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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 001. 2000-07-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5126.

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(2000-07-01). Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5126

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000 - File 001, 2000-07-01, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/5155/show/5126.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1002, January 7, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date July 1, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Sidney Abbott, who is HIV-positive, won her 1998 Supreme Court case over her dentist's refusal to treat her, but AIDS advocates say that rul ing is in jeopardy if the court turns down an appeal filed by Alabama inmates with HIV. Page 2 Highly lauded gay Spanish fi lmmaker Pedro Almodovar talks little of his sexuality, but much about his new film 'All About Mother: which is already garnering critical acclaim. Page 15 ISSUE 1002 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. JANUARY 7, 2000 Conservatives ask 'Who cries for Jesse?' The rape and murder of a 13-year-old boy, allegedly by two gay Arkansas men, has anti-gay groups crying 'double standard' by LAURA BROWN Matthew Shepard, 21, was taken from a bar by two men, brutally beaten and left tied to a fence to die because he was gay, police say. Jesse Dirkhismg, 13, was tied up and brutally raped until he suffocated on his own underwear, police say by a gay couple engaging in a bondage-type sex act. What's the difference between these two s tories of tragic deaths? Nothing or everything, depending on whom you ask. For numerous gay rights opponents-from the Family Re~earch Council to Americans for Truth About I lomosexu.ility to white supremacist David Duke­Dirkhising's death has become the new cause celebre. That Shepard's death drew far more national media atten­tion than Dirkhising's, they claim, is proof positive that mainstream mt•d1a 1s so beholden to gays, and so riddled with g.iy reporters, that it is afraid or unwilling to report on crimes committed by gays. "Ihe n.1tional media, following the lead of homosexual activists, m.1de Matthew Shepard a houst•hold name for most Amenc.ins," said Peter LaBarbera, president of Americans For Truth About Homosexuality, .in orgamz.1tion that believes gay people c.in change their sexu.:il orit•ntation. "But wh.1t about young Jesse?," l.aBarbera asked. "ls his death at the hands of two sadistic homosexuals less news­worth} than Shepard's al the hands of two crut•I hell'rosex­uals7" Yet .Kwrding to several national gay org.ini1.ations, the outcry O\'t'r Dirkh1smg's death has more to do with attempts to br.ind homosl'Xuals as pedophiles, and link the issm•s in both thl' m.11nstrl·,1m ml•d1a and public opinion, thJn real concern owr thl' child's murder "If the rl'11g1ous nght wants to turn this mto a rcfl'rendum on whether !PY people arc sadistic murderers, the media should be commended on this particul,u case," said Wayne llesen, spokesm,rn for the Human Rights Campaign, a Washington-b,l'l'd gay lobby. "They didn't on•m•act, they sa\\ through the attempt to demo1111e gav pl·ople, and this is actually one of those mstanct'S whl•re thl'Y got 1t nght," he said Gay groups blamed l.1B.1rbl'r,1 could m>t bl' reached for furthl'r comment by prt•ss time. But in otlwr prL>ss rl'le.N.~ posll'd on his organi1A1tion's web-sill', lw Wl'llt l'Vl'n further, blJming l IRC and .mother of the nati1m's J,1rgl·st g.1y nghts groups for allegedly contributing to D1rkh1sing's dl•.1th. "Tlwrl' is a mort• plausible link behvl'en 'gay' advocacy in. lltullons and )l'Ssl"s murder than betWl'l'n Shl•pard's mur­der and 1digious fot• of homosexuality," thl• group cl.1ims, noting that "many reporters and pundit rqJe,1tl'd the absurd cl.um bv homosexual activist that the public d1 courst' of pro- Joshua Brown, 22, reportedly told poli<e he and Jesse Dirkhising were ' just playing a game,' but when/olice arrived at Brown's apartment, they found the 13-year-ol naked and not breathing. family groups ... such as a series of ex-gay newspaper ads con­tributed to Shepard's murder by creating an l'n\'ironment that encourages anti-homo~xual violence." "All across America, gay newspapers and bars and organ­izations not only tolerate sadistic sex but promote it," LaBarbera said. "In fact, on the very day of Dirkhismg's death, two leading homosexual groups, thl• Human Rights Campaign and the 'ational Gay & Lesbian Task Force, were manning booths at a sadistic sex fair in San Francisco that celebrated bondage, human floggings and the same 'S&M' techni:iues that led to the death of young Jesse." Investigators say Dirkhising died of "positional asphyxia" after being bound, gagged, and repeatedly sodomized with ob1ccts mcludmg food (See story, Page 13) :- Continued on Page 12 Rallying against Exxon Mobil Organizers of a rally against the Texas-based oil company want customers to destroy their credit cards in protest of a recent decision to end domestic partner benefits and policies specifically protecting its gay employees by GIP PLASTER Organizers hope hundreds of Houston gay men and lesbians will rally in a city park later th!S month to protest the employment poliaes of newly formed Exxon Mobil Corp The compan}~ formed by the merger of Exxon and Mobil m November, retamed Exxon's employment pohaes and benefits and in the proce%, dumped the policiL'S of Mobil, which specifically protected gay men and le-.b1ans from employment discrimination and proVJded domesttc partner benefits. An orgaruzer of the rally hopes the e\ent, planned for Jan. 28, will $end a sirong message to the company, despite the fact that Exxon Mobil's headquarters are more than 250 miles away. "We do not appreaate that the company took some­thrng away that was already in ex1Stence," said 0Jn Di Donato, onl' of the gay activists orgamzmg the rally. DiD<inato wanb consumers to publicly destroy their Exxon and Mobil credit cards and provide rally organizers with receipts showing that they purcha.e products from Exxon Mobil competitors because of the company's change in policies The former Exxon Corp. has long mamtamed that it does not di,cnmmate ba~d on sexual onentation. But the company has refused efforts to mdude sexual ori­l'ntat1on m its nondisrnminahon policy. The company instead mdudes only the categones required by foderal law But Mobil, before the merger, included sexual ori­entation m its nondiscrimination policy and offered domestic partner benefits. The two companies merged as a re..,ult of Exxon acquinng Mobil, and the new company is governed by E xon's rules Former Mobil employees who already rece1\'e :- Continued on Page 11 2 NEWS Around the South . . . . . . • . • • ... .. ... . 5 B~h oide quits over gay group flop ... . .. . 5 Baseboll commish orders lest for Rocker .. . . 5 Trio! set for Saturday in soldier killing .. ... . 5 Orlando goy center reodying . . ..... . ... . 5 Police Beot . . . . • . .. . • .. • • ••.. 6 Al:cused killer relents lo police ...••..•... 6 Court orders new trial for killer . • . • . . 6 DP documents may hove been stolen . . . . . . 6 Phelps' son receives suspended sentence .• . 6 Bias commission calls for gay protections . •. . 6 Around the Nation . . . . .. . . ......... . .7 Both Democrats endorse litmus test on gays 7 McCain meets gay soldier but stands firm .. .7 Goy couples file claim seeking benefits .... .7 Goy students seek ruling against schools . . • 7 Wes! Hollywood rejects condom pion ...... .7 Quote unquote . . . . . . . . . • ...... I 0 CMd died during bondage, rape •. . ... . . 13 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • ..... 13 VOICES & ECHOES Editonal: The evollllion of the gay stalker .. 8 Shelton: Equality in the new millennium .•.. 9 Letters ........................... . 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU All Abolll AlmodOvar ................ • 15 'An absolute original' • . .. • • ..• . .. •• .. 15 Out in Print: 'Depot Street' . ..•..... . ... 16 Bestsellers .. • • • • .. . . . ........... 16 Eating Out: This is no Big Mac . .•.... .... 19 Flexology: Y2K groove . • . . . . • . .. 20 Occasions • . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • • . . . .22 Community Colendor . • . . . . . . . • • . . .23 My Stars! . . . . . . . . . • • . . . . . . • . • • •. . 25 DIRECTORY . .. . . • .. . .. • . • • .. . .. • • .24 CLASSIFIEDS .......•................••. 26 CARMART • • • • • • • ••••••.• . •••••• . 27 Issue 1002 Ae material 111 Housron Voice IS protected by looeral copyrighl law an<l may not be repro· dui:ed without the v.ntten consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers ptic.t.igraphers, wnters and cartoonists pub· lished herein is neither nterred or 1mpliad The appearance of names or ptctorial repre· sentatlon does not necessaoly indicate the sexual onentat10n of !hat person or persons Houst()o VolGe accepts unsotlcited edilorial marartal but cannot take respons1bd1ty for its return The editor reserves the nght lo accep1, reJecl or ed1I any subllllsslOn All nghts revert 10 authors upon pubhca!iOn. Gu defines for lreerance conrriburors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529--8490 NEWS JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Clinton opposes inmate suit claiming AIDS bias WASHINGTO'.\J-The Clinton adminis­tration has asked the U.S. Supreme Court not to hear the appeal of an AIDS discrimi­nation case involving HIV-positive inmates in the Alabama prison system, the New York Times reported Jan. 3. The ruling in the case, Davis v. Hopper, by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals approves a pmon policy that denies pris­oners \\1th HIV access to more than 70 edu­cational, recreational and religious senices and programs. The lower court dectsion found the "s1g­ruficant nsk" that the HIV-positive prison­ers present to the general prison population overrode the prov1s1ons of the federal Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, which requires a "reasonable accommoda- ~ tion" for HIV-positive prisoners. g The decision, if left intact, would affect ~ hundreds of prisoners in the Alabama < prison system, denying them access to ~ work-release programs that can shorten § their prison sentence. The justices will ..­decide this month whether to hear the appeal on the case, which has been in the court system for almost 15 years A coalition made up of public health organr:u1hons and AIDS specialists is sup­porting the appeal by the Alabama prison­ers, arguing that prison officials relied on "subjective fear and stigma" rather than an objechve assessment of the scientific risk involved in the level of exposure the pris­oners would have with each other. Sidney Abbott, who is HIV-positive, won her 1998 Supreme Court case over her dentist's refusal to treat her, but AIDS advocates say that ruling is in jeopardy if the court takes the Clinton administration's advice and turns down an appeal filed by Alabama inmates with HIV. They pointed out that the Supreme Court insisted in its first look at AIDS discrimina­tion, in the 1998 case of Brogdon v. Abbott, that fear and stigma did not override a per­son's rights under federal disability law. In that case, a suit by an HIV-positive woman against a dentist who refused to treat her in hts office, the court said the assessment of "51gn1ficant risk" should be made in light of the views of public health iluthonties, based on "objective, scientific information." A brief supporting the inmates filed by the Llmbda Legal Defense & Education Fund Jrgued that the appei!ls courts ignored the 1998 ruling by relying on a the­oretical risk of tr;msmission without regard to the particular circumstances. That Jpproach, the brief said, "threatens to justi-fy virtually any discrimination against per­sons with HIV in employment, health care, education, and every other aspect of com­munity life" Currently, Alabama, Mississippi and South Carolina segregate HIV-positive inmates. The federal prison system, on the other hand, evaluates inmates individual­ly and decides, on the basis of their histo­ry and psychological profile, whether to exclude them from particular activities, as do most other states. The Clinton Justice Department filed its brief in response to a request from the Supreme Court. The appeals court's ruling "may well be overbroad," Seth P. Waxman, Clinton's solicitor general, told the ius­tices, because "the court should have care­fully examined the circumstances and effect" of participation of inmates in the programs. Such an examination, Waxman's filing acknowledges, might have shown that there was no danger in permitting HIV­positive inmates participate in activities like religious services, data processing In other AIDS-related news: • The Fulton County, Ga. Commission agreed Wednesday to improve the medical cJre given to county jail inmates who have the virus that causes AIDS. A federal judge in April ordered the Fulton County Jail to provide adequate health care to the inmates after eight Hl\'-positive prisoners filed a lawsuit claiming they received substan­dard care. Sheriff Jacquelyn Barrett said it will cost the county an additional $250,000 a year to implement the settlement agree­ment. U 5. District Court Judge ~arvin Shoob must approve the agreement, which calls for the county to hire an on-site doctor and nur~e to provide care to inmates with AIDS; continue providing needed medicine to inmates who were receiving treatment before they were jailed; develop a dis­charge plan to ensure inmates get contin­ued care following their release. • The American Civil Liberties Union must respond to allegations its attorneys may have rewarded inmates who sided with them in an escalating dispute over who should rep resent HIV-infected inmates at the state penitentiary in Aberdeen, Miss U.S Magistrate Jerry A. Davis issued the order Wednesday after prison rights lawyer Ron Welch, who has represented the inmates at the Parchman prison, claimed in documents that ACLU/Mississippi officials had deposited funds in an inmate's account shortly after classes, and testing for high school equiv­alency diplomas. Nonetheless, the administration argued, there was no need for the court to take the CilSe because the appeals court's opinion, even if questionable in the particulars, was generally correct in deferring to Alabama prison officials the assessment of the risk presented by "the violence that is an inescapable part of prison life." In defending its policy, Alabama points to a much lower rate of HIV transmission in its prison population than in states that do not segregate infected inmates, the limes reported. The state told the court that over eight years, out of 30,000 inmates who did not have HIV when they entered pnson, only two became infected while in pnson. The Supreme Court's decision on whether to take this case may depend on whether the justices see implications beyond the prison context and on the extent of their concern about whether their prior ruling in the 1998 dental patient case has provided sufficient guidance to the lower courts. the prisoner signed a petition to have Welch removed as his lawyer. Welch had denied claims that he pro­vided inadequate counsel. He said he reached an agreement with prison officia ls to provide appropriate treatment for inmates. In July, Davis ruled in favor of Welch, who has represented the I llV infect­ed class of prisoners since 1990. The issue is pending before a federal appeals court in New Orleans. Davis agreed with the ACLU that the Department of Corrections was providing inadequate, outdated trea tment for the HIV-infected inmates. I le ordered improved medical treatment and frequent status reports to the court. - The Associated Press HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 llllJJ The first and only pill dinically proven to treat hair loss in men. PROPECIA IS a med1Cill breakthrough-the first pill that effectlllely treats male pattern hair loss on the vertex (at top of head) and antenor mid-SCillp area By aU measures. the cll!IC.al resi..