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Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 001. 1985-09-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1985-09-27). Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/436

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985 - File 001, 1985-09-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/461/show/436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 257, September 27, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date September 27, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript o No Endorsements But GPC President Sul' Lovell says thf' group is rl'gi&tering voters-in ma:.:s quanWies No Endorsements-But GPC President Says Caucus Will Continue to Fight Although no major candidates for the November 5 municipal elections sought the endorsement of the Houston Gay Polit­ical Caucus, GPC President Sue Lovell says the group will continue to fight for gay political participation. Lovell told the Montrose Voice that "There were no endorsements. No one wanted it. Yet, we will continue to register voters and urge gays to remain involved in the political system." The group met for an endorsement meet­ing on September 18. No major candidates appeared at that meeting. Councilman George Greanias, whose District C con­sists primarily of Montrose and southwest Houton, suddenly cancelled his planned appearance. Carl Denton, of the 3400 block of Yoakum, a little-known candidate for Greanias' seat, did attend the meeting but did not receive the caucus's endorse­ment. Some activists feel the "non­endorsemen t" meeting reflected the dem­ise of the political influence of Houston's most well-known gay organization. Gary J. Van Ooteghem, founder and former president of GPC, said in a statement released following the meeting, "In mak­ing a decision to do nothing significant this year, a majority of the former GPC presidents felt that GPC, itself. has just gone back into the closet." Although some members wanted to endorse candidates without their solicita­tion, Ray Hill, a GPC member and gay activist, feels that would "punish those who have helped us." Hill feels that in light of the results of the January !9refer­endum and an overall return to conserva­tism in Houston, a gay endorsement would only work to damage the political futures of politicians that are allies of the gay community. In keeping with the tenor of maintain­ing gay political activism, the caucus will accelerate its voter registration drive as the October 6 registration deadline nears. The caucus has placed voter registration cards in many bars and deputy registrars will visit many bare on the weekend of October 4-6. Regardless of the lack of a formal endor­sement, the caucus is distributing bumper stickers and T-shirts printed with the slo­gan, 0 Don't welch on Houston." Most Gay Men Victims of Anti­Gay Violence From "Philadelphia Gay News" A majority of ga males surveyed in a Phildelphia survey have experienced some sort of anti-gay violence, it was reported Sept. 20. The survey by the Ppiladelphia Lesbian and Gay Task Force, tonducted in March 1984 but just r n released, showed 63% of the gay men and 39'11. of the lesbians had experienced homophobic violence. The 183 people participating in the sur­vey said incidents included threats, objects thrown, being chased or followed , spit at, beaten, aAaulted with a weapon, arson and sexual assault. "Anti-gay violence is coming out the closet," said Task Force board member Steve Aurand. Montrose Voice ------- - - ·The News_paper ~tontrose" September 27, 1965 Published Every Friday (713) 529-6490 AIDS Vaccine 'Soon' Dr Donald Armstrong, a researcher in infectious diseases, testified last week that the virus believed to cause Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is Ins hardy and more difficult to transmit than most dit1C'ases, thus predicting the development of a vaccine within "the next year or so." Armstrong, testifying in a hearing on a lawsuit eonrerning an AIDS victim. said the virus is vulnerable to chlorine bleach , alcohol, drying, or heating to 133 degrees. Meanwhile in Washington, several Republican legislators are pushing for increased government spending for AIDS research. A House appropriations commit­tee recently approved about $196 million for AIDS research and education includ-ing $141 million for the National Insti­tutes of Health. The Reagan administration has only requested $126 million for 19~6 . Sen. Lowell Weicker, R.· Conn., chairman of the Senate Appropria­tions health subcommittee, said, "It is my finn intent that whatever resources are needed to meet the AIDS crisis will be pro­vided." Rep. Henry Waxman, D.-Calif., echoes the feelings of gay activists and science professionals by saying the Reagan administration held back on AIDS spend· ing because of prejudice against homoAex­ual men. Both houses of Congress are expected to appropriate more spending for AIDS research and education in 1986. TABC Agents Arrest Four People for 'Lewd Conduct' Offkere from the Texas Alcoholic Bever­age Commission, the state agency which regulates alcohol sales, entered Mary's, a bar locatt'd at 1022 Westheimer, on Sun day, Sept. 21, at approximately 2:00 a.m., and arrested five people on non-alcohol related charges According to Genie Thomas. a supervi· sor with TABC who was not present at the time of the arrests, four persons were arrested for public lewdness and one for disorderly conduct. Thomas said the agents observed "hugging and groping of persona] parts of each other and motions against each others' body." agents who entered the bar, would not comment. According to Jim Kuhn, attorney for those arrested and a witness to the event, TABC officers are authorized to make arrests and do carry weaPons. Another witness to the incident said those arrested were either holding hands or embraced. Those arrested, in an unus­ual move, were taken to Harrie County Jai1 instead of city facilities. All of the arrested are planning to con· test the charges 2 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 MEN'S NIGHT OUT HAPPY HOUR 12-8PM 8:00 DYNASTY 81 CHAM:PAGSE l_'STII .. 9PM 81 lVEI.-1.- DRISKS AI.I .. NIGHT @1 DRAFT ALI .. NIGHT 10:30BEST CHEST CONTEST 8100 CASH PRIZE E~IC'EE C.i-ARV CHt ~cu OP FITSESS EXC llASGE All Night Happy Hour 3in1 3 shots of your favorite premium, call or well liquor at our regular low price served in a big, tall glass (Highballs Only) or (your choice), Happy Hour Prices All Night Long QNTROSV Now the Most EXPLOSM Day of the Week ~~ ._'~ \"" .... " .... ' l9r!~ ~ 'OR A MAH S MAH Kff~1NG COMPANY 805 PACIFIC HOUSTON• 529-7488 Montrose Voice ANO TEXAS•STAR MONTROSE. TEXAS Popu1111on l•t 1985) 32.000 Ven1ut lracta 401 Ot. ~1 02. 402 01 , 402 02, 4'05 02, 403 Ind 404 01 Z•p COCln {roughly) 70006. 77019 1part1on). 77098 Bounded (roughlyl Shepherd Or fw•t). Allen P•rkway (north), Main St (east). US 59 (tOulh) Lat1tucte (Montrose Blwd 11 Weathe1mer Rd) 29•44·13··N Longltude95•22·511w_ Altitude 40' ElECTED OFFICIALS FOA MONTROSE George GrNniu. Howton Chy Coundl (dist C) 001 Bagtiy. f113J 22'2·5933 El Fr1nco lee. Ham• County CommlSSIOl'er (pct 11 1001 PrNlon. f713J 221-61" Wall1tt Rankin, Constable (pct 1) 301 SMJ JKlnto, 1713} 221·5200 o.hfa Olnborg. Te11H House of Repr .. ntatr11• (dist 137) 191 r S W fwy. (713} 520-8068 Cra.g WHh1ngton. Ta11u Senate (dist 13) ?323 Carohne. 1713) 45~43'3 Mickey .._elllnd. US HouH ol Represen1at1v• (d•!lt 181 1919 StMh •820. (1131 73~1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 257th ISSUE. SEPT. 27 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9.000 cop191 .,.eekly through 150 ma,or d111ribuhon pomts 1n MontroH. lhe Villege and the Hetghts Ht1m1ttd pa$l·on r1t1 factor 2 8 Hl1m1ttd rHdersh1p 25. 200 wHkly plus 1.000 cop1• weekly through 45 other TexH d1t1ributJon points est1m1ted pau-on rat• factor 2.s Ht1m1ted rHder1h1p 2.500 .,., .. lcly TOTAL CIRCULATION (GUARANTEED! 10.000 cop191 weekly 1011l t1t1mat1d'rt1dersh1p 27.700 'l'fHkly Contents copyright c1955 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg pvb/1Shfll-fN11tor Linda Wyche managing «Nor Roger Lackey olf1c1 manager Mark Blazek Au1tm corre1pDndfHft Scott Cutsinger, 8111O'Rourke1ou1contrlbutor1 Steve Warren n1rion11 co,,espondMI Jerry Mulholland .ecounr t•Kuf1iil Joel Cunningham Kcount ••«ut1v1 Rick Hill account ••«ut1V1 Founding MomNri Greater Montrose Busines~ Guild. Gay and Lesbian Preu Atsociat1on N•w<J S.,v1c•• N.,_t•One. P•cil•c: Nt¥iJo1 Service Syftd1cated FHture Services & W11rer1 Brian McNaught_ Uni· vet1AI Preti Syndicate. News Amenct Syndicate POSlMAST£A Send •ddrffl correctiOnfi to 408 Avondele, Housion. TX 77006--3028 Sub!CflQllOn flte In US "' sHfed em1•loc• $49 per ye8' (52 11uet), $79per1b: montns {26tuues). orSl 25perwMk (less lhtn 76 anuet) Beck 111un S2 00 each Nat10nat adv.,l1SlnQ 11Pte1.nttt1v• Joe D1S•b8IO, R1vendell Markeling. 666 8th Avenue New York 10011. f212} 242-6863 Ad'i.,htlng dHdlm• Tuelday 5 30pm, tor Issue released Fri· day hening Noli" to edvert1u11 LOcal 1dvertl11ng rate 1chedule Seven-A w11 ettect1v1 Oct 12 1984 R•pon• Oi11ty TN Montrose Vote• d~ not assume re1ponr ttbthty tor 1dvert111ng ca.uns Readers ahOuld alert lh• news· piper to any dKeptiv• advettltlng SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 ~ ~:~ f STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AJDS;KS DIAGNOSIS SAME-DAY APPOINTMENT OPEN MON-FR/. 9-5 PM BY APPOINTMENT MON., WED .. FRI. EVENINGS AND SAlURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT 2801 EU.A BL VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 ~~ ... ..- ~ ....., Straight Slate Wants Health Cards; Haughton Says 'Nonsense' Come to the Cabaretl rnontt'ose Sqmphonic Band Smgtrs, D•n··m, Big B•nJ fumJ s~tur~y. &pt. :?8, 8pm Allrn P Ali 9nn News One News Service City Health Director Dr. James Haughton says health cards are "nonsense." They are only good for the day they are issued. Dr. Haughton says some countries give prostitutes health cards, but she could con­tract gonorrhea the next day and transmit the disease for the remaining life of the health card. Dr. Haughton's remarks came in response to Dr. Robert Feldtman 's state­ments before Houston City Council cal­ling for testing for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and the issu­ance of health cards for anyone working with food, in blood banks, or in schools. Dr. Feldtman told City Council on Wed· nesday that AIDS can be transmitted through any of the bodily fluids including sweat. Dr. Feldtman said that the health cards should be issued only to those found Providence Deletes 'Sexual Orientation' from Ordinance From "Gay Community News" (Boston) The Providence, RI., City Council voted Sept. 5 to delete all references to sexual orientation from a general anti· discrimination ordinance. The decision came after an evening of "posturing and maneuvering," reported correspondent Mark O'Malley. "I do not believe that we as a legislative body ought to be legislating a type of behavior," said Councilor Thomas Glavin. Opponents of the inclusion of discrimi· nation protection for gay people cited reli· gious and "moral" reasons for their stanrl'. "Don't they (the potential discrimina· tors) have nghts? Where are their rights?"' demanded Josephine DiRuzzo, her voice cracking with emotion. The bill was deadlocked 7-7 but, when sexual orientation was deleted, it passed 8-6. to be free of the AIDS virus. 0.J. Striegler, a Straight Slate Candi­date for City Council at-large Position 4, asked City Council to reinstate the 1978 ordinance requiring health cards and add the inclusion of AIDS screening. 