 1Mon1roee C1voc Ctubl. 1ii3 w111heimer rneet 7prn 4th Tutl9 Nei10*n-BU...,..-Ai1~-:S~1010 meti11 7~ 2nd Wed liberty Bank 1001 Westtit'ltl'lef Nf.Wfrffctom Cl'ln5!11n Church. B29 Yete. 163- SJn svcs101mSul'\ N0rtMicl~m~wi~goti-CIO KJs t 1830 Aorttne. US-5849 bowrls 7pm Mon .W.u. O ec_'S. ~'9 Tsan La~. 4~W L1meYor1< &,e,..-e,, Anoriyma.rs_ e/o Morltr-OMCo~ tng Ctr. 900 LoYett Peggy It 5264015 lr'IHfl IPm Sun. Mor«roseCounsetingCtt. &fl9mWK S.tng Church. t•~ H1rOIC! p,,;;n&-~,.,,. & Gays 1Paren11 FlAGl. 464-6863 ...eels 2pm 3rd Sun Pr•by t«11"Ctr.410ekd11et P..,k- P•O()I•. -elo - NHrteiWn Com-munity Fit• hOUM. 741-252• P.ZYlot>«'iCWn POB 800063. 77260. 862-1476 Pr~~i p;s~PC). POB 66844 't7266. 523-6024 a Reere1l<1>rwl Lend FundCOmmittee -Renegades .,._ R.n.gilOll m....s II the Ba-rn.710 P1cll 52&- 1M27 ck.lb night Thut1 Aoe9UnwGey 4.e&b.ln5upportGr0up sii=J2"'ii IG&l. $'wolcH>olirdj Rolhi.o CMP91. 14~ie &,.1 ROS:s "52'"•:9839- 2!10 RolhkO Chapel A"'lrds Dee 10. 1886 ao.....,­Ul"' I' of th• UN Ul\IW9fsal o.c1a ... 1ion or Human A•gtts Dr.I Tx GavAOd.O""...W, !TGRA! Hou chi-pl• Ofaw• 1 HM POB 66973 77006. 5~5001 f:O,.~;;--R1;tlt1 Fovndet1on. 900 Lovett •206 r;-A---;-d9"Tc10 R•pcord:~-521-2792 V111t;ng Nul"9es AQ0("1ii11oft of Hou Bfil1yNo;: man at 84o>77u x48or AereJohnsonat8'0-77•• x67 traol'llng"""ooforwo1unteerslorAIDSv1c- 1,,,..llJOam.4pmA~ 16. VNACOflferenceroom 3100 TtmlTIOl'IS lane 1200 a WWB 8°"' "IQ MJ',, 723-1 .. -55 b.;. .... 1s -7~ ~-Post Olll tkw ~~ ~-lay•n F .. ow9'1op 164-ea98 W•ti..m.f Co.ionv ArtS ....-.ri -1001weS1tW"""'"* '163 521-Gt33 What E_. Happenecl to Baby Jane lll 11•d BowhngLeaoue- PN18i.k-1yfM5&.fltiO bc*I I 4Sprn Thurs. Stadium Lann Women's Ek""11rlQLe-.QUe------O.bb4 913-1"8 5pffl Sun S:iadklm LUie$. 8200 Brae.main Wom11t1 - •n Action. soe Bfa~rd. ·527::m-1a· f'v'llmJC!Hotae Pf'09l8"11CamAugl8•10ak .. ~ Women-. Lcbb'J' A1111nc; iChei'Sea. 52~38 w()ll'l9tl·s "'"'"'O•k- see Montf'"me "cOuM811nQ Ctr Womens Pgm Wo-·I - -Sottt>.. leegue 641 I Pi,..l\lioe nooa Calt'!y Of Ca~ 868-6256 NAGAAA 11a110Ml toumey Aug 27-Sep 1 N- H-n Cl W<)myl'l&p.ce 20J3Norfoi~~10 8AY'TCIW!•f Baytov.n la/Tlbcla Group •27-1378 meets 7:30pm Odd Fn 26 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 12. 1986 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat SEPT SEPT 12 13 SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT SEPT 14 15 16 17 18 •I ,., ·D•y C nd & M<.,11 A :es 1 Eve1>! groupnoustspec.f1ca11y per1~11n IO el(, Jd ..)IM<'.. ! ..184 ~ Hou&tCA'l'I gay-im1 u "'Y v•"SH m1,or oty s1a1eorna11ona1 l'IO 1ay or INllOf nat1u1,111 gay event 2 Stncr1y comm•c•al e-tef1ts not 'il'ICluded :J Business cl\'tC & IOC••IQl'OUOI & ltle1r!'\lentJ•egenet"anyqual•l•ed 4 Po''' a1..,.n11wl'le,.?nlyattev1twolatub,ect candidale or p;uty dom '\,;Int no1 qw1o· ed F.o.r. .9..d.d.•.ti. I ..,," ... ,..... ..,.. phelne riumbers .oo• fQll ll'le IPO"lsor•nv organ1zattoti undt'r Typestyles rnd1ca1e events· locations Jn Hou~ton. Of Local Interest Outside H01Jston. Of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS •FRIDAY: Art League of Houston bazaar Sept. 12, 19;')3 Montrose • FRIDAY: ''Breakthrough'' lesbian-feminist program. KPIT FM·90, 8't5-llam • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR 1919 Decatur • .SATURDAY: National Assn. LeHbian & Gay Alcoholism Professionals meet 7pm Sept. l :1, Montrose Counseling Ctr,!)