«s of PROPECIA 11 men are inpres.We:* • 831111 mainrained their hair based on hair count (vs 28% wrth placebo). • 66'" had V1S1ble regrowth as rated by independent dennatologlS1s (vs. 7'111 wrth placebo). • 80\b were rated as 1mprO'Jed by dinical doctors (vs. 47'111 with placebo). • Most men reported an 111C1ease ITT the amount of hal", a decrease ITT hair loss, and mprOllEITlellt in appearance. •Based on vertex studies at 24 months of men 18 to 41 with mild to moderate hair loss. Scientists have recently d&overed that men wrth male pattern hall loss have an ooeased level of DHT Ul their scclps. PROPECIA blocks the formation of DHT and, ui tlus way, appears to interrupt a key factor in the development of inherited male pattern hair loss 111 meri. lmporrantly, PROPECIA helps grow natural hair- not Just peach fuzz and IS as convenient to t.Jke as a vrt.Jmin: one pill a day Only a doctor Ciln determine d PROPECIA IS nght for you. PROPECIA IS for men only. Further, women who are or may potentlcllly be pregnant mu'it not w PROPECIA and should not handle crushed or broken t.Jblets beCilw of the nsk of a !>peclfK kind of birth defect (See accornpany111g Patient lnforrnallon for det.J1h.) PROPECIA t.Jblets are coated and will prevent cont.Jct with the actllle 111gredient dunng normal handling. tjMERCK You may need to rake PROPECIA daily for three months or more to see visible results. PROPECIA may not regrow aH your hair. And if you stop usmg tlus product, you will grarualJy lose the hair you have gained. There IS not sufflOerlt evidence that PROPECIA wons for recessK>n at the temporal areas. ff you haven't seen results after 12 rnonths of using PROPECIA, further treatment IS unlikely to be of benefrt. Like all prescnption products. PROPECIA may cause side effects. A very small number of men expenenced certain side effects, such as less desire for sex, difficulty in ach1e11mg an erection, and a decrease in the amount of semen. Each of these Side effects occurred in less than 2% of men. These Side effects were reversible and went irW8'f ui men who stopped raking PROPECIA. Se st.t talllhls te ywr Meter. And stop thmkmg further hair loss IS 1nevrtable ~AU 1-888-806-3725 or visrt our website at www propeoa.com today to rece111e detailed product information, mdudmg dimcal "before and afte( photographs. Please read the next page for additional information about PROPECIA. flropecla• (finasteride) Helping make hair loss history~ 3 4 r>ropec1a· , (finasteride) Tablets Patient lnfonnation about PROPECIA' (Pro-pee-sha) Genenc name. finastende (fin·AS·tur-eyedl PROPECIA" is for use by MEN ONLY. Pie•• rwed lhi1 ~ ...,_, YH ltlrt r..klnf PftOP(C&A AIM, reed ... ~ Mclud9d wiCh PROP£CIA 11ch 11mt YoU renew.,... insenciaan.J1811" case •""1hno M1 c~ ~. hi INft9I. din notllh !:he pllcaof ureflfd11cu110M Mm ¥Ollf doctor You lftd -;our Muir lflcalld *'ens P«OPEQA 'lll'tlen you art~ 'ffltl IDl6c:don lftd It rt;Utar checkups_ Wllat b PllOl'fCIA aed for? PROPEC1A IS .rsed fot the b'Utmenl al male patWn *km: on lht vettex Ind the lntenor mid·aealp lttl PllOPECIA" tw use by MEN ONLY and - NOT lie used lly """"'"or Cllildren. - .. --llalrlou? Mala pattern taair loss .s a common condition .. which men axpe:nenct rh.wng of the ha r on Iha 1catp Ottm. lhis rllSu!!s., • roclditHj ba"11ne •nd/or boldmg on the 1DP of Ille hell! 11me changes typicolly bogtn gr•wllv ., men lll!!oirllls. 0oaors brine lnl1- pattlm hi kJa II dUI lg heredity Ind II d•pmcfent an honnona effects Ooctorl refc to lflll rypt of hllf loll IS lndroQfnRC ak>pt'11 lesalboldlolcal- For 12 monlhs doctors studied over 1800 men •;ed II to 'I with to moderate amounts of ongoing hatt ms All mtn. wheUler recemng PROPECIA or plactbO (a pill cont.aRng no medic:ationJ were grven 1 medlcattd shampoo IN""'"V•M Tiile,.... Shompooi Of these mon, ·-"""'""' 1200 With lwr loss at the lap ol lhe head wt•• S!ud llll for an "'-1Jona 12 months.. In g1n1r1l men wtio took PROPEClA rnamtimtd or l'lcrtased Iha number of m1blt scalp ha rs 1rld notietd unptOY1m1m'" tht r h1ir 11 lhe first Yllf. witt't. the lfftct m1ntaned11'1dle11concl ywar Ha counts 11"1 men who did 110t t1k1 PROPECIA continued to d1cr11st In ... study, patenlS,.... queslioned on lhl gr11W111 of body bait PllOl'EtlA dod ""'-'° aflect bait., pllces­lhln lhl ....,,_ WIU l't10P£CIA wwf< lat me? For most men PROPECIA increases lhl number of sc1lp hi n. he ping to fill 11'1 dUn or balding antes al the a:alp Men tak:og PROPfCIA noted • l'-"G of ha• loss dumg two yun of USI Although rntJ!!s will wary. genenlly you will OOI be 1bla IO a-l!>ek 1 ol lhl Ila• you llavt lost Thero os not suff>C!et!l evidenco lhol PROPfCIA works in Use naunem: al rtctdcng tiaitfint In die tampol'll ar11 an both sidn of the had. Ma:Je pltt8m hair loss occurs ;rldu1ly0Ytr bme On average. healthy hatr grows only about half 1n inch HCh mon#I. Tbetwhn, a will take 11m1 t.o IH any effect You ,.... need m take PROPfCIA d>i!y lat dne momhs 01 _. beforo you an• bend!~ taking PROPECIA PROPfCIA can only wort -lh• long tann ii you c-. tlk"'V ._ Uthe drug hn llOl wortllll for you In """" _...__osunllkelymlleolbendtHyoullOptak"'!IPROPfCIA.vouwill olyloulh1bairyou-gamedwdtinllmomhscl- U11tmeftl.Youll>oulddise .... lhil __ --ltoltel'llOPfCIA! ---·- • Tah one ta~ by JnOUU'l 11ch day • You may take PROPEQA wtth or wtthoul: food. • I you lorgtt IO uke PROPECIA. do md tah an exira sabttt. Just take U.. next tablet as usual PRO PECA wi mn won flstar or better if you take c more lhan once 1 c1ay JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE --4 l!fi tab PROPfCIA! • PROPEClA as for d11 treatment of male p1ttem '111r Ion tn MEN ONLY and shoufd not be taken by women or children. • Anyone after; c to 1ny of the engredlenls. A wamu'I 1bout PROP£CIA end pregn1ncy • WOllttn who lrt or may potentially rte prtgn1nt --not ... PROPECIA - should.,. haodle crushed er bro!<'" tabllll al PROPfCIA. W 1~wM11 Pf91Mnl w1dt a •le bllby Hsorbs lhl ld1wt ingt9d1tftC 1n PROPf.CIA. erther by sw1llowint or...,.... 1N skin. d:...., ca .. ~lit•• of 1 Nie Nlry'1 M• «ti• M 1 woman who it preg,,_. CON111nto con· act wrdli .. 1Cb¥1 ~*" Mt PROPEaA. 1 doctor lhollW IN CM1UltM PROPECtA INiets.,. cHted and will prev..c co.laCt wrdl .. lctift i..-li ... MUii ..... 1 "-«•"'" ,,mded .... 1hl tablets 111 Mt..,....,. or crusMcf Mat.,. die~ side eflecta Ill PROPfClA? Lb al prac"""°" produota, PROPfCIA moy ..... """ eftects. In cirucal ll!ldies. llde eftll<U kom PROPECIA were UftCOll'l!O"I and did na1: effetl most men. A small...,._, at"*' pPtnlnCtd certain HXIJ81 side effects. These men reOQtted one or more of the tolowing ltss desn for•~ dltficutly 1n achihng an IHCtJOn, •nd. 1 decr11se m the 1maunt of nmen Each Gf 1hese side effects occurrtd in lelS 1han r4 at men.. These side effects went away 1n men who ~ tabig PROPECIA. lheyalso~., most rnon wllo conti1'1ued takirig PROPECIA In generaf use, the followi'1g have blln reported intrtquendy a rgic: r11ct10ns includirNil rash, itehing. twn and IWtlfing of lhl ips ind face, problems wU:tt IJICulnon; brHst ttnamess ind erUrgement;. and relbQlbr pain Tell -doctor promptly abcxal!lest or ony-......,., ,..,. eflocos • PROPECIA ca11ftect 1111"4 Int ctllH PSA lPTat .. e·S,.cilc Anti ... ! tor the "'""'"I If prosi.te cancer n yCMt a.....e a PSA test llOM. JCMI shoutd tell yow doctor tbt yo411re i.1111'1 PROPECIA. ""'"'' ud llandl•Of ~HP PROPECIA 111 the angina! canwner and htp the contamer cloud St0t1 •in 1 dry piece 11 room tempel'lturt PROPECIA ublets 1re co.fed ind will preveltl comet wim ~11et1n ingrH1ent dunng nonn1I Undl1n9. provided ltlat the tablets 1re llOI broken or crvshed Oo not QN8 your PROPECIA tablets to 1nyone tfse It has been pr11cribed only tor you Keep PROPECIA ind an medicenons out of the reach of chitdren. THIS LEAFLET PROVIOES A SUMMAFIY OF INFORMATION ABOUT PROPfCIA F AFTER READING THIS LEAFLET YOU HAVE A~ QUESTIONS OR ARE NOT SURE ABOUT ANYTHING. ASK YOUR OOC"DR. 1_1J15._,.....,.fn4rt,UIA.M T0111DPM!ffi r>ropec1a· ~I~ (finasteride) Tablets ·~11AA£RCK6CO..lnc:. ~I'd •ldamatl ol M!RCK I CO .. - ~.c.o . .-• Mute-tt'il .',a Jo-bDson 6· J obnmD '.) MERCK&CO., INC., lhr ellMe%nron. N.,111889USA -- lfl-GltlXBQ:l).f'ltP·CON JANUARY 12 30 THURSDAYS 8PM $18 FRIDAYS 8c SATURDAYS 8PM $20 SUNDAYS 6PM $18 $15 STUDENTS ALL PERFORMANCES TICKETS: 713.426.2626 3722 WASHINGTON AVENUE BETWEEN YALE & WAUGH/HEIGHTS R0°B SPECIAL OPENING NIGHT PERFORMANCE WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 12 @ 8PM CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION TO FOLLOW N As l··l·@foii.l·HkJ.i·'fM·· HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 NEWS Around the South Bush aide quits over candidate's refusal to meet with gay group AUSTIN-Diane Ravitch, a respected education historian, has quit as education adviser to Texas governor George Bush's presidential campaign because of Bush's refusal to meet with gay Republicans, the New York Times reported Dec. 29. The paper said that Ravitch told associ­ates she is resigning to protest Bush's statement during a television appearance that he would probably not meet with Log Cabin Republicans. Ravitch was assistant sec­retary of education when Bush's father was president. She declined to comment on the reason for her departure. Mindy Tucker, a spokeswoman for the Bush campaign, told the paper that Ravitch had "lx.>t:n a \"alued ad\~ser to the campaign, and Governor Bush regrets her position." Baseball commish orders psychological test for Braves pitcher NEW YORK (AP)-Baseball has ordered John Rocker to undergo psychological teshng fol­lowing his disparaging remarks about gays and minorities. The outspoken Atlanta Braves reliever will meet with doctors before commissioner Bud Selig decides whether to impose dis­cipline for Rocker's comments to Sports Il/11stmted last month. In the interview, Rocker said he would never play for a New York team because he didn't want to ride a train "next to some queer with AIDS." He also bashed immigrants and called a black teammate "a fat monkey." Rocker later apologized and said he was not a racist. "Mr. Rocker's recent remarks made to a n.itional magazine reporter were reprehensible and completely inexcusable," Selig said in a statement he released Thursday. "I am profoundly concerned about the nature of those com­ments as well as by certain other aspects of his behavior." The Major League Baseball Players As..~ociation, which tries to keep medical reports on players confidential, reacted angrily. "We did not authorize the release, nor do we necessarily agree with the characterization of the pro­cedure being discussed concerning Mr. Rocker," said Gene Orza, the union's No. 2 official. Trial set for Saturday for second Ky. soldier charged in killing roRTCAMPBELL, Ky. (AP)-Thecourt martial for a second soldier charged in a murder case that has prompted scrutiny of the military's policy towards gays is sched­uled to begin Jan. 8, the Army announced Tuesday. Spc Justin R. Fisher faces four charges in connl'ction with the July 5 beat· ing death of !'fr. Barry V\linchell. Fisher, 26, Wally and Patricia Kutteles, the mother and stepfather Pfc. Barry L Winchell, criticized 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' alter their son's commander said the policy prevented him from stopping harassment of Winchell, who was later killed. of Lincoln, Neb., is charged with participat- ~ ing as a principal to prl'meditated murder, ffi actmg as an accessory after the fact, making 1:i false statements to Army investigators and ~ obstructing thl' mvrstigation. Last month, d l'vt. C.1lvin N. Glover, 18, of Sulphur, Okla., cl was convictl'd in a court-marital of premed- a itatcd murder and sentenced to life m Si prison. Glover used a baseball bat to crush Winchl'il's skull as he slept m his cot at Fort Campbell. For wl'eks before the beating, soldiers had harassed Winchell, 21, of Kansas City, Mo., over rumors he was gay, and prosecutors said Glover was driven by anti-gay hatred. Glover never addressed the allegation that he despised gays, but his attorneys argued that Fisher goaded Glover into the attack. The death and the revelations at Glover's trial led to criticism, by gay rights groups and by Winchell's parents, of the Pentagon's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon has said the Defense Department is working on new training programs to ensure a fair enforcement of the policy on gays. Orlando gay community center ready to purchase first building ORl.ANIX}-Plans are falling in place for a gay and lesbian community ccnt<:r in Orlando, the gay nl'wspaper Watermark reported. Orlando's Gay, Lesbian & Bisexual Community Center is in the finol stages of a fund-raising blitz to obtain $200,000 for down payment on '1 spr<1wling property in the heart of Orlando's gay· friendly ViMi District. If the schrdulcd j,in. 4 closing takes place, it will mark the first time the organization will own property, instr.id of leasing. "Purchasing the building is a win/win situation," said GLBCC board president Barry Miller "PH.AG has already taken us up on our offer of space," said Miller. "fhe Orlando G,1y Chorus is interested, GALIXY (a gay and lesbian youth group) will utilize an office, and we've also offered the space to the MBA (the Metropolitan Business Associalton)." The push to raise the necessary $200,000 down payment is cur­rently underway. As of Dec. 9, GLBCC had raised $125,000. -From staff and wire reports I you are seriously ill, money ~ho ldri't n~ an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. M. 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Receive and Enjoy c{jad/s,; ~tWniit c£<WR/ Worship Services: Sundays 9am & 11an'I Wednesaays ?pm Alf programs are free and open to the community! 5 6 &:TR01 'GEST IDEAS have always been the simplest ones. The ones that grow from vision. At Chase Texas, it is our vision to manage diversity as we would any other strategic resource. vVe have made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know that bringing collective experiences and skills to the table enable, us to do things that none of us could do alo ne. A imple idea that inspires great rewards. OCHASE The right relationship is everything.