2121 Allen Pdrkwdlj '500 Dondlion-Cdsh °Bdr 527-9454 or 521-9321 TllE BEST LITitE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 l l 18 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 4 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 Montrose Mouth We Deserve a Break By L'Angclo Misterioso, Esq., M.B.E. Just wrat are those trucks, heavy equip­ment and big burly men doing up on Wes­the1mer? Some of you may have noticed all that activity across from Wendys. What was once a Mobil station next to Studio 13 is quickly being transformed into a McDo­nald's. Yes, Western civilization is coming to Montrose The symbol of American busi­ness and wealth has finally arrived right here In our very own Montrose When 1s the arrival date Don't know yet , but you can bet 1t will be in record time Now when do we get a Long John Slivers. -a- The Mouth and old pal Blake the Wonderful slipped to the Cresent City this past wee­kend New Orleans 1s always wonderful. Some of the old gang was there and extend their hello's, etc. Bobby Young. Bobby Bow­ers, Mauflc10 and Nathan ot Leffllles all say hello to Steve Coalter, Larry and Cha Cha.J­ason 1s a1so back at Laff1ttes and says hello to Randolph Parks. Saw some Houston1ans. Including Larry Hamngton, there partying 1t up. When m New Orleans, you should stay at the New Orleans Guest House-complete with all the old world charm and convenient to the Quarter -a- Now closer to home, when the Mouth paid a v1s1t to The 611 Club, there were some butch men moving the new patio bar into place This should 11>d1cate the new bar will be open anytime, probably by tne time you read this The61 t IS fast becoming an alter­native choice for many hot men Check 11 out ci- The Galleon Third Anni.al Happy Hour Dad­dy's Revue. to be held Sunday October 6 at 8 p m • has sold out of its reserved seating Open seating with no cover 1s still available. -a-now $2 The same goes for Saturdays. The patio is under renovation finally There's been so many rumors and all. Friendly David, the day bartender, says that Mar­garet Jean. the gossip machine. will be back on the air soon. -a-lt you missed making reservations for this weekend's Experience Weekend in Hous­ton. there's still time to sign up for Dallas (November 2-3). The poster says ''because you're worth it" Call 864-0280 or 522-1890. -o- The Frontrunners will be holding Sunday morning runs as well as their usual Tuesday and Thursday evening runs. For further info and a schedule of events call 522-0899 or 681-5679 -o- What ex-bartender 1s back from San Francisco? -a- D1gnity will be hosting all the Dignity chap­ters from Region VII for a fall conference the weekend of October 5-6 -o- Guess what made Houston City magazine's "best list?" Mary's. naturally According to the mag, Mary's is Houston's best gay bar. They even Included some pictures Mary·s next Full Moon Party will be a "slumber" party Bring your p.J.S. night shorts, whatever you wear to bed, etc. (Sorry no birthday suits.) -a- Dynasty was on all of Heaven's big screens -and before a packed house Wed­nesday The crowd constantly cheered and booed, depending on who was on the screen This will be a regular event at Heaven through the TV season-and will be followed by a 30-minute intermission and then 10¢ drink night. -o- Meanwh:le at the Mining Company, bar­back Paul 1s m lust again. But then he's always in lusti He even took three days off from his painting duties The trad1t1onal Sunday Beer Bust is now optional. So now all us well drinkers won't have to pay for something we don't use The Beer Bust 1s Rick and David at the 611 (Roger Lackey photo) The Rendezvous on Westheimer, next to Charlie's Coffee Shop. presents Mmus One through this Sunday night (Sept. 29). Minus One 1s a ''Manhattan Transfer" type group, singing old and new ballads and great jazz. Don't miss them. The Rendezvous will have a Sunday champagne buffet starting Oct. 6 (next Sun· day) from noon to 3pm. Your taste buds will be deltghted-and your ears will too with the sounds of JR. Jenkins at the piano. Beau of BRB at his birthday party (Jerry VPtta photo) Praying for a lot of business at B. Adams. Ltd. (Roger /,ackey photo/ Also at the Rendezvous, Gloria Lepe 1s at the piano Monday thru Friday for happy hour, 4 30 to 7:30. She 1s 1oined by the Las Vegas comedy impressions of Tiny Mac. (And JR. 1s back after 10pm each night.) George handU>~ a call at JR. 's (Roger Lackey photo) Dai id and Steele (Roxer LaC'key photo) STOP!! NOW IS THE BEST TIME E-V-E-Rll Lease Your New Car or Truck Can Own Car at End of Leasel-SPECIAL GMAC RATES THE PROS IN AUTO LEASING MERCEDES 300 $480 CADILLAC FLEETWOOD $327 NISSAN 300 zx $279 Domestic ALL MAKES OLDS 98 $278 MOTOR LEASING PONTIAC GRAND-AM $187 CADILLAC DEVILLE $278 BMW 318 $269 Foreign ALL 5ANJAC1NTO MODELS 10700 Richmond 781 8566 Suite 100, Houston, TX 77042 - Serving You Since 1926 A DIVISION OF SAN JACINTO MOTOR CALL DEBBIE OR ROBBIE f\llC:1fl,jf'"~ \FA~ OUOlES PERSONAL RAJf'S MAY VAP.V If you are an avid fan of THE FAR SIDE cartoons, you'll have to have Gary Larson's newest collection .. . And if you missed his first best seller, you'd better be sure you have ... I S395 Order now if you f love humor that f starts from and remains firmly j footed in left field! ! -P-lea-se- s-en-d -m-e:- ----- __ copies of The Far Side at $3.95 each. __ copies of Beyond The Far Side at $3.95 each. Total amount enclosed flnclude S1 for postage and hand/Ing per book ordered.J Mail to Far Side Books. cto Montrose IA:ltee 4400 JOllnson Drive. Fairway. KS 66205 <Malce ClleCks payable to Ulllv~ Press Syndicate1 ""-------- MioHHS ------ ( 1ty ______ _ St•t• 11111 __ _ (,iteftf card• You're never too old to quit blowing smoke. &~a American Heart V Association INE'RE F-IGH111\G FOR 'IOJRUFE From "Chicago'11 Gay Life" Police staged a raid on Carol's Speakeasy, a Chicago gay bar, Sept. 12. initially arresting two people but taking pholoti and intensely interrogating some 40 customers. Correspondent Tracy Baim Raid more than a dozen men came in the front and back doors, "guns pointed and flashlights shining." The raid was staged by the Metropolitan Enforcement Group, an Illinois agency fanned to combat illegal drugs. Patrons and employees were forced to lie on the floor, some more than an hour. Several officers called the cu~tomers names, including " .. sucker" and "fag got." Customers, one by one, were forced to onswer questions, giving place of employ­ment, maritol status, home address ond mother's name Frank Gomilla, director of the north· eastern division of the Metropolitan Enforcement Group, satd the raid woe held to arrest people on warrants after a three-month investigation into drug traf· ficking. Carol's manager, David Boyer, said at first he thought the club wah being robbed when the officers-wearing rubber gloves-did not clearly identify them· selves. A mayor's assistant, the ACLU and pri· vate attorneys were investigating the inci­dent. lRenwrinls Wallace Eugene (Wally) Smith Wallace Eugene (Wally) Smith died August 31. 1985. 1n Denver Co., after an extended illness. A nat ve of Houston. Smith had, at one time, worked as a bartender at Outlaws. He was mvolved m other community busi­nesses and actrv11Jes Survivors include his parents, three brothers and fifemate Roy W1lhams Donations may be made to the WE Smith Memorial Fund, 3012 Milam, Houston, TX 77006 to assist the family in covering medical costs. Mike M. Wallace Mike M Wallace, a nat111e Texan who had hved m Dallas, Houston, Beaumont and New Orleans, was found murdered m his Memphis. Tenn. apartment on August 4, 1985. Born October 3. 1939. Mike was employed by the Santa Fe Rallroad for 19 years A police mves!Jgat1on of his death was ongoing and no charges were imme­diately fifed OUR POLICY: The Montrose Voice will com· memorate lhe 1'3M1ng or Montrose residents and Houston gay community members with a one or two paragraph announcement Friends or relatives of the deceased may prov de us with !acts about the per· son s I le names of the closest survr.ors. and burial arrangements Prose or verse cao be included Pie· • res are apprectated and ._ II be returned Name of the deceased shOu d be attached to the phOto lntor­mat< an should be provided to the Montrose Vorce at the ear1 a t PClSS b1e date end win be pubhshed In the l"'Cx ava able ed t t0-i There is ro charge for th s Thursday Prime Rib DYNASTY PARTY AT THE BAR WEDNESDAYS SUPER SUNDAY BRUNCH $5.95 SUNDAY TEA 50¢-Bloody Marys, Cape Cods, Screwdrivers- SOC HAPPY HOURS Monday 3pm-2am Tues-Thurs 3-lpm Friday 3pm-9pm Saturday 7am-7pm --..--....'"" Sunday 12 noon-7pm ~ / ' '"' ~1".-- $1 Wells UNICJr\J ~ACK SPORTSWEAR HAIRCUTTING Endless Summer Suntan• $3 With package of ten 30 minute tanning sessions at $30 1 21 2 WESTHEIMER A full service salon Mon.-Sat. 10-7, Sunday 1 2 -6 For appointment call 528·9600 Health Department Delays AIDS Meeting News One New., Service A committee formed to determine how schoolR should deal with students having Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrom (AIDS) did not meet this week as planned. Health depnrtment spokesper8on Shirley Bridgewater says the meeting will take place sometime next week or later in October. Schedules of all the doctors involved in the panel are being coordi· nated. The committee is expected to determine whnt action a school district should take if a case of AIDS is confirmed in a student or teacher. Rec!'nt cases in other parts of the nation have crented controversy. Some students with AIDS have been bnrred from attend· ing classes. No cases of AIDS have been confirmed in school-aged chidlren in the Houston area. 'Democratic Rights' to be Topic of Panel Discussion The topic of"Dt•mocratic Rights in Hous· ton Under Attack: What Can We Do To Defend Them?" will be the topic of a panel discussion to be held at the Militant Forum, 4806 Almeda, on Saturday, Sept. 26 at 7:30 p.m. Participating pnnel members arl' Rruct• Griffith, an attorney ass0<·iated with the American Civil Liberties Union; Tom Colemun, vice-president of the Houston Gay Political Caucus and president of the Texas Human Rights Foundation; Ada Edwards, chair of the Free South Africa Movement; Cathy Courtney of the Texas Abortion Rights Action League and Coali· tion Against Clinic Violence; and Willie Mae Reid, mayoral candidate, Socialist Workers Party. A $2 donntion is requc•ted. That dona· twn 1s $1 for students and the unem· ployed. For more information, coll 522-8054. Boston Gay Man Gets Most Votes From a press r e lease An openly-gay incumbent candidate for Hoston City Council, David Scondras, 11 Democrat, captured 67% of the vote Sept. 10 in pn•liminary elections. He will fnce Republican Judy Porteus Nov 5 for the District 8 seat. Scondras soundly outdistnnced gay .rigb opponent Glenn.Fi cue SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 7 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You a ''High-Voltage'' Type? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Special to the Montrose Voice News-America Syndicate A hard-bitten oil tycoon was once asked if he had ulcers. His reply was, "I don't get ulcers, I give them." Living intensely is a way oflife for some people. More than 80 million prescriptions for tranquilizers are written annually to help people keep their emotions in check, but some don't succeed. Their overreac­tions often cause detrimental results for themselves and others. At the Johns-Hopkins University Medi­cal School's Department of Psychiatry, Dr. Leonard Derogatis has devised lengthy questionnaires to identify individ· uals who don't handle stressful events well. The quiz ahead is based on a number of Ruch tests which assess a person's style of handling difficult life situations. To learn if you, when irritated, are likely to "drop the bomb on Luxembourg," answer each item as follows: Rarely-I; Sometime~-2; and Often-3, then read on for explanations. I. You grow quite impatient when you must wait in line. 2. You work hard, play hard and try to be the best at what you do. 3. You easily become annoyed when held up by someone in traffic. 4. You are more of a go-getter than most of your friends are. 5. You slam and break things when you're angry. 6. It irritates you when people don't take you seriously. 7. You shout at strangers when you become annoyed (i.e. when you drive, ~-~~. while you shop, while on the job). 8. You hate to lose at things you attempt to do. 9. When you are angry, you speed up and do things faster, (i.e. drive, eat, walk, etc.). 10. You don't easily forgive and forget when someone has offended you. o Explanation The quiz items, you will notice, are all overreactions, which display an intensity usually unnecessary to cope with the situation. A healthy personality engages in a kind of psychic economy of its own. It responds to life with the effort and energy reasona­bly appropriate to deal with events-not much more and not much less. A wile who iumps up an<1 ru~hes to answer the door, a teenager who walks fast or gulps his food, a manager who slams his desk or who repeatedly jabs the elevator button would all be examples of over-extended behavior. Clinical psychol­ogists look for this "too-muchness" qual­ity in behavior to judge it as neurotic. People who avidly play games with a hid­den vengeance to win are usually displac­ing their hostility toward their opponents. It's fair to say that occas10nally eve­ryone acts intensively, but it doesn't necessarily brand us as maladjusted. However, some high-tension individu­als actually strive unwittingly to main­tain a high level of stress for themselves. These "adrenalin junkies" spill more adrenalin into their bloodstream than most of us. To them life isn't exciting unless it is lived at a high level of anticipa­tion and excitement. They push them­selves and take chances to create a sense of adventure and keep themselves in a state of pleasure and excitement. Research at Harvard University shows Voice Quiz that intense types drive hard to gain mas­tery over life. They are argumentative and competitive. They are over-sensitive to slights by others (items 3, 6, 10). they make up for shortcomings by overcompensating in the things they do (2, 4, 8), and they scapegoat others (1, 5, 7, 9). o Score The quiz identifies the above traits. The more you answered True, the more you tend to be an intensive adaptor to daily living. Total your points and check the meaning of your score. 0-15 points-Low key and easygoing. 16-23 points-Average range of emo­tional responll(' . 