()() Lovett. suite 201 &SATURDAY: Houston North Professionals mttL" 7:30pm, S.pt. l~ m..."'iATURDAY: Dignity mass & 80("ial, 7;...10pm, 3217 Fannin • SUl'iOAY· Frontrunners run from 9am Memorial Park Tennis Ctr. • SUf\iDAY: Houston Tennis Club and Hou·Tex Tennis Club play 9am·Noon, Memorial Park Tenms Ctr • SlJNOAY: Hou·Tex Tennis Club summer sing!~ championship!'! begin Sept. 14 • SUNDAY SPOT (Short People of Texas) meets Sept. 13, Chutt>s. 1732 Westheimer • SUNDAY: MSA Volleyball. apm, Wilson Elt>mentary ffairv1f'w & Yupon) • SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet ~pm Montrose CounSf'Jing Ctr .• 900 Lovett • MOr-.IDAY; Houston Outdoor Group and Colt 4fls skate night, ~pt. 15, Carou~J Rink • MONDAY· MSA Bowtm~ Fall League begins 9pm, Sept. 15, Stadium Bowl, fl200 Brae-;main • MOr-.iDA Y· Leabian Couples meets 6pm, Montro"e Counseling Ctr • MONDAY Norths1de Gay Community &wling League. 7pm, Big Texan Lanes, 440 W Little York • MONDAY· Montrose Symphonic Band reh('arsal, MCCR, 1919 Deratur, 7·'30pm m'TUESDA Y • Motheri-; Group mt'<'l" 7:.10pm Sf.pt. 16, Dignity Ctr m'TUESDAY: fo'rontrunntrs run 6::\0pm from Memorial Park Tennis C'tr. • WEDNESDAY HOBO iHouswn Organization of Bar Owners) meets 2pm Sept. 17 • WEDNESDAY: Montro"e Counselinf{ Ctr. Womf'n's Network presentation Sept. 17. Lesbian Women of Color, 7pm. 900 Lovett • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets Holiday Inn, 4640 R Main, 7:!JOpm Sept. 17 • WEDNESDAY It's Okay meets afternoon. Bering Church, 1440 Harold • WEDNESDAY, Life IS8ues mttts 5:.10pm, Monlrose Coun~eling Ctr • WEDNESDAY: Hou-Tex Tennis Club and Houi.iton Tennis Club play 7::ltlpm. Mt'morial Park Tennis Ctr • WEDNESDAY· MSA Pool League competition • WF:DNESDAY· Overeaters Anonymous mttt ~pm Bering Chur<:h. 1440 Harold rfHURSDAY Mixed Bowling L('ague fall !'i('U8on begins. H:45pm Sept. 11'1. Stadium Bowl. ~200 BraeHmain llTHlJR..';DAY· f<'rontrunnf'r~ run 6::JOpm from Memori.al Park Tt'nni,..Ctr rfHURSDAY "Wilde 'n SU>m" gay radio show 7:.10-9pm on KP~'T Radio. FM·OO SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • ll'i I WEEK P1m•nU. Fl.AG mt-.·~ 2pm. St·pt 2L PreMh.,.tenan C'tr -ti Oakdalt' • ll'i I Wt:F:K lnteKrity mf'f'Ui 7::~opm St·pL 2'2. Autry floul!f•, 626.') Main • IN I WEEK Lutheran,, Concnnt'd meets &.pt 2:J. GraC'f' Luthtran C'hurch. 2.'ll!> Waugh • I!\ I WEEK: Houi.tun Area Gay & Lesbian Enl{im't'rM & ~ienfo1t." m('(•t 7pm Sf.pt.21 • IN I WEEK: Montrtlfo!t· CiviC' Club (Neartown) ml.'f.'t~ 7pm St>pt 2:l, "11.1 WeMhtimN • IN I WEEK: Greater Montro1>1t· Bui.ine1>11 Guild l{eneral mtt•ting ?pm Sept 24. Ral'k:oitreet Rtt<taurant. I HJ:l S Shepht>rd • Il'i 3 WEEKS Houston Gay Health Advoc&tMI mttt 7:~1pm Oct. 4 • IN J Wf.EKS !\enrtown Huamep Allian('(' mw·tH ipm Od !'!. l.iherty Bank. IOOI Westhl'imf'r •Il'i 3 WF.F.KS Av1ondale Ai-llWK" ation meet& 7:30pm Oct 9. ('hri tian Women's Ctr, :110 PacifiC' • IN 4 WEEKS: Hou1>ton Area · women's Ctr \.'olunWt-r ori1·ntuuon clai;a, 6<10pm fkL 13 • IN 4 WEEKS_ MontrnM" Art Allian•·e meet.8 Oct.13 • If\" 4 WU:KS. Gay & Lo1·11bian HiHpaniC'8 t:nidt>M mt'f't 7:30pm Oignity Ctr., :J217 Fannin. (kt 1:1 • IN 4 WEEKS: Cit1zen11 for Human Equality mcetM 7::Jopm o,-t 14. 2414 Gramercy • IN 4 WEEKS. ~fou,.ton D11ta ProfH-sional~ mt't'UI 7<JOpm Oct. J.1 • IN 7 WEEKS Halloween. Oct 31 • IN 10WEEKS Thonksgrvmg. Nov 27 • IN 14 WEEKS
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