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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 018. 2000-07-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5143.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-07-01). Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5143

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 018, 2000-07-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5143.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date July 1, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 allaabout • , oltticdcvar > Continued from page 15 Almodovar's latest film, "All About My Mother," certainly does just that. The film recently dominated Spain's Goya cinema awards with 14 nominations, including best actress, best director and best picture. The winners will be announced Jan. 29. The movie, which won an award for best director at the Cannes Film Festival in May, is the story of a single woman whose son dies and her search for the boy's father. Manuela, played by Argentine Cecilia Roth, is accompanied by a handful of other female characters, including an aging lesbian actress, a fransvestite homemaker and a nun with the HIV virus. "It's really Pedro's most mainstream film to date," actor Antonio Banderas, who was "discovered" by Almodovar, stated in a recent interview. "And by 'mainstream,' I don't mean he has gone out of his way to make something commercial in order to sell more tickets. It's mainstream in the way that it can touch so many souls, regardless of who they are. You don't have to be a fransvestite to understand the feelings of his characters." Inspired by the Bette Davis classic "All About Eve," Almodovar began writing "All About My Mother" shortly after complet ing production on his 1995 film "The Flower Of My Secret." "There's a character in that movie, a nurse named Manuela, who appears just in the beginning," Almodovar said. "In so many situations, she has to become an actress: to the doctors she works with and to people she has to attend to. So, my idea was to make a movie about the capacity to act of certain people who are not actors. And what is acting anyway? It's just the ability to fake things really well." From an early age, Almodovar discovered that the best "actors" always seemed to be women. "As a child, I remembered seeing that quality in some of the women in my family," he said. "They faked more and better than men. And through their lies, they managed to avoid more than one tragedy. The women really resolved their problems, in silence, having sometimes to lie in order to do so. They faked, lied, hid ... and by doing so, allowed life to flow and develop, without men finding out or obstructing it." But "All About My Mother" harbors much deeper messages, Almodovar said. "It's really about wounded maternity, and the spontaneous solidarity between women," he said. "There's a line in Euro Pine Direct Importers of Fine Furniture 'Where The Trade Is Always Welcome' WESTHEIMER ROAD CLARKCREST N Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 • Fax: 713-781-8445 mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net • www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer Tennessee Williams' 'A Streetcar Named Desire' where Blanche Dubois says, T have always depended in the kindness of strangers.' In 'All About My Mother,' women are those kind strangers. Like most of my films, this one is kind of a salute, a tribute to women and their strength." Raised in a country ruled by "machismo," Almodovar said he has always used his films to celebrate females and femininity. "Femininity is an important part of all of us, whether men would like to admit that or not," he said. "So, as a filmmaker, I feel like it is my responsibility to express that. In my early films, people thought I was I was just trying to make subversive, gay movies by having homosexuals and drag queens in them. They were just missing the point. "Don't get me wrong, Spain is not the most open-minded country in the world, not by a long shot," he said, "but I think my films have had some impact when it comes to acceptance of alternative lifestyles." So why, then, is Almodovar so sensitive about discussing his own sexuality? "A lot of people begin to confuse your work with your real life," he said. "Like I said, I'm not ashamed of who I am—morally or sexually. But what if I wanted to make Cecilia Roth as Manuela in 'All About My Mother/ a critically acclaimed film that tells the story of a single woman whose son dies and her search for the boy's father. a children's movie? I don't think that's very likely, but what if I did want to do one? Would people let their children go see it if it was done by 'Pedro Almodovar, the gay director?' Probably not. So, by labeling myself this or that, I can limit my abilities to reach people."
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