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Houston Voice, No. 1177, May 16, 2003
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Houston Voice, No. 1177, May 16, 2003 - File 001. 2003-05-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4797/show/4768.

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(2003-05-16). Houston Voice, No. 1177, May 16, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4797/show/4768

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1177, May 16, 2003 - File 001, 2003-05-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4797/show/4768.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1177, May 16, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date May 16, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript 'Revolution' Comedienne Margaret Cho contin­ues to defy labels and categories as she brings her new stand-up tour to Houston. Page 15 ISSUE 1177 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. MAY 16, 2003 INSIDE Both pro- and anti-gay bills get sidelined as the Texas House, led by Republican Tom Craddick, stalls from a mass Democrat walk-out. Page 3 U.S. Rep. Mark Foley (R-fla.) prepares for a run for U.S. Senate without addressing per· slstent rumors that he is gay. Page 6 Montrose fixture Don Gill admits he has learned many life lessons from his beloved pets. Page 17 Gay families similar to others in Texas, new study shows New Census data shows households led by gays not unlike those with heterosexual couples By PENNY WEAVER Just as state officials have highlighted differences between gay and heterosexual couples with a Texas Defense of Marriage Act, newly released data shows str iking similarities between households led by same-sex couples and all families in the Lone Star State. "This study should ~rve a~ a wake-up call to both state and federal leaders," said Seth Kilbourn, National Field Director for the Hmnan Rights Campaign, which comnus-sioned a new analysis of Census ~data "Families headed by same-sex couples are much more similar to most other farni· lies than they are different - yet the Texas Legislature has chosen to treat them dif ferently in the eyes of the law,'" Kilbourn said. "The Texas DOMA bill is unabashed· An analysts of new Census 2000 data. released tlus week. shows a number of similarities between same­sex couples in Texas and other families in the state (Graphic by Bonnie Naugle) ly discriminatory, and, if signed into law, is destined to be overturned. All couples and families deserve the same treatment and protection m the eyes of the law regardless of sexual orientation." Please see FAMIUES on Page 4 Conservative groups upset over GOP meet with gays RNC chair says session follows Bush order to 'carry message to everyone' By JOE CREA WASHINGTON Marc Racicot is facing -a storm of cntic1sm from conservauve rel!· gious groups outraged that the Republican National Committee chatr met \\1th the Human Rtghts Campaign to discuss gay rights issues earlier thts year. Racicot faced his critics In a May 6 meet· ing that drew 11 conservative leaders to the GOP headquarters. At the meeting, Racicot defended his March 7 meeting with the HRC, saying that he was trying to implement "the directive that the president gave me .. to carry our message, our principles, to every· body and anybody," he said, according to an ar!lcle written by Robert Knight for the Concerned Women for America. At the meeting, Don Wtldmon founder of the American Family As>ociation, a kPd Mart Racicot, chair of the Repubfican National Committee, said that gays have 'a nght to be involved in the public discussion' and that he didn't know what caused homosexuality after pro-family groups provided him with 'evidence' that there is no genetic fink to homosexuality. Racicot if he would meet with the North American Man-Boy Love Association. since he y;as willing to me<t with gay actiVi.~ts. Racicot reportedly said he would not and called the group "aberrant," noting that he used to prosecute child molesters. "They are testing the depths of despera­tion. there's no doubt about that" said David Smith, communications director for HRC. "Racicot and others are gettmg an education 1n terms of the viciousness of [pro-family groups') mothes for all to see. Perhaps they are acting desperate because their perceived stranglehold on the parcy 1s slipping." Gary Bauer, founder of the conservath. group American Values and a former presi­dential candidate, tried to soften Wlldmon"s question by emphaslZlilg that the pomt wa~ not to compare ga}s to members of NAM BLA. but rather to obser\"e that simply meet­ing .,.. ith a group implies a level of accep­tance. accordmg to the Knight artiele. "There are people I'v met who arr. gay thoughtful people:· Racicot said m th Knight article. ·1 know of families with chll dren some of them are gllj: The;, have a right to be Involved in the publlc d1scuss1on. But after the meeting, Bauer sensed tha• the message from the conservathe groups might not resonak as strongly as it once did withm the GOP, according to the Kmght article. "M~· sense after the meeting was that, for reasons 1 don't fully understand, v.e still have a lot of work to do educating the Republican establishment about why this matters,· Bauer said m the Knight article. Please see GOP MEET on Page 6 2 MAY 16. 2003 DUMP YOUR DSL, DROP YOUR DIAL-UP. You can't beat our business telecom service for quality, reliability and value. Call 1.866.THE.DARE and let us prove it. It's a fact - we are the better choice. www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE 700 Total Communications Options~ is big business tools at small business prices. Our premium fiber-optic network delivers reliable local, long distance ond Internet service through one cost-saving, Tl-grade connection - including "olwoys on" Internet access with speeds of up to 1 Mbps. cJUeg/am::ele/crom,fnc. Ol!e Mlllfte f« ~ t.itcom,• HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I 1oca news . Police. report beating death Officials unable to confirm whether or not men were a gay couple By PENNY WEAVER Houston police are investigating the Wednesday evening death of a man allegedly beaten by his roommate. As of press time Thursday, Houston Police Department spokesman John Cannon said he could not confirm whether or not the men involved were gay or were a couple. The incident occurred about 9 p.m. at the v1c(lm's home at 9515 Pagewood. according to a Houston Police Department report. The name of the victim has not been released, pending notification of next of kin. police said. Medical examiners were st!ll conducting an autopsy Thursday morning, according to Cannon. HPD Homicide Division Officer C.Y. Park and I.E Flores repo11ed that the victim Harwin Dr retw·ned from a walk to his town home when the suspect, who was waitmg for him inside. confronted him. The suspect had recently moved into the t0\\'11 home \\ith the VICtim, accord· ing to police. The suspect learned that the victim was look· ing for anotl!er roommate and was planning to evict him, the police report stated. Police said the suspect was not able to pay rent. The suspect told police that there was a confrontation when the victim came home and that the suspect repeat­edly struck the vic-tim's head with a blunt object. The victim sustained severe blunt trawna to the head and died at the home, police said. Charges are j)E'ndmg against tl!e sus­pect. according to HPD. Gay bills likely victim of House impasse As Democrats maintain walkout, proposals both pro-gay and anti-gay may fall by the wayside By PENNY WEAVER AUSTIN- Democrats in the Texas House of Representatives this week maintained their headline.grabbing walkout, anrl a num· ber of measures directly affecting gays apj)E'ared Thursday to be down for the count. "It puts a lot of things on hold on the House side," said Randall Ellis, executive director of the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. "It's just shut down the House. Effectively, pretty much all the House bills will be dead (Thursday at midnight). On Monday; 55 Democrats shut down the House by not showing up for work at the state Capitol. The effort was in protest of a redistricting bill pushed by Republicans tl!at would give the GOP addi­tional Texas seats in the U.S. Congress. Since both chambers of tl!e Texas Legislature hold a Republican majority, Democrats know they are out-voted on the redistricting proposal. if it comes up for a vote. But without a quorum, lawmakers cannot meet, debate or vote on bills before the House. The 150-member legislative body must have 100 representatives present to have a quorum. Most of tl!e rebelling Democrats are at a Holiday Inn in Oklahoma. After the walkout, Speaker of the House Tom Craddick, a Republican, ordered tl!at tl!ose lawmakers be arrested and returned to the Capitol. That move is permitted under House rules, but state law enforcement officers do not have JUrisd 1ction to arrest the legislators if they are out of state, the Houston Chronicle reported. 111e House was to re-acljourn Thursday morning, and Craddick told tl!e Chronicle he will have members who show up wait for a quorwn to arrive. Without a quorum, Craddick said, he will adjourn the legisla­tive body until Friday, the Democrats coming together "stanafng unified on this issue," Ellis said. "They're standing up for a process. Chronicle reported. • "That effectively puts a nail in the coffin on the bills that were left pending," LGRL's Ellis said. The high-profile redistrict­ing flap specifically affects gay Texans in a number of ways, Ellis noted. ''There are several levels to look at," he said. Republican Speaker of the House Tom Craddiclc blames that legislative body's impasse on the Texas Democratic walkout but Oemocrats like Rep. Jim Dunnam of Wi'£0 blame the stall on Repubhcans' redis­trictuig plans "People say thry'rc not engaging in the process [but) what we had for the four months prior to tl!is was the Republicans not engaging in tl!e process," he added. ''The fact that tl!e Democrats are standing up as a unified voice to protect the Inter­ests of the people of Texas and they have the ability to stay together as a cohesive group means that they're really look­ing out for their constituents. "That should be hopeful to GLBT Texans," Ellis said. ''They are willing to take risks." The redistricting plan backed by Texas Republicans would re-draw a number of For one thing; at least one congressional districts and anti-gay bill would fall if tl!e House does not return to session, and three pro-gay bills - relating to nondiscrimination in employ­ment, education and housing • also would stall on the Legislature's calendar. The walkout limits the opportunity for new or renewed anti-gay moves in the House, according to Ellis. "What it does do on another level is it will knock down the number of vehicles that anti-gay legislators could tack unfriendly amendments onto," he said. But the action by the Democrats also can give gay Texans hope for the future. "On another level. it should be encour­aging to GLBT Texans because we have give several a new majority of GOP voters. "While LGRL is a bipartisan organization. 1 think people have to reali1.e that in Texas, Democrats have traditionally stood up for the LGBT interests more so than the Republican Party," Ellis said. "A day that they're not on the House floor is a day that they can't gay bash." The redistricting bill is backed by U.S. House Majority Lead~r Tom DeLay, R-Sugar Land, the Chronicle reported. State con· gressional districts now give Democrats a 17·15 majority, but DeLay said districts should be redrawn to match statewide vot­ing patterns. according to the newspaper. The DeLay plan would give the GOP four to seven more seats in next year's elections. MAY 16. 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1177 LOCAL NEWS .. ·--·--·-·-··-·"·-···--3 NATIONAL NEWS."-····--···--·6 FORUM ·-·"·--·····-12 OUT ON THE BAYOIJ ______ 15 COMMUNITY CALENDAR ·--.21 APPOINTMENTS ·--21 CLASSIFIED "22 Q PUm.L._ " ___ .23 MY STARS, ________ ...., IN MEMORY Laurance Butlei: a member of the Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. will be remembered in a celebration of life this weekend. Page 5 NO COMMENT. U.S. Rep. Marie Foley (R-Fla) 1s preparing for a run for U.S. Senate, but wont dis­cuss a published report that renewed previous speculation that he is gay. Page 6. TIEN MURDER Newark, N J .. police have labeled the murder of Sakia Gtm 15. a bias crime after she was stabbed at a bus stop this week. Page 7. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Bl11d .. Suite 200. Houston, TX 770-06. Houston Voice 1s published weekly, on Friday, by Window Media LLC. Subscriptions are $92/'jear for 52 issues (only $177 per issue) 4 MAY 16. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I local news Military service records differ by gender FAMILIES. continued from Page l HRC, the Iargrst national le-sbtan and gay political organization 1n the United Stairs. this week announced thE results of an analysis of newly released Census 2000 data. The group comnussioned the study by th Urban Institute, a nonprofit nonpartl· san policy research and educational organi­zation, according to an HRC press release. Data on Texas families is among the earliest released from the analysis. The study comes on the heels of the Texas legislature's approval of a DOMA. which prevents the state from recognizing same-sex marriages or civil uruons. Texas already does not allow such uruons. Despite intense lobby­ing by gay Texans and groups such as the Lesbian/Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. the bill now goes to Gov. Rick Perry and will become law tf he signs it, which he is expected to do. "GLBT Texans are denied hundreds upon hundreds of nghts because they are not allowed to marry the person they love. The time for demanding equality is now," said Randall Ellis, executive director of the LGRL. MThis is not the end of this issue." Similarities across the board According to the Urban Institute study, the average Texas family headed by a same-sex couple shares many characteris­tics with other families m the state, includ-ing the number of children being raised, income and home value. The study showed that the average same-sex couple with children in Texas is raismg 1.90 children, while other average couples are ra1SlllJ 1.97 children The new data also revealed that the a\·er­age same-SE'JC couple has a median house­hold mcome of $55,000. while other Texas couples have a median mcome of $52,400. Same sex couples and other couples in Texas also share the same median property value of $85,000, according to the institute. In addition, the study showed that many gay men and women from Texas have served In the country's military alongside heterosexuals, although men and women appear less or more likely to serve depend· ing on their sexual orientation. The institute found that 9.7 percent of coupled lesbians m Texas have served in the military, compared with only 1.5 per· cent of married women: 14.6 percent of gay coupled men have served in the mili· tary compared with 29.1 percent of mar­ried men, according to the HRC. The new analyses \Vere drawn from the recently released Census 2000 One Percent Public Use Microdata Samples (PUMS>. a sampling of individual Census records from one in 100 U.S. households, HRC leaders stat· ed The Census does not ask questions about sexual orientation, but gay and lesbian fam­ilies are understood to be households where the respondent identifies another same-sex adult in the house as his or her "husband/wife" or "unmarried partner." Data about the nation s smgle gay and lesbian population is not