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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 016. 2000-07-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-07-01). Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5141

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 016, 2000-07-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date July 1, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME all* about t, cilmeclcwcir Highly lauded gay filmmaker bears the whip of self-criticism that comes with the gift of talent Film-goers should worry less about his sexuality and more about the content of his films, director Pedro Almodovar said. by EARL DITTMAN For all intents and purposes, gay Spanish director Pedro Almodovar should be in the best of spirits: his 13th feature-length film, "All About My Mother" has been winning critical acclaim the world over. Better still, it has been selected as Spain's official entry for Best Foreign Film at this year's Academy Awards. But at this moment, Almodovar is a bit perturbed. He has spent most of the day talking to dozens of American journalists, and it appears the majority of them are more interested in discussing his sexuality than the making of "All About My Mother." "What is this American phobia with people's sexual preference?" Almodovar asked in Spanish, speaking through an interpreter. "Do journalists ask straight directors about their sex life before talking about their movies? I find the questions about me being gay or straight very irritating. It's not like I've ever tried to hide my sexuality, so why is it so important to talk about?" Surely, an artist who has made such bold and sexually provocative films like "Law Of Desire," "Women On the Verge of A Nervous Breakdown" and "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!" should expect such questions. American critics and movie-goers simply aren't used to seeing motion pictures with transvestites, gay men and lesbians as lead characters in box office smashes, and has been done in Almodovar's native Spain. "In a way, you're right," he agreed. "I guess I just don't want my sexuality to take away from what is clearly more important—my films. What I do in my personal life should not enter into the equation. My movies should stand on their own without having me to carry along as baggage." > Continued on page 17 (UU Patricia Highsmith, wary of being labeled a lesbian writer, is the force behind the popular movie The Talented Mr. Ripley' by GERALD BARTELL "Sissy!" The word stings Tom Ripley, protagonist of Patricia Highsmith's novel, "The Talented Mr. Ripley." So does the taunt from Dickie Greenleaf, the man Tom loves, that Tom is "queer." The lashes fester until Tom, in a moment Highsmith loads with blatant Freudian symbolism, lifts an oai resting between his legs and smashes Dickie's skull. Tom Ripley, closeted gay sociopath, has plenty of com pany among the other characters in Highsmith's dark world. There's cagey Bruno Anthony in "Strangers on a Train," a murdering psychopath, an alien to his father, a close friend to his mother. She and Bruno sail on "The Fairy Prince" after Bruno strangles the wife of a man he finds attractive. And there's Elsie in "Found in the Street," bludgeoned to death by a jealous former girlfriend of Elsie's female lover. "Highsmith was one of the most closeted and homo- >- Continued on page 18 Patricia Highsmith, concerned about being viewed as a lesbian writer, used the pseudonym Claire Morgan when writing The Price ol Salt,' a novel about a woman who falls in love with a married woman.
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