24-30 point.;-You 're living in a pressure cooker. Perhaps it's time to relax more and gain a better perspec-tive on life. exercise regutarlY· 8 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27 1985 Sports Voice Tennis Club Completes 1st Round of Championships HAIR LOSS­NEW MEDICAL TREATMENT By Rich Corder After a complete week of early rounds, the Houston Tennio Club championship results and next oppone~ts are as follows Level I: Dick Cotten defeated Donny Helley 6-0, 6-0, and now plays Shy Willie who beat J. Ryan 6-3, 7-6 (7-5). Randall DiC'kl'rson defeated Rick Hadnot 6-2, 6-3 and will meet No. 1 seed Jim Kitch who defeated Ron Bell 6-1, 3-6, 6-2 Level II· J.C. Barrera defeated Rich Corder 7-5, 6-2 and met Tiny Tim, who defeated David Garza 6-7 (4-7), 7-5, 6-3. Barrera then beat Tim in the semi-finals 7-5, 3-6, 6-3. Newcomer Xavier beat another newcomer Marty by defeault, then met David Robicheaux, the No. 1 . ecd, ,,..;nning in straight sets 6-2, 6·2. RobiC'heaux defeated Danny Casilla.s 6-3, 6-4 m the first round. Level III: Pat Power defeated David LeR-ter 6-1, 6-4 to get started. then beat 007 Garza 6-2, 7-5 to make it to the finals. Garza defeated Boom Boom Heiland 6-1, 5-7, 6-3 in the first round. Joel defeated Bill Santai ti in the first round 6-1, 2-6, 7-6(7-2). Sebastian Velez beat Eddie Chavez in the first round and will meet Joel in the semi­finals. Velez and Joel are scheduling their match with the winner to meet Power for the title. Level IV: No. 1 seed Eugene Brown cruised pa.st Gabe Herpin 6-0, 6-0 in the first round. Dan Jackson beat Thomas Cortez 3-6, 6-2, 6-3 to then meet Brown. Brown won the first set 7-3 in a tie breaker and took the second set 6-1. Jere! Shaw knocked off Rick Massey 6-2, 6-2. Marcus Lee defeated Rick Knapp 6-3, 6-L Lee defeated Shaw in the semi-finals 6-2, 7-6. Brown and Marcus will meet for the title. Level V: No. 1 11eed Steve Bearden came from behind to heat John Murphy 4-6, 6-3, Outdoor Group Visiting Ranch The Houston Outdoor Group (HOG) is ven· turing into Boerne, Texas, Sept. 27, for a pnmitive backpacking tnp. It i.s to take place through Sept. 29 on a 5000 acre ranch with hillF, lake~ and creek11. On Oct. 5, the HOGs will have a potluck covered dish dinner and movie. Partici· pantl! should bring a dish that will feed four to six persons. For information on HOG or any planned activities, call Jim at 680-3144 or Larry at 521-3641 Bacchus Finally Wins One While Herricanes Remain Undefeated Bacchus Boozers, with a 14-7 win over Undercover, gained their first victory after three weeks of play in Houston Women's Softball's fall i;eason The Booz­ers winning streak was .shortlived when they suffered a 7-3 defeat at the hands of the Ducks. The Boozers remain in the basement of both the A Divi.sion and the League overall. The Herricanes remain undefeated, Div· ision A leaders, and league leaderR with a 5-2 win over Coffee Beans. Sport reins aR the leader of the B Div­ision. They trounced SoftTouch 17-2 after barely losing to Coffee Beans 8-7. Herricanes appear to have a comforta· ble two game lead in the A Division, but Sport is followed by a mere half game by MCCR Angels in the B Division. The Angels fell to Hollywood Bears 8-2 in a non-division contest. The Bears also defeated Division A second-place holder Marion and Lynn's Rebels 13-4. In other action in week three of the WSL season, Latin Expre11s was defeated by Undercover and SoftTouch, 8-2 and 3-2, respectively. Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten· n1s Center Houston Tennis Club 9am-Noon. Homer Ford Tennis Center Houstons Women's Softball League competition. 9am-6pm, Heights-Lyons Field, Shepherd at 13th Women·s Bowling League 5pm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7.30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY; Frontrunners, Golf Center, Her­mann Park MSA Men·s Bowling 9pm. Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA ·Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7 30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League. 8pm, In sponsors' clubs THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta· doum Bowl Special Events Sept 15.22.29' Houston Tennis Club Singles Championship Tournament Oct 12·13 Annual Texas-OU Tennis Clas­sic, Dallas Oct.: Texas-OU Football Weekend, Dallas Nov 9-11. Houston Tennis Assn. ''Hou-Tex V" MSA Pool League Sland•ngs. Summer League FOLLOWING WEEK 19 TEAM This Week, Matches so far, Total games 1 Bacchus I S-10 15--4 17S-110 2 The Bam tc>-5 14--5 te&-96 3 Lopstock 4 Ranch Hands 5 Kindred Sptr1ls I 6 Street Cats 7 611111 8 JAs 9 Bacchus II 10 BAB Cowboys 11 E/J's 12 Kindred Sp1nts II 13 Too611 14The611 15 Al's Pals 16 Sally's ShoOters 17 Rancheroos 18 Yard Dogs 19 Hooters 11>-5 14-5 172-113 lS-0 14--5 164-121 11~ 13-6 163-122 tc>-5 13-6 156-129 7-8 13-6 152·133 S-10 12-7 172·112 1S-0 12-7 16&-117 S-10 11>-9 132-153 c>-15 ~10 126-159 6·1 8-11 134-151 11>-5 7-12 156-129 c>-15 6-13 141>-HS tc>-5 6-13 12S-160 S-10 6-13 1 lS-170 4--11 4--15 112·172 S-10 4--15 105-180 1S-0 4-14 1()().170 HoU8ton Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Sept 22 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jom Kotch 2 Randall D•ckeraon 3 Rock Hadnot 4 Donny Kelley 5 Ron Bell 6 JC. Barrera 7 A•ch Corder 8 A•Ck Dupont 9 Shy W1ll1e 10 Anni Albanza BLADDER 1 Tony Tom 2 Oscar Martinez 3 Davod He1l1nd 4 R>Chard Pregeant 5 Aon McCauley 6 Sebasllan Velez 7 #007 8 Larry Jarvos 9 Rick Massey 10 Steve Bearden CLADDER 1 Edd•e Chavez 2 Thomas Cortez 3Joe L. 4 A•Ck Knapp 5 Gabe Herpon 6 Billy Green 7 Steve Bryant 8 Roy Mendiola 9 John Murphy 10 Paul Brown D LADDER 1 Da•"'id Hendrickson 2 Oscar Ysass1 3 Steve Chesney 4 JV Klinger 5 Aid< Martinez 6 Moke Holloway 7 Randy Moller 8 Joe D 9 Dav•d Moskowotz 10 Howard Brown 6-4. Paul Brown beat Steve Chesney, 7-6 (7-3), 0-6, 6-1. Brown is now scheduling his quarterfinals match with Bill Green. The winner will meet Bearden. Randy Miller beat Joe D. 6-2, 6-3. The results of the Miller-Rick Martinez match was unavail­able at pre11s time. No. 2 seed Steve Bryant defeated newcomer Rudy Garcia 6-0, 6-1 and will face either Miller or Martinez in the semifinals. Male pattern baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli· cles. Proxidil a is an advanced combination ~f topical J?HT-block­ing agents ~th .t1!e hair growth­stimulator Mmox1d11. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Championshihp Summary: Level I: Cotten or Willie will play Dicker-son or Kitch Level II: Barrera vs. Xavier Level IIIo Power vs. Joel or Velez Level IV· Brown vs. Lee Level V Green or Brown vs. Bearden to me<>t Bryant or Miller-Martinez Houston Players Signing Up for the Texas-OU Tennis Classic The Oak Lawn Tennis Association (OL TA) is hosting the sixth annual Texas­OU Classic October 11-13. Entry forms have been received in Houston and Rick Hadnot is coordinating the participants, providing entry formti, and information. Hadnot can be reached by calling 526- 0315. Again this year the competition will be in Singles A, B, C and Doubles A and B. Entry fee is $18 for singles and $22 per team in doubles. OLTA provides housing and transpor­tation as requested by entrants. OLTA brought 19 players to Houston forthe 1985 Texas Cup competition. The Houston Ten· nis Club is hoping to top that number for the trip to Dallas. Week 19: Bacchus I Still Leads in Pool Bacchus I continued to hold to the top spot in the MSA Billiards League following the • 19th week of competition, despite losing 10 games in the Wednesday meeting, Sept. 18. They now have 15 wins and 4 losses in the match column. Results of Sept. 25 action will appear next week. Following Bacchus I, at one match back with a 14 and 5 match record each, are The Barn, Lipstick and the Ranch Hands. The Ranch Hands had been slowly inching their way up the standings and trailed Lipstick by only 12 games after 19 weeks, says league secretary Dennis Lord. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite lD, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 .tJ ~~ J~~- ~ ~1,0 <'\ <:> ...l. v~~ (() r<-~.,,. .a.i\.~~~ ,«o "'J.. ~~~~ "v.,,.\; .cO~~,._o .... ~o ""' V ~.._-<-o ...1 ,_Y ~o 1 ~ <o'--f- ~ o~~ IDEO TAPES/VCR RENTALS & SALES NO MEMBERSHIP FEE NO DEPOSIT FOR MEMBER TAFT 1411 Taft 522-2190 * Cooling System check & flush $27•s * A/C Charge & Check $2t." * Oil, Filter & Lube $24•s Tome 11 c~· " . ~your COOiing system1 ASK FOR CHIFF BUTTROCK 1411 TAFT- 522-2190 Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real· life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores. or use this coupon to order by mail He;:; is $7.so for Murd;; is Murd;; is Murder. by Sa;-uel Stew.;d, city state _ ____ zip - --- ---- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 • SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Montrose Art Brown Pavilion Opens at Fine Arts Museum By Albert Puente Montrose Voil'e Art Critu: Dear readers, fall is upon us, and with it comes the new season's best art openings. First and foremost is the opening of the newly redesigned Brown Pavilion at the Museum of Fine Arts. The "Grand Tour Gala" is the name being given to the pavil· ion's official opening celebration. The exhibition consists of the muAeum's finest collection of European art. Museum Director Peter Marzio is partic­ularly excited about the "Grand Tour" col­lection. Marzio and his staff began working on the Brown Pavilion project in the fall of 1982. "A major part of this project has involved the examination and conserva­tion of the museum's finest works. Just viewing our paintings and sculptures, which have been restored, is an uplifting experience. The new arrangement will help all of us get a better understanding of the history of art and of the great tradi tions of collecting and philanthropy in Houston," Marzio said. The Brown Pavilion was designed in 1974 by renowned architect Miei; van der Rohe. The pavilion was a much-needed addition, which has served as host to tra­veling exhibitions. Consequently, the museum's own collection has gone some­what unnoticro in older parts of the build­ing. Some works have also been removed from the public hall all together. Hope­fully the "Grand Tour" will bring back to us works which have been forgotten. The European Galleries will certainly be a rebirth of our city' A Museum of Fine Arts. The collection, arranged in 13 galleries, will allow the public to view art from antiquity to the post·modem era. The 23,000 quare foot pavilion will be a walk­ing history of European art, with over 400 works displayed chronologically covering 4000 years of European art. Propaganda is another exhibition cur­rently on view at Midtown Art Center's LaBranch Gallery at 1419 Holman. The exhibition runs through October 21. Over 40 Houston artii;ts with a concern for social issues will be featured in this controversial and powerful exhibition. The works have been selected for aesthetic content and not the artist's particular pol· itical beliefs. Richard 1'1uhr. Frank Williams, Jo,efa Vaughn, Bert Long, Gregory Salazar, Max Pumeda, Chuck Degan, Derek Bo~h ­ier, David Crossley and Paul Hester are a few of the artists represented. The exhibi· tion will feature paintings, sculpture, ceramics, works on paper and a site­specific installation. All works were created as, are incorporationg, or are in response to propaganda. Other current exhibitions in Montrose: Richard Fluhr/ Recent Works, Econo­mos/ Works of Art, 2503 River Oaks Blvd., Sept. 14 thru Oct. 19. Jim Rochel"What'• Ta Madda Wid Ja?", Moody Gallery, 2815 Colquitt, Sept. 14 thru Oct. 12. John Wenger/ Recent Paintings, Davis/ McClain Gallery, 2627 Colquitt, Sept. 14 thru Oct. 5 David Caton/ Recent Paintings, Wilhelm Gallery, 5201 Bayard, Sept. 7 thru Oct. 2. LUXURY CONDOMINIUMS NOW LEASING ----With Ot>tion to Purchase---- Large lkautiful Swimming Pool Controlled Entr,y Securit} lkmote Controlled Garage Entry High Effidem·y AC & Heating One lkclroom Onr Bedroom With Lort Two Bedroom T'' o Bedroom Onr Hath Onr Bath Two Hath Two Hath Townhouse lrom $375.00 :1 month Office Open Dail) 11 :00-6:00 2507 Montrose • Houston, TX 524-0830 Chic thnlls f '. ·, t;- "' Scooters mean freedom and fun• And the Spree'" rs the easiest way to get started II s easy ( O on you. with push-bullon s1arl109 no shill- { . ~ 1ng and low marntenance And 1t s ~· easy on your budget. In fact. ts the A ~ lowest p11ced scooter you can II tJ buy'' lf I So oet the fun started• Get the \ - \ '"'" '.9~N~ [?f~, :),,._ STUBBS CYCLE 4436 Telephone Rd. 644-7535 .... ~, ... :.1.1JJ:USJ~'JJ1 y £J:U:.. PIS)~' 'FfDT/£.J'PI "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS· Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer 10 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27 1985 Commentary How Did the Press Handle 21.06 Decision? By Mark Blazek Montrose Voice Auatin Co,,e.!pondent Most gay men and women who have lived in Texas longer than a year or so know certain major daily newspapers in this state sustain homophobic influences, though this editorial bias is often inter­woven 8h to pass as reportage. The January referendum in Houston showed many-some for the first time­how homophobia is clearly entrenched where it should not be. In a similiar way, the August 26 deci­sion by the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals gave us another example of how the e~tab­lished pres~ handle,;. or mishandle,;. as the case may be, a gay i~sue. Most editors recognized the court·s deci· sion as representing a crossroads which the gay community last met on the death of Harvey Milk, and, before then. at the Stonewall riots. Suddenly, our society•s relative