available from the Census. Information on individual states is bemg released incremrntall)~ with Texas among the first 15 states to have data pub­lished, according to the HRC. A full report will be completed once stat1St1cs on all states are available. Differences are in laws Human Rights Campaign officials and gay activists said the new data emphasizes the injustice of discrimination against gay Texans. The size of families raised by same-sex couples is roughly the same as families headed by heterosexual couples. they point out, but the number of rights and protec· Uons they are granted lS not. Without any form of legal relationship recognition for same-sex couples. laws that most Texas families enjoy are not always available to children and families of same-sex couples, HRC officials stated. "The newly released Census 2000 data provides a detailed portrait of gay and les­bian families that can inform and frame public dialogue about issues that affect all American families." said Gary Gates, Ph.D., of the Urban Institute's Population Studies Center. "It reveals that laws on adoption, marriage, immigration, tax and military service clearly impact all Americans, regardless of sexual orientation." Arttv1Sts said many Texas laws are inherently unfair to gay couples and their children "What kind of society grants som€' chil· dren the secuJ1ty of a legal relationship to both of then- parents, but denies the &mie security to other children simply because of who their parents happen to be?" said Lisa Bennett, who runs the HRC Foundation's FamilyNet project "Gay and lesbian couples m Texas, along with their children, have been singled out for hardships and inequities that are reminiscent of Jim Crow laws." The Urban Institute was established to examine the soc1al, economic, and gover­nance problems facing the nation, accord· ing to an HRC press release. The Human Rights Campaign works to lobby Congress, provide campaign support and educate the public on behalf of lesbian. gay, bisexual and transgencler Americans. ft MOREINFO Urban lnstibrte www.urban.org Human Rights Campaign wwwhrc.org Gayribbean Cruises We are the Original and the Best. We have been sailing.from Galvestonfor over 6 years . • Gayribbean Halloween Cruise• October 26-November 2, 2003 This is going to be a frightfully good time! Join our fantastic group aboard the Elation sailing from Galveston to exotic ports of Cozumel, Progreso and Belize. This cruise has it all! •Parties •Mixers •Costume Contest •Great Entertainment •Group Dining •The GayGames •Optional All-Gay Shore Excursions •Gayribbean Cruise Host and So Much More! Interior Staterooms from $432.00* Ocean View Staterooms from $532.00* Our Rates include the Port Charges and Taxes ... (the other guys don't.) • Call TravelOUT to reserve your stateroom before it Is too late. 214-824-8765 888-813-994 7 Or book on-line at: www.GayribbeanCruises.com • Gayribbean Holidaze Cruise• December 6-11, 2003 Cruise from; $291.00* Sail aboard the Celebration and celebrate • the this holiday season .... ith Gayribbean Cruises. There is no better time to do your holiday shopping. Sail from Galveston to the beautiful ports of Cozumel and Calica/Playa de! Carmen where duty-free shopping and great deals are abundant. We offer the best holiday escape this .... inter. Book early rates will go up and space will sell-out! Interior Stateroom from $291.00* Ocean View Staterooms from $351.00* HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I around houston • Center for AIDS plans session on 'HIV: Past, Present and Future' As part of its "Conversations at the CFA," Houston's Center for AIDS presents a discus· sion next week as the last presentation in its tlu·ee-part series, "HIV: Past, Present and Future." The forum, titled "HIV and the Future: Revelations or Mysteries?" will be led by Dr. Richard Sutton. an assistant professor In Molecular Virology at Baylor College of A Medicine and a staff physician al Harris • • MORE INFO County Health Department's Thomas Street Conversations at the CFA Clinic. Di: Sutton combines both "ivory 6 p.m. dinner on Thursday, May 22 tower" research and "real life" patient care Center for AIDS to give attendees a unique perspective on 1407 Hawthorne this topic, according to a CFA press release. To RSVP call 713.5278219 or The public is invited. The series is funded E-mail: rich rocenterforaids.org by The Hollyfield Foundation. Community Gospel Church opens counseling center Christian counseling "without condem.na tion" for gays is the goal at the Community Gospel Life Counseling Center. according to leaders at Community Gospel Church in Houston. The center opened May 1. "The Life Counseling Center will fill the critical gap in thP.rapcutic services to our community," said <'hurch pastor Chris Chiles. kPersons in need will no longer have to hide their sexual olien­t. ition or their Christianity from their thera­pist" Counselor Dennis Schave will provide love, understanding, and sound advice, chw-ch leaders stated in a press relPase. kThe goal of the Life Counseling Center is to offer hope to all and especially to those within the GLBT community," Chiles said. "We want to dispel the notion that God does not love homosexuals and help people heal from this serious and common wound." The program offers a sliding scale fee system, and standard rates are $50-$75 per session. Schave, a profe:;­sional counselor with more than 35 years' experience, will offer private counseling ses­sions to explore spirituality, spiritual abuse, and general life challenges. His wife. Evelyn, a nationally known outspoken revival speak­er. also joins the centei: ~eoo~!~FO mmumty Gospel Church 05 Lillian • 713-880-9235 I obituary Bering volunteers honored Bering Omega Community Services honored a number of people at its Volunteer Appreciatmn Day. From left are John Haskins. a volunteer for administration: Lashonda Hopkins and Theodora Foster of Abundant Life Cathedral; Peg Nevers, an Omega House volunteer; and Gil Warrick. a volunteer for development Not pictured. but also honored as 2002-2003 Outstanding Volunteers were Steve Spillette. Adult Care Center; Greg Simpson, Financial Assistance; Susan Wood. Dental Clinic: Cynthia Holliday, Volunteer Services and Community Outreach; and Ken Hurt, Omega House. Beriag Omega Community Services assists indigent and uninsured people living with HIV/AIDS m the greater Houston area. The organization provides a number of health care and social services to people who have no other care alternatives, all at no cost to the client Assistance offered includes help with rent and ut1lit1es, dental services, adult day care and counseling (Photo by Dalton DeHart) Laurance Butler, 65, aerospace systems analyst Laurance Erwin "Larry" Butler, 6.5, of Houston died on Saturday, April 5, 2003. Butler was born on March 31, 1938, in Santa Monica, Calif. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1956 tol962. He then was employed as a systems analyst in the aerospace industry. He worked on the mission simula· tors for the Apollo and space shuttle programs. Butler was a member of the Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church and the Gay Men's Chorus of Houston, and supported many HIV-related charities. Survivors include his sister, Joy Spencer of Denver; brother. Edward Blakely of Annapolis. Md.; and many friends and extend­ed family, including Donald Bryant and family, and Julius Daguanno and family. A celebration of life will be held at 2 p.m. Saturda}; May 17. at Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church, 2025 11th Street at T. C. Jester. In lieu of flowers, dona· tions may be made to Body Positive Wellness Center of the Montrose Clinic, 3311 Richmond, Suite 100, Houston, TX 77098. PENNY WEAVER MAY 16. 2003 5 GAY MEN'S CHORUS of HOUSTON Saturday · June 7, 8:00 pm Sunday June 8, 3:00 pm Tuesday June 10. 8:00 pm Wednesday June 11, 8:00 pm Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church 2025 W. 11th Street $15 in advance $20 at the door Order on·line: www.gmch.org Order by phone: Box Office Tickets 800.494.8497 wliere tlie journey h.ome a[ways begins. featururg Robert Seeley's extrABBAganza! THE GREATEST HITS OF EXILE PUS ABBA • 11 was evident that the GMCH is ready to break out of ds comr:-u ty base and stake out a strong position in the city's perforr:- rg arts co"'mun ty • C/larles Wan1 ~ 2003 Houston Chronicle Publishing Company Repnn/ed "'th permission All "gnts reserved 6 MAY 16. 2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I natio al news • Newspaper says Fla. lawmal<er is gay Staff for Rep. Mark Foley says sexual orientation irrelevant to Senate bid By lAIJRA DOIJGlAS.BROWN U.S. Rep. Mark Fole}; a Republican cand1· da• for a U.S. Srna~ seat m Florida next year, "is gay" and "the people have a right to know." accordmg to a oolumn published last week 1n a weekly newspaper. No openly gay person has ever served in the U.S. Senate, but Foley's staff oontends the issue is irrelevant to voters. "Generall}; I just don't discuss Congressman Foley's personal life with reporters," Kirk Fordham, Foley's chlef of staff. told Houston Vm.ce on Tuesday when asked if Foley Is gay "When Congressman Foley travels around the state, voters are a lot more inter· ested in his view on things llke prescription drugs or Medicare reform or the threat ter· ronsm poses to their lives." Fordham said. "He doesn't ask about their personal lives and they certamly aren't asking about his.'' Foley was not available for interviews on the subject, according to Fordham. Foley and Fordham also declined mterviews w1th the New Times Broward-Pahn Beach for writ· er Bob Nonnan's oolumn, "Out with the Truth." In the column, Norman decries the way most media outlets have ignored the issue of Foley's sexual orientation, even \\bile report mg on possible controversy over hts positive voung record on gay ISSues The column quotes several sources - rangmg from a gay Democrat who serves on the Wilton Manors City Council to a staffer wtth Florida's chapter of the Christian Coalition - who say it is well-known, though not openly discussed, that Foley is gay. But the most direct evidrnce comes from Tracy Thorne, who gamed national recognition when he crune out while servmg m the C.S. mili­tary to protest the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell Policy" Thorne now an attorne}: has urged Foley to come out for }ears But he offered evidence for the first urne for h!S claim that the Florida Republ.=an IS rny, tellir"' Norman that Fo!ey a famil} friend brought his boyfriend on a 1S1t to the Thornes m the early 1990s 'What put 1t over the top was Tracy Thorne, Normlil told Houston Voice "He ha~ no reawn to ll_ about it" Thorr. could not be reached for com mcnt this week. Fordham. Foley s chief of staff, declmed to d.:scuss Tborne's claim Yet '1 would pomt out that Tracey who 1 thirut is a very courageous young man who certainly served hts country well made a dec1s1on whrr, he entrred the milnary to withhold informatlon about his own person· al life," Fordham added "He served for cro.1ite some time m the mili­tary dishonestl)( and I thJnk 1t IS unfair of hlrn to now demand that everyone else disclose details about thelr personal lives, espedally when it may affect their job or position in sociecy" Fole}: first elt>cted to the US. House in 1994, will formally announce "in the next oouple of months" his bid for the US. Senate seat currently held by Sen. Bob Graham (D-Fla.). according to Fbrdham. Graham's decision to run for the 2004 Democratic presidential nomination touched off a scramble of candidates, both Republicans and Democrats, for the potentially open Senate seat. Fbley has said he will run for the post even if Graham changes his mind and seeks re-election. NoopenlygaypersonhasEM!I"~ in the US. Sma1e, and only three out fL the 435 members fL the US. House ct Representatives are openly gay Out of the more than half-million elected offices 1n the country, there are 246 openly gay officials and only 17 in Florida. according to. the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund, a Washmgton, D.C.·based group that supports gay candidates across the country. Yet de~pite the potentially historic nature of Foley's race, the Victory Fund disagrees with Norman's decision to "out" him, said Jason Young. spokesperson for the group. "\\'"e are opposed to outing anyone," Young said. "We want people to be openly gay candi· dates by their choice - the whole idea is to be honest with the ~lectorate." Honesty vs. privacy As Norman notes m his oolumn, he is not the first journalist to broach the subject of Foley's se.~ual orientation, although he Is the first to state as fact that Foley is gay. National gay magazines Advocate and Out, before they both became owned by Liberation Publications, broached the sub­ject in 1996. when Foley rnted in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, which banned fed· era! recognition of gay marriages. "Frankl}; I don't think what kind of person: al relationships I have in my private life is of any relevance to anyone else." Foley said in a Y.Titten statement to the Adi.'OCate at the time. US Rep. Marie Foley (R-Flal won't publicly discuss htS sexual onentation. despite a newspaper column last week that reported he is gay (Photo by J. Scott Applewhite/AP) Whether "outing" a pubic official is ever appropriate was hotly debated then, and remains strongly contested today. "People who chose to lead a public life know that their lives are open for discussion to the media. Whenever it is relevant to a larger story, their sexual orientation, just like their tax returns or anything else, should be discussed," said Michelangelo Signorile, a gay writer and activist who penned the 1996 Out article. In the past. outing has w;ually been resen'ed for politicians who are gay and closeted, but oppooe gay rights. But with the exreption ci DOMA, Foley has supp<rted ~ OOcked by gays, b¥:1ud­ing co-sponsoring the Employment Non­Discrimination Act, a bill to 00n anliilaY job bias. ':As a conservative . he has been consis­tent in his view that govequnent should not interfere wtth private enterprise or private lives," f'ordharn said. But voters deseive to kmw If tha'e is another mouvation behind Fbley's votes, according to Norman, especially because they represent a "hard left turn" from his other Republican JX)Sittons. "Might not this be actually, for lack of a bet· ter word, for a se!f!Sh motive?" Norman said. Both supporters and opponents of outing framed their arguments in terms of privacy; citing the pending Supreme Court challenge to the Texas law banning gay sodomy. Norman said recent attention to the case and the now Infamous remarks by Sen. Rick Santorum CR·Pa.) supporting the law and com­panng homosexuality to incest and bestiality helped prolllllt him to pen his story outing Fol('}: "People in his party want to criminalize, or keep criminalizing, one of the most basic human expressions," he said. But Fordham called it "unfortunate" that •·some 1n the gay comnuuμty who, on the one hand, are outraged when Jaw enforcement offi· cials m Texas violate the rights of two men in their homes, then feel the need to pry into the personal lives of their elected officials." In addition to the Victory Fund, officials with the Human Rights Campaign and the I.DC Cabin Republicans - two national gay rights groups that have endorsed Foley in the past said they oppose out mg people against their will. Young, from the Victory F'und, also cited the Texas case in explaining why his group opposes the practice. "Gays and lesbians have Just been before the Supreme Court arguing for our right to privacy in our oomrnitted relationships, so to take that away from Congressman Foley or anyone else in the name of politics is just dirty and also hypocritical," Young said. Impact on Senate bid Of the three openly gay people currently scrv· ing in Coogress, only one-Rep. Tummy Baldwin (D-Wi~.)