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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
File 017
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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 017. 2000-07-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-07-01). Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5142

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 017, 2000-07-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5142.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date July 1, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print BOOK NEWS 'Depot Street' depicts decades-long journey by A L COTTON One of the great joys of reading poetry is how efficiently it can convey another person's world view. For example, to go from the poetry of iMary Oliver to that of the late James Broughton is to leave a world where the cruelty and beauty of nature is perpetually on md enter one where playfulness and awe intersect in male sexuality. The worlds poets create can be so radically different that sometimes you find it impossible to reconcile, as Oliver said in one poem, that "there is, after all, only one world." Minnie Bruce Pratt's world, on display in WALKING BACK UP DEPOT STREET, isa place where life's oppressions are ever-present, and solace seems to come only from your knowledge of their existence. The point of view of these poems is that of a Southern woman named Beatrice (which instinct says must be pronounced Be-AT- rice) who, like Pratt herself, is an anti-racist lesbian teacher living in Ihe South who eventually moves North. The title poem serves as prologue to the collection, and perfectly sums up Southern expatriate-hood: "Words would not remake the past. She could not make it/ vanish like an old photograph thrown onto live coals.// If she meant to live in the present, she would have to work, do/ without, send money, call home long distance about the heat." Beatrice's world is one in which the personal is almost unrelentingly political—in "The A&P," a trip to the grocery story for tomatoes reminds her of who picked them, how mechanistically they're grown. Slavery, racist oppression, homophobia—they haunt Beatrice's South. But ignoring what we know about the past, trying to forget, is not an option. "Every day she wanted to/ forget something she'd learned about the house, the fields,/ the lopped cedar posts propping the scuppemong arbor,/ the fallen grapes fermenting on the ground." The closest she gets to an answer? "Stay conscious, a voice said. Can't do nothing if you don't/ stay conscious. ...// But every time, every damn time, she walked/ into this A&P to get groceries, she had to decide/ not to be like her father." Life in the Beatrice's South creates one dilemma of memory after another—the ghosts of Hiroshima show up in "Strange Flesh"; sharecroppers' lives are the topic of "A Cold Not the Opposite of Life"; "Shades" tells of how the stories of African tribes arise in her mind while she's teaching. But the urban North provides no respite from injustice, just different subjects—factory workers, engage Chat | Personals | News | Travel | Entertainment | People rfc PlanetOut.com www.planetout.com | AOL Keyword: PlanetOut ^n93ge "> enjoy MINNIE BRUCE PRATT \ V^alking Bach Up^ Depot Street "■§•*»» v' miners, evil landlords, even the sweatshop malady of the '90s, carpal funnel syndrome. These poems, some of which are almost two decades old, are a cycle that tells the story Pratt's personal political evolution. They are tough, vigorous poems, full of long lines of blank verse that ache to convey the painful truths people try to forget. Technically, they are ambitious, using italic and indentation to denote shifts in time, narration and perspective. in tone, you'll find a fascinating combination of moral certainty and personal ambiguity, a complex perspective that feels very familiar-a sort of "I know what's wrong here, but where can I find something that's right?" that speaks directly to the soul's Southern queemess. In the final poem, "The Other Side,'' Beatrice meets a mysterious figure at a drag bar who challenges that personal ambiguity—"What kind of woman/ are you? Stand here. Answer/.... Answer me and live." Since Pratt's partner is transgendered activist Leslie Feinberg, the ironic ending for this book of poems is Beatrice finding solace when she accepts the challenge to make the political even more ferociously personal in her life. As they leave together—"Into the rain- streaked street of night, the yellow leaves fallen/ like golden scars on black asphalt, they walk out their answer/ to the riddle, the woman who is not a man, the woman who is not/ a woman, following the yellow drift like fire around the corner"-you can imagine the thunderclap that follows when love strikes in someone's poetic world. VI H v Ur Mi Walking Back Up Depot Street by Minnie Bruce Pratt University of Pittsburgh Press, ■- What your neighbors are reading . . . 1 Men on Men 2000 ed. by David Bergman, $12.95 2 Cybereocket 2000 by Gaynet Directories, $9.95 3 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11.95 4 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 5 Don't Get Me Started by Kate Clinton, $14 6 Outfoxed by Rita Mae Brown, $24 7 The Hours by Michael Cunningham, $13 8 The Talented Mt Ripley by Patricia Highsmith, $13 9 Welcome to World, Baby Girl! by Fannie Flagg, $7.50 10 Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Felice Newman, $21.95 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORE St CAFE 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 1 Chop Suey Club by Bruce Weber, $60 2 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11.95 3 Sensual Men by Bruno Gmunder, $29.95 4 Best Gay Erotica 2000 ed. by Richard Labonte, $14.95 5 Innuendo by R.D. Zimmerman, $21.95 6 Best Lesbian Erotica 2000 ed. by Tristan Taormino, $14.95 7 Down From the Dog Star by Daniel Glover, $26.95 8 Girls Will Be Girls by Leslea Newman, $12.95 9 Baby Precious Always Shines ed. by Hay Turner, $17.95 10 The Woman Who Rode to the Moon by Bett Reece Johnson, $12.95 JLOBO 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 1 _j ......I
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