quiet tolerance of the gay lifestyle has turned to declared hostility in the guise of "implementing morality," and good editors understood the potential mis­calculation behind the court's decision. As a result. this news story was run on the front page of most dailies. Some observations: • The press could not agree on the numbers. The Associated Press incor· rcctly reported the decision was eight to seven. Mo't other sources properly Looking for MEDICAL CARE? Look m the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory SERVICE LUS HOSPITAL INSURANCE MAJOR MEDICAL Ages 19-34-$45.30 35-49- 50.84 50-64- 70.01 Monthly Bank Drafl Insurance Office 523-9822 Group ~ates Individual Issue reported nme to seven. The AP also incor· rectly reported the crime carries a $500 fine, in addition to a possible jail term. The crime actually carriei:; a possible $200 fine and a jail term. • The mainstream press continues to call us "homosexuals" despite years of protests by gay activists and the fact that few of our gay publications or organiza­tions include the word homosexual in their title. Establishment still has a rough time using the preferred term "gay " • Most publications ran headlines sim· ilar to the Austin American-Statesman ("Banning of Sodomy Upheld"). The Cor­pus Christi Caller, the Fort Worth Star· Telegram. the San Antonio Express Newi:;, and the Waco Tribune-Herald, among many others, all included the rather ambiguous and antii:;eptic phrase "Texas sodomy law" in their headlines. • Praise to the Houston Post for stating the issue much more clearly with the head· line "Federal Court Rules Against Homo· sexuals. The Post reporter, Eduardo Paz Martinez, wrote the finest lead, explaining the result of the court's ruling as "outlaw· ing homosexual activity and making the private sexual lives of gay Texans illegal." •The Dallas Times-Herald deserves spe­cial mention for amplifying the issue with an additional story titled "Foes agree on one thing: Legal battle is not over." •Most editors highlighted the fact that the court used "the past seven centuries" of "objection to homosexual conduct" as the prime reaqon for it. decision. Such an explanation as the court's is ludicrous on its face, and no further editorial comment was needed. (And most obervers agree that the U.S. Supreme Court will be NAT RAJ Now in Montrose! Finest Indian Restaurant Shepherd & W. Alabama Experience Fine Indian Food in an Inner-City Setting Close to Downtown Special Lunch Platters under $5.00 -OPEN FOR LUNCH- 11:00 to 2:30 Monday through Friday 11:30 to 2:30 Saturday and Sunday -DINNER- 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Sunday through Tuesday 6:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m. Friday & Saturday ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED Located In Shepherd, W. Alabama Area et 2047 Marshell Tel. 526-4113 n ~ . [ 1-i----­' I MA.ASHA ----"' " Wt A A6AMA required to concoct a far better reason than tradition for continued oppression of gays.) • Most editors at least intimated AIDS figured prominently in the judges' deci· sion but also pointed out the court made no mention of AIDS in its ruling, and • Unfortunately, only gay publications suggested that the court's decision smacks of politics by citing the political affilia· tions of the judges along with the way in which they voted. But, perhaps moot importantly, the reporting of thi11 news illustrates, once again, the real inability of the masses to understand gay love. The issue is not a "sodomy law." The Fifth Circuit Court may think they are legislating behavior, but they are actually suppressing expres· sions of love. There is a serious difference, as only gay men and women can sadly understand. The press has failed in its responsibility to communicate the enormity of the court's shortsightedness on our evolving social nature. More gay writers need to be assigned to write the news on gay issues in order that a naive public can understand, through the subtleties of language, that at the core of decisions such as the Fifth Cir­cuirt Court's sits, pure, simple, unadulter· ated love. And tampering with such a rare commodity is a very dangerous game. IT"S VA~T"1 TIM~! I . ~~· \ • 'l r-.l>A \ & \10,l>A \ • 1 WO HIG l)A f'S OF '1 I. I OOTHAl.I. AT Ull·Clll~ HOD /)HAIT P/TC/11:.RS ·7~<TA(0 8AR • 1l f'lH\ I' \I tHl:,tHllAlll.U , ti/. 11.tHl,'AHll A.\' l/.~U ' PR/Cf, OH/I.I\ ti OR STR.~ WBf.RRf WEDNESDAYS-Happy Hour Well Drinks S1 Shots of Schnapps "Dynasty" on Wide Screen T.V. • 1111 l<'llA \ I' .\I \IJRITA I II I.I SI UO f)Hl\/.:S /OR 1 llf: I A/)/E.\ I.<\//\~ & /)/ ... /.\(;ROOM FEATC Rl\G 1111 .\IHI '>Al>IS :JI CEASAR f>ff,\D07.A /Ill .\/HOU/\(; GUT AH/ST ~<<k) ·f;:;t-[)'' "\:::P LA" YOUR NEXT BUSINESS ME t1 ING, OR PRIVATE PARTY WITH U'>. YOU'LL l IKf IT. YOU'l L LOVE IT. I RE EC U!>l 01 OUR GAROt.N R00!\1 LI ( l I • ~t. I H ( lt. 11 ("-ii: ·)._(. ) .l ')J COUPON-Valid at this location only-COUPON ------------------, ------~;;;~!~~;; ------ :no:1 1 'i 1%0 II' ltou .. ton, Tc••' 770~U1 11 ... • ·- ~ ~. ~hit ... .......-.-.... i .~ - ~\ --- ,. ,1 I ii ; ~ ~\ ~ - UUY ONE CHIMICHANGA OR MEXICAN DINNER COMBINATION ' ANO RICEIVI IHE SECOND Of EOUAL OR LESSER VALUE FOR 99C I J. J' V4l JV.'1H/."lY01HlAOfflA NOi YAll00N(HAAIAOllf0.HM$ COlll'ON (1()01> I OR ONl 99 DINNlR ONL V OfHR EXP1RES OCT &. 1985 F$)) RTrrnesG \@)XOH~ NAUTILUS FOR MEN & WOMEN *COUNSELING *60 NAUTILUS MACHINES *SUPERVISION *SAFE UVA TANNING BEDS *WHIRLPOOLS *COMPUTERIZED BIKES *UNIVERSAL *DYNAMIC AEROBIC CLASSES *FREE WEIGHTS *WET & DRY SAUNAS *VERY CLEAN •AIR CONDITIONED *Only $30 with No Start Up* SALE ENOS SEPT. 30 2900 RICHMOND [near o,...nw1y Pl1m1J PHONE 524-9932 Good reading for you ============from=============~ A•L•Y•S•O•N PUBLICATIONS DEADLY LIES, by fohn Preston, $5.00. Who says hcroc.> can't be gay? Ever smce his lover was killed by a homophobic coward, Alex Kane has fought for the safety of gay men everywhere. Herc, he takes on an unscrupulous politician in­tent on 'preading homophobic propa­ganda (The first two hooks in this scnes arc also available, at $5 .00 each. Sweel Dreams and Golden Years.I YOUNG, GAY AND PROUD!, $4.00. Gay teenagers have no place to go with their quemons. This candidly-wntten book addresses such concerns as: Am I really gay? What should I tell my parents? Is it a good idea to come out in school? How can I tell if my best friend is gay! BETWEEN FRIENDS, by Gillian E. Hanscombe $7.00. In this innovative and widely·praised novel, Hanscombe uses the lives of four very different women to explore 1ust how strongly our political beliefs shape our everyday lives. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Confe~sions of a gay schoolteacher, hy Enc Roles, $7 00. When he graduated from Harvard, Eric Roles began teaching sixth grade at a conservauve private school Soon he felt the strain of a split identity - between "the gay Eric and the u:achcr Enc;" here he telb of two years of teaching Imm w1thm the closet, and his dtfficult decision to come out at work. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by W1llyce Kim, $6.00. A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls: "A wonderful, rip-roarin11: Western lesbian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she writes a dozen more." "The book of the year," writes Feminist Booksrore News. llM• fUUUh•'I hi" IN,,., 4. II~· 'hU l'\11 \ Clllll EXTRA CREDIT, by Jeff Black, $6.00. Harper King has a boring teaching job, stagnant relationships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were se­duced. Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start? This story of his life and loves is the funniest gay novel of the year. IN THE TENT, by David Rees, $6.00. Tim, seventeen, has no way of express­ing his attraction to his schoolmate Aaron, so he is left with frustration, humiliation and guilt. But in the middle of a camping trip, a storm traps the two of them in a tent with two other boys, and the issues can no longer be avoided Faced with a life-threatening situation, the boys must rely on each other. THE SPARTAN, by Don Harrison, $5.95 In the days of the first Olympics, gay relatmnships were a common and valued part of life. The Spar1an tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures in love and war, providing a vivid picture of classieal Greece, the early Olympic~, and an important part of our hist0ry SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 THE LA VEND ER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to psychotherapy for les­bians and gay men, by Dr. Marny Hall, $8.00. How many of us really know how to choose a therapist, or how to get the most out of therapy! Here, m a refresh­ingly readabk style, Hall addresses that critical question, as well as what to ex­pect from therapy, danger signs to watch for, and when to get out of therapy. HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. The AIDS crisis has closed off some forms of sexual activity for health-conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex­pression. Here, over a dozen of toda}"s most popular 11:ay writers present new short stories that imaginatively eroticize safe sex. Contributors mclude Toby Johnson, Frank Mosca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and T.R. Witomsk1. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7.00. Is it always harder to accept what is offered freely? Jeremy, young and sull naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the hand­some and unpredictable Mark. THE HUSTLER JOHN H H ~ R'f MA C KA Y TllANS ATID IV HU8£1tT K £•N!DV THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay; trans. by Hubert Kennedy, $8.00. Gun­ther 1s fifteen when he arrives alone in the Berlin of the 1920s, There he soon learns how to pick up a few extra dollars on the street. One of his customers 1s a sensitive and naive youllj!; man who becomes hopelessly enamored wnh Gunther But love docs not fit neatly in­to Gunther's new life as a hustler The llusrler was first published in 1926, in Germany For today's reader, it combines a poignant love story with a colorful portrayal of the gay subculture that thrived in Berlin a half-century ago. FIRESTORM, by Gerald Wening, $6.00. Most gay fiction takes place in an urban setting; here is an exception. Firestonn tells of two men who fall in love in a rural midwestcm tawn, only to have religious homophobia dramatically alter their lives. CHOICES, by Nancy Toder, $7 00. A popular novel about lesbian love that depicts the joy, passion, conflicts and in­tensity of love between women MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patnoli, $13.00. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territory in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. (Oversize paperback! by C\amucl M. Stc~ud •wrhm of 'lw l'luJ A"""" uonn MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7 !)(, This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Alice B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who 1s their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories. ·········································· : TO ORDER : Enclosed is $ ___ . Please send the books I've listed below. (Add $1.00 postage when ordering iust one book: if you order more than one we'll pay postage./ Please s'nd me these books: L 2. _ _________________ _ 3. __ _ 4. __ s. - Visa and mastercard accepted. please send acct. number, exp. date, and s1gna1ure. name address --------- - - Clt}' ------- s tate --~ zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-5 40 Plympton St. Boston, ~'IA 0211 12 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson " """" - O.?• While the city slept, Dogzilla moved quietly from building to building. "Matthews ... we're getting another one of those strange 'aw blah es span yol' sounds." Feb. 27, 1907: The duck-billed platypus Is Invented. 9·27 .. .,.,_,..~-~ ;;.~ (, •.) ... ~ "Notice all the computations, theoretical scribblings, and lab equipment, Norm .... Yes, curiosity killed these cats." late at night, his own stomach would foil Gordon's attempt at dieting Fortunes Lighter Side of Life Looking Up for Leo By Mark Orion For Fr1<1ay. Sept 27. 1985, through Thursday, Oct 3. 