™ Member FDIC NEWS JANUARY 7, 2000 •HOUSTON VOICE Police Beat Scottish man accused of murder, dismembennent tu'ns himself in GLASGOW-Britain's most wanted man, William Beggs, surrendered to police in Holland, the Glasgow Daily Record & Sunday Mnil reported Dec. '19. The fugitive was being sought over the killing of teenager Barry Wallace, whose di~membered limbs were found in Loch Lomond. Beggs, accomp.i.nied by a Dutch la~er, turned himself in to police in Amsterdam after almost two weeks on the run, but may now oppose extradition proc:a-dings. Beggs evaded police for 12 days before turning himself in. Court orders new trial for Pa. man convicted of killing roommate PITISBURGH-A man convicted last year of the strangulabon and bcabng death of his roommate, has been granted a new tnal, the Pittsburgh Post Gazelle reported Dt.~. '19. A state Supcnor Court panel this week ruled that a jury should have been allowed to hear that the vic­tim, Gregory Schumacher, 46, had a criminal R'Cord that included a conviction for a violent knife attack. Robert Irgang, 33, told police that Schumacher had made advances toward him on April 26, 1997. lrgang said that he had been .i.sleep when Schumacher awakenl'<i him by touching his leg, and an altercation ensul'<i. An autopsy showed that Schumacher died after being struck 20 times with a skillet. lrgang was convicted of third-degree murder, and Judge Raymond A Novak sentenced him to 15 to 40 year.. in prison. lrgang had argued at trial that the attack was in self-defense, and produced evidence that Schumacher had been involved in a bar fight about five years before and had brandished a knife. The three-judge Superior Court panel ruled that the trial court had been bound to give the 1ury an instruction that it consider whether Schumacher might have been the aggre;sor. D.C. domestic partnership documents may have been stolen WASHINGTON, D.C.-More than 100 1words for Washington, D.C:s domestic partner­ship registry have been missing since July, the Waslrington Blade reported Dec. 31. Director of the DC. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs Lloyd Jordan said his staff informed the D.C. Inspector General's office of the missing documents-comprising all the records since the registry was implemented in October 1992-and that an investigation is under way to find out what happened to them. "We foci there may have been a theft," Jordan said. Jordan said that the documents were found in a state of disarray in June, and he instructed people in his office to file the documents properly. A restriction passed by the Republican· controlled Con~ forbade Jordan's department from spending any money on the domestic partnership statute. Jordan added that other rL'Cent developments at DCRA that may be related to the missing domestic partner registration documents, declining to elaborate. I !is office b also dealing with a discrimination charge by Robert "Jim" Fagclson, 52, a gay man who was fLTed in November 1998. Phelps' son receives suspended jail sentence for slur TOPEKA, Kan. (AP)-Anti-homoscxual picketer Jonathan Phelps has received a suspend· ed pil sentence for shouting a slur at a woman in 1995. District Judge Jack Lively sentenced Phelps Dec. 28 to 30 days in jail but suspcnMd the j.111 term. Phelps is the son of FTl'<i Phelps, the notoriously anti-gay minister of Westboro Baptist Church who maintain.-; a web-site called www.godhat~fags.com. Lively placed Phelps on prob.i.tion for one year and ordered him to perform 40 hours of community service. I le also must pay a $250 fine, as well as court and wit· ness fees of $2.380. Phelps' attorney immediately appealed the conviction for disorderly con· duct, a misdemeanor. A jury convicted Phelps May 11 of disorderly conduct related to an inCJ· dent on Aug. 5, 1995. Teresa Roles, of Bellingham, Wash., and her sister, I lope Goodman, were riding in a vehicle that day when they stoppt.>d to let Phelps and his family cross the strec>t. After reading Phelps' picket sign, which said God hates gays, Roles told Phelps, "I late 1s not a family value." Roles said Phelps scrcamed a slur at her, then continued yelling at hC'r. Ill. governor's bias commission recommends protection for gays SPRINGFIELD, Ill.-Ilhno1s Gov. George Ryan's Commission on Discrimination and I late Cnmes will rec­ommend non-dL<;<:rimination legislation that indudes "sexual onentation" as an enumerated protected category, the gay newspaper Out/mes reported. "Changing Headlines: Build mg TolC'rance Ul the Land of Uncoln" b a 30-page report detailing respollSC> to a variety of bias­motivated <1chons in the state. The nC'arly 40-mC'mber comm1ssmn included four gay members and Dorothy l la1dys·llolm<1n, mother of slam gay sailor Allen Schindler. The report, issued OC'c. 15, also recommended diversity and SC'nsitivity training within the mminal jus­tice system, non-disclosure of names for v1chms of h<1tc cnmes, and support groups for teen gays and their fami­lies. The section dC'aling with I !IV and AIDS recommend· ed. among other things, mandatrd training for all local health departments on HIV confidentiality issues. - From staff and wire rqxJrts A pmel appomted by ~ Gov. George Ry111 11115 reawwled ~ legislatioa md confidmtia&ty for the Yirtillls of hate ainles. HOUSTON VOICE •JANUARY 7, 2000 NEWS Around the Nation Both Demoaats endorse litmus test on gays for military brass DUR! IAM, i .H.-Vice Presidrnt Al Gore and his Democratic opponent, Bill Bradley, said Wednesday that if they were elected president they would require their appointees to the Joint Chiefs of Staff to fully support allow­ing gays to serve openly in the military, the New York Times reported. Although both candidates had previously opposed the Ointon administration's "don't a~k. don't tell" policy, their comments in the fourth Democratic debate of the pri­mary season were a strikingly forceful embraC'e of gay rights. ~ Their rt'marks came in response to a question of whether thl'}' ~ would support a "litmus test" on gays in the military in nom- ~ inatmg members of the Joint Chids. Gore was the more ::; expansive, saying he wanted to make the same sw~ping ~ changes toward allowing gays to serve openly in the military -' that i'TL'Sidcnt f larry S. Truman made toward racially inte- V°Ke President Al Gore said grating the armed forces. Bradley said simply that the com- during a presidential debate mander in chief is.~ued orders and soldiers followed them. Wednesday with Bill Bradley Retired members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and other military that he would support a fitmus experts warned Wednesday that subjecting future members test on gays in the mifitary in to a litmus test would hurt the armed services. selecting the Joint Chiefs. McCain meets gay soldier but stands firm on 'Don't Ask' policy WAS! llNGTON-An openly gay Army reservist was unable to convince his gcnator and hero, John McCain, that he should quit supporting the "Don't Ask, Don't Telln policy, the ArlZOna Republic reported Dec. 30. Steve May, who is facing a possible Army discharge, said aftl'I' a private ml'Cting with McCain that he's not sure the GOP presidential candidate fully understands the consequences of the policy. ulike most Americans, I don't know that John McCain has had the opportunity to think critically about this policy since it was implemented," said May, a Republican state representative from Phoenix. May publicly disclosed that he was gay after he was honorably discharged in 1995, then found himself recalled in e;irly 1999 dunng the war in Kosovo. Now, the Army is moving ahead with plans to discharge May despite stellar performance ratings. Gay couples file claim against Wash. state seeking benefits OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP)-Two gay couples have filed a claim against the state of Washington dem;inding that medical insurance coverage be given to same-sex domestic partners of state employees. Lawyers for the 19,®member Washington Federation of State Employre> filed the d;iim against the 1 lcalth Care Authority, a pren'quisite to a lawsuit, earlier this month. The cou­ples are asking for financial damages, but the real gool is to pressure the state into offering the benefits, said F.d Younglove, a lawyer representing the federation. "We're going to do everything we can to persuade them to change their policy." But lawyl'rS for the state said the L<i.,ue is one of policy th.1t belongs before the legislature. Gary l. Christm..;on, administrator for the Health Care Authority, met with Younglove and union officials Dec. 28 to discuss the matter. Gay students seek ruling against Orange County school district ORANGE COUNTY, Calif.-Attorneys askrd a frdcrakourt judge to issue a prehmmary injunction allowing a g.iy-support club to begin mt'ding at El Modena High School, the Orange County Reg1slrr n'portl'<I !JL'C.. 30. The Orange Unified school board voted unanimously 0..'C. 7 to deny students' rL'quest to form a Gay Straight Alliance club. lhe students arc suing to over­turn the dcasion. If the injunction is granted, it will allow the dub to meet pending the suit's outcome. "We believe it 15 clear the studenl~ arc likely to prevad in their lawswt, but there is no telling how long a lawsuit will take," said David Codell, an attorney representing two El Modena students, Anthony Colin and Heather Zetin. Schcxil trustees offered to allow the club to meet in a school cl;issroom if the students change its name and ban discussion of sex, repro­ductmn, AIDS or sexwlly transnuttcd diseases. West Hollywood rejects mandatory condom distribution law WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif (AI')-The City Council unanimously turned down a pro­posal ordering bars and nightclubs to offl'r free condoms at the door, citing anecdotal evi­dence th.it many businesses were already volunt<irily handing them out. The council on Monday night voted 5-0 to expand the voluntary distribution program that has b~n m place for eight ye<irs and <ipproved the purchase of an ;idditional 50,000 condoms for the program. After more than two hours of discussion, council members decided that forcing bars to offer condoms would create too much resistance in the city's efforts to educate peo­ple about safe sex. The AIDS Healthcare Found;ition was the driving force behind the mandatory proposal, citing it as a pubhc health issue. The found~tion, ~e n~tion's largest I llV-AIDS medical provider, hopes to get the mandatory d1stnbuhon issue on the November b;illot. "A bar does not open without beer or without a fire extinguisher. It should not open without condoms," said Michael Weinstein, the foundation's president. -From staff a11d wire rqx>rls EDITOR Join the nation's fastest growing lesbian and gay newspaper company. Houston Voice is a newspaper in the expanding WindowMedia chain, offering exciting and challenging opportunities that extend far beyond one newspaper and one city. Houston's weekly lesbian and gay newspaper seeks an aggressive, experienced, professional journalist with management background for position of editor. Applicants should be well-versed in newspaper operation, work well under deadlines and thrive in a team environ­ment. Excellent writing, copy-editing and communication skills. Proficiency with Macintosh OS, MSWord and QuarkXpress pref erred. Competitive salary and benefits. Houston Voice and WindowMedia are equal opportunity employers. Please send (no phone calls) writing samples, resume and cover letter for consideration to: EDITOR Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 by e-mail editor@houstonvoice.com or fax 713-529-9531 7 8 VOICES AND ECHOES JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE 1 1v1to 't' r::1ftct'eI 1'I ThEDleTORIAL _ . evolution of the gay stalker (and the gay activist) STAFF Associate Publisher M ke Fler."1ng m~eCll-oustor>vooce com Editor Mattrew A Hen e edotorOh i.stonvooce co,-, Production Betra y Bartrar <.raphoc Des gner 1\.1 ke Swe~m· - Gr hoc D~ ;ner Contributors R ch Arerisc'l e dt. Kay Y Dayus. Trayte D sk Earl Dittman, 0 L Groover, Rober' B Henderso • Gop Planer. Ell" Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. K m Thompson, Terry Sullivan Adve rtising Sa les Richard B Hay~ Ken Burd Office Administrator M4rshall Rainwater Classifieds & Directory Carolyn A Roberts Carolyn White National Advert1S1ng Representative Rovendell Marketing Company, Inc lll-142 6863 Publish ers Oms Crain Rick Ellsasser rn ....... ~p•per Guild MEMBER CH ARTER MEMBER mGREAT ER HOUSTON GAY & lESBJAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett B vd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 caoo> 729-8490 Fax (713) 52~9531 Contents copyr ght 1999 Offoce ho<n: 9 a to 530 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the •1ght to edit for content and rengtt- We woll withhold names upon requ~t. but you "1USt nclude your name and phone number for verifJCatoon. Please send mail to Houston Vooce. 500 Lovett Blvd Suite 200. Houston. Texas 77006, fax (713) 529--9531 or e-mail to ed1torClhouston voice com Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Vooce •• In "The Talented Mr Ripley," Matt Damon plays a gay man whose obsession with ;;ooahte Dickie Greenleaf (played by Jude Law) 1nsp1res a killing spree shocking for its amoral ty. Among Tom Ripley's v1chm:>, after he duphcitously wms his way mto high socie­ty, are the two wealthy young men with wt-om ~e falls m love, a penerted expres­smn of affec!Jon 1f ever there were one. It's not the first !Jme m re1:ent years that Hollywood has offered up a gay st,1lker for the big scrcef' In 1992, "Basic Instinct" enraged gay activists, who took issue with Sharon Stone's dulling, seductive portrayal of a man-hating bJSexual That -;ame year, "Silence of the Lambs" featured as its villain a misogynous, effem­inate man who collected the skrn from dead bodies to create a "dress" for him to wear. A year later, activists took issue with "Six Degrees of Separation," in which rapper/actor Will Smith played a young black man who won his way into white Manhattan society m Ripley-esque fashion by pretending to be Sidney Poitier's son. Although at the !Jme, it wasn't the less­than- flattering portrayal of a gay character rn "Six Degrees" that angered the actl\'Jsts so much as it was Smith's highly publicized refusal to Jo an on-screen male-mille kiss for fear 1t would ruin his carL'er. But at the end of the decade, with gays never more powerful m Hollywood, there hasn't been a peep about the negative image homosexuality portrayed in ''~1r Ripley." And that's a very good thing. As we enter a new decade, I lollywood has happily evolved and so have gay ac!Jvbts, and both are smarter about how to handle homosexuality on the screen, though both shll have something to learn. For one !lung, "Mr Ripley" doesn't have the history that would suggest insensitivity toward homosexuality. The story b based on a novel by lesbian author Patricia Highsmith, and the adaptation by directory Anthony Minghella actually adds to the homoerotic content. (See story, Page 15) Minghella injected a more overt, 1990s gar sensibility to Ripley's desire for Dickie, which was portrayed less sexually in Highsmith's early '50s original. Even more important, Minghella added a new, com­pletely likable gay character, Peter Smith Kingsley (played by Jack Davenport). That Mr. Ripley finds himself incapable of accepting love says more about his char­acter than the mane's \iew of homosexual­ity, and Ripley's cruel treatment of the Kingsley character only puts an exclama­tion point on the image Mmghella has