- came out prior to first being elocted to the bocfy Rep Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and Rep Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz.) were already servmg in the us. House when they acknowledged bclng C3}; although both have since been roelected. Foley "decided he would run, and he knew it would provoke lots of discussion and politics," Frank s:ud in an Atlanta, Ga, interview where he met this week with gay leaders to carnpa4,'11 for Democratic presidential candidate Sen. John KeITY (D-Mass.). "You stick your head out and you expect to take a couple of hits." How blg thn'le hits might be remains to be seen. Florida's Republican Party does not endorse candidates in the primary and had lit· tie official response to Norman's column. "Congressman Foley is a valued member of our Republican farnil;.: and we are not going to engage in this gossip and innuendo,'' said Towson Fraser. the state GOP's communirations directoi: Fordham, Foley's chief of staff, predicted Norman's column would have "very little impact" on the Senate race. "\'oters in Florida don't make their decisions based on second hand rumor and innuendo. They sec columns like the New Times as rather dis­tasteful, and It offends their sensibilities that a lib­eral publiartion that charnplO!IS the right to priva­cy would turn around and violate Mara Foley's right to privacy simply because he IS a oonseiv.1· tlve Republican," he said. Log Cabin director: Conservative groups hold GOP 'hostage' GOP MEET continued from Page I Many of the oonsenatIVe leaders demand ed from Rac1oot a clear. strong, unequivocal statement" from the GOP that declared homo­sexuaLty to be unmoral Knight's article sug g sted that If their demands were not met, many e\angehcal C'hr1suan~ would stay home on Election Day m 200i Mark Mead JC ltlcal director of the gay Lo Ca m R pub 1 !l t oned the ll')al ty of these groups to the Republican Party. "They say to the Republican leadership. 'Do this, or we'll walk away.' LCR does not agree with e\erything the Republican Party does but I can assure you that we are not walkmg away. These people hold the presi· dent and Marc Racicot hostago on these issues." Racicot did not respond to calls seekmg cc.. !Ilent IX t Ix told that there was no gcnet- 1c link to homosexuality, Racioot told the groups that he didn't knoo' what caused homo­sexuality nor did he know how much was "genetic or envll'Onrnent." according to the Knight article. While governor of Montana. Racicot enacted a state emp!o}ee non-<llscrimmation policy that included sexual orientation. He attempted to repeal the state s 50domy la\\ in 1993 and was criticized by the Christian Coal1t1on for the Pffort, which ultimately failed. According to the llRC, he opposed leg. 1slative efforts In 1995 to add gay people to Montana's sexual offenders registry. HRC said Racicot also signed a bill in 1998 that made same-sex marriage illegal tn Montana. Smith said that while Racicot spoke of inclusion to more than 300 gay rights activists on March 7 the first t1me ever that a sitting GOP chair addressed a gay audience he did· n't articulate any policy decisions. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com MAY 16, 2003 7 I national ne s New Jersey lesbian, 15, murdered at bus stop Newark police call it a bias crime By KEVIN SPENCE NEWARK. N.J. - A 15-year-old girl was fatally stabbed at a bus stop here after returning from a Greenwich Village party with her friends early in the morning on Sunday; May 11. Newark police are treating the murder as a bias crime after someone in the group told her assailant they were gay. Two men in a white station wagon were passing by the five teenagers at the corner of Broad and Marl<et Streets. a few blocks from Newark's Pennsylvania Station, and taunted the group with sexual suggestions around 3:30 a.m. An argument followed after the teenagers rejected their advances. One of the men then thrust a knife into Sakia Gunn's chest. After the incident, the men fled. "One of the girls expres.c;ed her sexualit};" Lt. Derrick Glenn of the Newark Police Department told the Voice. The New York Times has reported that one of the girls told the men they were not interested in them because the girls were ga,)l Glenn said the perpetrators at first did not know the girls were gey A friend of Gunn's then signaled a pass­ing motorist, who drove the victim to University Hospital in Newark. She died a Sakia Gum was stabbed to death on Sunday at a bus stop. in what police are calling a bias crime. short time later. "There is a warrant out for his arrest," said Glenn about 29-year-old Richard McCullough. When apprehended, he will face charges of homicide, weapons possession and bias intimidation. On Mon~; May 12, the Essex County Prosecutor's Office determined that the sophomore at West Side lligh S<'hool. was, m fact, the victim of bias crime. "The murder didn't have nothing to do with her being bisexual." Maurice Gunn. the victim's uncle, told the Voice. LaTuna Gunn told a reporter from the Newark Star-Ledger that her daughter was gay. All five girls (ages 15 to 17) dressed like boys, she said. LaTuna Gunn told the Times, "I won't know what kind of crime this is until I talk to the guy who did it and he tells me. All I know is that my child is gone now." GET THE AmNTION YOU DESERVE I AND DO IT FOR A LOT LESS THAN YOU THINK! Run •ny Ml In Houston Voice Cl•sslfleds for only $12.50 per w-k for the flnt 25 words, •nd 911C:h addltlonal word is only 50( more. HOUSTONVOICEclasslflecls Sakia Gunn was a member of the West Side High girls' basketball team until low grades forced her to the sidelines last year. She had hopes of someday playing for the Women's National Basketball Association. By several accounts popular v.ith other stu­dents. Gunn. whose nickname was "T." had a talent for braiding hair and often created hairstyles for her friends. '1'he teachers and the coach are having a hard time dealing with this." said Michelle Baldwin. a spokesperson for the Newark Board of Education. Calls to West Side lligh School were not returned by press time. Maurice Gunn told the Associated Press that several students were wearing T­shirts with Gunn's likeness on them. Glenn, who is a 15-year veteran of the police department. said that Newark has not recorded a high incidence of bias crimes. He said he found Gunn's murder particularly upsetting for personal reasons. "I tend to have more of a personal issue with this because some of my close friends and family members are gay," he said. Clarence Patton, a spokesperson for the New York City Gay & Lesbian Anti-Violence Project, noted that this case was unique. In most gay-related bias crimes. the perpetrator believes that the victim is gay or transgen· dered. Here, the killer did not know Gunn's sexual orientation when he approached her. Often, the perpetrator of anti-bias crimes claims, "I got so upset I had to kill them," Patton said. "This is the flip-side of that. A woman is dismissive to the violence of men, and they pay for it with their lives. It's still unclear how old these murderers are, but these were young girls." "There's no way around it This young woman had her whole life ahead of her, n he said. Gunn's murder was especially senseless, he said, "because of her dismis sive attitude toward these men." Most cases of crimes against lesbians involve sexual a~sault, not murder, Patton added. The police are continuing to look for more information about Gunn"s murder Until then, the real rea<-0n for Gunn's murder will remain unknov.n, he added. "Until the im-es­tigation is complete and you have statements from all parties, you don't have any public records," said Glenn about the killer's moti\'e. "We are following up leads in search of hlm." "It's sad. Their lifestyle didn't interfere with anyones," Glenn said. "It's like racism. It hasn't progressed, even in this case. Ifs an aspect we're investigating." Alicia Toby-Heath and Saundra Heath­Tuby, Newark residents who are being rep­resented by Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund in a landmark case for same-sex union rights. expressed. shock at the murder. ''We have stood on the street corner where this happened man)': many times while waiting for a bus." the women said in a statement "For a proposition to turn violent all because this time the pret - ty girl is a lesbian shocks and frightens us " Tues. May 27 and Thurs. May 29 ARGARETCH TICKET GIVE- W Y! Meteor and Houston Voice want you to win FREE TICKETS to the Margaret Cho concert at Verizon Wireless Theatre on May 30th. We'll also be giving away DVDs and CDsl NOTORIOUS MARTINIS only $5! 8 MAY 16. 2003 Join 11$ tit e lot one of --- -R-E-WSWU'-R--R-~E--C'TV.I-O..N, METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 2025 W. 1 lth St.@ TC.Jester• 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org "Building Community Through Compassion• Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/ Children's area Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1.net www.maranathamcc.com www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE §around the nation Gephardt's lesbian daughter to join presidential campaign WASlilNGTON (AP)-Rep. Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.) said his lesbian daughter. 3(}.year-0ld social worker Chrissy Gephardt. would seek backing for him from the nation's gay voters as he campaigns for the Democratic presi· dential nomination. "Chrissy is a lesbian. She's a great young woman. She's doing great ·work," Gephardt said May 8 on CNBC's Capital Report." I'm very proud of her. and I want her help in the campaign. She's going to help with gay and lesbian people, but she's going to help with people all over the country" Gephardt's campaign Web site, in a section about his family, makes a brief refer· ence to Chrissy's live-in partner, Amy. Vice President Dick Chene~; a Republican. has a gay daughter, Mary. who worked for him in the ~ campaign, traveling with her father full-time as his personal aide and a con· stant presence in his inner circle. But Mary Cheney did not work specilically with gay voters and has not s~ ken publicly about her sexual orientation. Professional athlete stands by comments against gays DENVER - Colorado Rockies pitcher Todd Jones again spoke out about gays m a May 7 column for SportingNews.com. "They think I'm a gay-hater, a narrow· minded redneck from Alabama who ain't never been nowhere .... I stand by what I said, but I'd like to tell you the context of how it happened," Jones wrote. The pitcher was referring to comments April 27 to the Denver Post, when he said he "wouldn't want a gay guy bemg around me." In his column for Sporting News. Jones said his comments focused on the "delicate" clubhouse atmosphere, where "guys shower together." "If there were a gay guy on the team, you can't tell me that it wouldn't be a huge distraction from what the team was trying to accom­plish," Jones wrote. Meanwhile, last week pitcher John Rocker - who made headhnes in 1999 for anti·gay remarks when he played for the Atlanta Braves - returned to Major League Baseball, called up by the Tampa Bay Devil Rays. Rocker signed a minor league contract with the Devil Rays on April 10. "Maybe I'm a little wiser than I was four, five years ago." Rocker said. McDonald's appeals ruling for employee with AIDS CLEVELAND - A three-judge panel of the Eighth Ohio District Court of Appeals heard arguments May 5 in an appeal by McDonald's in a case alleging the restaurant chain forced out an employee who had AIDS, the Gay People's Chronicle reported. Russell Rich, who is gay and a former McDonald's manager, sued the company and its Ohio franchise under the federal Americans with Disabilities Act and Ohio state laws. A jury sided with Rich in October 2001. awarding him $5 million in compensatory damages. But :..tcDonald's has not yet paid anything to' Rich. The chain's attorneys argue in their appeal that he is not disabled. Paige Martin, Rich's attorney, said he would seek more damages if the compa. ny wins its request for a new trial or reduced verdict. Calif. Supreme Court weighs gay adoptions SAN FRANCISCO - The California Supreme Court is expected to rule within 90 days on whether second-parent adop­tions. commonly used by lesbian and gay parents, are legal under state law. On May 7, the state's highest court heard testimony in the case of a lesbian couple, named in court records as Sharon S. and Annette F., who split up after their second child was born. Sharon was the birth mother for both children: Annette adopted the first and was in the process of adopting the sec­ond when their relationship ended. Trying to block the second adoption, John Dodd, Sharon's attorney, argued that allowing such adoptions creates "no limit to the number of parents. and I think that is a frightening possibili~;" according to the Los Angeles Times. Charles Bird, Annette's attorney, argued that "from the perspective of the child, whether the func­tioning parents are married is irrelevant." In questions to the attorneys, the state's supreme court justices appeared to lean towards upholding the adoptions by gays and other unmarried partners, the Times and the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Ind. judge dismisses gay marriage lawsuit INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Marion County Superior Court Judge S.K. Reid dismissed a lawsuit challenging Indiana's ban on rec· ognizing same-sex unions. ruling that state law clearly defines marriage as a union between a man and a woman. Such a law, Reid said in the May 7 ruling, "pro­motes the state's interest in encouraging procreation to occur in a context where both biological parents are present to raise the child." The Indiana Civil Liberties Union said it would appeal the ruling. Three gay couples ftled the lawsuit last summer, seeking state recognition of gay couples or at least recognition of civil union from other states. "Same-sex cou· pies in a committed relationship are no dif· ferent than married couples. The time has come to recognize that," said ICLU attor­ney Ken Falk. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I' .., . police beat Gay L.A. police officer faces hearing in sexual abuse case LOS ANGELES A grand jury began a closed door hearing May 6 into sexual abuse allegations against gay Deputy Los Angeles Police Chief David Kalish, according to the Los Angeles T1mes. Three former members of a police out· reach program for at-risk boys aged 14·21 allege Kalish sexually molested them in the 1970s wh"n he was a uniformed officer. Prosecutors laid out evidence found during a five· month LAPD inves tigatton that endrd with Kalish's suspension in March. The investigation began with two civil claims against Kahsh, the> police department and the city filed by former youth charges. One accused Kaltsh of "sexually fondling him, molesting him and forcing, coercing" him into sexual acts for four years beginning at age 14, A decision whether to send Kalish to trial is expected by the end of the month. A grand jury opened tesitmony last week m the sexual abuse case against gay Los Angeles Deputy Police Chief David Kalish. who stands accused of molesting teenage boys in the 1970s. (Photo cour· tesy Los Angeles Police Department) Man ordered to stand trial in death of Calif. prosecutor BAKERSFIELD, Calif. {AP) - A man charged in the stabbing death of a gay assistant district attorney was ordered May 6 to stand trial. Chris Hillis stands accused of first-degreP murder in the September death of Stephen Tauzer, a gay man who housed Hillis' 22-year-old son Lance. Witnesses in a preliminary hearing last week testified that Tauzer urged drug treatment for Lance, but Hillis wanted his son to serve time in jail. Chris Hillis' father, Donald Hillis, testi­fird that his son "joked" several years ago about killing Tauzer. DNA evidence was found on a knife near Tauzer's body and on a beer bottle inside the home that linked Chris Hillis to the crime scene. Kyle Humphrey, an attorney for Hillis, said the evidence is inconclusive. "They say they found DNA on a beer bottle in the kitchen, yet if they're serious that Chris hated Mr. Tauzer enough to kill him, I certainly can't see the two of them sharing a beer," Humphrey said. Arraignment is set for May 14. Transgendered Conn. inmate begins hormone therapy DANBURY, Conn. - A transgendered male inmate who said federal prison offi· cials denied him hormone therapy began receiving the injections May 8, according to the Hartford Courant. Jesse Carr, who was born Jessica Carr, is a 21-year-old college student from Ohio serving a three-month sentence for trespassing after n November arrest during a protest at a U.S. Army training school at Fort Benning, Ga Carr was receiving testos­terone injections regularly smce November, and stopping the treatments abruptly can cause medical problems. Carr's supporters said that he finally began receiving his shots and was assured by officials that his medical regi· men won't be interrupted. Carr's attor· ney, Bill Quigley, said he thought the treatments were withheld because of a bureaucratic problem that prevented Carr's medical records from arriving in Danbury. "Prisons are tough institutions to run, and this is an unusual situation," Quigley said. Paris mayor's alleged attacker found fit to stand trial PARIS {AP) - Psychiatrists examining a man accused of stabbing the gay mayor of Paris found him fit to stand trial May 9, saying also that he was at least partially responsible for his actions in the attack. A first team of psychologists found Azedine Berkane unfit for trial in December, but a judge ordered a second opinion. The latest rl'port said that emotional problems did not make Berkane unable to resist vio· lent impulses. Berkane is accused of knifing Mayor Bertrand Delanoe at a public party in October. He told lnvesti· gators he attacked the mayor because he disliked gays. Delanoe suffered a sen· ous wound to the abdomen but recov­ered. The presiding judge must now weigh the findings and decide whether to send Berkane to trial. His defense attorney protested the exam results and requested further tests. 'Cowardly' attack on lesbian gets U.K. man three years LONDON - A man was sentenced May 5 to three years in prison for what a judge called a "cowardly" attack on a lesbian, the London Free Press reported. Superior Court Justice Dougald McDermid said he could see "no other conclusion" but that 24-year-old Christopher Broughton "assaulted the complainant because she was a lesbian Homosexuals ... have the same right as any other citizen to walk down the street of this or any other city without fear of assault." The 23-year-old woman and her 30-year old partner were at a club the night of the attack and left holding hands. Broughton made remarks about "faggots and lesbians" and said the women should perform a sex act on him. according to court records. He began punching the younger woman, then grabbed her ponytail and pulled her to the ground, where he kicked her in the head. Broughton has been in jail since the arrest and now has 28 more months left on his sentence. 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GET TESTED FREE ANONYMOUS HIV/STD TESTING Houston Area Community Services 3730 Kirby Dr. Suite 1165 • Houston, TX 77098 713-526-0555 ext. 226 IV~ervlces nlna C()uncil \ ~et nd Add Your Input to Ions ' Priorities about.L ing H~/AIDS Services I n~rea 1 1ng Will Be Held At uncil Chamber www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE ijm i al repo Global AIDS Fund in need of cash, Congressional study says WASHINGTON (AP) - An international fund that is a key to the Bush admm1Stratlon's $15 billion plan to fight global AIDS is threatened by a lack of money. according to a congressional report made public last week. The report by the General Accounting Office, the investiga· ttve Wing of Congress, could bolster the argument of some that the administration needs to do more to support the Geneva-based Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. Earller this month, the House passed a five.year, $15 billion p:ickage to fight AIDS glob­ally. The Senate is expected to take up the measure soon. Up to 1 billion m fiscal year 2004 Is earmarked for the Global Fund, which has been worlcing since January 20ro. Rep, Jim Kolbe (R-Arlz.), the gay chair of th<' Appropnahons Subcommittee on Foreign Operations. said his panel enthusiastically supported the president's efforts to establish the Global Fund, but "we are aware of the vulnerability of any organization awarding large sums of money Jn countries that are poorly governed and often corrupt." The GAO warned that a lack of resources ''threatens the Fund's ability to approve and fmance addi· tional grants." It said the Fund currently has less than $300 million to support the next round of grants later this year, well short of the Fund's projections that it will receive l.6 billion in technically sound proposals. A Congressmnal report released last week dunng a hearing of the House Appropriations subcommittee on for eign operations, chaired by gay Rep. Jim Kolbe (R-Ariz), said a global AIDS fund is threatened by a lack of money (Photo by AP/Elise Amendola) Gays more likely to be left-handed, study says FULLERTON, Calif. Gay men are much more likely to be left·handed than heterosexual men, according to new study by California State University, Fullerton. According to the report pub· lished last month in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, a little more than 3 percent of heterosexual men are exclu­sively left-handed, compared with near­ly 8 percent of gay 111en. Taking into account people who are ambidextrous, the study concluded that gay men had 82 percent greater odds of being non-right· handed than heterosexual men. Lesbians had a 22 percent greater chance of being non·right·handed than heterosexual women, the study said. The report was based on a survey of about 2,000 people in Southern California. About half of those polled were gay. The report noted that a larger study published three years ago found that gay men had a 34 percent greater chance of being non·right-handed and lesbians had a 91 percent greater chance of being non-right·handed as compared with their heterosexual counterparts. The study:S author, Dr Richard A. Lippa, discussed four complex th!'ories to explain the differences that include a number of hormonal, genetic, and envi· ronmental factors present in the devel· opment of a fetus. Calif. officials want more resources to fight crystal meth use SAN FRANCISCO About 150 people attended a May 7 hearmg about a grow ing crystal methamphetamine problem, which health experts say is fueling an increase in HIV infections among gay and bisexual men, accordmg to the San Francisco Chronicle. The hearing fol· lowed a Chronicle series documenting that 30 percent of those with new HIV Infections at one high-risk clinic report ed using crystal meth in the previous six months. The articles also showed how state health officials found that gay men who use the drug are twice as like­ly to be HIV-positive, and that men who use crystal are less likely to use con· doms. At the forum, health officials said that already limited resources needed to be focused on counseling and preven· tion because mental health problems underlie much of the crystal use. "I fear our waiting lists (for treatment and counseling) are just going to get longer," Michael Siever. director of the Stonewall Project, a speed recovery pro­gram for gay men, told the newspaper. Crystal 111eth is a powdery substance that can be swallowed, injected, snorted or smoked. It is often referred to as "Crissy," "Tina," "tweak" and "crank." West African fonn of HIV reached humans by 1940, report says WASHINGTON (AP) - One form of the virus that causes AIDS made the jump from animals to people by 1940, a new analysis indicates. HIV-2 didn't become widespread until the 1960s, perhaps spread during a war in the West African country of Guinea·Bissau. where researchers say It originated HlV-2, which is common in West Africa, is genetically d Lfferent from HIV· I, the virus that has spread around the world, also caus1ng AIOS. An international team of researchers studying the genetic code of two subtypes of HIV·2 r!'ported that one type first entered the human population before 1940 and the other before 1945. Their findings are repo11ed in the onllne editton of Proceedings of the National Academy or Sciences. A pre­vious analysis of the e"Volutionary tree or HIV-1 Indicated it moved into humans around 1930. From staff and wire reports www.houston voice.com international news Canadian lawmaker says gays should 'shut up' about marriage TORONTO - Lawmaker Elsie Wayne has refused to retract comments that gay men and lesbians wishing to marry should just "shut up," the Toronto Globe & Mail reported. Wayne, 71, an outspoken MP from New Brunswick, spoke up during parliamentary debate about same-sex marriage. "Why do they have to be out here in the public, always debating that they want to call it mar· riage? Why are they in parades? Why are men dressed up as women on floats?" she said. "If they are going to live togethe1; go live together and shut up about it." Tory Leader Joe Clark, well-known for his progressive views on gay rights, said Wayne has "extreme views" on this issue, but stressed they do not reflect his own views or those of his party, CNews of Canada reported. In Ottawa. a Liberal member of Parliament reiterated his view that allowing gays to marry could open the door to polygamy, CBC News reported May 10. "Don't tell me Ralph and Elsie Wa'j!W!. 71. a member of the Bob being together is marriage, because to me it's just Canadian parhamenl asked in a wrong," Pat O'Brien told CBC Radio. "If you're going to debate why gays 'have to be out throw open the defmition of marriage so you destroy it here in the public, always debating in essence, how do you know you can ever draw the line that they want to call it marriage.' any place? If I want two or three wives and want that considered legal marriage, who are you to tell me I can't do that?" Australian leaders lower gay male age of consent SYDNEY. Australia - The age of consent for gay men will be dropped to 16 at the same time as new penalties for child sexual assault by adults in positions of trust are introduced under an overhaul of New South Wales sex crime laws, the Sydney Morning Herald reported last week. The proposed changes will create a uniform age of con sent for men and women, bringing NSW into line with every other state except the Northern Territory. Currently, the age of consent for heterosexual intercourse is ·16, while 1t is 18 for gay sex. But because les· bian sex Is not defined under the law. gay activists have battled the inequality between the ages of consent for lesbians and gay men. The amendments to the NSW Crimes Act will be debated when parha· ment returns next week and come nearly two decades after the former Labor Premier Neville Wran decriminalized homosexuali­ty following the 1984 state election. Gay spa commercial raises controversy MELBOURNE, Australia - Family groups have condemned television advertising for a gay men's spa, saying the ad amounts to a "recruitment drive," the Melbourne Herald Sun reported. The ad, to be screened on com­mercial channels this summer, shows two young men leaving a crowded pub to go to the gay spa Wet on Wellington. Bill Muehlenberg, vice president of the conservative Australian Family Association, said he expects a public outccy "They are trying to get new recruits, fresh blood almost, into the community," he said. Muehlenberg compared the ad to cigarette commercials encouraging young people to take up smoking. "To be advertising that lifestyle, or promoting that lifestyle, is not in the interest of the community in terms of public health," he said. But Damien Kimber, who produced the ad and is manager of Wet on Wellington, defended the commer­cial as "a bit cL fun" and denied it was aimed at straight men. "It is for men who like men and want a venue to explore that," he said. EU presses Malta to outlaw discrimination against gays ST. JULlANS, Malta The EU Commission is pressing the Maltese gov· ernment to ban sexual orientation dis· crimination in the workplace, in line with union directives, The Independent report· ed Sunday. Although Maltese labor laws ban discrimination in principle, the new EU directive states that gays are at a high· er risk of being discriminated against in the workplace and grants them special pro­tection. The same directive prohibits dis· crimination on grounds of age, disability. race and religion or belief. But the Maltese government is refusing to adopt the full EU directive, arguing that existing legisla tion is enough to ban discrimination against gay men and lesbians at the place of work. Lawrence Gonzi, Maltese social policy minister, said current meas.ures outlaw all forms of discrimination in Malta, making a proposal specifying some forms unnecessary. Gay men's surrogate baby plans under ethics review WELLINGTON, New Zealand - For the first tJIDe, an application for two gay men to have a surrogate baby is being consid· ered by a New Zealand ethics committee, the Dominion Post reported Sources say a New Zealander who lives in Europe has returned to Auckland with his European partner after the man's sister agreed to be the surrogate mother. The European man would father the child through artificial insemination. The couple plan to return to Europe after the birth. The Government's National Ethics Committee on Assisted Human Reproduction considered the pro­posal in March, but deferred a decision pending more information. According to minutes of the meeting, members were concerned about the welfare of the child, the young age of the men and the age dif· ference between them. From staff and wire reports Work where you con make a difference. ~~---- Advertising Account Eirecuth1e The Houston Voice, the region's GLBT media leader, 1s seeking an advertisin~ account e\CCU· live. You'll be re<>pons1ble for all phases of the 5.lie> proce5s: qualifying; cold-calling; prospect development; conceptualizing, pl.inning and delivering sales presentations: vmtmg proposals, negotiating contracts and closing new b1Nness. At least one year of print or on-line advertis­ing <ales expenence preferred, but not necessary. We offer a challenging and exerting opportunity in a fast1iaced, goal-<Jriented (yet fum enwon­mcnt. We offCf competitrYe compensation; spe­cific training and a comprehen<ive benefits pad· age including hcalthldent.il/hfe insurance, gener· ous p.ud holidiys, vacation and more. If you have a pro\lt'n trac:lc record in 5.lles, are result,-dnven and want to help build a newspaper that has a positive impact on your community. we want to hear from you. MAY 16. 2003 11 Send cover letter and re,ume to· Creneral Manager, The Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006. Fax. (713) 529·9531. Ecfll.1il. demenchOhouston1101c!e.con Administrative Assistant, Part-Time If you are a self-starter who 1s organized accustomed to multi tasking and proficient in M1c<esoft Word and Excel, we'd like to hear more about you. We offer a dynamic environment. excellent compensation, flexible pan-time hours (20 hours per week) and the opponumty for advancement Send co.,,.,,. /etter and re,ume to: General .