1985. ARIES-Someone that you care for very much is in need of your help, but doesn't know how to ask for 1t. You're seen as a pillar of strength in the middle of a lot of shaking. Try to find out where you're needed, and reach out and hold someone. TAURUS-As most folks know. there's a difference between being direct and being diplomatic. Keep that in mind right now. You can guide others without stampeding through their feelings, and get what you want without grabbing it away. Charm is a Taurus gift, too. GEMINI-Last week was a lot of fun, but this week you'll have to remember that. while you do some serious planning Opportunities come up that are too good to miss. Take them and make the future brighter You'll have to be realistic CANCER-It's party time. Your !un­loving side finds full expression. Your ability to entertain and make others have as much fun as you're having comes right out front. Silliness and laughter and a rollicking good time sounds pretty good. right? LEO-Make a wish and take a chance. This is a time for having fun and being frivolous. The lighter side of life is looking up and smiling. Leo in the fall? Balance for the balance. Save your seriousness for later. VIRGO-What's new is what's good for you A fundamental change in your life will be quite an alteration. getting rid of old habits and patterns. You could quit smoking, find a successful diet, or maybe a new lover. You're such a go-getter. you may do all three, and more! LIBRA-Your thoughts are of your home this week, but the problem that needs your attention there is easily solved Your mental powers are high, and your close one. who's responding to thrngs strictly emotionally, needs the kind of input you'll be good at giving. SCORPIO-You're shining bright. There's a glow about you that attracts others spontaneously. In fact, though many are attracted, you're in the mood for a very special person that you can pour out your heart to. What a lucky per­son that is! SAGITTARIUS- There's someone in your life that you're having a hard time with. A serious fight is in the picture that may be avoided with some help from a "family" member. You'll need someone who knows you well to get you out of this. Trust leads to release. CAPRICORN- That different part of you that you experience from time to time finds even deeper expression right now And all because the one you want under­stands you. Understanding goes both ways, and you'll be doing your part at 1t, too. Falling in love? Or just deeper in love? AQUARIUS-The past can haunt or reward. Right now, it's reward time for you. Something or someone from your past is giving you a very fine gift that's special You're reaping the benefits of seeds you may have forgotten. Now you'll remember them gladly. PISCES-You've got the strength of Taurus. and the sexiness of Scorpio to add to your mellow Pisces ways this week. That makes you quite a person Someone near you may have a hard time recognizing who you are Let them know 1ust how versatile you can be •1985 Letters Fighting Mad From Craig Bales Like others, I have been stunned by the defeat of Houston's "Gay Rights Ordi­nance," the decision of the federal appeals court on 21.06, and now the passage of the "bookstore ordinance" by all those council persons whom we had supported so well in the past. However, I am most shocked and angered over the lack of fighting spirit shown by the gay community in protest­ing these losses of our individual rights. We Americans are losing our personal freedoms at an unprecedented rate since the election of Ronald Reagan and his courtship with the New Religious Right! Is there no Houston group who will step for­ward on our behalf and demand enough is enough? Apparently not!! On the religious TV network, CBN (Christian Broadcasting Network). Pat Robertson of the 700 Club has been denouncing the homosexual person as being evidence of our country's decay, and thus, our similarity with the fall of the Roman Empire. He has also stated AIDS will become so pervasive by 1990 that the Christians won't have to worry about the homosexual any more. My lover immediately called the NGTF (National Gay Task Force) office in New York to inform them of Robertson's comments and was only told to file a com· plaint with CBN. Come on, Robertson owns CBN. NGTF apparently has no appropriate interest in my friend's concern. What is needed is a combined, concerted effort by gay and straight organizations to file complaints with their congressmen and with the FCC. Will they do that? I don't think so! The other night the HPD sent six cars (12 officers) of their "fine11t" men to raid the Mangum Road News Stand. They ver· bally harassed the four patrons and one clerk for 20 minutes. They stood them all outside in front of the store, frisked them, checked the contentR of their pockets, called them ''queers," made other slander· ous remarks about them, and finally told them they couldn't be arrested now but in the future they could and would be arrested if caught in that or any other bookstore. On the GPC From Gary J Van Ooteghem The death knell is now sounding for Haus· ton's Gay Political Caucus (GPC). It began sounding WedneAday evening (Sept. 18) as the GPC went through its regularly sche­duled endorsement procedure, which was anything but regular. This year, no serious candidates sought out the endorse­ment of GPC. The GPC has given up having any effect during this next election based on its deci­sions last evening that virtually follow the dictates of City Hall: Do nothing! The mayor, through operatives from within the gay community, effectively bypassed GPC tradition so that she could have her way. It worked! She has been, and still is, this community's "sweetheart." The GPC is well aware that she doesn't need us this time around. The current caucus has been losing its constituency steadily over the past couple of years; accelerating this year as never before. In making a decision to do nothing significant this year, a majority of the former GPC presidents felt that GPC, itself, has just gone back into the closet. I was founder of the Gay Political Cau­cus 10 years ago this month. I am not proud of it this year. I was during the past nine years. In fact, I am ashamed of the Gay Political Caucus this election year. The attention that GPC brings to itself SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 this election year in waving the white flag-waving a big white flag-bears wit­nei; s to the caliber of its members; not just its officers and board members, but w the GPC caucus, itRelf. What we have left, after the defections just mentioned, are people with no backbones. This is the rea­son why GPC also has no backbone. Today's caucus is comprised of wimps, cowards, and closets. They don't have the spunk of prior caucuses. I call upon the GPC to close its doors. It is unfit for service. Its meeting Wednesday evening was not a caucus meeting. It was a wake. GPC is running rudderless and is impotent and should be put out of its mis­ery. But the caucus doesn't have guts for that either. Instead we will witness some­thing resembling this: a chicken writhing around after its head has been cut off. There is little difference in my mind between the chicken and GPC. The GPC has ordered a news blackout. I refuse to honor this or any other instruc­tions originating from wimps and the like. Which I say again is what they have become. Items in the "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MONTROSE VOICE. Readers are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. Please keep the letters brief and mail to "Letters to the Editor," MONTROSE VOICE, 4-08 Avondale, Ho1U1ton, TX 77006. This was nothing but harassment and a blatant infringement on their right to view the material in that store, all under the protection of a new city ordinance, and with the obvious approval of the police chief (surely he has felt discrimination like this before), the approval of the city council and mayor, and even the approval of the fine Christian community including our own MCCR. Of course, thchc actions have occurred before, especially around election time, which make them even more dastardly, since they no doubt are the establish· ment'b way of keeping our group in line and telling us how we'd better vote. 'Wben are violation~ of our civil rights going to get us all off our backoides and organized to fight for what is guaranteed us by our constitution? Various gay groups have tried to docu­ment police harassment in past years but have failed-failed because of a general apathy toward life, an atttitude of "what doesn't happen to me doe1m 't concern me." The same attitude respsonsible for the murder of hundreds of thousands of homo­sexuals throughout history. Throw in a lack of leadership, a lack of funds, and worst of all our own masochistic self image and you have the reasons for fail­ure. To quote a friend, "If all gays turned pink after their firi;t sexual encounter, we would then have a re8"0n to ban together and fight." Since this easy way w distin­guish gays is out of the question, our com­munity must find strong, new leadership. Leadership which will educate the gays as well as the straights, and help us all regain some feeling of personal pride in who we are. Hopefully it is not too late to salvage the positive accomplishments of the gay rights movement. Will we fight? I am one fighting-mad homosexual who isn't going to take it any more? A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Frederick Brandt can shew you hew to have active Ion or play p ... 1ve games Vv1th the personal ads In lheu n""' boo!<. 'ClasStf•ed Attairs. lhey11 tell you how to write an ad lhat really stands out. what to exped when you place or respond to an ad, and ..,en what all those funny hltle abbrev1at10ns mean Send$8to Classlf1edAffairs. Aly· son Pub Dept P-S. 40 Plympton. St • Boston. MA 02118 (Also Included will bea coupon for SS off on your next Personals •n your choice of 25 gay pubhcat1ons. including the Montrose Vo•ce l 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 528-8851 "HOUSTON'S BEST GAY BAR" Houston City Magazme October 1985 MONDAY SEPT. 30th FULL MOON MADNESS RETURNS! A "SLUMBER PARTY" EVERY WEEK AT MARY'S NATURALLY THURSDAY LEATHER SUNDAY NIGHT MARY'S BIG BEER BUST 2:30PM TIL? ~Pl~y ~SaJe! MONDAY BEER BUST 8PM TIL? $1.00 SCHNAPPS Alf,;, NIGHT TUESDAY COOKOUT BPM BEST WEENIE IN TOWN! and then some!/ AFTER HOURS NIGHTLY HAPPY HOUR ALL NIGHT TO MEN JN BLACK LEATHER :.,~ ~~.:'t1 MEMBER B.0.A.T. i_~-~ "''•Y 14 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 Meg Tilly, left, and Jane Fonda in "ARnes of God" 'Agnes' and 'Creator' Take on Heavy Issues By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic Two of the three new films opening this week take on the "big" issues like religion, creating and sustaining life, and even vir· gin birth. One tackle · the issues quite nicely, while the other blindly sidesteps any harsh confrontations. Surprisingly, it is the much anticipated ARnes of God that overlooks the questions that it rai11es. With Jane Fonda, Anne Bancroft, and Meg Tilly (as a nun found with a strangled infant) we are assured of an acting tour-de-force, but the religious topics that appear at ita center are never fully explored. Creator does a much better job with ita issues as Peter O'Toole attempts to recreate his wife from cells in a home laboratory. Many provoking questions are raised, and the surprising solutions often make a lot of sense. The third film is a fluffy British comedy with Christopher Plummer and Maggie Smith called Lily in Love. No big message here; just a lively, theatrically-oriented movie about age and 'marriage that fea· tures two very entertaining performances. o Agnes of God \\"hen Hollywood takes on religious topics, it inevitably steps on shaky ground. Recent films like Mass Appeal, True Con· fe,;sions, Monsignor, and Nasty Habits all fared rather poorly at the box. office because people take their religion seriously. They don't like to see priests, nuns and the church displayed commer· cially no matter how serious the subject matter is. Now we have Agnes of God, a shocking story about a nun found with a newborn, strangled baby in her room. This one is sure to shake up some Catholics. I thought so myself because it deals with the touchy subject of immaculate conception. Appar· ently the child-like nun thinks that her baby was conceived through God not man. Director Norman Jewison (A Soldier's Story, In the Heat of the Night) is no stranger to controversial films. His movies have explored themes of race, reli· gion and justice in pictures as diverse as Jesus Christ Superstar, Fiddler on the Roof, and FIST. Yet while Agne,; of God looks like another risky venture, Jewison has actually played it quite safe. While the saint-like nun Agnes (glow· ingly played by Meg Tilly) seems to be the center of the film, she is really just a side­line off the major religious confrontation. When Jane Fonda, the court psychiatrist, met>ts Mother Superior Anne Bancroft, the believers vs. the non-believers showdown becomes evident. Mother Bancroft is going to change Fonda's ex-Catholic mind to accept miracles. saints and Catholo­cism again. Each time Fonda and Bancroft meet, we expect fireworks. Bancroft hams it up with sly and witty comments (not to mention the droll looks) while Fonda fidgets and chain smokes with nervous anxiety. The talk seems to center on poor, innocent Agnes but we sense that the Rev. Mother is more interested in saving a lost soul. Meanwhile, while Dr. Livingston (Fonda) fends off the Mother, she must try Maggie Smith and Christopher Plummer in "Lily in Loue" Peter O'Toole stars in "Creator" to find out if Agnes is looney or sane. The mystery behind Agnes' saint-like appear· ance and thoughts do become partially unraveled, but it seems rather flimsy and not needed. It is obvious that Livingston is supposed to think through religious beliefs because of her interactions with Agnes and the Mother, but the point of the film just seems to wander. In the end, the filmmakers have played it safe by sidestepping many moral and religious topics (but still raising them), and dwelling on that aged theme of reli· gious backsliding. While this may please the church-going crowd, they may still be puzzled over the virgin Agnes whose hands bleed