also been refreshingly open about the tightrope he walked m updating H1ghsmith's story. "I'm desperate that no one infer a connec­tion between (Ripley's) actions and his sexual­ity," Minghella told the Nero York Times. "But it's a sorry state of affairs if you can only write about a homosexual character who behaves well-that's another kind of tyranny, I think." Minghella's pomt is well-taken, especially m a tum-of-the-century Hollywood more notable for its well-adjusted, 1f one-dimen­sional, gay characters in movies like "American Beauty" and "As Good As It Gets." As Minghella himself pul~ it ~ well, the flc:-h-and·blood Ripley, warts and all, is far more interesting to watch and despite his amorality is at times much more sympathetic. "The minute you try to pull back from what's sensual and erotic, you're losing your nerve, and I just didn't want to shrink away from the romance of it; it's very ten­der to me," he said. With all the positive role models in l lollywood today, it's a lot easier than it was in 1992 to swallow the gay psychopaths, and it JS a more mature gay audience that understands central charactcr.r-gay and straight-must be tragically flawed to be worthy of the casting. Low marks for the promo But if Minglwll. • h;, · cimed ~· ~h m. rks for lus intelligent, sensitive update of H1ghsmith's story, Miramax Films deserves a failing grade for its promotion of "Mr. Ripley.'' In ubiquitous commercials and film trailers, the studio portrayed the story as a typical boy­girl stalking. The previews had you believe not that Ripley ·wanted [)icf.Je, but that he wanted to be Dickie, and that included a rela­tionship with his girl Marge (played by Gwyneth Paltrow). A number of film critics even repeated the studio tnpe that Damon's character was "bisexual," though there is absolutely no indi­cation of it in the movie. Some movie-goers took the bait and weren't too thrilled with the homoerotic love story they got fed instead. While there's a certain juiceness to the idea that I lollywood is subverting popular culture by luring mainstream audiences to a movie with a gay love story, it's much more likely that Miramax was simply promoting the Christmas movie it wished Minghella had delivered. "The studio would have been thrilled if [Tom's attraction to Dickie] was transmo­grified into a love for Marge-he wants the life, so he wants the girl!" Minghella con­fided to the Times. Perhaps the movie's strong box office per­fonnancc-" Mr. Ripley" finished number two last wl'ek-will embolden studio promot­ers to be more direct in the future. More honest packaging--•md maybe an actual love scene since Damon like Will Smith before him avoids the dreaded mak'-male kiss-would have made ''The Talented Mr Ripley" a truly evolved portrayal of the gay P.;;vchopathic stalker. , ,.. r. ~ , 'I• q1 11 l r. HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT •• . \~ ... Vermont should help bring us equality in the new millennium by MELINDA SHELTON The 20th Century, fitting­. ' ly, went out with a roar that has left the conservative right quivering in its bigoted boots. The source of their angst is the recent Vermont Supreme Court decision that same-sex couples should have the same mamage benefits extended to different-sex couples. While the case applies only to Vermont, it is sending shockwaves to the very core of a conservative movement that works tirelessly to perpetuate dis­crimination against the LGBT communi­ty. This fear- and hate-motivated, anti­gay movement cloaks itself in carefully crafted rhetoric, using phrases such as "traditional f,1mtly values" and "the sanctity of m.uriage between a man and a woman" to garner support and to chill hcarb in a public that traditionally sup­ports equality and fairness. But the Vermont Supreme Court turned a deaf car to the conservative din. Instead, the five juslicl's largely based their decision on the state's constitution which contains a "Common Benefits Clause" that says the state's government should be "instituted for the common benefit, protection and security of the people, nation, or community, and not for the particular emolument or ad\·antage of any single person, family, or set of persons who are part of only that community." In short, the state is violating its consti­tution that guarantees equality for all of its citizens. LETTERS In its wisdom, and undoubtedly because they understand how slowly the wheels of government can tum, the jus­tices also ruled that the Vermont Legislature must act in an "expeditious fashion" in carrying out the court's order of either legislating same-sex marriage or providing a "substantial equivalent." Gay rights activists have reacted in a cautiously optimistic fashion l\ew Orleans gay rights attorney John Rawls cnhcized the Vermont justices for stop­ping short of ruling that "marriage is marriage and licenses should be granted to the defendants in the case . ... They're saying 'separate but equal,' but separate is not equal. They were very reluctant to use the 'marriage' word." While the ruling will be cited repeated­ly in cases across the nation and is "a great victory" for the gay community, Rawls cautioned that it also will fuel the backlash against gay rights. "The fallacy of all of this is that equali­ty 1s a bad thing. We've proven time and again that's not the case," Rawls said. The battle for-and against-equality dates back to the verv start of the nation. Our founding fathe~s m'aled the U.S. Constitution around the basic tenets of freedom and equality, albeit under their narrow understanding of such freedoms and their unwillingness to extend full rights and equality to everyone. In the 1800:;, abolitionists fought for an end to slavery, and on Dec. 18, 1865, the 13th Amendment to the Constitution was declared ratified by 27 of 36 state leg1sla-lures. Slavery was abolished Although the battle for women's equality had already begun, the next \"ic­tory proved to be less-than-equal. On March 30, 1870, the Secretary of State declared that the necessary maiori­ty- 29 of 37 states-had ratified the 15th Amendment. The amendment stipulated that the right of U.S. citizens to vote could not be dented based on "race, color, or previous condition of servitude." Voting rights were extended to black men-but not women-although it would be decades before blacks could take full advantage of the polls. Some SO years and countless battles and protests later, women finally were granted the right to rnte. On Aug. 26, 1920, the 19th Amendment was signed after 36 of 48 state legislatures had ratified tt. Alice Paul, a preeminent lemtmst leader, wrote an equal rights amendment and introduced it to Congress in 1921, and an ERA has been introduced every congressional Sl'ssion since 1923. Paul's amendment states: "Equality of Rights under the law shall not be dented or abridged by the United States or any state on account of sex." Tho .. e 23 words send shivers down the spines of con.-.cr­vativcs and misogynists who to this day fight an ERA. The ERA passed Congress in 1972, and the National Organization for Women led the fight for its ratification by the dl'ad­linc date of July 1982. The deadline man­date from Congress was designed to stymie :'\OW's national campaign, and it More t1ia11 a 'dot-org' at wonl 011 dte Net To the Editor· Thank you for your nicely written and generally ilccurate story, "New kids on the Net" (Dec. 17). But there are two things we'd like to clarify and comment on. pro1ects; • Conducted activism on the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, including a silent vigil outside the White House on Nov. 6; as well as work on incidents ranging from the railroading of a gay man by a county judge in Michigan to the firing of a gay man by a SUNOCO affiliate in Indiana to protesting entrapment arrests in Virginia. doors," Dec. 17). During my employrnmt at Sue Ellen's, the incidents of straight men com­ing to harass lesbian customers were extremely rare. It was also my part of my job to watch any ~uspicious males that entered the club and to remove them if needed. In the story's lead, you ask whether a "dot-com" or "dot-org" by itself substitutes for "a constituency, bylaws, and the other traditional measures of an organization's legitimacy?" I would like to point out that ationalGayl.obbyOrg has a constituen­cy- our members, and the tens of thou­S: rnds of individuals (not hits) who visit our web-site each month. Not only docs !\GI. haw bylaws, we arc the only n.1tionJI organization I know of thJt publi~hes tis bylaws at its \n·h-site. And, as for "the other traditional meas­ure:. of an org;inization's legitimacy,'' NGL has in ib brief, six month existence: • Been granted a corporate charter by the Commonwt•alth of Virginia, • Attrartni memlwrs from all SO states; • ~all•d more than one-third of its 29 board mcmbt'r::.; • Raised and spent in excess of $12,000 on start up, operating cxpcn$cs and on NationalGayLobby.Org is much mo1e than "just a dot-org," and that NGL meets all the criteria generally included in "tradition­al measures of an organization's legitimacy.'' l\!GL is also as non-profit as an organiza­tion can be We have no shareholders and if we ever dissolve, our assets must be trans­ferred to ,m appropriate non-profit entity We have not opted to seek an IRS SOl(c) designalton because tJx-excmpt groups are too limited m their activities. M1cllilel Ronumello Nationa/GayLobby.Org £x, ·c111ire Dircctor Open club's doors to gay men To the l:ditor; As a former emplO}'l'C of Sue Ellen's, a les­bian bar in Dallas, and being a gay man, 1 find it hard to believe in the reasoning of Alcxb Wasifuddin in changing the policil'S at Club Rainbow to allow men (" l.e;bian club opa-i.s ill> I find it infuriating when a gay and lesbian business is discriminating. This is exactly what our community has been fighting against since Stonewall. We of all pt.'Ople should know better than this. I sincerely hope that we always cause a brouhaha when this happens. I just can't believe that ignorance b il valid excuse. Marshall Ra111m1ter Houston Lesbian club sltould be proud To the !:ditor; I don't know exact!) what transpired to make tht.> owners ot Club Rainbow feel the nL"ed to apologtzl' ("ll',btan club open~ ah succeeded, although narrowly: 35 of the 38 needed states ratified the amendment. The quest for equality has not ended. Efforts are underway to introduce and ratify a Constitutional Equality Amendment that broadly protects women's nghts, including reproductive rights, but also would forbid discnmina­tion based on "sex, race, !'exual onenta­tion, marital status, ethnicity, national origin, color or indigence." Dl~pite the ground gained in the '90s for gay rights, there is a backlash by a few who want the power to decide who should­and should not-be considered "equal" under the law. They expect gay men and lesbians to pay tax~>s, obey laws and essen­tially knuckle under and accept serond­class status. They incorrectly predict that by extending equal rights under the law to our commuruh; It will be the demL<,e of "the traditional familv" as thev see it. Detractors used similar tactics to stop the end of sla\'ery and to deny voting rights to black men and women. They !ought de~egregation, interracial mar­riages, equal education and 1ob opportu­nities, and thl' nvil rights and women's mowmenb. 'ow they are fighting the gay righb mowment. \'crmont opened the door last month, and it's up to us to make sure other states follow-however long it tak6 to achieve equality Melinda Sliellon 1s editor of IMPACT News 111 New Orleans, a szsler IU'lt'>paper of tlze Houston Voice. doors," Dec 17) or defend its tagline "Exclusively for Gay Women." I am a gay woman and I can't tell vou the number of times I have been denied entrance to most of the gay male clubs m this city for silly things hke wearmg open toe shoes, when gay men with the same shoes were allowed in with no hassle I doubt verv senouslv thJt thL~ lesbian club ever denied entrance to a gay man. I haw to sav I was excited to see the club open. I felt' proud \\'e should all remember that we are a community and little battle~ hke this do us no good. Lidtes put your taglint• back up and remember, in the world of business, 1t b a dog eat dog Korld. By surrendering to this type of sally whining onh• ~eh you up to be bitten bv the othl·r dog Put your ta~line back up and be proud. Wanda Hou.;ron 10 - e11 llLLltl teLLAISI#. • Prim MilY Vary. See Sture For Dmils. r&9 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~JITll ~~m~~~~~~. ___ .,.. ______ ___ JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE "Q ote unquote" compiled by STAFF "The question of whether Ben [Affleck] and I are gay is so awkward in a lot of ways. There is no real right way to answer it without offending somebody. It's offensive to just deny it fiercely, as if there would be anything wrong with it if we were a couple. That would be offensive to the people I grew up with. I don't want to be that person. At the same time, I can't say it's true because it's not." -Actor Matt Damon (right) to the Advocate, Jan. 18 "There is a particular variety of American gay man-you know the type: perfect physique, perfect tan, perfect hair, and so on-who is so glossy that my eyes somehow slide right off of him. No, the 'Stepford gay' look doesn't work for me, just as I think the 'body fascism' of the gay scene often fails on its own terms, namely aesthetic." -Former Out magazine editor James Collard, writing in the December issue. "I think that were Harvey Milk able to come back today, he would be amused that our movement's two top goals are the right to marry and the right to be in the military. In the 70s we were about disman­tling the patriarchy and exploring personal liberation and we were not trying to be like straight people. We were radicals!" -Cleve Jones, founder of the Names Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, to the Associated Press, Dec 13. "I am not conceding the war. I am conceding the battle. My voice may be high, my orientation may be gay, my politics may be left, but we are right. We moved San Francisco forward." -San Francisco Board of Supervisors President Tom Ammiano (left), acknowledging to supporters that he had lost the mayor's race to incumbent Willie Brown, Dec. 14. "I meant it when I said I'd like to have a baby. I was deadly serious. I don't think it matters whether you're gay or not. Still, I don't think I'm responsible enough to bring up a child. My lifestyle doesn't allow for children. I'm not saying I've ruled out being a parent forever, though .... I just don't want to be like Madonna and have a kid as another accessory to go with her new handbag." -Boy George as quoted by Yahooi News, Dec. 20. "I feel like I'm in a sexual no man's land. I'm too poofy for the poofs and too scary for the straights." Boy George to Britain's The Guardian, Dec. 16. "I write about things that are going on in the lives of my friends: child abuse, AIDS, contaminated water that got into their system and gave them cancer. It's not like I make these things up. The trick for the song­writer- for me-is to take these issues that are too painful to hear about and put them in a context so that you can listen." -Lesbian singer Holly Near to the Sacramento Bee, Dec. 12. "I do believe in true bisexuality. We all have the capacity. [My partner] Julie is much more bisexual than I am. The more the world understands their bisexuality the better we'll be. I'm attracted to souls. I can be attracted to both." -Singer Melissa Etheridge (right) to the Los Angeles gay newspaper Fab. Dec. 23 "Straight man wins Mr. Oklahoma leather contest" -Headline in the Gayly Oklahoman newspaper, Dec 15 "We are poised to expand the circle of human dignity yet again, to say that it will no longer be permissible to discriminate against some­one because of who he or she falls in love with or because of that per­son's sexual orientation." -U.S. Vice President and presidential candidate Al Gore in Des Moines, Iowa, Dec. 21 . HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 NEWS 11 Exxon Mobil 'took something' away from gays :..