\\anager, The Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, ~u1te 200, Hooston, TX 77006. Fax: (713) S2'J.9531 E-mail: demenchOhoustonvo1ce.com Looking for a partner? Partner with .AMERICAN Cor-:suMER CREDIT CoIDISEIJ};G TM Crttlll Co11N•tli11K l'ro.fmionaJ• ACCC is dedicated to helping consumers regain control of their personal finances. Take the next step tn fighting your debt battle. As our partner you can be assured that we will do our best to reduce your interest rates, reduce your monthly payments and reduce the time required to pay off your debt, The choice 1s ywrs .•• Start today and we will worl< wlth you every step of the way to regain your financrat frettlom. Call now for a free no obligation consultation 1-800-867-3407 A , , •ader in the credit couns• · ', · ,J, , · ry www.consumercredit.com l1f1ilE!4td1i voice STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION fxeculi'le Editor CHRIS CRAIN ElilDr PENNY WEAVER editor a;houslOllWICe.C001 Pnxb:tion BONNIE NAUGLE, JOEY CAROUNO Correspoodents: :.OU CHIBSARO JR. !AURA IlOOGl.AS-HROWN. MIKE FW.IING. IATTHEW HENNIE. BRIAN MOl'lAN. KEVIN NAFF JEN'~IFER SMITH RHONDA SMITH. STEVE WEINSTEIN OlntrhJ!ors JA CHAPMAN. LEE DAVIS. TINA KING ~ DAI.TON DO!ART KIMBERLY TllOMPSON Webnaster JED DEMPSEY SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANIEi. EMERICH demericfl'.a;houstonvoiceaJm Amxl1t Executives BRITT CUUUM - bculknn:a;houstonwice.com BRIAN MARTIN - bmarlin:.ii.houstonvoice.com National Adver1isino RepresenbtM RNendel Marteting ~. Inc. 212-242-6863 l'lilisher- WINDOW MEDIA UC President· WIUIAM WAYBOURN EditDrial Director· CHRIS CRAIN Cor'por3te Ccntllller· BARNITTE HOl.STON Art Director· ROB BOEGER General MwQer· MICHAEl KITCHENS Mneli1g MwQer· DAN GARRIOTI rn ........ ~~·· MEMBER ... ._da 1Dr ................... .,_ DWITTR MEMBER Est.!brlShed 1974 as the Mmtrose ~ 500 l..oYett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 WWW .houstonvoice.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 am to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To Slbnit a letter l..et!m slo4d lie fewer than 400 Wtll'ds. We mem! the right to edit for cooten1 and length. We will wi!li1old names upon request. but you llllSl indude ,.xr name and phone runber for ~fication. Please sad mail to Houston \'ace. 500 IJMtt Blvd. Slile 200, Hooston. Texas 77006; fax (7l3) 529-9531 °' HnaiJ lo edlri;hooston­WllCe. Clllll. OpirD1S expressed therein do not reflect those al the Houston Voa. Issue 1177 editorial A tribute to mom Mother's Day and backlash for Sen. Rick Santorum reminded everyone of maternal strength and that hell hath no fury like an angry PFLAG mom. By KEVIN NAFF Ill OTHER'S DAY IS ONE OF those rare Hallmark holi­days that doesn't make me cringe. For starters, it's not a true manufactured American holirlay, with roots in the ancient Greek celebrations of Rhea, mother of the Gorls and formal recognition in the United States by President Woodrow Wilson in 1914. More importantly, moms routinely e:ililblt the kind of strength and character that merits a day of recognition. Just last week as the holiday loomed, I retneved a voice mail from a particularly angry PFLAG mom irate over Sen. Rick Santorum's (RPa) recent anti-gay remarks and his subsequent failure to apologize to a roomful of PFLAG supporters. Santorum apparently wasn't comfort­able meeting with actual gay people and thought he might get off easy by meeting their parents and friends instead. He was wrong. According to reports from those who attended the .!\1ay 1 meeting, the good senator was in such a hurry to escape that he tripped over a chair on his way out. Only a wronged mother could inspire such fear In a U.S. senator. I was inspired. too, by a recent story involving an Arkansas teenager who came out at h1.s high school only to be marched to an assIStant principal's office where he was forced to recite biblical pas­sages condemning homosexuality. School officials later outed the kid to his parents. But nobody warned those school officials that the mother, Delia McLaughlin, is a force to be reckoned \\1th. "If anybody is preaching to this kid or throwing Scriptures at him. it's going to be me," she said. "I don't worry, they'll get theirs. Judge not, lest you be judged yourself." McLaughlin not only supported her son against the school system, she pur­sued legal action to remove any mention of disciplinary measures related to his sexual onentation from her son's record. She granted an interview in March and her photo ran with the story. Imagine being 14 again and opening up a gay newspaper to find your mother's picture alongside a story about gay rights. As if that weren·t enough, the son said that his mother fully supports his display­ing a poster in his bedroom of a man emerging from a swimming pool. "Why not, you know," McLaughlin said when our reporter asked about it. Why not, lnrleed. MOST m· US HAVE MORE CO.MPUCATED relationships with their mothers, although more and more of us are lucky enough to have open-minded, supportive moms. My own mom was upset when I came out to her not because her old· est son is gay, but because I didn't tell her sooner. The moms of PFLAG were busy last week, coordinating Capitol Hill visits to congressional offices while lobbying for a range of pro-gay initiatives. Among the moms' demands: passage of a hate crimes bill and the Employment Non· Discrimination Act inclusive of gender identity protections: and passage of the Permanent Partners Immigration Act. a House bill in need of a lead sponsor In the Senate. In addition. PFLAG members are working to oppose a disturbing number of conservative judicial nominees backed by President Bush who have decidedly anti· gay records. The PFLAG moms who canvassed the Hill carried with them photos of their gay loved ones, and they describe those photos as among their most powerful tools. "There is no argument quite so strong as the one that says, 'I do this work not for myself. but for these friends and loved ones."' says one mom on the PFLAG Web site. ALSO. AS ANOTHER MOTHER'S DAY passes mto memory, we should be remind- HOUSTON VOICE MAY 16, 2003 PAGE 12 Delia McL1ughlin mother of a gay teen who was forced to recite biblical passages by school officials. set an example for mothers by defending her son. (File photo by AP) ed of th" growing number of lesbians and even gay men who are taking on the responsibility of parenthood. According to recently released figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. one-third of lesbian couples and one-fifth of male cou· pies now have children living in their homes. The numbers speak to a trend among gays: in 1990. only one in 20 same­sex male couples had children, while 22 percent of lesbian couples had kids. In a related move earlier this year, Washington, D.C., officials announced a plan to recruit gay men and lesbians to arlopt the city's abanrloned children. As of March 21, about 200 D.C. children and teens between the ages of 6 and 18 were in need of a foster home. "We urgently need foster homes in the Distnct of Columbia," said Maureen !'AcFarlden. supervisor for adoption and foster parent recruitment for the Child & Family Services Agency. "Unlike other jurisdictions. we are looking openly for GI.BT foster parents." So if you forgot to call your mom last weekend. take heart and pick up the phone for what she has done for you and for the PFI.AG moms who work hard on behalf of advancing gay rights. If nothing else, do it for the 33 percent of lesbian couples ratsing children and especially for Delia McLaughlm. Kevin Naff IS managing editor of the Washington Blade, Sisler publication of Houston Voice, and can be reached at knaff@washblade.com HOUSTON VOICE wwwhouston voice.com I letters Both sides to blame for statehouse lockdown To the Editor: I have viewed the current state of dys­function in Austin with great interest. I am an endangered species in Texas: an Independent. I vote for the person and their pos1· tions, integrity, record. experience, etc. Many times people like me swing elec­tions one way or the other, but neither party wants to recognize us because we don't do everything they say. I do not blindly vote for a party; I am objective and not partisan. I look behind all the political rhetoric at the logical. rational issues, so let me try to give you my view on this situation. The Democrats have walked out because they were not allowed a voice in something as critical as congressional redistricting. The current districts were drawn by a three-member judicial court. The proposed districts have been drawn by Tom DeLay and his colleagues in Austin, without input from many afiected groups. I would trust three judges to be objective far more than I would trust DeLay and his colleagues. The proposed districts look like a Picasso print with wildly jagged bound· aries; the current districts look much more block-like and seem to encompass entire communities and neighborhoods. DeLay says his map reflects what Texans voted for in the 2002 elections a state dominated by Republicans in statewide offices must equal a state dominated by Republicans in Congress too - so it is right. The weight of logic here says DeLay's way is wrong. I must have missed some­thing in the 2002 elections I guess. I thought we were voting for governor, lieu· tenant governor. etc. I did vote for most Republicans for statewide office, because they had the best candidate for the job, not because of the party they represented or because I viewed it as a referendum for a Republican plan to dominate and change all the Congressional districts. If that had been on the ballot, myself and thousands like me would have voted a dif· ferent way. I find it highly offensive that DeLay would twist voting results around this way. Who elected him to be in charge of this? Again, I did not; I saw him nowhere on my ballot, and he does not represent me or most Texans. only his little district in Sugarland. The statewide office elections ire not a mandate to do what he and his colleagues in Austin are trying to do. I applaud the Democrats for standing their ground. but it does not mean I would vote for them in an election. Apparently all the good con· sensus building that George W Bush did in Austin to get things done has evaporat· ed in the heat of partisan politics, and I blame both sides for that. Shame on all of the principles here. Why can't we work together as Texans? The whole nation is chuckling. and 1t is at both sides. Mike Johnson • Houston Former EJ's bartender thanks benefit supporters To the Editor: I would like to thank all of the Montrose community for your every kindness. It means more than you know at this time. I have always heard that if you are lucky, when you die you can say you have one true friend. With that in mind, I am truly blessed. Thank you all for everything and a special thanks to everyone at EJ's. Wil a.k.a. Wilma William Johnson Houston Editor's Note: The kiter writer is a former E.J's bartender for whom a fund· raiser was held on May 4 to assist with medical expenses since he has been diag­nosed with cancer. MAY 16. 2003 13 "She said the Senator• s position on gays needed a •Mother• s Touch' . . . 11 We want to hear your voice! Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Names may be withheld upon request. but submissions must include a name and phone number for verification. Send c/o Editor. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd~ Suite 200, Houston. Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor@houstonvoice.com. 14 MAY 16. 2003 t The New Lakes of Jersey Village (281) 469-1661 (713) 542-5324 Nt1» Sales Ttam' • Nru.1 Prim1 • New Roor Plans! 100% Financing Available Location! Location!! Location!!! Off of Nonhwest Freeway at Jones Road. Red tile roofs, Stucco front elevations, Spnnkler ~ystems, Energy Star package, lake, and much morel Peter Estevez D • R •Horton Homes 20 Cherry Hills Jersey Village, TX 77065 Affordable Luxury Living Just a Step Away! SERVICING THE ENTIRE HOUSTON AREA FOR ~LL YOUR BUYING, SELLING & LEASING NEEDS FORIECLOSURIE/INVIESTMENT SPECIALIST • FREE l.ISTING CONSULTATION • FREE PREQUAl.IFYING • FREE LIST OF HOMES IN ANY AREA 1~HAEL BRIDGWATER rn-•s .!J;'; AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK ~lft' .. a111b 7 8 9 ( o ) 8 3 2 - 7 5 4 - 5 7 6 5 ( c > OSEHOM ES@AOL.COM on he record •·ram inclined to think. Mr. Kohler, that in view of the fact that all of our intelli· gence agencies agree that men who are homosexuals ... are security risks, and in view of the fact that this man has held a very important job and may hold one again tomorrow. I think we have to require that you answer." TMn·Sen. Joe .lfcCarthy, ordering Eric Kohler, a prominent accountant at the time. to give tM Committee on Un-American Activities tM last name of "Bill." a formerly high-rank· tng budget offzcial with whom Koh~r admit­ted having an affair (Newly released tran· scripts of the McCarthy hearings) ''Drinking a diet soda doesn't make you gay. but it does make you look gay." Helpful advice for straight men from Maxim magazine, cited by op-ed columnist Maureen Dowd (New York Times, May 11) www houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE "(11,iadonna's guest appearance] will probably be our biggest episode. Let's have that number of people show up to watch me hold George Clooney's hand, or whoever's up for doing it. ... Maybe that's what it's going to take to really make that next big, bold move; an actual relationship where we know, when [Will and another man] walk out of a room, they've probably just had sex." Eric McCormack. who plays Will on "Will & Grace," on prospects for the character's on-screen love life (Entertainment Wet>kly, May 2) "l feel very connected to [Will], ... and I would Imagine that the next time I fall in love will probably be the time Will falls in love." "Will & Grace" co<rcator and executive pro­ducer Max Mutchnik (Entertainment Weekly, May2) "Yeah, I bring this out in women. I think both these gals were psyched to jump into roles that are part of their identity, but that they had kept dormant." Lesbian director Lisa Cholodenko, on haw shP roaxed sexy performances out of Ally ShR«Jy in "Hi/?h Art" and Frances McDormand in tM new film "laurel Canyon" (Miami Herald, May 7) "Butt Munch II: Back to the Crack" TM video title that "Six Feet Under" charac· ters Keith and Dovid are admonished for not returning to the rental store in the HBO shaw's Apr/127 episode. All Worlds Video reacted to the scene by issuing a press release trumpet· ing that tM title is a real one, by legendary "diva director" Chi Chi LaRue (May 2) · "I've been out as a gay woman and as part of a gay family for one year. And in one year. the tabloids have had us breaking up four times, and I think that's homophobic. You want to say that I'm fat, say that I'm fat. You want to say that I have a big mouth. go ahead. You want to say that I'm stupid and not funny, fine! But don't say my family Is breaking up when we're one of the only public gay families in the nation. I think there's some sort of per­verse joy: 'Oh, look, it's breaking up!' No, It isn't." Rosie O'Donnell (May 6, ''Access Hollywood 'J "I think vaginas are wonderful." Oprah Wirifrey to Jennifer Finney Boylan, author of "She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders." during a discus­sion about gender reassignment surgery and transgender issues ("The Oprah Wuifrey Show." May 7) PETS: Gay Houstonian Don Gill passes along a few life lessons that pets can teach their owners. Page 17. I THEATER: Theatre New West opens its new production, Robert Chesley's 'Jerker,' this week. Page 18. n OU HOUSTON VOICE MAY 16, 2003 PAGE 15 evo u ion' Comedienne Margaret Cho returns to Houston with her own outrageous spin on today's world By PENNY WEAVER S HE'S "VERY CON ERVATIVE," SHE LIKES to sew and she's gettmg married this summer (to a man). And although some fans may not recog· nlze comedienne Margaret Cho from that description, that Is Cho in her own words. Yes, she's Asian. Yes, she's bisexual. although she says "slutty" might be a better way to say it. Yes, she's a woman, and yes, she has battled Hollywood's vision of what a woman should look like. But Cho says people are people - labels are too confining - and that might be a key reason so many gll)'s and lesbians fill her fan base. "I am the voice of the unheard," explains Cho, who brings her new tour, "Revolution," to Houston on May 30. In the past, Cho has done work on behalf of Montrose Clinic, and she says she has a special regard for the Bayou City. ''Houston was the first place that I really played a big venue ... like I felt like a star," Cho recalls. "I have a real affection for it." She has shown, quite publicly, her affection for one famous Houstonian, too. Cho calls Anna Nicole Smith and the experience of kissing hf'r "gorgeous, delicious. "She's the most beautiful woman ever. I just think she's a goddess. She's a dream." The Cho spin "[The new material) is a workbook to a personal rev· olutton starting with yourself as breaking down some of the ideas that society has put out," Cho says. Cho's new show rovers current events in her well known unbridled, no-bolds-barred fashion. She tackles topics ranging from the "axis of evil" to her travels through Thailand's red light district, the explosion of child birth, bartering sex for household chores and more. personnel from Iraq. She noticed that gay military fam· Illes were treated differently when it caine time to wel­come soldiers or sailors home. "The partners of the people were not allowed to wait on the dock," she says. "It's an expression of hatred that I cannot really comprehend. "It's not about sodomy or any of that shit. We're talking about love. To me, to deny that moment. .. to deny that of homosexuals because of the fact that they're homosexuals Is heinous. It's atrocious and it's inhumane and It's against love and it's against God. "They always say that homosexuality is against God. That's against God," says Cho of discrimination against gay military couples, expressing her frustra­tion with "the inequality in the home of equalit):" She doesn't see her views as unusual or liberal. "I don't consider myself an extremist. I'm actually In my mind very conservative," Cho says. "All I ask is that America be America that it be a place where we're allowed to be equal." But she relaxes from her frustrations with politics a minute. "Basically, that's what the show ls like - but it's funny," she says with n laugh. "I'm really excited and I think that it's really run;· she says this week in an interview with the Voice. "I think that what's really exciting is the new material: the state of the world, combined with what's going on with the media ... the fact that reality television is much more valued than reality itself." Comedy with heart Cho notes the recent return of American military Cho was 16 when she started performing stand-up A'Revolution'MO' RM.a rgaEl rNetfCOoh . 8 p.m. Friddy, May 30 ~ • Atesleiavnis-Aiomn esirticcoamn f tahmaltl yf.e aHtuerr egdr othuen dsmbraelal ksicnrge eonn'es- first woman show, "I'm the One That I Want," toured the Venzon Wireless Theater· 520 Texas Ave. • 713-230-1600 country in 1999 and became a best-selling book and fea- "Notorious C.H.O." tour and feature film. Cho wants there to be more than just laughs behind all that she does. "When we do \\\lrlt, like, It's got to mean something. I don't like oomedy that's secular. Or anything that's secular. I don't like something that I can't feel what the artist is feel­ing. To me, that"s not art - that"s just killing time. I want to be able to live an entire life with an artist That's whyl do what I do. I mustly want to give people an entire experience." Changes on tap Called everything from "bisexual" to "multi·sexual" in the press, Cho says love does not fit into a categoQ: u1 have an enormous capacity for love which is beyond sexual and beyond all that stuff. Whatever happens m bed it's like a dtfferent thing in every experience. I don't think that we're supposed to be monogamous generallj:" As it happens, she is getting married-to a man on June 13. She says that as much as she travels, she actually prefers to be at home - her "sanctuary" - \\ith him. ~He's a famous artist and he"s very talented. We're very pnvate. We have a very beautiful house and it's huge and {yet] it's h.ke I'm really agoraphobic. I'm just kind of freaky like that," Cho says. "I'm kind of old ... I like to entertain at home. '"l\ly husband is very similar minded to me, which is why we're getting marned," she explaLris. "I really love him and I really love the way I finally figured out my life that I can have really fulfilling relationships with both sexes and have totally queer politics and have a r totally queer life and not feel as if that is a respcms1bil1ty -comedy. In 1994, she starred in "All-American Girl," a wwwvenzonwirelesstheater.com • wwwma ar.::.:et:::ch.:::O.::::COm::.::___ __:tu.=re;.;;..:;fil:::=;m.... :S"h'_e~fo..;l.lo_w.;..;;;...ed..;h.t_n.;..ts ;;..;;u.;..;.cc.;..es~s_ w1.·;.1..h;.;...;..200.;;..;;..;.l'..;..s_ _~ ------ Please see CHO on Page 16 16 MAY 16. 2003 1/20ff au .......... nlWll 1111 •1.m1nhl111 713.524.gg32 4040 milam St. Houston www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I out on the bayou Cho: 'The gay community is where my heart is' CHO, contmued from Page 15 to anyone because It's so different. "It's not really gay, it's not really straight - nobody really knows what to do with it," Cho adds. After "Revolution," Cho plans time to work on her Web site, a new book and other projects. And - she's going to sew "I just want clothes that fit me. I bought a bunch of patterns that were from the '30s, '40s and '50s," Cho explains. "[That's) when women's bodies were completely respected and worshipped and loved. That's all it's about is to have this worship.. ful woman's body revered once again." Beyond tradition As an Asian bisexual woman. Cho rejects being pigeonholed into any of those "minority" labels, or into any other catego­ry She says she doesn't feel any pressure to stand up and represent any minority group. "Unfortunate!); like. the way that the world JS. ifs just fucked and ... it's almost as if some­times )00 identify yourself in that manner and yoo automatically add a prefix to your profes.sion." Cho says, noting that she often is introduced in the press as 'J\sian ... ". ''I'm already used to the label I don't really give a shit. It doesn't really reflect on my 'M>rk. "I think that the way that the media is which is horrible - is that you add a prefix to your name that may or may not be considered something against you but people can't see past the shorthand. That when we are 'out,' then that's all you are. Then your talent is irrelevant." She says she is no more Asian than bisexual, and identifies no more as a woman than any other part of herself. "There is no separation. There is no way to say one is more [important) than the other. I feel like I belong to all the minorities," Cho explains. "I feel like it's not even bisexuality - I feel like I am a gay man, I am a lesbian, I am transgen· der ... this is all about the fact that we are the same no matter how we identify." That thought process. no doubt, is part of why so many gays love this Asian. American. bisexual, soon-to-be-married female comedienne/actress/author. ''And racism and homophobia are the same thing, and in that we come together as well," Cho says. "I totally like get it, you know: The gay community is where my heart is and where I do a lot of my act, and I'm really proud to be able to do what I do within that." HOUSTON VOICE www houston voice.com TINA KING For Montrose fixture Don Gill, pets are reminders of important life lessons Animals teach a lot I PULLED INTO THE DRIVE OF AN adorable wood frame house located in the heart of Montrose and there was Don Gill on his lawn, leisurely sipping a drink. As I stepped out of the car I could just make out the little pointed ears and curious eyes of an Australian Shepherd through the glass of the front door to the house. Don and I exchanged pleasant introduc· lions and then he ushered me into Studio 911 where he works his hair magic. He offered me a seat and then we plunged right into the discussion regarding his pets. We'd not pro­ceeded far when I realized that I was speak­ing with such an interesting and multi· faceted person that I was going to have a dif· ficult time staying on the topic of his pets. Don inherited Kodie, his 6-year-old Australian Shepherd. at 11 months old from a salon customer relocating to New York. The customer didn't think Kodie would make the transition well as a puppy and Don willingly took him in and has never regretted this addition to his household. Kodie's temperament is multi-faceted too: Don says that he appears vicious at first and therefore is a great guard dog. But after he has become familiar with your scent on an extended hand, he'll roll over on his back with all four legs in the air for you to rub his belly. In fact, he's so lovable that Don's friends have nicknamed him the "Love Sponge." KODIE SHARES ins HOME wrrn SCOOTER the rooster, six hens, a new baby chick, and sev­eral more on the wa~ One of Don's hobbiP.S is raising poultry and this has also been some­what of a therapeutic and life-stabilizing endeavor for him, he says. He mentioned his cl.1d quite fondly several times. at one point telling me about the important life lesson he learnl'd from this man, although his dad was illiterate. Don's dad told him that if life ever got too stressful or overwhelming that he nel'ded to watch the animals. because they would remind hun what was essential and neces.<>ary in life. So there have been many days when Don sits out on his back porch. throws out some feed for Scooter and his friends and then just watches they eat, sleep, talk to one another, and procreate. One would think that after having two lovers and eight friends succumb to AIDS that there are probably more days than not that Don has spent watching those chickens. But after personally nursing and caring for these 10 that he loved and then seeing them die in his own home, he says, "From that point on, every· thing I learned about living came from dying." This is why, although Don's pets are cute and lovable, I frequently had a difficult time focusing on them though as I learned from him, these are the very creatures that can help ground us In life. Longtime Montrose resident and fund-fa1ser Don Gill shares his home with critters including dog Kodie and rooster Scooter. (Photo by Penny Weaver) KODIE FINDS HIS GROUNDING IN CHASING balls; he loves them. He frequently holds a ball in his mouth while chasing or playing soccer with another. He also has keen focus while waiting for the ball to be tossed high from his master's hand and an amazing Jump. ing ability ns he soars through the air to trap it in his mouth. Don says this is Kodie's favorite activity while playing at the family's river house. At his river house, Don al.c;o has a Siamese cat named "BaayBeee," and yes. it must be pronounced in just this way. It seems that Kodie inherited his jwnping ability and love of bouncing balls honestly Don is an avid Houston Rockets and Houston Comets fan; he can't wait to get up in the morning to read the sports section of the newspaper concerning his two favorite teams. He modestly spoke of breaking religious bar· riers to be the first young boy in a particular denomination from his small hometow11 to play organized school basketball. When not spending time with Kodie and the pack. Don has dedicated his life to chari· ties. Through Don Gill Productions, he helps raise money for the Gulf Coast Archives & Museum, AIDS and HlV, and breast cancer. His studio is filled with plaques and ay,ards presented to him by high·profile politicians such as Ann Richardson, Annise Parker, Bob Lanier, Dl'bra Danburg and more. But the title and honor he seem' most proud of is to be called "Mr. Wonderful"' and "Mr. Everything" by the Montrose community. It's easy to see that Don is "Mr. Wonderful" to Ko<lie, Scooter and the gang, too. / Hanns Ebensten .....___., TRAVEL Great European Hikes! lpine 0 . August 22 • Septemller 6 See the stu . vistas al the Austnan Alps then r~n Venice with friends Mykonos & Monasteries =:4·15 MykOllOI ta Septellbar 18 Hike through history on Mount Athos along spectacular mountain trails. Irish Idylls September 20 • 27 Explore the magic of the Emerald Isle from our cozy gay-friendly B&B. Also contact us about tnps to the Nile, Poru or viewing tho polar boars of Canada. 1866) 294-8174 HEtravel@aol.com www.HEtravel.com MAY 16. 2003 17 "Come to us Kllen yon hafe a part that needs some special attention. " • Highline Body Repair & Collision Service • State of the Art Technology • FREE ESTIMATES • We support the Gay & Lesbian Community Call us at 713.520.9696 or visit us at 106 W. Gray in Houston www.suddenlmpactcollision.net - 18 MAY 16 2003 -~~~ ' HI:~ y ~t: ~t:~ v-.#t:~ f "lfyouilave to as , yous ouldn't come" .\1ature Audiences - Strong Language - Nud ity written by Robert Chesley Directed by Joe Watts ..• too Starring Brett Cullum & Glen Fillmore MAY 23rd thru JULY 5th• Fridays and Saturdays Curtain: SPM • Tickets: $20 •Reservations 713-522- 2204 BSl!IJ+c-1,,1 1415 California St. Houston, Texas 77006 BANKRUPTCY Free Initial Consultation ROGENA JAN ATKINSON Attorney at Law 3617 White Oak Drive, Houston, Texas 77007 Karan Stone www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE out on the aisle PENNY WEAVER Homoerotic 'Jerker' debuts as first production at Theatre New West..T oo New stage opens 'J erker' Directed by Joe Watts. artistic director of Theatre New West, "Jerl<er" is the open· ing production in the new second stage of Theatre New West, dubbed "Theatre New West. •. Too." First performed in Los Angeles in 1986. the Robert Chesley play caused a stir not only because of its nudity but also because of its honest depiction of homoerotic sex, according to a theater press release. The play revolves around two men who share a relationship over the tele­phone. The storyline brings out the humor of the bizarre relationship, as well as the feeling of L~lation, loneliness and the unabashed honesty of one human reaching out to another. Watts directs actors Brett Cullum and Glen Fillmore in "Jerl<er." ~'Jerker' 8 p.m. Fridays & Saturdays May 23-July 5 • Tickets: $20 Theatre New West.Too 1415 Califorma • ID-522-2204 'Stones in His Pockets' A hit from Broadway and London's West End. "Stones in His Pockets~ relates the hilarious story of an American movie being shot in County Kerry, a small rural Irish town. Told from the perspective of two locals who al~ play everyonP. else in the produc­tion - the play won the 2001 Laurence Olivier Award and the nxJ Evening Standard Award for Best New Comedy in New Yori< and London. "Stones in His Pockets" by Marie Jones also is the recipient of three Tony Award nominations. The Alley production features Todd Waite and Jeffrey Bean as all 14 characters in the pla)z ~ 'Stones in His Pockets' Through May 18 • Tickets: $40-45 Alley Theatre • 615 Texas Ave ID-228-8421 • wwwalleytheatre.org 'Speaking in Tongues' Stages Repertory Theatre presents the award-winning "Speaking in Tongues" by Andrew Bovell The production examines a surprising - and~ fatal series <I ~ts triggered by one random night ri flir­tation bet\wen two married couples, accord­ing to a Stages pres.5 release. Nine people become connected as they navigate the llllpre­dictablP. paths ri fidelil): betrayal and forgive­ness. ''Speaking in Tongues illustrates how our actiom, regardlei.s ri how small or incon­sequential, alter the course of the universe," sald Rob BUl'ld); who will direct the Stages ~ 'Speaking in Tongues' 7:30 p.m Wednesdays and Thursdays 8 p.m. Fndays and Saturdays • 3 p.m. Sundays Through May 25 ·Tickets: $32 and up Stages Repertory Theatre • 3201 Allen Par1cway m-527-0123 • www.stagestheatre.com lfttt QAm (left) all Glen Fhre star i1 the 9i'I' themed :Jeri<e;' opeOO,J tlis ~ as the laX}ral Jll>­dm at lreatre Ntw West. Too (Plrto l1f .Ire Watts) production. The play has been called "clevei: provocative and resonant" by the New Yori< TimP.S. and praised as a "shimmering, irides­cent beauty" by London's Financial Times. 