- Continued from Page 1 domestic partner benefits will be allowed to keep them, but former Exxon employees and former Mobil employees who had not already signed up for the benefits will not be eligible. Exxon's nondiscrimination policy, which does not mention protection based on sexu­al orientation, applies to all employees of the newly merged company. DiDonato said the idea for the Equality Rally came from a discussion of Exxon Mobil's policies and benefits on the Houston Acti\'ist Network, an email dis­cussion list for gay men and lesbians. He said that he and two other activists worked to secure the city park at the inter­section of Brazos and Pease for the rally. The park is in downtown, near Exxon Mobil's Houston offices. The rally is a way for gay men and les­bians to show their opposition to the policy and benefits changes without having to travel to the company's headquarters in Irving, a suburb of Dallas, DiDonato said "We think there is plenty of upper man­agement down here," he said. Organizers hope for hundreds to attend the rally, which 1s intended to show non­violent opposition to the company's changes, DiDonato said. "We want to make a statement, and we want to make it a very peaceful statement," he said. "We can get equal rights if we ask for them m a peaceful manner." DiDonato said he encourages gay men and lesbians to send receipts for purchases from gay-friendly oil companies to rally organizers to be passed on to Exxon Mobil. People attending the rally are also encouraged to bring their Exxon and Mobil credit cards to destroy them at the event m a public display of dissatisfaction with the new company, DiDonato said. The event seems to be gaining some momentum, as the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus weighed in Wednesday, appro\'ing a resolution encouraging gay men and lesbians to buy products from companies other than Exxon Mobil. Exxon Mobil spokesman Tom Cirigliano said he had not heard about the Houston event, but when he was informed by a reporter, said he is displeased to learn of the effort. The event may be the result of misin­formation in the media, he said. "We think it is unfortunate [that a rally is planned]," Cingliano said. "We think there has been a lot of misinformation out there." He said the company does not oppose same-sex marriage, but that it has chosen to adopt a broad policy rather than one that mentions specific categories of people out­side of categories required by federal law. "A lot of organizations, a lot of gay organizations, believe that once you've cov­ered sexual orientation, you've covered the world," he said. "It isn't true. It isn't going to happen here." Cirigliano said Mobil Corp. no longer exists, so any policies it had are no longer an issue Cirigliano said the company bases its benefits on legally recognized marriages and partnership because benefits based on other criteria would force the company to invade the privacy of employees to verify the information. "We don't think any company has the nght or the knowledge to get into personal relationships," he said. Exxon Mobil, which does 80 percent of its business outside the C.S. recognizes same­sex relationship in Holland, for example, because they are legally recogmzed there, Cirigliano said. "This isn't a political issue. This isn't a gay issue. It's a matter of personal rights. We believe that there is only one criterion we can apply throughout the world: ls it a legally recognized partnership?" he said. Chris Martin, spokesman for the Gay and Lesbian Alliance at the former Mobil Corp., said he hopes upcoming meetings with com­pany officials will push Exxon Mobil to clari­fy its position on nondiscrimination. When told by the Houston Voice about Cirigliano's statement that the company has a broad nondiscrimination policy that includes everyone instead of mentioning specific groups, Martin said Cirigliano is "not incorrect, technically." Martin also said he is not sure if company officials are committed to doing the right thing for its gay and lesbian employees. Exxon Mobil has bucked the national trend Dan DiDonato is helping to organize a Houston rally against Exxon Mobil. of companies offering domestic partner bene­fits and including sexual orientation in nond1scnmmation polices, Martin said. "The company is going to have to go back at some point to adopt what ~obi! had in the first place," he said. The Equality Rally City park at Brazos and Pease Jan. 28, 4 p.m. P.O. Box 667221 Houston, Texas 77266 713-862-3312 equality@wt.net Controversies in HIV Care This educational program will focus on two of the most pressing issues facing people with HIV-drug resistance and lipodystrophy (fat redistribution). Come hear the latest treatment information available. and use the opportunity to ask questions of local physicians and HIV/AIDS advocates. DATE: Monday, January 10 LOCATION: The Power Center 12401 South Post Oak Road Houston, TX Grand Ballroom TIME: 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM Buffet Dinner 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM Topics of Discussion - Understanding HIV-associated Lipodystrophy - HIV Drug Resistance: Planning for Long-term Treatment Success To RSVP: Call (800) 203-841to or e-mail HIVCare@medisolutions.com Cosponsored locally by AIDS Foundation Houston 12 NEWS JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Who cries for Jesse?' - Continued from Page 1 But gay groups refute charges that not con­demning the sado-masochistic behavior prac­ticed by some gay adults, as well as some het­erosexuals, amounts to condoning sexual assault "I have two words to completely obliter­ate that argument: consenting adults," said Cathy Renna, community relations director for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. Renna said that GLAAD is overall pleased with the way the national media has responded to criticisms like LaBarbera's, "but although the religious right is trying to say this is some sort of gay conspiracy, not a single gay organization was involved in shaping this story one way or another. "If there is some kind of pro-gay media conspiracy, can someone explain to me the amount of coverage we saw of Jeffrey Dahmer and Andrew Cunanan that focused obsessively on their sexual orienta­tion and not their crimes?" Renna asked. Headlines frequently described both Dahmer and Cunanan as "gay killers," she noted, placing their sexual orientation before even the acts that put them in the news. Hate crime or sex crime'? While Matthew Shepard's death, and the vigils and outcry that followed, drew immediate national media attention, Dirkhising's murder initially drew mostly regional media attention, except for an arti­cle in the conservative Washington limes, which described the killing as "the result of homosexual rape and ritual." But supporters of groups that have adopted the cause have slowly brought the case into a national spotlight, mamly through repeated letters to the editor demanding that crime. "committed by homosexuals" get as much attention as those "where homosexual~ are victims." Some local new~papers have joined the fight, including the generally conservative Augusta Chronicle in Augusta, Ga "Of course, the Dirkhising murder got lit­tle notice outside ol Arkan~s because it would have been 'politically incorrect,"' a Nov. 15 editorial argued. "There's absolutely no excuse not to report murders that might upset homosexuals. The liberal notion that they occupy the moral high ground in the murder sweepstake~ is ludicrous!" Still, national mainstream media outlets that have responded to the cnticism, including Time magazme's web-site and the Washington Post, have agreed with gay groups that the Shepard and Dirkhising killings-beyond both being tragic and involving gays-are substantially different, explauung the difference in coverage. Shepard's murder, they argue, is a hate crime, perpetrated by heterosexuals against someone simply because he is homosexual, while Dirkh1smg's is a sex crime, some­thmg that unfortunately happens far too often for every case to make national news. "The most salient difference between the Shepard case and this one ... is that while Shepard's murderers were driven to kill by hate, the boy's rape and death was a sex crime. It was repulsive, unconscionable-­and the predictable pastime of perverted criminals," wrote Jonathan Gregg. associate editor of Time magazine's web-site in a com­mentary posted on-line in response to letters. " It was the kind of depraved act that happens v.1th even more regularity against young females, and, indeed, if the victim had been a 13-year-old girl, the story would probably never have gotten beyond Benton County. much less Arkansas. (There is, of course, a double standard there)," lime argued. "Matthew Shepard died not because of an all-too-common sex crime, but because of prejudice." The tremendous public outcry of fear and anger generated by Shepard's death also fueled the increased news coverage, Washington Post ombudsman R. Shipp wrote in a Nov. 14 editorial. A hate crime like Shepard's murder or that of James Byrd Jr., a black man dragged to death in Texas, is "a special kind of killing" that "tells a segment of American society that its physical safety is at risk," Shipp wrote, quoting previous Post editorials. "Arkansas authorities have not character­ized the Dirkhising death as a hate crime," she said. "Matthew Shepard's death sparked public expressions of outrage that themselves became news. That Jesse Dirkhlsing's death has not done so to date is hardly the fault of the Washington Post." Even smaller regional papers covering the crime, and the law enforcement officials investigating it, have agreed that compar­ing Shepard and Dirkhising is somewhat of a false parallel. "Journalists in Northwest Arkansas are ma uruque position to evaluate the contro­versy, because the Dirkhismg case was and IS a high-interest story to our readers," wrote the Northwest Arkansas Morning News m a Nov. 7 editorial titled, "Differences in two cases: death of boy not a hate crime." "There are those who want to believe in some sort of wide-ranging media conspira­cy designed to engage sympathy for certain groups of people, including homosexuals, .. [but) like most conspiracy theories, tllis one crumbles under the weight of the facts," the paper ~id. "Shepard was killed because he was a homosexual This IS a sex crime, but 1t is not a hate cnme, and I think to compare it to the Shepard case is comparing apples and oranges," Benton County prosecuting attor­ney Brad Butler told Reuters. Butler said he believes it is "wrong" for groups to use Dirkhising's death to voice their political and religious views. "These crimes are just the acts of two degenerates, sick people," he said. Pedophilia or gay? While national gay organizations have been quick to distance themselves from Dirkhising's murder, the case nevertheless Gay groups say coverage of Jeffrey Dahmer a~ Andr~w Cunanan:--mu!derers who ~ere. branded 'gay serial kUlers' in many press accounts, putting th err sexual onentattan before their mrnes­refutes daims that the meata is biased towards gays. raises thorny questions about the dangers of linking homosexuality and pedophilia, as well as when an accused cnminal's sexu­al orientation is relevant to a story. "The reality is that homosexuals are far more likely to be predators than they are to be victims," David Duke, a nationally known "white civil rights activist" wrote in a press release describing Dirkhising as "a child who was literally raped to death by two male homosexuals." By focusing on the sexual nature of the crime, anti-gay groups are trying to play on fears that all homosexuals are pedophiles, GLAAD's Renna said. "I am sure that when they heard about this, it was the first thing they thought of," she said. "But if you look at all of the research, the vast majority of people who commit child sexual abuse are identified as heterosexual men who arc usually related to the children they abuse." "In my experience, there certainly can be gay or lesbian people who prey upon chil­dren, but the numbers are far, far greater for heterosexuals in that regard," agreed Dr Barbara Rubin, an Atlanta psychologist with many gay clients who abo works as a court psychologist for Fulton County. A case like the Dirkhlsing murder "opens things up for manipulation on the part of those who want to portray gays and les­bians in an inaccurate light, to suggest that here is an example of what two gay men arc out there in the world doing, and the statis­tics don't bear that out," Rubin said. "The truth is, there can be gay people who commit heinous crimes, but that doesn't mean gay people equal hemous crimes, and that is what is worth talking about," she said. In the Dirkhising case, most media outlets appear to be understanding of that distinction. "A red herring worth addressing at the outset is the failure to distinguish between homosexuality and pedophilia, which cre­ates a false parallel" between the Shepard and Dirkhismg murders, lime argued. "A double standard would be in effect had the media ignored a situation wh~rl! two gay men killed a strai9ht mai:i for ~mg straight. But sex wiili children 1s a cnme regardless of the sexes involved, and is not synonymous with homosexuality,'' it said. Initial Associated Press reports on Dirkhising's murder did not describe the two accused killers as gay, although later reports quoted investigators who described the two men as "roommates" and "lovers!' When to identify an accused criminal's sexual orientation, like when to identify someone's race, can often prove a difficult issue in news rooms. Most media advocates agree that such identifying characteristics should only be included when they are clearly relevant to the story, like revealing a suspect's race when the person is still at­large and a physical description is necessary. In the Dirkhising case, HRC's Besen said he believes it is appropriate for news reports to note the two men's relationship, so long as it 1s not portrayed as the reason they allegedly committed the crime. "It is relevant that the media should report they were dating and they were gay, in that their relationship to each other is rel­evant," he said. "But this is not a 'gay issue' and there shouldn't be a 'gay angle' to 1t anymore than there is a 'straight angle' when it 1s a young woman who has been molested. "It has to do with molestation and child abuse, not sexual orientation, and I don't really see how a gay angle fits into this story other than to sensationalize it," Besen said. "Nobody looked at the O.J. Simpson case and tried to find the straight angle." Most pedophiles are primarily sexually attracted to children, sometimes of both sexes, with few adult relationships, so you can't necessarily assume that SOffil'One who molests a child of the same sex should be labeled "gay," Rubin said. The same holds true for cases of s.ime-scx sexual assault involving adults, she noted. "The issue of rape is really about power and control versus sex or sexual attraction," she ~id. "From my treatment experience with folks as outpatient~ and m running a psychiatric hospital. you can't pigeon hole it that way. Rape is way more an issue about rage and control over other:. as opposed to linkmg it to sexual orientation." HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 NEWS 13 Child aied during bondage; iape Jesse Dirkhising, 13, died last Sept. 26 in Rogers, Ark .. after being repeatedly raped and sodomized, according to police and press reporb Da\'Js Cupenter, 1!:i, ,1nd Joshua Brown, 22, are charged with c.1p1tal murder and six counb of r.1pe in Dirkh1sing's de.1th. The boy was found bound .md near death in the apartment the two men shared Both men h.we pleatkd not guilty. A pn'-tnal hearing in the c.1~e is sched­uled for Jan. 13. In a bncf hearing on Det'. 10, Benton County Circuit Judge David Clinger re1ected the men's claims that the death penalty is unconstitutional, and ruled pro~ecutor~ may pursue it in the case. Carpenter, who was working for a hair s.1lon at the time of Dirkhising's death, told police he h,1s lived in 26 states. Brown told police he was Carpenter's lover. The pair are being held without bond in the Benton County Jail pending their trial Apnl 10. Dirkhising's grandmother said the sev­enth- grader, a resident of nearby Prairie Grove, had been going to the men's home on weekends because he sometimes worked ,1t the salon where Carpenter was employed. Dirkhising's parents knew Carpenter. Brown r!!portedly later told police he had been having sexual r!!lations with tht> boy. In court last month for the death penalty he.mng, Carpenter appeared attentive. Brown kept his head down and fiddled with his fingers. Neither made any comment. OBITUARIES Mark Richard Reinhardt 'len ices arc schcd u led for I louston lllV /AIDS actimt Mark Richard Reinhardt, who died Jan. 1 after complica­tions caused by the flu. He was 36. A service will be held Jan. 8 at 10 a.m. at Bering Memonal United Methodist Church, 1440 1 larold St. Reinhardt moved to I louston in 1982 to attend San Jacinto College and 1 louston Baptist University and pursue a career in health care while working as a home healthcare attendant. I le later formed a computer consulting firm. Reinhardt was a \\'Cll·rcspected I !IV/ AIDS advocate in 1 louston and an active member of the Ryan While Planning Council and the Thomas Street 1 lealth Their lawyers tried to convince Clinger that the state's death penalty law was unconstitullonal, but the judge re1ected their arguments. "I don't find anything new that changes the current status of the law in Arkansas," Clinger said. He also re1ected the defense argument that it would be inappropriate to automatically disqualify potential jurors who were opposed to the death sentence. Clinger said hl' would weigh later the ddendants' arguments to mm·e the trial to .mother county because the notonetv of tht• case could keep them from gdting a fair trial. "I'm very much concerned about being able to pick a jury here in Benton County," Clinger said. Police s.1y they were called to the men's home and were met at the door by Carpenter. They found Dirkhising nude and unconscious on the floor. Brown was also nude and holding a tele­phone and a flashlight when officers arrived, police said. Brown reportedly told the officers he and Dirkhising "were just playing a game." Dirkhising's mouth was blue and he didn't respond to officers. Duct tape was wrapped around his right hand and an empty pre­scription bottle was found next to him. The boy was pronounced dead at a hospital. According to court records, Brown said he had tied Dirkhising's hands behind his back, placed a pair of underwear in his mouth and secured it with duct tape. Police :;aid Brown Center Advisorv Council. Reinhardt is· sumwd by his parents, Ruth and Walter Reinhardt and his brotht?r Steve, all of Jamestown, N.D. In lieu of flowers, don.itions c.in be made to People With AIDS Coalition/TSC Volunteer Program or Omega House Hosp!Ce. Margaretta Newell Longtime d1sab1hty acl!v1st Margaretta Newell died Dec. 12 from complications related to Multiple Sclerosis. She was 46. Davis Carpenter, 38, allegedly told a fellow jail inmate that he went to the grocery store while Jesse Dirkhising was tied up to purchase items to use to rape the boy. told officers they placed belts around Jesse's legs and ankles, blindfolded him and strapped him to a mattress face-down. Brown allegedly repeatedly raped the boy while Carpenter watched and mastur­bated, police said. Brown took a break to eat a sandwich and soon noticed the bo · had stopped breathing, according to police Carpenter called 911, investigators said. An autopsy indicated Jessi! died of posi­tional asphyxia, the inability to breathe while in restrictive positions. Once in jail on Scrv1n'S are scheduled for Jan. 8 at 12:30 p.m. at Bering United ~fethodL't Church, 1440 11.irold St. A reception will follow. Visitation was held Dec. 13 at Croley Funeral Home in Gladewater. A pm·ate memorial service took place Dec. 14 at Starrville Cemetery. l\ewell voluntl'erl'd with the Houston chapter of Amencan Disabled for Attendant Programs Today (ADAPT) as an advocate for the disabled She also co­founded Houston-based Canine Alternatives, which trains and places scn·- 1ce dogs with human companions. Newell also served as a board member of Assist! lers, a women's health group, and the Houston Center for Independent Li\•ing. "One of my fondest memories 1s when I picked her up at the airport after an ADAPT demonstration. With signs and buttons saying. 'Free our people' and hand­cuffs still on the wheelchair, she proudly stated how they shut several federal build­ings down. I was proud too," said friend Kim Thompson. "She was honest and admitted she wasn't a saint. She found peace in her unique spirituality." In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to AssistHers, PO. Box 541095, Houston, Texas 77254, Canme Altemati\'es, 14134 Sylvia Drive, Cypress, Texas 77429; or Multiple Sclerosis Society, 2211 Norfolk, Suite 825, Houston, Texas 77098. the charges, Carrcnter told another inmate that he went to a grocery store late on the night of Sept. 26 to purchase items used to rape Dirkhising, mcluding the duct tape and a cucumber, a Rogers delL'Cti\'e !'aid in a sworn affida\•it. Carpenter abo said he stufted "pain pills" in the boy's throat. the detcch\'l' said. Police reportedly found drugs m the men's home, as well as notes that de.~cried vanous sex acts and how to bmd and sedate a child. -From staff and wire rt'1-1()rf,; Shirley Goulet Longt me Houston resident Shirley Goulet died Dec IS after a short illness .• he was 47. Goulet, who moved to Houston in 19 ·2. was employed at Kroger and Leather by Boots. She was a member of the area's leather community since the earlv 1980s. Ser\'ices are scheduled for Jan. 15 at 3 p.m at Bering Cmted Methodist Church, 1440 Harold St. "She always took care of evervbodv and made sure e~eryone had a good time.'' said Tommv Nix, her brother. In lieu of flowers. donations can be made to AIDS Foundation Houston, 3202 Weslavan Anne\, Houston, Texas 77027. 14 Selling your life insurance •I S a When yo.Ire goy. lving wilh HIV and ll'llllklng QI !eling yoo lfe ll'l$U'Once shQuldn I you be given a foce-to-foce cOl'S\A!olion n 0 tlO-po'esl(.Je. !lO-Olligotioo enWQl"menf~ Shouldn't this option be discussed l.Jrll:ed Vo'icol Benefits G P<Ol.<'.l lo be 'he only gay °"' ned ond operated YoQticot tiro<er wnr a 10CO office tn liaul'or AP.er a\ we beieve"' providing you the ~ or.ent.o.~ ycx. dese<ve and ge"111g you the mo:l "'<O<'e'f 'he SllO<lesf lime! Call 1·800-275•3090 today! decision 3701 Kirby [)we Su•te 1036 Houslon. TX 77098 7'3 5'18 6777 leglslered In Texas Memberol Natlonal V1allcal Auociolton LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Ru1inro I rancr • Wor.lrn Com11r11rntion (;roup llrr1ltlr • Ufr Jniurancr & much mort 6575 iv. l .oop South, Suite I 85 Bellaire, TX 77401 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME •• Highly lauded gay filmmaker bears the whip of self-criticism that comes with the gift of talent by EARl DITIMA:-.: For all intents and purpose:., gay Spanish director Pedro Almodovar should be in the best of spmts: his 13th feature-length film, "All About My Mother" has been winning crit­ical acclaim the world O\'er. Better still, it has been selected as Spain's official entry for Best Foreign Film at this year's Academy Awards. But at this moment, Almod6\·ar LS a bit perturbed. He has spent most of the day talking to dozens of American journalists, and it appears the maiority of them are more interested m db­cussmg his sexuality than the making of "All About Mv Mother." talking about their moVIe:;' I find the questions about me being gay or straight \'ery imtating It\ not like I've ever tried to hide my sexuality, so why is 1t so important to talk about?" Surelr, an artbt who has made such bold and sexually pro\'OCahve films hke "Law Of Desire," "Women On the Verge of A l'\ervous Breakdown" and "Tie Me Vp' Tie 1e Down!" ~hould expect such questions. Amencan critics and movie-goer:. simply aren't u,,ed to scemg motion p1Ctures with transve;.1ites, gay men and le~bians as lead characters in box office smashc.~, and ha~ been done m Almod6var' s native Spam Film-goers should worry less about his sexuality and more about the content of his films, director Pedro Almodovar said. "What ·is this American phobia with people's sexual preference?" Almodovar asked in Spanish, speaking through an interpreter. "Do journalists ask straight directors about their sex life before "In a way, you're nght," he agreed "I guc.~s I 1u~t don't want my ~exuality to take away from what is clearly more important-my films. What I do in my personal life should not enter mto the equation. My movies should stand on thetr own without having me to carry along as baggage." _. Continued on page 17 Patricia Highsmith, wary of being labeled a lesbian writer, is the force behind the popular movie 'The Talented Mr. Ripley' by GERALD BARTELL "Sissy'" The word stings Tom Ripley, protagonist of Patricia Highsmith's novel, "The Talented Mr. Ripley." So does the taunt from D1Ckie Grt•enleaf, the man Tom loves, that Tom 1s "queer." The lashes fester until Tom, m a moment Highsmith ]o<ids with bbtant freudi.m symbolism, lifts an oar resting behn'<'n his legs and smashes D1Ckie's skull. Tom Ripley, closl'ted gay sociopath, has plenty of com-pany among the other characters m H1ghsmith's dark world. There's cagey Bruno Anthony in "Strangers on a Train," a murdering psychopath, an ahen to his father, a close friend to his mother. She and Bruno sail on "The Fairy Prince" after Bruno strangles the wife of a man he finds attractive. And there's Elsie in "Pound in the Street," bludgeoned to death by a jealous former girl­friend of Elsie's female lover "Highsmith was one of the most closeted and homo­);>- Continued on page 18 Patricia Highsmith, concerned about being viewed as a lesbian writer, used the pseudonym Oaire Morgan when writing 'The Price of Salt,' a novel about a woman who falls in love with a married woman. 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU Out In Print BOOK NEWS 'Depo~ Street' depicts decades-long journey bv ALCOTIOl\ One of the great joys of reading poetry is how dfmently 1t can convey another person's world view. For exaMple, to go from the poetry of Mary OI ver to that of the late James Broughton 1s to leave .i world \\here the cru­elty and beauty of nature 1s perpetually on v1e\\, and enter one \\here playfulness and awe intersect m male sexuality. The worlds poets create can be so radically different that sometimes you find 1t 1mposs1ble to recon­cile, as Oliver said in one poem, th.it "there is, after all, only one world." ~1mrue Bruce Pratt's wor display in WALKI~G BACK UP DEPOT STREET, is a place where life's oppressio"S t er-pres­ent, and solace seems to come only from your knowledge of their exbtence. The pomt of VJew of the,e poem.~ b that of .i Southern woman named Beatrice (which mstmct says must be pronounced Be-AT­nce) who, hke Pratt herself, 1s an anh-racist lesbian teacher Ii\ ing in the South who even­tually moves ~orth. The title poem serves as prologue to the collectmn, and perfectly sums up Southern expatriate-hood ''Words would not remake the past She could not make it/ vanish like an old photograph thro\\ n onto live coals/ I If she meant to live in the pre;ent, she would h.ive to work, do/ without, send monev, call home long d1St..mce about the heat" · Beatrice's \\Orld b one m which the per­sonal is almost unrelentingly pol1tical-m "The A&P," .i trip to the grocery story for tomatOt's reminds her of who picked them, how mecham~t1cally they're grown. Sl.ivery, racist oppre s10n, homophobia-they haunt Beatrice's South. But 1gnonng what we know .ibout the past. trymg to forget, is not an opllon "hery day she wanted to/ forget something she'd learned about the house, the fields,/ the lopped cedar posts propping the scuppemong arbor,/ the fallen grapes fermenting on the ground " The closest she gets to an answer? "Stay consaous, a voice said. Can't do nothing if you don't/ stay conscious .. ./I But every hmc, every damn time, she walked/ into this A&P to get groceries, she had to decide/ not to be like her father." Ufe m the Beatrice's South creates one dilemma of memory after another-the ghosts of I !trosluma show up in "Strange Hesh", sharecroppers' lives are the topic of "A Cold ~ot the Opposite of Life"; "Shades" tells of how the stories of African tribes arise in her mind while she's teaching. But the urban :-.;orth provides no respite from mius­hce, just different subjects-factory workers, Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~ PlanetOut:com WWW panetoulCDl!l MY.. Keyword: PfanetOut engage -i enjoy miners, evil landlords, even the sweatshop malady of the '90s, carpal tunnel syndrome. These poems, some of which are almost two decades old, are a cycle that tells the story Pratt's personal political evolution. They are tough, vigorous poems, full of long Imes of blank ver.;e that ache to convey the painful truths people try to forget. Technically, they are ambitious, using italic and indentation to denote shifts in time, nar­ration and perspective. In tone, you'll find a fasciruting combina­tion of moral certainty and personal ambigu­ity, a complex perspecllve that feels very familiar-a sort of "I know what's wrong here, but where can I find something that's right?" that speaks directly to the soul's Southern queerness. In the final poem, "The Other Side,' Beatrice meets a mysterious figure at a drag bar who challenges that personal ambigu1- ty-"What kind of woman/ are you' Stand here. Answer/. ... Answer me and live." Since Pratt's partner is transgendered activist Leslie Feinberg, the ironic ending for this book of poems is Beatrice finding solace when she accepts the challenge to make the political even more ferociously per­sonal m her life. As they leave together-"lnto the rain­streaked street of night, the yellow leaves fallen/ like golden scars on black asphalt, they walk out their answer I to the riddle, the woman who is not a man, the woman who is not/ a woman, following the yellow drift like fire around the corner" -you can imagine the thunderclap that follows when love strikes in someone's poetic world. Walking Back Up Depot Street by Minnie Bruce Pratt University of Pittsburgh Press, S12.9? JANUARY 7, 2000 •HOUSTON VOICE What yo!'r neighbors are reading . . . Men on Men 2000 ed. by David Bergman, $12.95 2 Cybersocket 2000 by Gayne! Directories, $9.95 3 Be.st of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 91 4 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 5 Don't Get Me Started by Kate Clinton, $14 6 Outfoxed by Rita Mae Brown, $24 7 The Hours by Michael Cunningham, $13 8 The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith, $13 9 Welcome lo World, Baby Girl! by Fannie Flagg, $7.50 10 Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Felice Newman, $21.95 Crossroads Market B 0 0 K_§_T_9 RE & CAFE' 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 1 Chop Suey Oub by Bruce Weber, $60 2 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11.95 3 Sensual Men by Bruno Gmunder, $29 95 4 Best Gay Erotica 2000 ed. by Ridii!rd Labonte, $14.115 5 Innuendo by R.D. Zimmerman, $21 QS 6 Best Lesbian Erotica 2000 ed. by Tristan faormino, $14.9<; 7 Down From the Dog Star by Daniel Glover, $26.95 8 Girls Will Be Girls by l..t.