'City of Angels' Two shows in one, "City of Angels" interweaves two plots: one dealing with the writing of a screen play in legendary 1940s Hollywood, and thP. other the enactment of that screenplay. According to a press release from Houston's Masquerade Theatre, this production is possibly the only "color coded" show theater audiences will see. ThP movie scenes appear in shades of black and white, and the real life SCE"nes are in techni· color, the press release states. The show includes two musical scores and finishes with two happy endings. Phillip Duggins directs. The program is based on a book by Larry Gelbart, with music by Cy Coleman and lyrics by David Zippe!. Cl) 'City of Angels' 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays 3 p.m. Sundays • Through May 24 Tickets: $25 or $20 for students and seniors Masquerade Theatre • 1537 N. Shepherd 713-861·7045 • wwwmasqueradetheatre.com 'The Big Bang' Theater LaB Houston celebrates its 10th anniversary season with "The Big Bang," a tale ri two struggling musical writers trying to raise money for their pet project: a history of the Western World from creation to the year nxi. Jimmy Phillips and Greg Gorden star in the production, which is directed by Linda Phenix. Music is by Jed Feuer, with musical direction by Steven Jones. The play is based a book and lyrics by Boyd Graham. ~ 'The Big Bang' 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays • Through May 24 5 p.m. Sunday, May 25 • Tickets $20-22 Theater LaB Houston • 1706 Alamo 713-868-7516 • wwwtheaterlabhouston.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com sports LEE DAVIS Rainbow Fishing Club plans Saturday outing, as Montrose Softball League competition heats up Galveston trip on tap fish aho), mate) Saturda}: May 17, :ro3 Seawall be there! The Rainbow Fishing Club recently announced a Galveston Fishing Pier e.'<pedi­Uon at 89th and Seawall Blvd. The cost of ndnussion to the pier Is $8 per person. Ch'.ldren 12 Md under have an admission charge of $4. while 60 .. ers have a $6 admission fee. All interested persons should plan to meet at the bait shop between 7 and 7:30 a.m. Expected catches will be Speckled Trout, Redfish and Black Drum. Please note that participants must have a fishing license with salt water stamp In order to fish. Call Scott at 832-971-4900 to RSVP. The club reminds all that the "in season" chart indicates amberjack, bass. bonito, cat· fish, grouper, red snapper, salmon, shark, tarpon and wahoo are all the catch for Ma): On Saturdal( July al, the club has planned a deep sea fishing trip with Captain Elliott's Ferry Boats out cl Freeport. The cost for the 12-hour trip is $75 with a $40 deposit If you really want to be on this trip, the club will have to receive your reservation and deposit immediat.ely Departure is at 6 a.m. with a return to the docks at 6 p.m. All fishing equipment and bait are supplied by the boats, as well as ice for your ft~h. This charter company is virtually booked for the entire summer already, so hurry! Ebony and i~ory The lndepeMelJ.t Billiard League cl Houston (!BL) pa;ts its tqi teams after Week 13. Ebon}; Ivory Jaded are 11·2. withBaOOits 11-2,BOO<layers 1(}3. E.J 's Stokers 103 and Bricks KX:ks ~ The tqi plaje's for Week 13 are V. Henry with a',!},-7 recml. R Chew with~ G. Bamw at 258, R Hines at 27-9 and L Lentz v.ith a>-11. Goals for enryone The Montrose Soccer Club of Houston is open to men and women who have experi­ence playing soccer. The only requirements for membership are that participants be team players, know the rules c:i soreer and have basic skills (you don't have to be a pro, just pL1Yed before). You don't even have to be gay, Just willing to be mistaken for gay For more information, send an e-mail to MontroseSC@,soccer.com or go to www.geoci­ties. com/MontroseSoccer. or log on to other sites such as the international Gay & Lesbian Football Association, Oak La\m Soccer Club. or West Hollywood Soccer Club. lf You have the international flair, contact the Munich Elves (yeah, in Germany). Lone Star Classic The Montrose Softball League announces its Memorial Day Weekend Lone Star Classic Softball Tournament, set for May 2.l 26, 2003. Registration is on Fnday, May 23, for Division B. C, and D. Registration is $350 if postmarked by May 17, 2003. The host hotel Is the Houston Renaissance Hotel. This is a great tournament bringing teams from all over the United States and Canada. It offers Houstonians a chance to Members of Montrose Softball League's Rich's Hellcats are ranked sec­ond place so far mtheMSL's B 01vis1on. (Photo by Dalton OeHart) meet and greet people and show them what Texas - more specifically, Houston - hospi­tality is all about. For more info, contact the league at www.montrosesoftballleague.com. Gay basketball Replies are still coming! Doesn't look like it will be too Jong before this venue gets its kickoff. If you missed it before:~ interested in a gay basketOOll league? If so, please ffil3il me via editor@houstonwire.am Looking mar<! to a kit cl replies to matdl the number cl inquiries&> far! World Serles SoftbaU NAGAAA (North American Gay Amateur Athletic Association) announces its 27th annual tournament to be held in Washington, D.C., beginning Aug. 17. Rooms will fill up fast, so contact the organizers of this great tournament at infor­mation'' Series:ro3.org/, or call 202-543-002.6. Volleyball sUlts The Lone Star Volleyball Association posted its stats for the current season. In the Rec Division, the teams in order of standing are Sluggers, Hot Shots. Mix Nuts, Hot-Nets. Raunchy Sec, Jackson 7 and Evil Alliance. The Competitive Division is headed by the Marauders, with Skittles, Fongala and the Red Hots close behind. The Power Division is led by Scrubs, CH Aerial Attack, handful, Assault and Meatstack. MSL stats The Montrose Softball League (MSL) announced as of Week 4, the Houston Force, Jone competitor in the A Division. hold.• a record of 6-0. In the B Division. BRB is fol· lowed by Rich's Hellcats and the Bucs. The C Oivision L~ currently champed by Meteor, followed by the Butchers, Drillers, Swallows, Outpost and 24-Hour Fitness. The D Owision is led b) Doc's Jocks. \\ith the Trojans, Mary's, Sharks. Bering, 'foros, N'Motion, Grizzlies, Wave, Bolts and the Hurricanes following close!): in that order. Bump, \et, \pike to raise fund\ The M~1, is hosting Four-Man Sand Volleyball at PJ.'s Parlt on June 8. This is a fund. raising event v.ith all monies split between MSL and the Lone Star Volleyball Assuciation. RegiStration begins at 10 a.m. Enl!J' fee is S'JJ. For information. contact Travis McGee at 936-36.5-3297. MAY 16. 2003 19 FINAL HOUSTON ENGAGEMENT T E TIMES THE WORD 20 MAY 16. 2003 Chapu Iappreciate being a part of this community! I want to -;ee Fitness Exchange as more than a health club. It is a community center' So I use the Houston Voice to show my appreciation. and as my kJvitation to its readers. -Mary Ann McBee Fitness Exchange MEXICAN RESTAURANT Happy Hour Margaritas for$1.99~~ Huevos Rancheros $1 .99 after midnight! 813 RICHMOND~713.522.2365 mong www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE dining J.A. CHAPMAN Sassy atmosphere at Vietnamese restaurant matches tasty dishes it offers up Jenni's serves attitude HOLD ONTO YOUR FEATHER BOAS! A visit to J nni's Noodle House is a fabulous delicious nde Located in the old Chinatown on the east side of downtown, Jenni's Noodle House is a restaurant with attitude. Maybe ifs the pink flamingos in the grass strip out front that give it away. Maybe it's those T·shirts above the counter with slogans like "Madonna Eats Here·· and "My Noodle is Bigger than Your Noodle." Whatever the reason. it's definitely clear that Jenni's Noodle House is not your typ­ical Vietnamese eatery. With hip red walls, mirrored columns and black and white photos on the walls. Jenni"s Noodle House is a sleek standout in what i~ generally a neighborhood "m transition." On a recent Saturday night, a friendly waiter found us a table, and joked with us while he took our drink orders. The irreverent humor is definite­ly part of the appeal here The menu is easy to understand, offer­ing $3 Steals, Deals ($5 or $6) and $8 Meals. With nothing over $8. except for bottles of wine, It's also a fairly economical meal out. We started with edamame ($3), those addictive salted soybeans, and dream rolls ($3 for 2), because they were all out of the spring rolls we really wanted. We enjoyed the dream rolls, stuffed with tofu. shitake mushrooms and vermicelli, but the accom­panying house soy sauce was the real dis­covery. Tangy and vinegru,; it woke those dream rolls out of their slumber, making for an excellent start to our meal. JENNI'S NOODLE HOUSE HAS A FUNKY offbeat ambience. Classic '70s and ·00s disco and pop tunes provide a grooving vibe and everyone seems to be having a good time. The table of 10 next to us was decked out in feather boas, and no doubt there would be more on display on Boa Friday. If you forget your boa. just borrow one of the ones hanging by the front door. For the main course, we tried the Shrimply Ramen ($8), which arrived as a bowl full of fresh ramen noodles. shrimp, shrimp patties, Japanese fishcakes, and lettuce, all in a savory broth. This dish \\·as a cornucopia of funky Asian foods, some of which were new to us. The fresh ramen noodles were a bit tough, but we'd never had them fresh before, so maybe that's how they were supposed to be. The shrimp patty, with its spongy texture, was weirdly satisfying. With fresh bean sprouts, jalapenos, and plum paste on the side, this dish provided a delicious wealth of flavors and textures. We also tried the Infernal Chicken ($8), a coconut-curry dish. It arrived as a broth, full of chicken and potatoes, \\ith jasmine rtce on the side. We were slightly surprised, stnce the menu didn't mention broth, but we were not di<;appointed. The intoxicating coconut-curry broth was a winner, and after all the chicken was gone. we were slurping it out of the bowl. We also enjoyed the straightforward Salt-n-Pepper Shrimp ($8). Six generously sized shrimp tossed with salt. pepper, and chives were served \\ithjasmine rice. It was simple but good. WE STILL HAD A BIT OF ROOM u;pr for dessert ($4 each), and queried our wait· er as to what was available. When he men­tioned the tres leches, we asked his opin· ion. Being a good waiter, he said it was tasty, but volunteered that he didn't think it was up to the gold standard quality of Churrasco's. We u·ied a piece anyway. and dr>cided that our waiter was right. It was nch and milky. but not the best we've had. On the other hand. the simple white cake with a nch dark chocolate icing was divine. We polished it off. fighting each other for the last bit of that deep choco­late frosting. Ju:;t so you know. Jenni's Noodle House does not serve tap water. It says so all over the menu. Bottled water is avail· able at SO cents. Or try the delicious limeade ($2) or hot chrysanthemum tea ($2), which comes in a glass with dried chrysanthemum flowers floating in it. Owner Jenni Tran-Weaver has created a cool little dining spot where almost everyone can find something they like. The menu even offers a special lap dance from Jenni's husband Scott ($50). You'll need to reserve that waaaay in advance, though. As we passed the boa rack by the door, our waiter called out his thanks and told us to come back agam. With the disco beat grooving us out into the warm Houston night, we all agreed we would. ~ Jenni's Noodle House ~ 2130 Jefferson Houston. TX 77003 713-228-3400 www.noodlesrule.com Food·,.,.,.,. Service: !el• lei • Value; ,.,.,.,.,. Scene: ,.,.,.,.,. ., = Stay home and eat cereal • ,. = Well if you really must 191 • • = Fine for all but the finmcky ••••,• .,•.,=.'M=wAlhs rrm tMi a 20filoote <iiYe go00 as you'll find 111 tlis city HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I community calendar SATURDAY, MAY 17 Houstoo Gay & Lesbian Parents. Beach Party at Pocket Parlt Thi ~ liw• M.iy F1•rnly Acbvily for HCLP 1-5 p.m. at Calvtstom Pocket P.irk No l C:O,.t is SS per car ID parlt For more lnf0f'11iltion caJt C11udc .1t n1-66r.9325 WWW ;lo.org EVERY SATURDAY Al-Spar.sh Worship SelVlce/Nodle Espiritml 6 p.m Resurrection M<1topoi.t..1 C..'"1 ~"lY 2026 W 11th. 713-303-3409 or 713-861-9149. After Holrs. KPfT 90.l FM ,-4 a.m. D91ty ma 7:30 p.m for gay CatlrJtics. r}.880-28n Hie H!VT.,q Mrtrt!sc Ch:. II pm-2 a.ma VMm\ 7130).3000 Gay & le5IQ1BroalcfastClih9:30 un 281-437-0636. Houstoo w~ a.a Pr.lttice. uo P-'11. 713-453-7406. UmlJda Cenllr. Alcohobcs Anonymcus. ll30 a.m. Eye Opener Croup. 8 p_m Sah.rday lfight Uve, 9:30 p.m. Wjling Onos Gtoup. 1201 W Cby. nJ-521-1243 or 713-528-9772. wwwlanM!houstonorg. ona ~a 1t1? strtcts to1..;i pmie111utecm-... 9:.30 pm ~al comtUilycen!er. 7J3.52&SAFL [-m;j:~;Dam St Sliphen's Episcopal CludL Rosary 8 am 1805 W Abham.1. 713-528-obbS. HoustD11 GI.BT Conmnty Cenllt Orop-tll, noon-5 p_m. • 3400 M• 11, · ~.' 207 ~.._.?4-"118. wwwhouston;lbtreller.org. SUNDAY, MAY 18 EVERY SUNDAY 8enng Memorial UMed Methodist CludL SeMtes at 8:30 & 10.50 am Sunday sdlool 9:45 am 713-521>-1017 Cent8' for Sprilual UYing. Sttvices at 11 a.m. for childrtn al 10:50 am 6610 Harwin. nJ-339-1808. The center also has ccmmitmenl cmmonoes. ~ boobtort and cbsses. Conmnty Gospel. ~ at 11 a.m. & 7 p_m Sunday School for children 10 am 71J..880-9235or ~· Conmlity of JCm!CI Splrih in Beunont WoM? at 6 p.m. 1575 Spindl<top Ave, 8eJumont. Te""'- 409-813-2055. E..ai!: cksttv3'liinotzenl.nel ~ CludL ENntrial, l.bnl Baptist Semct 9:..10 a.m. & education how II a.m. 7lHb8-8830. Emonon UM.lriM1 CludL AIU! ocb:atm. 10 a.m. ~II a.m. IJ«h at noon. WWW MlOl'SOl'lhouor First Corq'egational Cluth (Memorial) ~at 10 am Chmti.ln Education. IL30 ~..._ 713-468-9543 or fee~ First Ullltarion Univenalsl CludL Servtcts at 9:.30 & 11:30 .tm 8nn:J1 at 10:30 J m 713-521>-5200 chutch(!ilf11'51uu.OfV. Froe HIV Testing. Montrose C5nic. 9 p_m-<111dnight at Club lner1JY ID-830-)000 1:.1"11owhJ ~ 7 pm Palace l.rcl. 41918e!airY BM nJ.861-1187 Gay Catholics of St Ame's-Houston. 5 p.m. Wlll'ship servoce Dinner and socJJI. akxcam)'wlnet 713-b23-0'l30. r.l08AL Gay lesbian Or lllse•ual Al!i.IICe. Urivmity of Houston GI.BT stlldcnt !l""'P """ting. 2 p_m at the Houston lesbian & Cay Convramity Cenler. 