>Slea Newman, $12.95 9 Baby Precious Always Shines ed. by I fay Turner, $17 95 10 The Woman Who Rode to the Moon by Belt Ree\:e Johnson, $12.95 LOBO ~~u~. 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU ~ Contin ued from page 15 Almodovar's latest film, "All About My Mother," certainly does just that. The film recently dominated Spain's Goya cinema awards with 14 nominations, including best actress, best director and best picture The winners will be announced Jan. 29. The movie, which won an award for best director at the Cannes Film Festival in May, is the story of a single woman whose son dies and her search for the boy's father. Manuela, played by Argentine Cecilia Roth, is accompanied by a handful of other female characters, including an aging les· bian actress, a transvestite homemaker and a nun with the HIV virus. "It's really Pedro's most mainstream film to date," actor Antonio Banderas, who was "discovered" by Almodovar, stated in a recent interview. "And by 'mainstream,' I don't mean he has gone out of his way to make something commercial in order to sell more tickets. It's mainstream in the way that it can touch so many souls, regardless of who they are. You don't have to be a transvestite to understand the feelings of his characters." Inspired by the Bette Davis classic "All About Eve,'' Almodovar began writing" All About My Mother" shortly after complet· ., •• ing production on his 1995 film "The Flower Of My Secret." "There's a character in that movie, a nurse named Manuela, who appears just in the beginning," Almodovar said. "In so many situations, she has to become an actress: to the doctors she works with and to people she has to attend to. So, my idea was to make a movie about the capacity to act of certain people who are not actors. And what is acting anyway? It's just the ability to fake things really well." From an early age, Almodovar discov· ered that the best "actors" always seemed to be women. "As a child, I remembered seeing that quality in some of the women in my fami· ly," he said. "They faked more and better than men. And through their lies, they managed to avoid more than one tragedy. The women really resolved their problems, in silence, having sometimes to lie in order to do so. They faked, lied, hid ... and by doing so, allowed life to flow and develop, without men finding out or obstructing it." But "All About My Mother" harbors much deeper messages, Almodovar said. "It's really about wounded maternity, and the spontaneous solidarity between women,'' he said. "There's a line in Antique Country Pine at Competitive Prices Phone: 713-266-4304 • Fax: 713-781-8445 Tennessee Williams' 'A Streetcar Named Desire' where Blanche Dubms says, 'I have always depended in the kindness of strangers.' In 'All About My Mother,' women are those kind strangers. Like most of my films, this one is kind of a salute, a tribute to women and their strength." Raised in a country ruled by "machismo," Almodovar said he has always used his films to celebrate females and femininity. "Femininity is an important part of all of us, whether men would like to admit that or not," he said. "So, as a filmmaker, I feel like it is my responsibility to express that. In my early films, people ~ thought I was I was just trying to make subversive, gay movies by having homo· ~ sexuals and drag queens in them. They i'.! were just missing the point. "Don't get me wrong. Spain is not the most open-minded country in the world, not by a long shot," he said, "but I think my films have had some impact when it comes to acceptance of alternative lifestyles." So why, then, is Almodovar so sensitive about discussing his own sexuality? "A lot of people begin to confuse your work with your real life," he said. "Like I said, I'm not ashamed of who I am-moral· ly or sexually. But what if I wanted to make 17 Ce<i&a Rot~ as MC111Utla ii 'AD About My Mother,' a atti<ally D<daimed film that teUs the story of a single woman wliose so dies and her search for the boy's fatber. a children's movie? I don't think that's very likely, but what if I did want to do one? Would people let their children go see it if it was done by 'Pedro Almodovar, the gay director?' Probably not. So, by labeling myself this or that, I can limit my abilities to reach people." 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU JANUARY 7, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE a111~RIGINAL .- Continued from page 15 phobic of writer:;," says Barbara Greer, president of aiad Press, who worked with the late author. H1ghsmith's fears produced a dbturbing series of novels that were published to wide acclaim. But success apparently never healed the scars of her hfe. According to Russell Hamson, m a critical b1ograph1cal study he wrote about Highsmith m 1997, the author was born Mary Patnd<i Plangman m Fort Worth, Texas, in 1921. Her parents rod separated before she was born, and H1ghsm1th took the name of her stepfather, Stanley Highsmith. She suffered her parents' bitter quarrels, separations, and cruelties. Her mother once told her she tried to abort her by drinking turpentine. "She made my childhood a little hell," Highsmith said in an interview quoted by Hamson. "She never loved anyone, nei­ther my lather, my stepfather, nor me." Adult life brought Highsmith success as a wnter, begmnmg with the publication of "Strangers on a Tram" in 1950. "The Talented Mr Ripley" appeared m 1955. Four sequels followed, including "Ripley Under Groundw and "Ripley's Game." Readers savored Ripley's impersonations, forgeries and murders. But tucked among Highsmith's thrillers was a cunositv. "After Strangers on a Train," lhghsmith wrote "The Pnce of Salt," a novel about a woman who falls in love with a married woman. The two become a couple, and the married woman sacrifices custody of her child to remain with her partner. Highsmith describes the women's sexual relationship exphdtly, their happiness con­trasting sharply with the misery most of the author's other characters feel. But Highsmith did not sign her name to the book when it was published m 1955. Instead, she used the pseudonym Claire Morgan. "1 larper and Brothers, who had pub­lished 'Strangers on a Train.' was embar­rassed by the lesbian content, especially since Hitchcock's film version of 'Strangers' was a big success," Greer says. "They arranged for Coward McCann to publish 'The Price of Salt' under a pseudonym. [Highsmith] was scared shitless that people would identify her as a 'lesbian writer."' The book became a perennial favorite, eventually selling over a million copies. In 1984, aiad reissued the book under Highsrnith's real name. In an afterward m that edition, Highsmith explained that because "Strangers" had resulted in her being mislabeled as a suspense writer, she once feared "The Price of Salt" would lead to her being labeled a lesbian writer. Grier believes I Iighsrn1th had several relationships with women over the course of her ltfe, spent mostly in Switzerland. In an interview Harrison A fresh approach for restoring the skin you are born with. Available NOW for men and women. SPECTACULAR RESULTS! • improve skin tone, clarity, elasticity • effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS borrows from, however, Highsmith acknowledged only one such relation­ship, describing it as "catastrophic" "She was a dear person, but she was shy, private, self-hating," Greer says of Highsmith. Others offer less tempered opinions. "She was the most odious human being I've ever met," says Otto Penzler, who edited and published several of Highsrnith's works. "I never heard her speak warmly of anybody. She was full of hatrl'Cl for men and women." Yet Penzler, like most critics, is unstint­ing in his praise of Highsrnith's writing. "She's an absolute original.'' he says. "It's hard to find a mystery-suspense writer who's better. There's a sense of dis­quiet and unease about her books. I don't know anybody else who wntes like that." In 1995, the year Highsmith died, film director Anthony Minghella began the first draft of a screenplay of "The Talented Mr. Ripley." Like other readers, Minghella admired Highsrnith's work, yet sensed the darkness m her personality. "She had the most amazing conceptual mind," Mmghella says. "She always start­ed with a thrilling idea. I also think she was misanthropic. I think she had a dim view of the majority of her characters. They always feel like if you ordered the wrong martini you could be in great danger." Mingella's worldview is, he says, "quite the reverse." And that has influenced how he adapted the book for the big screen. "The film is a series of love stories," Matt Damon and Jude law in 'The Talented Mr. Ripley,' a screen adaptation of Patricia Highsmith's 19SS book. Minghella says. "Ripley is looking for love wherever he can find it. He meets somebody who embraces him for all the things that Tom Ripley is, but at a point when he does­n't think he can be Torn Ripley any longer." Epithets like "sissy" and "queer" that were hurled at Ripley in the original novel are gone from Minghella's film version. When Ripley kills, he does so partly in self­defense, and Ripley's pathology is no longer connected to his sexuality. "I'm nervous of reducing the film to a story about a man in a cl~t," Minghella says. "Ripley's biggest fears are with rejection on all terms-in terms of his class, his tastes, his own identity, with which he has such a mys­terious relationship. Anything which makes him different troubles him. I think that is something that is absolutely universal." TRANSDERMAL HAIR RESTORATION All natural transdermal skin and transdermal lace technology MILLENNIUM SPECIAL 1 System ... $650 2 Systems ... $1200 reg. $990 each Offer valid ONLY January 1 - February 1, 2000 WE SERVICE AND REPAIR ALL TYPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. FULL SERVICE, $30 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 Eating Out_ _;_R;-=-=-EST.:..:....:..AU=-..:...:;RA_::....:N_;_;.RT= -:EV...;..::;..IEW:..;..::..S This is no Big Mac by TRAYCE DISKIN It's easy to be captivated by that one block of Europe behwen Richmond and Oakley on Montrose Boulevard, a place where tiny white lights are wrapped around large ruks ,md diners fill the sidewalks. This SCl'ne is mil, in part because of BOULEVARD BISTRO, owned by revered Houston chef Monica Pope. It continues to live up to its reputation as one of Houston's top restaurants. Boulevard Bistro is swank Curl.'d Salmon ($7). The rye toast seems the perfect choice to hold the tangy salmon piled with capers, chopped egg and red onion. The solid, mild flavor of the egg mingled with the more potent vinegary capers, onion and fish. Salads don't come with entrees, but some are worth the extra bucks to complete your meal The Organic Field Greens ($5.50) 1s a classier, tastier version of the simple dinner salad, with handsome chunks of shaved romano and .ind trendy. But with the sleek wood inte­rior and dim lighting comes 0 N I C crunchy apple and hazel- 1:A <1. nuts thrown in. The /.) Endive Salad a genuinely friendly <ind easy-going attitude that helps makes the place more 1) like a classy ~ neighborhood cafe. to Jr 0 ($7 SO) is more ...0 adventurous, ~ with grape­fruit, bleu en cheese, can­died pecans and a sweet red wine and honey dressing. The varietv and quality of the D I S TR l C 1 entrces illustrates the high standards that make Boulevard On a rcn·nt visit, the US l? hors d'ocuvres of corn meal UM and ~.1ge crackers werl' delicious, although the dry texture makes one long for some sort of dipping sauce or butter. We started our meal with Cornmcal­Fried Calamari ($7.50) which were meaty and lightly dusted with a crunchy, grease­less batter. The tomato sauce was fairly pedestrian-likable, but nothing special. Two other appetizers lend just a hint of the magic Boulevard Bistro can deliver with a slab of salmon. The Tempura of Tuna and Salmon Nori Roll ($12.50) is heavenly, with the tender meat soaking up the orange chili sauce and sting of roasted garlic wasab1 mustard. For a more breakfast-like side of the great pink fish, try the Citrus and Dill Boulevard Bistro 4319 Montrose Blvd 713·524-6922 Food: 'r:?SJSJt)t Service: SJt>t)SJt Value: bJbJ <t>SJ Scene: b> ~ ~ t ' Opt for bread, water at home OK. if you really must Worth the drive, so live a little Bistro stand out from other restaurants. The Venison Chops with Blackberry Glaze and Truffled Country Potatoes ($28), the most expensive item, feature tender meat with a sweet-sour sauce that isn't over­powering or too sweet. The Hanger Steak ($16), according to two friends who ordered it, offers a rich steak sauce. The Thyme Fries lend a smoky, Italian twist to the typical French fry. Like the creamy Horseradish Mashed Potatoes, these can be ordered as a side dish. Even when some of the selections didn't knock our socks off, there was something about each one that made it impressive. The Pistachio Crusted Salmon Filet's ($19) spinach salad proved rather bland and watery, but why complain when the rocky pistachio flakes seem baked right into the fish, creating a nutty and smooth combination of fl avors. The special for the evening, Grilled Mahi-Mahi ($16) was served in a well of black bean and corn ragout. It was sheer bliss. Whm a friend ordered the Hamburger ($12.50), I had to rescan the menu to make sure ~hl• didn't misread. The idea of a burger plate next to the I lazclnut Baked Duck Bn>ast ($20) SC1.·med out of place; I wa~ mistaken. This 1s no Big Mac. The B3R Ranch Burger on Pizzette is scn·l'Cl with mild, white chl'Cl· dar cheese, a car.imclized omon with rich s.1u tc and apple-smoked bacon. Our server continued to win points by suggesting the most egalit.irian, and deca­dent dessert option, for our large group. The dessert sampler tray included a choco­late cheesecake, a cherry chocolate bread pudding, creme brull:C, banana walnut gclato and ti ramisu. 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And she may save you money, too. Come in and meet her and take advantage of her broad insurance experience. GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @TC jester • Houston. Texas n007 713 %1-9455 fax:713-850-085~-·- • Flexolo A GUIDE TO SITTER HEALTH Your physical groove for Y2K by GREG HERREN Every year at this time I wnte about New Year's fitness resolutions and how to stick to them Once again, 1t is that hme of year, and as I sat down to write another column along those lines, it occurred that my approach was all wrong. The advice I had given in the past was valid, and hopefully it had helped some people get back into the groove of regular exercise. But why does it work for some and not for others? The fitness industry has turned into a billion dollar realm based on playing on the fears of an America obsessed with appearance. "The fattest people in the world," headlines trumpet. Everyone obsesses about body image. We all worry about whether we've gained weight over the holidays. We worry if we're too fat. We worry if our muscles are big enough. We worry, worry, worry. Somehow, the true message of exercise has gotten lost in the shuffle. Exercise 1s about being healthier and improving your quality of life. It's not about dropping four pounds so you can fit into those 30-waist jeans. It's not about going on a fad diet because you feel bad about being overweight It's not about getting pees the size of grapefruits so other men will think you're hot. It's not about having washboard abs so you can go shirtless at a bar It's not about train­ing for a marathon. What happens to your body when you exercise regularly 1s a side effect. The goal should be Jiving a healthier lifestyle Exercise is about feeling better about yourself, but not better about the way you look. Exercise is your way of saymg We all worry about whether we've gained weight over the holidays. We worry if we're too fat. We worry if our muscles are big enough. We worry, worry, worry. Somehow, the true message of exercise has gotten lost in the shuffle. to yourself, and everyone else, "l care about myself." Don't you do regular preventive main­tenance on your car? On your house? Well, why not do prevenhve maintenance on your body? Why not approach it from that perspective? Forget about the weight Forget about the body image. Forget about everything except that you arc taking care of yourself. So, if you want to make a resolution regarding exercise this year, here's one I suggest: "I resolve that in the 21st centu­ry that I am going to treat my body with the respect that it is more than entitled to. I am not going on fad diets. I am not going to buy into the latest exercise fad. I am going to start exercising and I am going to find an exercise routine that appeals to me, whether it is weight lift­ing, aerobics, playing tennis, taking walks, jogging or riding a bicycle. "I am going to eat a sensible diet with the proper combinations of carbohy· drates, protein, and fats. If I have to miss some exercise or if I want to indulge in a cheesecake I will do it and not judge myself harshly because of it. I am going to do this because I care about mrelf, ,md because I deserve to have a better, health­ier quality of hfe. I am not going to be inhmidated by anything or anyone that wants to stand in my way. I deserve it." That is the attitude that you need to have. That 1s the positive mental attitude that will get you into the groove. You can do it. Don't let negativity invade your life. And once you start treating yourself better, it will carry over into other aspects of your life as well . Don't allow the negativity in Don't tell yourst'lf you can't do it. You can. It is possi­ble. People do it every day, and arc happier and healthier because of it. You'll bt• am.11ed. 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The Houston Vozce welcomes your special occasions. Send e-mail lo crober~houstorrrozce.rom. Fax.· 713-529-9531. Mail: Ocrasions, Houston Voire, 500 Lovett Bhli., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006. Pltnse mclude a telephone number so occnsions am« verifitJ1 and ronsideml for publication. NEW 2000 JEEP s299fe999 P E R MONTH! m:::>C>~ ....... ~ Several to Choose Pml based on $999 c!Wn + $1500 reba18 + TT&L 35 pmts ol S299 with hnal om• of $16 369 0 6 4% APR W/'C. Happy birthday to Eclcfie, the bonky bartender at the Venture-N, on Jan. 7. Happy birthday to Ridt Ellsasser, co-publisher of the Houston Voice, on Jan. 13. NEW 2000 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER RllSty is a S....itHild MW V111 Male kitty wlio lms to play with. kit-. He recpres lovilg cmd lots of atteafioL ff JOI wlllid lb to adopt RllSly • oft. pets, c.- lad the HOlstm ..... Society at 713-434-5531• ... ,.... atlalioas@liomta I • CllJ. Affordable Luxury! lntroducln1 Daewoo. You'll be Surprised At How Much You Can Get For Your Money~ Our Cori Come Well Equipped Wirh Fearu~s Others Moy ConSJder Opdons. Eich Of our Amazing¥ Reh1ble And ComtortabJe Cira ls SoWett Burl We CoVCt'Them For The First 3 Years or 36,000 Mlleat on All Regularty Scheduled Maintenance (Evon Oil and Wiper Blades) Al Absolu1ely No Cost To You! NEW '99 DAEWOO LEGANZA A..-romAtir. Air. Po1«r Wi11Jo.., 6 L«/11, ABS. Kryln1 Entry, AJ,,,.,.. do Fot lifhts • 20002 ·~ $14,415 Sale PrU S1SC«i S1SOO Reta!e You Also get Daowoo Priority Mslst.-nce (24 Hour RoMbJde A.sbtance) For the Aral 3 y..,.. or 36.000 Mdes Should You Need It tt Daewoo .•. Styled In Italy ... En gineered In Germany .•. Research & Dev elo pment Do ne In England ••• Provides An Exceptional Value For Your Car Buying Dollar. HOUSTON VOICE • JANUARY 7, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU community calendar saturday, jan. 8 A~ Hour~ KPfT 90.1 FM. 12 am. to 3 a.m. 713-52&-5738. Q-l'atrol walks the streets at 8:45 p.m. 713·528-SAFE. Vrsual Arts AJhance 10 a.m. 281 ·58Hl408. Oogn1ty m.w at 730 p.m. f"' gay C..thol1cs. 713-880-2872. St. Stept,..n·s Eposcopal Church. R~ry at 8 a.m. 1805 W Alabama 713-528 6665. Houston Lesbian and Gay drop-on houf1 frOfn noon to 4 p.m. 803 H.>wthomc. Montro.e Wnte(s Proiect 3 to 4:30 p.m. lntrrnatoonal Bdhards League meeting 2 pm. 713-524-3818 Kolbe Breakfast Oub and Hospotal Vis1tatl0rl. 9:30 a.m. 71)-4161 ll!OO. sunday, jan. 9 TheWamen\Group.10·45a.m 713-52'>-8571 . Houston Alea T.,..,. CoalotlOn of Homos<">luals mee~ 713-942-7002. Ran-bow RJders. A bi<yde dub for women. 71H!69·1686. O...ch of the XII At>o>t"" AnfJ1CM1 Rote Old C..tholic Church. Holy Communton 10.30 am at 239 Westhe1mer. 713-6657901 St Stephrn-. Eposcop.11 Church. Holy Roi• Euch.>nst I at 7:45 a.m. Holy Rote Euch.>ri>t II at 855 am.; Education hour at 10 a.m; ChOfal Eucharist at 11 am 1805 W. Alabama. 71 J-528.f.665. M.>r"""tha F•llow\hop Metropolitan Church. "Preaching the ~1· Bible study at 9:10 p.m. 713 528-6756 Rc:surrectlOn MCC Servtces at 9 a.m and 11 a.m. 71Hl61-9149 Grxe Lutheron Church. Sund.Jy <chool for all ages at 9 30 a.m. ScM<e at 1030 am 713-528-3269. Fant Unitan . .,n Uni¥erwhst Church Sef"Vlces at 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 am Community GQ!l>"I SeM<e at 11 a.m; 7 p.m. Sunday School tor children 005 uU1an 713~9235 or www.c0fnmun1ty· gooptl.org Houston M""°" Church. SeMce at 1030 a.m. 713-529-3225. Covenant Baptist Church. Sennce at 1 :30 p.m.; education hour at 3 p.m. 713-668-8830. Benng ""'monal UMrd Methodist Church. SeMCes at 8: 30 a.m. 10:50 a.m. St.wlday «:hool at !HO am. 713-526-1017. Resun'ectoon MCC Handbell Choor rehearsal at 1:30 p.m. 713· 16H149 \Jn!Mlo)tl Fellowship of GalYfiton County. 402 Church St. 1n WIY<slon. SeMce at 1030 a.m 409-765-8330. Farth - Hope Feflaw>hop. SeMce at 11 a.m. 713-520-7847. Fif'>t Congreg.>tton.11 Church (Memorial). Sennce at 11 a.m. 713-468 ~1 or fcc-houston.org Church of Kindred Spmts (Beaumont). Sen.Ke at 7 p.m. 409 835-4765 Unita11an Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum at 10 a.m. Sef'\'1ce at 11 a.m. and noon. Open Circle Family Support at 12:30 p.m. 1504 Wirt 713-686-5876. Interfaith Wcnsh1p Celebration. 7 p.m. 2515 Waugh Dr. 713-528-3601 . Thoreau Unitarian Un1versahst Congregation: Adult d1~~ s1on at 9:45 a.m.; ~Mee at 11 a.m. 3945 Greenb11ar Stdfford. 2B1 -277-8882. www.neosoft.co1TV·thcneau. Lone Star Volleyball As10<•at1on (LSVA) w,nter League begins. 281-878-4629. PFLAG-Houston. 2 p.m. 1117 Texa~ 713-867-9020. monday, jan. 10 Gay Fathers/fathers Forst support grouP. 8 p.m. 713-861-6181 C..lendar/Computer workshop for Pride Woek. 7 p.m. 713- 5291223. Gay Men Sun.1v()(s of Domestic Violence support group. 71 J- 52&-1017 B"1'1ng 5upPOrt Notwcnk Grief and Divorce Groups at 7 p.m. 713-526-1017. Frost Eye ClonK. Free eye exams fen people wrth HIV 713·83o- 3000 AIDS Careg1vors' Supp()(t Group. 6 p.m. 713-732-4300 HIV t.,tong. Free from AVES frOfn 1 p.m. to 6:15 p.m. 713 626-2837 FrontRunners. 6:30 p.m. 713-522-8021 . Kolbe Proiect Eucharist at 7;30 p.m. 713-861 -1800. Integrity Houston. For gay and lesbtan Episcopalians. 7·30 p.m, Autry House, 6265 Main. More light Presbyte11ans. Meeting. 1110 Lovett. 9:30 p.m 281-444-8861 X309 Black Lesbtan and Gay Coal1t1on"s weokly meeting at 7 p.m. 803 Hawthorne Houston Lesbibn and Gay Commurwty drop­'" hours from 6 to 9 p.m.; PositrvelNegative Photo Exhibition. 803 Hawthorne 713-524-3818. tuesday, jan. 11 FREE HIV testing at Oub Houston at 8:30 p.m. to midnight. the Monbose Oon1c 713-BJQ-3000. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous. 7 p.m., 239 Westhe1mrr. 713-"195-8009 Gay Men HIV+ Psychot~rapy. •The Suf'\'1vor"s Carde• ceremo­ny and celebration. Montrose Counseling Center at 4.:)0 p.m. 713-529-0037 Youth-Rap. 6:30 p.m. 713-822-8511 Aftercare Group Treatmtnt. Montrose CouMelmg Center at 6 p.m. 713-529-0037 AIDS Alliance of the Bay Area 7 p.m. 713-488-4492. PROTECT. An HIV-negative support group at 7 p.m. ASK THE PASTOR Q: "I low do I go on hvmg when I don't want to, but I know I need to stay alive for the Lord's work?" A: Sometime situations get so bad that we feel we just don't want to go on living. I would imagine that you art• in this place right now. The opl10n to end our life as we know it is not really ours to have. God has given us this life and we arc to live it to the glory of God. So how does a person go on when life docs not feel worth it? God has promised us that then.> would not be any test or trial put upon us that would be more than we could bear. Cod promises a way out, a way lo escape the pressure of life that docs not involve taking our life. Many times that way out can be through a good therapist who is gifted to help us sec a new perspective on our situation. One can learn coping skills for the toughest challenges that life presents to us. For others, prayer and meditation bring a sense of peace and a place of solace for a busy and overwhelming life. What you and I are encouraged to do is to seek that "way of escape" that God promises us that is most beneficial for us. It is there and we must seek to find that way out. Sometimes it is hard for us to admit that we need help to face the next day, or just to get up in the morning. God docs have a purpost• for your life and it 1s a good one. God's plans arc for you to prospt•r and be in good health. God's plans art• for your good, and not to harm you. I C't us remember that God is pulling FOR us. And if God be for us, who c,111 be against us? ~,..,i' MARANATllA FELLOWSHIP MCC Rn. Janet l'arkcr, Pa~tor • /\ l.1b:ra1mg ('hurch :s<:rvrng a L1bcra1111g Clod'" M \\ S1K1<fay Cdebrot1on 1 une: IQll "'1 (bq:uuun~ June 6ch) "" Monrrosc. StulC CHI. 11.itmOI> Ph. 71J ·S:ZS·67\6 l\un<r) provided. Bihle Slt.dy ~.l:J A\1 lluni< Groups Oii Tue~ & ¥.eds. ~Cr~l\ Maranstha ~..,, I l Fellowship Metropo/ltln Community Church 713·52&-1017. Women Sur..1vor> of Choldhood AbU>e. Montrose Coumehng Cent"' at 6:30 p.m. 713-52'>-0037 Boring Support Network. Lunch Bunch Gang at 11 a.m. 713- 526-1017 Gay Men's Process Group. 7 p.m., 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713-52&- 8390 M•n's ~tworl-.. Discussion group for social. educ.rtoonal development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713-52'>-0037. Mor• on Relat1onsh1p>. D1Kussoon group. 7 pm. 415 W Gray. 713-861 -9149 Lambda Sk<ihng Oub skates at 8 p.m. at the Tr~ 711· 523-9620. Gay & 8' Male SupPOrt Group support group forming Sponsor<d by AVES 713-62&-2837. Houston Lesb<an and Gay Community Center drop-m hour\ 6 to 9 p.m. Lesbian Comng Out Group meets at 7:30 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 71 J-523-3818. PFLAG·HOU>tOn cfiscussoon 9"0UI>· 7:30 p.m. 2700 Albany. •304 713-867-9020. wednesday, jan. 12 Free HIV testing by Thomas Str .. ·t Ou> (9 a.m. to 1 p.m.). 713-793-4026. Free HIV testing by Montrose dime at Mary"s (4 p.m. to 8 p.m.). Modtowne Spa (B p.m. to modn1ght). Ropcord (9 p.m. to m.dnight). 713 830-3000. 81Net HO\Mon. 7:30 p.m. Sooal meetmg at (.afe T~ 1830 w Alabama. 713-467-4380 Womerfs Network. 7 p.m. Montrose Coumel'ong Cent«; 701 Richmond. 713-529-0037 HIV sunnvor support group 7 p.m. 713-782-4050 Mind/Body Connect>on: Altemab°"' Appt-oaches 7 p.m. 1475 W Gray. 713-524-2374 Protect: Caesar 7 p.m. AFH. 3203 Wcslaya'l. 713-621-6796. Out Skate Rollersk.>t1ng Oub, 8 to 10 p.m at 8075 Cool< Road 281·933-581a Houston Lesbian and Gay Communoty Center drop;n hour\ 6 to 9 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713-S24-3818. thursday, jan. 13 Froe HIV testing at Toyz (9 p.m. to midnight) by the Montro~ 01mc. 713 -830-3000. Art Labs. The Art League at 1 p.m. 713-225-9411 . Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open reheaf101 at 7 p.m. 713-521-7464 HIV+ Men P>ychotherapy. Montrose Counsehng Cent"1'. 1:15 p.m. 713-529-0037 Relapse Prevention. Montrose Counseling Center, 2 p.m. 713-529-0037 23 Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center, 6 p.m. 713-529-0037 Women·s Therapy Group. Montrose Counseling Center. 5:30 p.m. 713 529-0037 Center for the Healing of Racism. 7:30 p.m. 713-738-RACE. FrontRunners at 6:30 p.m. 713·522-8021 . Hrv Art Courseo Program. 1 to 4 p.m. Patrick Palmer at 713-52&-1118. Women's 01nK. Montrose OinK. 713·83o-3000. F&1th and Hope Fellowship. B;J,le study 7 p.m. 713 520-7847 Community Gospel Choir practJ<e 6:30 pm. semc:e at 7 30 p.m. 713-88o-9235 °' www.communrtygo<pel.°'g. HIV/AIDS Support Group, 230 at family Sennce Center. 713· 861-4849 Women's HIVIAJDS Support Group, 4 30 p.m. Fanuly Service Centcf. 713-247·3810. HIV/AIDS Support Group. 7 p.m. Family Service Center m Conroe 888-24 7 381 o. Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center drop-on hours 6 to 9 pm 713 524-3818. friday, jan. 14 HOU\ton Area Teen Coal1t1on of Homosexuals (H.A.. T.C.H) meets 713 942 · 7002 Aftercare Group Treatment. Montrose Counseling Center at 6 pm. 713 529-0037 frc»t fye 01n1c Free eye exams for people wtth HIV 713-830-3000. Lesbi.ln A~ngers. Cafe Toopees. 1830 W Alabama at 7p.m. O·Patrol w&lks the streets at 8 45 p.m. 713-528-SAFE Kolbe
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