3400 Montrose. Siite 20Z 713-524-3818 wwwulu<ll/~ E""'1il: globala;~ Gtxt AsstrnlJfy Cluth Gaylgay-aff111111ng congrtgJtiott 11 a.m 50'YICt. '5b7 Ced.tr Crove. l.Mngston. Teus. mSl 931>-64b-nl4 E..naif leol1"?asttcx.ort. Graef Luthonin CludL Sonday sdlool for aR ages 9 a.m SeMce 10.30 a.m nJ-528-3269 HA lc.H. lblston ~Teen CoalitDt of -.,u.115 me<ts 6-9 p.m. For mcetaY,j lnfonn.ilion call 713-529-359Q ~ Houston Rouglrlecb Rugby CU.. Placbct from 4-6 pm For more Information tog on ID www.rcugllnecksnJO ~ HoustDl1 Ttmls CU.. q am-noon Mc:non.if Patk at the Te1111s Centet: houstontennisdb act com laTbla C«ll!r. AkdDics Afo¥m.o. 9:.30 am ean.. to Be!iM ~ 1201 W Clay. 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9772 wwwlantld.Jhouston M.r.wtha Fellow"1ip MetropolilMI CludL 10 a.m scrvoce. 3333 Fanmn Suite 100. 713-528-6756. Northwoods Unot.lrian Uniwnalist Cluth. Servoces at 9 45 & 1115 am Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 281-29:8-2780. Resurrection MCC. Servias. 9 and ll a.m Ctildrtn and Youth SmdJy School.10 a.m. Ctitdrtn's servoce. ll a.m. 713-861-9149 St Patriclc's Rfformed Catholc Mis!ioot SundJy M.lSS at noon tidy Unions MiL1lllc. Group moets at the Hair Ex~ 3310 ll.tawJtf. ~ Texas 77701409-781-8152. E-mal: bwotsonl~RR.cont St Sliphen's Episcopal CludL tidy E1lcharlst. Ritt l 7.45 a.m; tidy Euchar1St. Rile U 855 arn; Education how. 10 a.m. Choral Eud>arisl 11 am nJ-528-0665. Sinloy Bnl1Ch. For HJV-positi"' rren.11 am Riva'~ lll7 Missoun Sl Paul 713-880-0690. H1\1il PcznBuff aolrom. The Womin's Gm4J. Mccting and disMslon. 10:45 a.m. nJ-529-8571. Thor.au ~ l.Wtenalist Congrogation. Adult discussion. q lJI\ Strvtce.1115 a 'II. 281·277-888Z www.twc.or; ~ F~ of GaMslon c...rty 502 Cluth St Service. 10.30 a.m. 409-lbS-8330. UNbrian FelloMhop of Hous1o!t Adult forum. 10 a.m. Service. 11 am ro 686-587&. Houston GI.BT Conmnty c.nt.. ~ 2-6 p.m. • CLBT Conmnty C!uth with Rev. M<llSS<I Wood: Boblestudy.10-!045am. """'1op II a.m wwwgeoc1ties.cam'glbt.x • Schoc:A outreJC'1 progr.m 2 P.111. • 340" M-~. • Sc • '!07. 713-524-3818 wwwJwstonglbtcmter.0111 MONDAY, MAY 19 EVERY MONDAY Cent.. for Sjlir1bQI lMlg. Ml'dltalion (dto!>inJ, U:30 am l p.m. 6610 H.!rwin. 713-33'l-180Ei Fn!e HIV T.,q lbQoo}rea Qmnrity Ser""-9 JJn<ml a .klsqjl­IW< S en. mo 1\151"81'stID52&-0555.ett.231. m tr 22tl Froe HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic 4-8 p.m al 8ridcs. 617 Fa11·v ...... nl-830-)000 Frost Eye Clinic. Fll!e eye ex.ims for people with HIV ID-830-3000. Gay l!owiing Leagues. Women's league. 645 p_m Dynamic Unes. 6121 Tarnef1lnve. n3-861-ll8Z Cay FalherVFathors Flr>t Support group. 8-9:.30 p.m. 8enng MelllOl'l.11 United Methodist OutlL Toot 713-nl>-87.lb. wwwgeodt~ Gtxt AsstrnlJfy CludL Gay/gay-affirming oongreg.1lion. 1 p.m. acrobi(s c1ass. 567 Ced.tr c._ L.Mngston. Texa~ mst 9lf>-64b-nl4 E-mail leol1"?asltruiet. Grief & OiYorcf ~ Gnqis. 7 p.m. l!eri"g. 713-520-1017. ox!. 208. HoustDl1 Rouglrlecb Rugby CU> P>actict from b:30-8:30 p.m. For more informatioo, tog on lo www.roughnecksrugt.org. l<ol>t Project. EIJCflamt 7:30 p.m. 713-861-1800. UmlJda Cent8' Alcd10ics Anonymous. 8 p.m. ~ Groop.1201 W Cby 713-521-1243 or nJ-5.28-9772. WWW~ Montrolo Ch: Of!m ~ peer sawort l11ll4IS for ljJ'/ llll ti<eoa m:rt with HIV Sp;sish ~ l1ll4> 111rt; 6:30 pm 215 l'ksllmn 713-830-3050. Gn4lO de Afnlo iaa La!inos gay y bisocwles VTH posi­tiws. LJllcs 6:30 Para rros l1fcrmDJn bro al 713-830-3025. Qi.-Voices Radio Show 8-10 p.m. KPfT 901 HoustDl1 GI.BT Conmnty Center. Ort>p-m 2-9 p_m • 3400 Mooln ""l' C07 nl-'?4 ·-·- www.houstonglbtcenter.orv TUESDAY, MAY 20 Center for AIDS. M• 7 1407 Hawthomc. r.13-527-8210. EVERY TUESDAY 8enng St.wort NelWOlt. 18oodl Cang. ll am ro 521>-IOlZ Center for Sprilual LJy;ng. Meditation (di1>p-in), ll30 a.m. I p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Fret HIV Testing. Houston~ Cllltmllitv Servites.10 am 2 p.m. at Joscii1>11ines anc, mo West z5th SL 713-52!>-0555. txl m 2Ilor22b. Fret HIV Testing. MonU1>sc Clinic. 8 p_m-111idniQ!rt at CliJb Houston. Also 4-8 PJ1I. at 6ll cu.. 611Hyde"-le713-830-3000. Cay yOIJ!lt New Pt09fam for young gay mal<s. ages 18-29. 7 p_m 614 Avondale. 713-533-9786. GIBT Pentecosb1s. Bible study, fl'ilYI'« l p.m. in the Hetghts. For Info: 931>-931-3761 t-mJil: www.WrjJ1947 CS.Cont HoustDl1 Womrn's Rugby Team. No experience nec:tSS.lry. Practice, 6:30-8:30. W~tland YMCA. Kay, nJ-208-1529 Introduction lo Bud<hsm. Alt wt1come at 634 W Temple Kl the Height' 7 p.m Carlton. m-862-8129 Rainbow Rangltn. Fr<e C&W c!Jnce lessom. Brazos River llotlont No partner needed. Beginner 2 Step. Waltz. Shuffil! & Sw~ 830 pm 713-528-9192 Houston GI.BT Conmnty Center. Orop-tn 2·9 p_m • Lesbi.1n Coming Out Group, 7 p.m. • 3400 Mont"1SC, Slile 207 713-524 3818. WWWI ,fl I *·'f.1 WEDNESDAY, MAY 21 Uncommon Legacy . lier metls at Annabelle's. 6:30 p_m Allan!l1Vltl ' -'-""'visibility.vltalityand strength ot lesbians. re ·'°"'call 713-520-1142 EVERY WEDNESDAY CenterforSpirituallMnq ~- tdrop-111~ ll30ant·l p.rn, SOM Discussion & Expb-a"-" p , o610 Harwin 713-ll'l-1808. Cry.bl Meth Anonymous (CMA) 8:15 PJ1I. ~ Montrose Counseling Center. 701 Ric'lmond A-re. Room 15. Bering M<morial UMed Melhocist Cluth. ~ "'™'"' Pot Luck O ner, 6 JO p.m. VJnous support - 7 p 'II. 713-521>-lOlZ BIJtt Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m. 5l Stephen's Episcopal. n3-52t.6665. Froe HIV Testing Montrose Clinl.:. 4-8 p.m. at Mary's. UOO W~thr1mer: 9 p.rn-midnighl at RllJ(Ofd. 715 Fa11view, 10 p m·I a.m. at EJ'~ 2517Ral~10 p.rn-1 a.mat Maftowne Spa. 3100 Fannm ID-830-)000 Froe HIV Testing. Thomas Street Qinic. 9 a.m-1 p.m. 2015 Thtmas Sl OraSure method. Call for appoontment Sh.wl\ nJ-873-4157. Gay 8owting Leagues. 6:30 p.m Palace Lanes. 4191 Bellairt Blvd. m-8bl-1187 Gtxt AsstrnlJfy Cluth C.iylgay;iffll'Tling congrtl}ltion. 1 p_m aerobics c1ass. 567 Cedar c-. livings!ll\ Texas. m51 93b-641>-nl4 E-mail: leol a.'eaSttex.n!!. Houston Pl1dt 8""f. Open l'l!heasal. 7-9 pm 1307 Yah 713-528-4379. Houstoo Rouglrlecb Rugby CU> Practice from 6:30-8;30 p_m r or """' Information. tog on ID www.roughnecl:>rug~ Houstoo Ttmis lli. 700-9 p.m. Memorial Pati<at the Toms Center. houstontennisdb ~ Sprilual Uplift 5el\'ict. 7 p_m Resurrection MCC 713-861-9149 Houston GI.BT Conmnty Cenllr. arop..n. 2-9 p.m. • FM HIV lrn· Ing. coonseling. l>-9 p.m. • S&M Night tSroci<s and Movies), 7 p_m. • Houston~ a...ct tthcats.11. 7 30 p_m. 3400 Montrose. Siite 207. T.~ .,'.'>1-"'~:.._ .•,rwwL ,;-+ ~l".,....tN'orv. THURSDAY, MAY 22 EVERY THURSDAY ~Houston G<o<ip fol IX'• ""I' c"ll'f)')llO """"""'- 7'.30 PJ1I. HOObit Caf~ 2240 Pbtls!muu, wwwftaw..V-iiwsc ID-467-4380. Cenllt for Sprilual Living. Meditabon (drop-<n). ll30 am 1 p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713 339-1808. Conmnty Go5pol. Service 730 p.m. 713-880-9235. WWW.COlllnUlllygospcl_~ Fnot HIV Testing. Houston AteaConmlitY SerYica 10 a.m-2 pm. at JOSCph-Hines ainic. mo Wt51251h Sl Also u a.m l30 p.m. al CJl!ery M<dical Clinic. 5900 North Fteew.iy. and WI Toyz from 9 p_m-midnighL 713-52b-0555. ext 23L 227 or 22b. Froe HIV Testing Montrose Clirlc. 8 p.m.- nD1ighl at Br.l20s River 8oltom (8RB), 2400 &uos. and Cousins. 817 Fairview. 713-830-3000. Froe HIV Testing. 7-9 p.m. at Alt Siar Nows. 3415 t<aty Frteway Health d1noc with fll!e testing for HIV and syplilis. 713-86'1-7878 FrontRlmers. lblring chb. 630 p_m 713-522-8021 Web slle'. hltpJ/hOme.Swbdl~lltm(-mail:~ Cay Bowing leoglJOS. Luci Duos. 9 p_m Oynamic Lanes. 6121 Tard Dr1-re. 713-861-ll8Z r.lOBAL Cay. Le!bian or Bisem1t ARine at the lkivmlly of Houst~ ~ Wetldy mee1in!> 6 p_m Mlail: llQIJyefl()O~a.:hotmaiam. Hap c AeaMly. ~~ 6:30 p_m Beril} ~ Ext2ll HoustooWorntn'sRugbyTeam.No~~ P1actice. 6:30-8:30. Wl!stland YMCA Kay, ID-208-1529 lJlt Uvfn;ston GI.BT ~ Group 7 p_m cinner and liscussion Gr.la! Assembly CtiJrth. 567 Cedar GrM, Livingston. Texas, IDSl 9lf>-64b-nl4. E..ail: leo~easttex.net UmlJda Skating CU.. 8 p_m Tradewlnds Sbbng Rink. wwwneosoflcllm/ft. ID-523-%20. Montrose Clinic. Offers wetldy peer support~ for 91'1 and bisexual men with HIV. English speaking ~meets. 6:30 PJ1I. 215 W.Slhcimer 713-830-3050. IQiibow ~ters. Froe C&W dance lessllns. No partner rtQUlred. Brazos R1vtr Boltont 8;30 p_m 713-528-9192. RrcovtrY From Food Addiction (RFA). MeWng for 12-st~ program open ID an. Noon-I p_m SL Stephen's Episcopal a...cti.1805 w ALibama Sl RFA: ID-673-2848. www.geocitieuonVrfml51 E..,,.,t,~a;aol.am. Spali5h a..na Conversation Group. Cafe Aqora. 7 p.m. E..,,.,1chJrlahouston(_a:msnam.713-410-7201 Worntn's Clinic. MonU1>sc Clinic. 713-830-3000. tb6tan GI.BT Conmnty eent... Drop 11 z.q p_m • Montrose Wnttrs' Prqect 10 a.m •Houston Cay & ~ FWicJI CaCIS bo.W of - ~ 7 p_m.. Monl!q vcU1tte' -~ 7 p_m • J'. «Iv · 51itc20Z713-524-3818.www~~ FRIDAY, MAY 23 EVERY FRIDAY eent.. for Spintual LJy;ng. Meditltion (drop-In), !130 am 1 p_m 6610 H.lrwut 713-339-1808 Fret HIV Trstng. Montrose Clinic. JO p.m.-2 a.m al The Me3track. 2915 SJn J.lclnto; 10 p.m.-1 arn at EJ\ and at Mldtowne Spa 713- 830-)000. Froe HIV Testing Thtmas Street C5nic. q a.m Ip_ TI. 2015 TI..nas St OraSure method can for appointment Sharon. nJ-873-4157 Frost Eye Cllnic. ffl!e eye exams for f)OOIJle with ~IV. 713-830-)000 Gtxt AsstrnlJfy Cluth Caylgay-aff1r1111ng congrtl}llion. 7 p_m atr­obocs cfJss. 561 Ced.tr GrM, livingston. Texas. ID5l 9J0.646- nl4. E..naif. leol,MasUex.neL HA lc.H. Houston ~ Teen Coalition of lbmsex1'lls mom 7-10 p_m For meell'll) information. cafl 713-529-359Q ~ HoustDl1 T tmis lli. 7:00-9 p.m. Menoial Paric at the Tenms Center Houstonteflisduhorg Kollt Projoct Morning prayer, IO a.m. 713-861-1800. M~ Alillm. GI.BT Jewish congrtl}ltio.'1. Satmth 5"'ices at 8 p.m. on the second Frid.Jy of tJCh month at B.lby 8amabys. 602 Fi111W!W Monthly stLdy groups with (;ongrtgation 8cth Israel ~ Nori-~ 8r.Jeswood Ml>hpachJI AliZim. P.O. Box 980136. Houston TX 77098 8/il>-841-9139. ext 1834. ona ~ wa11ct11es1rtct> lo~ PfMlll 1me~ 9.30 pm """""'at armuity ctn!J. n3-'i28-SAf£ £-mall~ a:llon1 Houston r.lBT Conmnty eent... ()rop-«12-9 p_m • LeslxJn Fim N ght show"'!I 'Clairt of the Moon; 7 p.m. • 3400 Mmtt1llSC Soil 20Z 713-524-lfl!R www.houstonalbtcenter.org. VOLUNTEER/SELF-HELP ECHOS This oo try · !he Ep!SCqlal a..th of the Epiph.lny Is det 'lLJ l. _ 'I po.'(ltlle acttSS hralth and soaal servoce systems. FM medical services irdJde HIV. STD and hrpatitis l&lng. call for d.1tes and Urnes of services. 9610 S. Gessner. nJ- 270-0369. E"fflJil: echos~swbtllnet Gay & le5IQ1 SwrtcHJoard Houslo!t Vohl1teer> offer a friendly ear ID calkn 11 need of information norjudgmental support and~· lllCllS COll1SCting to the GI.BT comnu-dly. nJ-529-3211 WWW~ HoP«I """"' C3I Jll' this imjlldit m:deralal ...... "1IUll!!l'Dt 1st t1m h.;ls ~ at.ocaty ...n llll 1J111.T121'9 e!li:ll1> tr~ tWslm.n Oatlty "l>Olln;s ~strictly lmted Alstrgs id.d> pes rrlc.N'sadacti:nalerts fnm mtua <t:a and Id~ ad*dcip> itlti:ns.Forriltrtopr.aca!SSWWW11"4!'~ Houston r.l8T Conmnty Cenbr. VoUitcen perform• vnty of Critical t.1Slcs which lndude staffmg the-onfonmtion deslc ckmg dnJpin hcln; helping with center progranmng and Mots: woiti."IQ on conmnty outreach efforts. funckaising and ptl)liclty Carll pby­en. wnttt. and artists 111 par1iaJlar are needed 713-524-3818 Peer l.isUnng ltt Youth only Sta~ by GlBT youth for !PY les­bian bisexual. trJnSQender and cμ>slJoring youth S-10 p_m Monday­Frid. Jy 800-399-f'EER Pride Commrttet of Hous~ Volunt~ <oUght for Pride 2003 preparabons. This os the 25 Pride celebration. www.pridehOllston.~ E-mall: volwiteerSQ!!lf1dehouston.org. 713-529-6979. Iii\ To Its! an event. call 713-529-8490. fax ~ at 713-529-9531. or e-matl ecitor@ houstonvoice.com Deadline is Monday at 5 pm. MAY 16. 2003 21 appt a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL NEXT WEEKEND Burt Bacharach. Qne of the most prolific com· posers of the 20th century. joins the Houston Symphony for three evening performances. Bacharach's songs include "I Say a Little Prayer," "That's What Friends Are For" and "What the World Needs Now." He has earned three Academy Awards. six Grammys, nine No. 1 hits and is a member of the Songwnters Hall of Fame. 8 p.rn Friday, May 23. and Saturday, May 24 7-30 p.rn Sunday, May 25. Tickets: $25·79. Jones Hall 615 Louisiana 713-224·7575. www.houstonsymphony.org. FILM SATURDAY, MAY 17 'War and Peace" was banned from public screen­mgs in India This documentary considers the dan­gers of nuclear conflict between India and Pakistan. The filmmaker contrasts the poverty of the people with the billions each country spends on nuclear research. T ICkcls $6 or $5 for mati­nees, MFAH members. senm and students. 6 p.m. Museum of Fine Arts Houston. Caroline Wiess Law Building. on Bissonnet at Main. 713·63•H515. www.mfah.org THEATER THIS WEEKEND "Shakespeare: Love & Wrath" follows a troupe of actors through some of Shakespeare's most com­pelling and provocative scenes. sonnets and soliJo. quies. Presented by Theatre Illuminata through May 18. 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2 p.rn Sunday. Tickets: $10, Midtown Ari Center, 3414 La Brandt 832-216-3916 GALLERIES THROUGH MAY 30 Women m the V-ISllal & Literary Arts (WIVl.A) presents its juried vi~ art membership exh1bi­t1011. The purpose of the group is to offer a stimu­lating and inspiring forum for women to explore the creative process One Allen Center, 500 Dallas. THROUGH JUNE 30 Sculptor R. David Mattiza's bronze works are the centerpiece of the Thomwood Gallery's Annual Group Sculpture Exhibition, now open. Mattiza's bronzes are known for their flow of motion and the powerful pull into the intricate detail of each piece. The exhibition also presents indoor and outdoor sculpture by artists Wei-Ii Willie' wang, Daryl G Colburn, Mark Yale Harri5, Zena Stetka HOWi!. Joe lncrapera. Gary Kosmas. Michelle O'M1chael Eugene Sitcheff, Michael Smith. and Patrick Stone. Gallery hours are 10 a.rn to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, noon to 3 p.rn Saturday, and by appointment on Sunday and Monday. Thomwood Gallery, 1201 Birdsall. 713-861 ·ARTS www.thomwoodgallery.com. ONGOING Gulf Coast Archives & Museum of GlBT tfrstory Satellite Exhibition. The first exluOition from the GCAM collection presented at the Houston GLBT Community Center honors the NAMES Project Houston. Community Center, 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. 713-524-3818 Positive Ari Wori<shop Photography ExM>itioll Artists living with HIV/AIDS created these pie· t11res with accompanying texl Houston GLBT Commurvty Center. 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. 713·524·3818. 22 MAY 16. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS SALE I HOUSTON AWESOME HEIG-HTS BUNGALOW (706 Usentr St) Remod­eltd m. formal LR/DR/den. Hdwdl. grarn1e. new app1s. 1. 7 44 s;;f! UI Steve (832) 654-8479 STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD syourbomespedal' Id OU1 rt~ abcul It (.:Jarar!let! they will see I with OUI new f<=es. Bold or bcx ,...- ad !Gt added aruactJon Contaet c..!tcmer service reps fer more details. (877) 863-188S RENT I HOUSTON ARTIST STUDIO SPACE 1250 S 1,000/mo. www W10U!rstreetstd10s.corn or Paul Sur.:-all O (7' I) 85' · 6576 FOR LEASE A must seer i,000 sqft, 31212, AC. huge yard, brm'~ DR/fRILRs. ._, prMCusl'j leased lnaedillle cil!CO. Extensive <emode ng. New hdwds thrcughou~ lieat. hot wat!r heate•, insulator!, WO, flidgo DW, BA fix. llJ'es & IO<.ets. Ytsl Al! new Very quiet neighborhood • 0- • 5 m from the Medic.IJ Crnter S 1,SOOOna, 1 mo dep 'fC!d {.0 (7 13 729-6806 RENT IT FAST with our ._ leallJ'es. Draw attention to JOO! ad by using our bold or be> feature. Cornact OUI CUS· tcmer service reps fur mer! details. (877) 863· 1885. TWO FOR RENT IN GALVESTON: ... 1ooosq1t1o1t. ...-..rg storefront studio I cornmerda! space. wwwonelandia.mm/galYestoo.'itml I (71 l, 206-96'~. SHARE I HOUSTON oRuG FREE M 10 siv-;;iw T..mi BR ap1 OtJlet
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