like Jesus and who may have killed the "second coming." We are left with many startling scenes containing que~tions that are never answered. Agnes of God is an interesting film with marvelous performances by all three actresses. Yet the film seems so unsure of itself that it seems to come apart at the seams. Fonda makes a gallant attempt to hold it together, but her psychiatrist role seems more like an investigative reporter getting a religious tongue lashing at every tum. In the end, this is an uncomfortable movie that really makes us uneasy for nothing. o Creator Creator is one of those crazy little movies that looks very simple but ends of up being quite complex. The newspaper adR suggest something on the order of My Science Pro· ject, but we actually get something very differenl Czechoslovakian director Ivan Passer (Cutters Way) takes a bushelful of heavy, controversial subjects and dumps them all into one strangely mixed film. Everything from test tu!J(> babies and euthanasia to God vs. 11cience and the retirement of older, able workers. is stirred up for benefit of review. This is one film that should have a group discussion following earh screening. The "creator" of the title Dr. Harry Wolper !Peter O'Toole), a slightly off. balance professor on the brink of a scien· tific breakthrough. Using the cells of his dead wife, he is attl'mpting to recreatt> her in a test tubeSOyearsafterherdemise. His love for her has never waned, and he is determined to bring her back to life. His lab assistant is Boris, a young grad student played by Vincent Spano (Rum· blefish). Boris is not pleased with Harry at first, failing to see what he calls "the big picture" of life instead of all the little ones that science searches for. He is actually more interested in a beautiful girl (Virgi· nia Madsen) that he saw on campus­especially since Harry knows her name. Things become more involved when the professor advertises for a young girl to donate an egg for his testa. The answer comes in the form of Mariel Hemingway as a 19-year-old nymphomaniac. She donates her egg, and then hangs around the house falling head-over-heels in love with Harry. Suddenly, we have quite a few things coming at us at the same time. Boris gets his girl, falls madly in love, and then she falls into a coma with a brain tumor. Harry is getting a fetus in his experi· men ts, but he is too busy to realize that he could have a beautiful relationship with Hemingway. And then the university comes down on Harry by taking back the lab equipment that he pilfered and there· fore ruining the experiment. Some how things start to fall back into pla~. and we start to get some answers to the questions that are rai~ed. The main que~tion about whether we should attempt to create life is answered simply: Don't bother-let God handle it. Life is precious. but when it's over-then it's finished. Harry even makes his forced retirement into an occasion where he can gleefully continue working. Creator is fresh, funny and even intelli· gent, IJ(>cause it makes you think. Of cour11e, the wit of Peter O'Toole is always welcome in any film. Bicycling around campus puffing n cigar, he is like Mr. Chips gone a bit mad. He can sense that he could have the power of God with his experiment, but he's not really sure that he could handle the responsibilities to go with it. All he knows is that God and science can somehow work tllgether, and if you have faith in both, then the " big pie· ture" will fall into place. There is almost too much going on in this film to absorb in one setting, but for some reason this film is actually murh more satisfying than Agnes of God. Both fil!f!S ~ontain excellent acting, but every­thing 1s more neat and concise in Creator. pon 't overlook this little gem just because it looks offbeat. It may just surprise you. o Lily in Love If you miss the witty "Old Hollywood" comedies like they used to make, check out the new British film Lily in Love. Maggie Smith (last seen in Private Function) stars with Christopher Plummer in this minor but often funny look at theatrical mar· riage. Aging actor Fi troy Wynn (Plummer) is a bit peeved when he finds that his wife has not written a part for him in her new screenplay. Lily (Smith) has written many hit roles for her husband, but her latest script calls for a dashing young European gent. He begs and pleads, but she defi· nitely has her mind set against him. In desperation, he forces his agent to help him get the role by disguisi~imself (using a lot of make-up) as a younger man. In true Hollywood "~shi~~.J.i!y doesn't recognize him and ltves ~ to this man who calls hi fib to Terran· ova. On locations · · ii sud denly finds herself a t Italian actor who speaks ~---• English . '1• For Fitroy, the role of Roberto is a bril· liant piece of showmanship and theatrics. The problem is that he is quite perturbed that his wife would fall for another man-no matter that he a nd Roberto are one in the same. Of course, this is all quite whimsical and predictable, even if we a re never quite sure if Lily knows about the masquerade. The actors are what make this film work; Plummer having the choice role as her lov· able, hammy and egotistical actor, and Smith underplaying her part with just the right touch of innocent humor. For a light, amusing evening of cinema, you probably won't want to overlook Lily in Love. It will be playing at the River Oaks Theater Sun· day, Sept. 29, through Saturday, Oct 5. I bi&MorTday, t. 30th 7:3~ RICH'S 2401 San Jacinto $3.50 admission A benefit for the Gay & Lesbian Switchboard of Houston 529-3211 EARTH STATION SPIRITS (/ ~ BY POPULAR DEMAND WE ARE SATELLITING TO YOU HOUSTON OILERS vs. DALLAS COWBOYS Sunday, Sept. 29 Noon NO COVER FREE POPCORN sPi!!its 4902 Riehm nd Houllon, TX 17027 (71 l) 623 61 lS SEPTEMBER 27. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 THINKING ABOUT BUYING A NEW CAB? THINK AGAIN If you're thinking about purchasing a new car, perhaps you'd be wise to consider teasing. Leasing yout new car from Ascot Leasing Ltd. 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I, of course, am a play reviewer, not n poet. Still, I didn't need the calendar to tell me Inst weekend that fall had arrived. Suddenly there are more play:s than I have time to review. 0 just mi,,sed Vernonica 's Room at Theater Suburbia. You still have time to see it, but you wouldn't if you wat1ed for me to review it first.) Suddenly, too, I am faced with plays which areinten· tionally depressing, like The Ensemble's Split Second. Personally, I prefer robins. However, there are important, serious issues which need to be discussed and which are being ignored by the mass media. Many of these issues were meant for the stage, anyway. It is where they can best be discussed.Not only do I accept that fact, it makes me proud to be a live-stage professional. So it is not as some flit who can't enjoy a good drama, who has to be laughmg all the time, that I feel forced to caution you against going to this show. Nor is it the acting. It is up to The Ensemble's usual high standards. This is a starring tum for Lee Stansberry. He is only offstage for about two minutes of the entire play. He carries it off with aplomb. Yet he is such a good, giving actor. And the rest of the cast is so strong that the evening has nearly a small ensemble feel. r-;or is it the direction. George Hawkins 1s a fantastic director. I have seen several actors who were never much more than good Journeymen elsewhere give shining performances under his inspirational leadership. Was it the lighting? Alvin McAfee did what he could with what he had. It was still very dim. This theater, like a couple others I could mention, desperately needs more lighting instruments. (In theater, if you just call them lights, you run into all ,orts of trouble.) :-<o. All·in·all it would have been a mar· velous production were it not for the script. What could have so blinded George Haw· kins that he chose this play by Dennis Mcintyre to open his tenth season? It's beyond me. There are two scenes in the play that are not like every other scene in the play. One of them is the very first scene in which a white punk in handcuffs so torments a black cop by giving him undeserved, prej· udiced lip that the cop shoot.; him. From there on out, each scene begins with the cop lying to another character about the first incident. Then the other character sees through it. Then the cop changes his story closer to the truth. The scene-change music wells up. There are approximately three more sentences of dialogue. Blackout. This scene, with varia· tions only in the characters and the details, is played out five or six times. Theme and variation:; work well in other, shorter artistic media-mu ic, poetry-but it does not work in theater. Well, maybe in LaRonde, but not here. Everything 111 so predictable. You know you've come to the climax when there are two people onstage and neither one is the cop. You know that either the man ha~ taken the only honorable way out of the situat1on-hari kari-thus allowing the playwright to continue on indefinitely with two character scenes. Or else he is probably going to listen to his wife, a close relative of Lady MacBeth-in which case the paralleli ·m will be broken. Three peo­ple onstage in this play,i:an only mean the end is nigh Pity. Mcintyre writes very good charac· terization. Now if he can only come up with something for his people to do. San Francuco Ballet premieres new works in Houston. Meredith Monk to perform at the Tower Th1•ater Saturday and Sunday. o Notes Buzz is back out of the hospital. Cheer up! Casts don't last forever. It only feels that way .•.. The Group's production of One donated $175-0 to the KSt AIDS Foundation. Direc· tor Joe Watts is a little disgruntled that he didn't make more for them, but, as I told him, it's the best any art happening has done for them locally. Next AIDS play: As Is at Stages in early 1986. Next gay play: Execution of JwitirP. Wilde & Stein and Houston Area Women's Center are selling tickets to a special night at the Alley- Oct. 5. That's next Saturday already. Grab those tickets! ... Tomorrow morning Allen Parkway and Memorial Drive. between Shepherd and downtown, will be thl' sitl' of the fourth annual Inter First Symphony run, benefit· ting the HSO ... Then next Saturday there will Ix• a five· mile fun run bcnefitting City Hallet of Houston. Pre-run festivities will be Friday (Oct. 41 at the Hyatt Regency West ball· room .•. TUTS has signed hot man Antony Hamilton to do the title role in Pal Joey next May. Anyone who saw Mirro;,, knows he makes n great heel. ... A special performance of Rocky Horror will take place at Rich's this coming Mon· day at 7:30 p.m. to benefit the Gay and Lesbian Switchhm1rd of Houston. Celebrate! As September turns into October, take thoAe Johnny Mathis (born the 30th) rernrds off the spindle for some Vladamir Horowitz (born the 1st). Painter Charles& Rickets (2nd) was best known for his innovative set designs and art nou· veau book bindings; Caravaggio (28th) for his apple cheeked boys. Vincent Varga's (21\th) first novel waa the first gay gothic romance, Gayu·.vck. Robert Patrick (27th) is one · f our more prolific gay play· wright&, be.st known for his one act come­dies like Angel Honey Raby Darling Dear Relieve it or not, he wns born just up th1 road a piece in Kilgore, Texas. o Openings Festival Chicano (Miller, 27 & 28)-last shows of the Miller freebie season. Great chance to show our local Chicano brothers our support after the tragic earthquakes in Mexico. Gary Stewart (Gilley's, 27). Lovin ' Feelings (Summit, 28). ONO! Meredith Monk (Tower, 28)­Performance artist par excellence in her Houston debut, with singers from the Houston Opera Studio. ONO! Pasadena Philharmonic (Slocomb Aud­itorium, San Jacinto College, 28)­featuring Haydn's "Surprise" symphony. ONO! Montrose Singers (St. Stephen's, 29)-a capella men's choral music by Mozart, Dunstable, Ferrabosco and Tippett. ONO! Pygmalion (Rice, 30)-Shaw's original non-musical story of Henry Higgins and Eliza Doolittle. Houston Symphony (Jones, 27-30)­features a French instrument rarely heard in America-the Ondes Martenot. Mary Chun will play its eerie, supernatural sounds in the world premiere of Ezra Lad­erman 's Symphony No. 6 (which was com-missioned .by the HSO). Also, Cho-Liang Opera Night Live (Four Seasons, Oct. Lin plays Brahm's Violin Conerto. 1)-HGO dramaturge Scott Heuman, Ann All That Glit rs (Alley, 28)-All you Thompson and Bill Albright in a "free-for­. :J. sight of people all" discussion of the upcoming HGO sea- ONO! son. ONO! Allen Pa San Francisco Ballet (J ones, 2-4)- pO•J1811c~l!'!l.l.!d Shorts on the 3rd. The 2nd and 4th are the .... regional premiere of George Ballanchine's r.. idsummer Night's Dream. We Make Your A Pleasant Experi MERCEDES BENZ 190 E l49'mo 380 SL &4'l1mo 500 SH 725/mo _ <;;:ADILlAC _ St>dan 0.-..ille 375/mo Fleetwood 460/mo Eldorado 435/mo BMW 318 i 294'mo 325e 345/mo 735i 5%/mo BUICK Sky Ha"k Somerset Electra 145/mo Corolla 189/mo Celica 235/mo Cressida Supra 265/ NO DOWN PAYMENT • LOWER MONTHLY PAY1,.!'."'"-11!1111i ... . SEPTEMBER 27. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 "._. In the he art of The City" $44 00 · fRfE AIRPORT SHUTTLE ·COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE & WINE • · COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VALIT SERVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required p lease c o ll Toll Free 800-253·5263 {No11ono 1) 800-521·4523 {Coli!) ( 41 51- 44 1 - 5~ 4~ (Son ~10..c1scol 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 ernational Have a heart to heart with vour doctor ... ft American Heart V Association WET<t. t11$1TIN\,, FOR 'lOURUFE Printing Specialists ~/ ~ need '§-n.k £)/n f!JJafU!4 /me can, flJu/nt ill Our Services Include: * Design & Layout * Business Stationery * Business Cards * Flyers, ·Brochures * Price Lists * Menus * Office Forms including: * Blank Paper Stock: Continuous Forms, Invoices, Copy paper, letter & legal size Purchase Orders, Mailing * Large Mailing Envelopes Labels, Tabs, Interoffice Forms_ * Delivery * Wedding Invitations, Social Announcements & Brides Boutique Please consider us for your printing needs - Call 861-0026 so our Sales Staff can asist you with your next printing order. 2103 Yale • Houston , Texas 77008 • T elephone: (7 13) 861-0026 18 MONTROSE VOICE SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 If Montrose is parikJ · you should be part o ~ TO SUBSCRIBE, OR T . Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS ARTISTS/ARTISANSWANTED Ma1or gallery looking for an1sts/ an1sans for possible represental1on. For appoint ­ment call Val 529-4648. Tues -Fri., 1(}-5 Rocky Horror Picture Show This Mon- ~:bra~ lw~c~~~~d B~;!~~·~1~ Gay and LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice, a general circulation newspaper having published continu­ously for 1 year or longer. 1s qualified lo accept legal notices affecting the news­paper's c1rculat1on area Montrose CARS & BIKES 76 MGB-Red-Racmg Strope 2 sets of cov­ers $3.500 Runs perfect 654· 1120 - ASCOT LEASING 1303 Upland. 973-0070 (See our display ad thos 1ssue) DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSES/APTS. FOR SALE, RENT, LEASE Monlrose larg8, 2 bedroom. den. fire­place. fenced, burglar bars $450 782· 8384 NEW TOWNHOUSE FOR LEASE 2 bedrooms. 2 ~ baths. 2 car garage. mar­ble and hardwood floors, Jacum. roof terrace with beautiful view from River Oaks Center area $1400 per month Larry 583-7045. BURUNGTON APTS. ** Remodeling Special** with 6 mos LEASE, 112 3rd & 112 6th month RENT FREEi with 1 Yr LEASE, 11th & 12th month RENT FREEi Sec Deposit $150"" 1 Bedroom $340"" Skyllne Vi- of Downtown Houston &lcurity Gates COMING SOON JACUZZ/1 3502 B urllngton 523-0249 1 BEDROOM APARTMENT Monlroso I br apl hardwood fioors. wood burning fireplace, d1Shwasher, dis­posal. track llghllng. ce1hng Ian New carpet $325 mo 651·9610dsys 52&-9073 weekend and eves Montrose Hawthorne. I bedroom apan­ment Many windO>NS, high ceilings, hard· wood floors. $275 plus bolls 666-8946 A·1 ROOMMATE SERVICE For your ideal roommale. call 932- 1363 Established on 1979 MONTROSE-MUSEUM I bedroom, all new. ceiling fan, pool. free cable, no pets $315 526-1326. MONTROSE EFFICIENCY Security gatoa, cc1hng fan, covered park­ing, free cable, no pets $235. 526-1326 MONTROSE/RICE/MEDICAL - - Unusual2br,2~ bathstud1oapl 1200sq fl Freneh windows. patio, Lg closets. colling fans Unique 1 br , 900 sq fl F/P Free ut1litc:;, cable TV, 523-5028. Helghla HOUM.-211/ 1, d1nmg. CAIH, large k1lchen. WID conneC11ons. shady ~~~~~:;c'.c venetian blinds ~25. 528- THE GARDENS CONDOMINIUM NOW LEASING 2507 MONTROSE BLVD. One end two bedroom units from $375 00 a month Oll1ceopenda11y 11001o600or by apPo•ntment 524--0830. VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Renl that house or apanmenl through a Monlrose Voice Class1f1ed Call 5~8490 . And charge II on your Amerlcen Expresa. Diner's Club. Cane Blanche MasterCard or Visa EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Mala leasing agent lor SIW Houston property Prelerred apartment expe rlcnce, but not necessary If capable of being trained Must have good telephone vOlce and neat appearnrce Salary open to experience 776-0665 Ask for Jim or Chris I. Part time help wanted. organtz8t~ skills, light typing 521-3055 Now accepting apphcat1ons for full/pan tome counter help at Goodies, 604 Wes· the1mer. 9-3 Now acceptmg applicat1ons for expe­rienced cake decorator Apply in person. Goodies. 604 W8' - 1e1mer 9-3 (MISC.) FOR SALE --.. TRIBUTE TO JAMES DEAN~ COLLECTORS Album- ·Only one Original 50's ed1t1on 523-2335. "Sam • FOR YARD SALE_S ___ See ads under "Yard Sales" at the end of the Montrose ClasS1f1ed MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS ~ - tntur&-N-2923 Main - S22-0000 EE OUR DISPLAY AD N THE MONTROSE VOICE c..;aa1ilac of Massage Autumn Special. call ET (713) 622-4530 GOLDEN TOUCH-MASS~ Performed by a Greek trained. hol, hairy, handsome. well-endowed massuer offer ... 1ng 25 years of expen1se Services to the discreet 1nd1v1dual If size and pleit:sure 1s 1mPortant, Call Peler, $40 In, $50-$75- $100 out 52-4-6337 .,~,,.. "ch Ou1rter Theater- 3201 Louisiaoa- 527 ,,,.,.,; Spa '3100 F1nn1n ~22- 2379 FIGHT/FLIGHT SYNDROME depresses your Immune system and inter ... feres with your digestion Ease out of 1t through massage Boll O'Rourke 869- 2298 BODY MASSAGE Full body massage Hol 011-ln or out Bruce 622-0370 GOLDEN TOUCH ESCORTS Offenng for the discrete ind1vldu•I com­plete lours ol Houston available Also massages Models needed Call Pete 524- 6337 HEAL THY BODY MASSAGE Galleria David (713) 622-4530 ET PERSONALS GWM, late so·s, 5'8", tanned. muscular, hairy. clean shaven, rugged good looks I'm stable, honest. d1Screet, bul very affectionate. versatile and fun loving Var­ied interests bOating. fishing, sk11ng music, electron1cs. travel. parties, friends and more Equally comfonable quiel limes al home Seeking GWM under 30 who epprec1ates stability, experience and comm1ttment. and Is open to a monogam· ous relationship where we're best fnends and lndlv1dua1s as well as males and !ov­ers Your common sense. personahty, prodo, and quiet determination are much more lmponant than education or status TeU me about yourself and let's get acquainted Reply Blond Box 257 ·S Clo Voice GWM, 28. looking for friendship and pas­s1ble retat1onsh1p with man over 55. Prefer g~:i::" ;;f 'fi~~~~~~:" 0~"~~3 Richwood, TX 77531 G/W'M. 33, 5'5W. 1351b Looking for fun in all the right places Looking for you PO Box 26334f, Houston, Texas 77207 3341 Attractive, GWM, sensitive, masculine, preppy, JO Seeks same 933-7288 I Al1 \J\lllNG IN LINL IT'S I\ PP.IN IN 1\-IE f\ffiR I'll &: STlX.K IN WI'> UN£ fOR A DtCAOC, I FEAR • THEY SAY: A HARD MAN IS GOOD TO FINO But I've found that hard men are common, and the uncommon good man can when the need arises Yes. I like sex. but I also hke talking, reading, eating, and a myriad of other things I'm a professional. GWM. 34. sincere. down-lo-earth. and loyal ~°hc:~'~~~:;e:~~-t~;mi,r~~:n~e!~~~~= tance. and mutual goal orientation If you're a masculine, non-promiscuous, passionate man with these same qualities who's interested on dating and a pass1ble Bl~~Ji"o~o~~tl~g~~~e wrote to me at Want to lose weight. 100'111 money back guarantee. 528-5443. GwM. 32-:6°'. b-1-o-nd-.-b-lue_._1_60,_g_o_o d bUiid. good looking, down to eanh. masculine. stable Secure. honest. interested m mas­culine. stable outdoor types 25-40 Car­penters. masons. surveyors. construction workers who enioy Ille with healthy sex­ual appetite. hght booze, smoke, good humor. good tomes and no bull Reply Bhnd Bex 253-T Clo Voice A DECA~ Of FEM """"" WHILE l'M 5TANOING IN LINE I SUR£ COOl.O lJsE A BEER OR fl COO.. GLASS Cf WINE SEPTEMBER 27. 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 GAY/LESBIAN PARENTHOOD B1WF. 31. a happy, attractive. intelligent and stable professional seeking B1WM profess10nal 27-37. exploring marrying and having children As a nurturant father, I envision creatrvely working through our becoming compant0n1 and parents while making room for otner r~a .. honsh1ps Reply Blond Box 254C cio Voice OUR POLICY on Sexually-Explicit Adver­tising · The Montrose Voice does not believe that human beings engaging on sexual acts with one another is immoral It is abnormal, in fact, for a person not to engage in sexual act1v1ty Therefore. our readers are encouraged to advertise here to seek relat1onsh1ps, encounters. ad\ten lures. etc. All adven1song should. how· ever. not contain language that woullt offend an unsuspecting reader G, M. G'F, Runners and 1oggers wanted Front Runners 681-5679 PLAY SAFE Safe sex is furi, erotic Play safe, tor your sake, for your partner·s sake ACLASSIFIED A~ - John Preston &'ld Frederick Branot can show you hOw to have active fun or play passive games with the personal ads In their new book, ''Class1f1ed Affairs." they'll tell you how to wrote an ad that ra.lly stands out. what to expect when you place or respond to an ad, and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean SendS8to · c1assrliedAffa1rs, Aly­son Pub .. Dept P-5, 40 Plympton, St • Beston, MA 02118 (Also included will be a coupon for SS off on your ne)(t Personals :::Cru>J:~gc~~~c~o~tr~;._g~~,geut1cat1ons YARD & GARAGE SALES Apt I• rn1ture sale. Sept 27-28. 1653 'Yi Mam 528-1311 HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce It here then stand back for lhe crowd Call 529-8490 orv1s1t the Voice at 408 Avondale to place your yard sate announcement. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 Gay romance and adventure on the high seas THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDITION by Patricia S1tkin Evan Talbot has a secret: although he's done his best to create a public image of himself as a playboy, he knows inside that his strongl'st sexual feelings are for men. even his old classmate Hamish - who is himself qi..1te openly gay - doesn t suspect Evan's secret. When a friend of the two men is imprisoned by fanatics m the Middle f:ast, Evan and Hamish lay plars for a rescue mission booking passage on a cruise shi~ bound for the Med1tC'rranean As the m1ss1on progresses, romance and mterna­honal adventure weave together into an unforgettable story. $5.95 in book5tores or use this coupon to order by mail .................................. TO ORDER ................................. . Please send me Enclosed 1s S name <<"pies of The Ale rnndros f xμ,•d1t.011 .it S6 50 each, postpaid Jddress city state zip ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 IBM "Wheelwriter" 3 and 5 Typewriter Supplies IBM " Easystrike" Correctable Ribbon Cassette and " Easystrike" Lift-off Tape Cassette NOH IN STOCK ! ! ! Typewriter Supplies GENUINE IBM SUPPLIES I •• I I I I ,OF COURSE , I I ....------....--.. r----... COLUMBIA RIBBONS&. SUPrUES " ~ r- 8939 BUNNY RUN ~ -~ :::J HOUSTON.TEXAS 77088 713 ·999·0947 Sf)!ll~'l1l!ll~S Y f) IJ ,J IJS '11 f;f)'l,,111 ill) \71~ ll 'l1IS I~. And when you do, remember, the Montrose Voice has the largest circula­t ion of any publication in Montrose, the largest circulation of any gay publica­tion in Houston. The Voice is distributed through the most Houston shops, stores and clubs-140 of them. And we have more Houston display advertisers than the other gay publication or any other Montrose-area neighborhood publication. The Montrose Voice IS the Number One* Gay Publication in Houston and the Number One* Publication in Montrose- of any kind. For more information on display advertising in the Montrose Voice for your shop, club or service, call 529-8490. Or visit our new offices at 408 Avondale. "Number One means quite simply the most copies printed, the most copies distributed, through the most distribution points, picked up by the most readers, and advertised m by the most advertisers- in Montrose or In the Houston gay community, whichever area is applicable to the comparison. On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visitors to Houston) Houston Guest ~106 Avondale-523=' 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Eegtecrest Inn 104 A'lond le 520-9~ ·~----------....,...., I CAl'IT ALLCA.l Tt\fliT TE'JTll"'O\N. IT llOJLD BE PRDUD\C~l TO 11\E J~ ... YOOR HONOR, SINCE Ml{ m:wE.NT ATI£MPl10 TO INTR<X>tXE INADMISSIBLE TESTIMONt<, ANO SINCE AS JUDGE I 'i'OU fV>,\1£ (QNS[)ER!\BLE. L££Wf\I.{ \N PROCEDURAL MATIERS I I MOVE TW\T 'vJ£ BE ALLMD TO \NTroDOCE SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 21 GAY BARS .~-~ TESTti"'ONt/ E\/£N MORE BaCChua752°3 Lovett · 523-3386 '9sbian earn71o P8Clt1C-s2•SM·27e0un~ Bayou L1nd1ng- 534 We1thetmer-52tr7519 opening SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Brazos R~Vftr Bottom- 2'CX> Brazos-528-9192 country SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Galleon- 2303 Richmond- 522· 7616 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE H.M"n- P~;c;;t Gr~t-52;:91'23"d.sc0--­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~09~52Ml28 ---­Hoo1er1 -2212con~erse 521 .. 2310 JR 1-808 P.c1flc-621 2519 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE M•ry I 1022 Westhetmer 528-8851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrote Mtn1ng Co 805 Pae.il1e 529-7488 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Mother Lode Cale & s .. 1oon -ecM'P~ ~" SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE .~...b....e n 2 300 Weslheuner 5~1nu' Rac.ts 2702 t<.lrby-524--6277 ditung, eriter~ tamment R-endezwoua 1100 Westhe1m;;- 523-2422 piano Rteha ~401 San Jadnio--650-0769 d•ICO Ripcord 715 Farrv•flw 521· 2792' -~ Rt1ky Bu11ne11- 2700 Aibany - 528-3611 c.baret Sh;d10'3- 1J18 Weatheuner 521:'9CM1,52"1- 9030 The 61 "i 1)11 Hyde Pirk- 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Tw1n1 2053 Wirt Ad 827 1113 Ventur•N - 2923 Ma1n ~522-0000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRIVATE GAY CLUBS Ciub HOuston Body Centre- 220!> Fann•n - 659~ •998 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE French Quarter Theater- 3201 Louis1ana- 527· 0782 ~sp;-:j"ioo FiM1n S22-:°2379 P,guus t3l4 Rosalie 524·PIGS VACATIONS VISITING SAN FRANCISCO? DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41!;-861 ·5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOlORES ST S F , FOR INFO Fc;'r Houston tra\lel agents, sec " Tr&\lel Agents'' m the Greater Montr0$0 Busi­ness Direclory, next page - NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE 1118 Ursullnes. (504) 566-1177 See our display ad monthly 1n ~e Monlrose V~ SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTEL 1315 Polk, 1-800-253-5263 or (415) 441· 5141 See our display ad monthly in lhe Montrose Voice. ADS BY THE INCH In add1t1on to our regular class1- f1ed rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by the inch." When buying by the inch, you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles. REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2" $34 3" $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3" $39 DINING OUT IN MONTROSE RESTAURANTS Al l RESTAURANTS LISTED HERE SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Babe~-2607 Grant ~22.&i42 - - ­Boulev1rd Cafe 808 LOven-52'i10t5 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Chafing Dish 803 Snover-864·1466 Chapullar>« 813 R.chmond 52'1-:l365 Cuttured Cow 2366 Ric&- 522· 4686 Eats 714 W Alabama $24 CATS [dd1ng1on1 6121 H11lcrolt 981·612' Fr1n1uea Montros" at Watheimet-52~'7896 Man Gamer UBO 138 W Gray 527 8488 Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shop 1!>36 West netmer '528-4655 HouM of P..s ~112 K1rt>v 52&-3816 La Jaleienae.--1306 Montroae -!>24 8676 M•,tourl Street Cale 1117 M1ssoun "529-1~ Mf 81ke--a Tater 2.eo5 S Shepherd-524~ l OUiAAGW..JSL'< PREJUDICIAL. i n\IS WILL TERO{ Ml( Cffl)NENI -~~ 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat SEPT SEPT 27 28 SEPT SEPT OCT OCT OCT 29 30 1 2 3 Criteria tor in 1 >n 1n ·Day Calendar and Montr~ Ret rce1 Event or group must apec:Jf.calty pertain to ne1gl'lb0rhood of Montroae or Houston·• gay community uniess ma10t city, state or n•t<Onal holiday or maJor f'lat•onal gay event 2 Strictly commercial eventa riot included 3 Buatnea. civic and aociaJ groupe and their events are oeneralty qu1hhed 4 Pol11aca1 events where only one \llf'W of a 1ub1ect candidate or perty 11 dominant noc quahl•ed For add•honal 1ntorm1t10n Ot phOno numberl, look ror the sponsoring organcutaon under "'Resources Typestyles indicate events' location · Event.> in Houston, Events of Local lnteresl Elsewhere, Events of Area Interest SELECTED EVENTS • SUNDAY: Full Moon, .. Harvest THROUGH 7 DAYS Moon." Sept. 29 • FRIDAY: .. Breakthrough" le.;bian·feminist program. KPl'"I'. FM-90. 8:15·10:30am • FRIDAY: Montrose Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur • FRIDAY Baytown Lambda meets 7 30pm Sept. 27 • SATURDAY: KS/ AIDS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, no. 501, 11am -SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 9am·noon, MacGregor Park -SUNDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center -SUNDAY: Houston Tennis Club Singles ChampionRhip Tournament concludes Sept. 29 • SUNDAY: Town Meeting II, original tentative date, Sept. 29, 2-6pm, but confirmation unobtainable • SUNDAY: Women's bowling league plays, 3pm, Stadium Bowl -SUNDAY: Gay Asians & Friends meet 3pm Sept. 29 • SUNDAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak LanM 00000000 M~ th1 r ~& Satoon-ao'.iP~ SE" E OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE c5-enen·s Oyslet S.r-608 Weathe1rner 524· 0105 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Perky a Richmond at Kirby - 5,4..0075 Ra1Ph's-51SWA'"iib1";'1 52&-&000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Rascets-:!702 KlrbY 52.,6272 &ec"'Ond Vet'ltt---3619 Wastung1on 862---8773 Withe 1 BBQ WesttMHmer at Montrot&- .s .. a. ~·1 -SUNDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett • MONDAY: Frontrunnl'!'s run from Golf Center, Hermann Park • MONDAY: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Brae,main 8TUESDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center 8'I'UESDAY: MSA .. Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm 8'I'UESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin. 7:30pm • WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meets 3217 Fannin. 7:30pm Oct. 2 • WEDNESDAY; MBA Pool League competition • WEDNESDAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold 8'I'HURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Center 8'I'HURSDAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFr Radio, FM·90 8'I'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 9pm, Stadium Bowl, 8200 Brae.imain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS llOPENING IN 1 WEEK: 11th AMuol T•as Renolssance - IYal. Planl-11•. Od. ~. 12-13. 19·20. 2t.27. Nov. 2-3. 9-10 • IN I WEEK: Hou•ton Gay Health Advocalefl meet 7:.-.Jpm Oct.5 • IN I WEEK: Alley Theau-e preview "Ex0<ution of Ju•tke," Ort. 6, benefit for KS1AIOS Foundation, Gay & IA'8h1an Swil.<'hboard. Gay Political Caucu•. Hazltwil.<'h Productions • IN I \H:EK: Luthmrns Conctmt'd ml'<'ts Oct. R, Grae. Lutheran Churcll, 2.515 Waulfh • IS I WEf:K: Citizens for Human f:quality moets 7:30pm Ort.o. Houston House, 1617 f'anmn, 9th Ooor • IN I WEEK Houston Data Prof..,sionala mttts 7':l0pm Oct • IN I WF.EK: Neartown Rusutftl8 Alliance m...-ta 7pm Oct.9, Uberty Rank, 1001 Weetheimer • IN 1 WEEK: Human Rights Campaign fund annual CMClrds. Waldoff AstOfla Holel. ~ YOfk. Oct. 9. honoflng 1V hoot Phff Donohue. pubUshs GIOfla Steinem a lambda legal Defense a EQlcallon Fund • IN 1 WEEK: Avondale Association m°"ta 7;30pm Ort.10, Christian Womtn'o C.,,,t.er, 310 Pacific 9IN 2 WEEICS T•mOU Foolbafl Weekend. Dallas • 2 WEEICS · AMuot l81blan A Goy l'!Jde Conterence. R. lau<lerdal•. Fla.. Columbus Doy Weekend • IS 2 WEEKS Houstoo l\orth ProfE1monala mt't"l.B 7·30pm. Oct. 12 • 2 WEBCS Columbus Doy, Od. 14 lllN 2 WEBCS ~maflOn Gav ar>d l•bian Mcmnons naflanOI conlwence. Sari Diego. Od. 14-15 • IS 2 WEEK.<; ln~ty met>ta 7;30pm Ort. 14, Autry House, 626.5 Main • IN 2 WEEKS. Montroo<> Ari Alliance meets Oct. 14 • IN 2 WEEKS KS AIDS Foundation & Montr- Counselinll Cent.er AIDS Ruik Reduction 1Saft Sexl Workshops, 8pm Oct 14 • IN 3 WEEKS: Fall WNtheimer Colony Ari Feotival Oct. 19-20, 1001 Weotheimt'I' • IN 3 WEEKS Cbmcm ml'et• lpm Oct. 20, Maatenon YWCA. 3615 Willia • IN 3 WEEK." Parents Fl.AG mtet.. 2pm. Oct.ID, Presbyterian CenieT, 41 Oakdale • IS 3 WEEKS Houston Area Gay & L'9b1an Engmttra & Scientiots meet 7pm Oct.22 • IN 3 WEEKS Montrose Civic Club (Neartown) mttta 7pm Ort 22. 1413 W•theimer • IN 3 WEEKS Great.er Montrc~e Bu11neu Guild meets 7pm Oct. 23. B~nnan •a Restaurant, 3300 Smith • IN 4 WEEKS Parmta & Frienda of Lesbian• & Gays national convention Oct 25-28. Atlanta • IN 4 WEEKS. Houston Triathlon IV, Oct. 26 lllN 4 WEEICS: f\.111 Moon. "Hunter's Moon." Od. 21 mlN 4 WEBCS Halloween. Od. 31 • IN 5 WEBCS Election Dov. Nov 5 • IN 6 WEEICS Houston Tennis Assn. ''H<»l• V' Nov 9-11 lllN 6 WEBCS "9l•an·s Doy, Nov 11 • IN 6-7 WEBCS f•as Goy Rodeo. Houston. Nov. 1~17, wlll )Jdgong Mr. a Ms Rodeo Nov 14 • IN I WEEKS Thanksgiving. Nov 21 • Il" ~ WEEKS Turkey Trot Fon Run. Nov. 28 • IN 11 WEEKS. Jin!fle Bell Fun Run. Dtt 15 • IN 12 WEEKS· Ctvlltmas, Dec. 25 • IN 13 WEECS N.,. Yea's Ew. Dec. 31 • IN AHOlIT 28 WEEKS 11th annual Southeas"'m C.onforence for Leshisns and Gay Men, •prmg 191'!6. !'>tw Orleans • IN 39 WEEKS 17th anniv .. ary of Slon...oll Riola, N.,. Y0<k. June 21 • IS 45 WEEK.<; Gay Gamee II. ''Triump m •86," Aug 9·17, 1986. San Franatl<O •N 46 WIECS Mh annMlrsary ol -al ruling agOll\SI T•as· '11omoMKuol conduct low," Aug 17, 1912 • II\ 20 WEEKS Houston Ll'eetock .Show & Rodeo, Aatrodomf' rompln., 22 MONTROSE VOICE I SEPTEMBER 27, 1985 Greater Montrose Service Ir Shopping Directory TO ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE OR 1t4 Tl-IE MAIN FRONT PAGES Of THE MONTROSE VOICE. CALL 529-8490 'MEKDAYS 10o\M-5:3CJ'M. ADULT VIDEO RENTAL WE DELIVER VIDEOS ~~-~m video Sflf'l•Ce 1420We;ilhe•mer AOVERTISIN! PROVIDING A SERVICE_? __ Keep It listed here •n the Montrose Vo•ce wtlere iterally lhousands turn each week VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Voice Class1lied Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard. Visa or Ce rte Blanche AUTO SALES. LEASING - ASCOT LEASING, LTD. 1303 Upland. 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE AUTO REPAIF - ALL P°'AiNTi"" BODY SHOP-~ 1510 Leeland 65~131 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Montrose Auto Repair Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed Ma1orlMinor Repairs Gas or Diesel Electncal Repalf 526-3723 211• F·nrv1ew Gay Owned & Operated TAFT AUTOMOTIVE 1411 Taft, 522·2190 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ---- PISTONS UP 1901 Taft. 528-1901 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE A UTO REPAlR • BODY SHOP 2001 Harold. 522-5255. 526-1940 CHIROPRACTIC CAR - ROBERTS CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC - 1305 Waugh. 521·2003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CLEANING. JANITORIAi SERVICE PLUS~-- 528-6245 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Becks Cleaning Specializing in Bars Professional Service We Care How You Look 528-9427 (S.m-11em) COMPUTER-RELA TEO DIMENSIONS IN SCANNING 1820 Hetghts BM! 864·7845 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CONSTRUCTIO~ WILMARK CONSTRUCTION co. We do remodeling, room additions, minor plumbing. electrical. No job too small o~ too large. 521- 1377 !Bnm~iHWri - PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY ASSOC. 4622 Walker, 926-2182 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DENTISTS Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 427 Westhe1mer Houston. TX n006 Monday thru Saturday HotJrs by Appomtment (713) 524-0538 lnnl]ll.il!i! - A·1 DOMESTIC SERVICE Daily ma•d•. party helpers. and all domes· tic services provided In business since 1981, 932-1363. FLORISTS BAG PLANT CD. 2600 Houslon Av. 862-1213 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE FORTUNE: FUNERAL DIRECTORS - SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch 528-3851 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GYMS FITNESS EXCHANGE 2900 R•chmond. 524-9932 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR LOSS SERVICES MPB CLINIC 5401 Dashwood #10. 661·2321 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HAIR SALON ~ BARBER SHOPl:i RON'S HAIR STUDIO_ __ 1310 H.wthome 521·3000 Your Barber/ Stylist In NW Houston is Hank Wierzba 680-3166 682-9495 Barchus Barber Shop 727 N.W. Mall HOME AIR CONUI I IUNINli TIME FOR Aic REPAIR? $25 plus parta. CALL 543-039&. ---'--M~ld Town Air--- Buy 6 Mii window A/C Service •II branda AICI 521-- 7 dayl DCNT Tiit ffiTH OF L\f E FE£.L MD, S£CCC'l.S A FRfil..lf'H SAU.~· \'!'"\ DIVIDING INTO BPID\.~ Silll TRll\NG l'lAAW) £X\1 RAnPS TO CIW '!OJ f££.l. '!$ If '((XJ l'W CF\RttR. PICK 'HIE ~ONG ONf., '{OOL L BE. \.OSI F~VE.R LEGAL SERVICES' DAVID SOSEBEE' ATTORNEY AT LAW "'a lawyer who cares about Montrose· (;21-!)H!)f) NO CHARGE for 1nt111/ consullat1on. AFFORDABLE FEES-quoted upfront Evenings and weekend appamtments c DWI c Possession OI Drugs c Prosi.tut1on c Lewd Conduct c Debt Rehel c Bankruptcy c ln1ury Cla""' > ·b & Accident and '1trlt!r n rf•B! ) )WJ-..-nOM li\:!00 3816 W. Alabama. Suite 21L M.<!rtJ~r rwn""' "'°""ty Cr1mina1 Lawyers Auoc.ation Oavtd SoMbee (SOZ BE) 11 IM:ef\MO l)y" tf\e Tt•• Supreme Court Mtd condud:I a General Pfachce N! Cert by TX Bd ot LO S0.C F.S.L GENERAL REPAIR SERVICE 850-1122 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MEOICAL CARI -sT°EVE D MARTINEZ M.D. 2801 Ella Blvd , suite G 866-4535 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE MOVIN! MOVEMASTERS Boxes too• V15a. MC. AMEX welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 6»6555. PEST CONTROL PEST CONTROL 993-0663 COMMERCIAL RESIDEN TIAL TPCL #05640 VISA MASTERCARD PHOTO DEVELOPING - CALIGULA PHOTO LAB 2513 Elmen. 520-7061 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE PRINTINI SPEEDY PRINTING 5400 Bella11e Blvd. 667·H17 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE INTERNATIONAL PRINT ING-- SPECIALISTS TRAVEL 2103 Yale. 861-0026 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TANNIN( KWIK TAN 3313 Stanford-528-9170 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE TIRES --TRAVELCOMPA NIONS Want to go to Hong Kong. R•o or even San Antonio for a weekend .. or go by motor home No one to go with Call now for more information and brochures 932- 1363 - TRA VEL CONSUL TANT_S _ Complete travel arrangments. All services FREE. Open Monday through Friday 9am·5 30pm, 2029 Southwest Fwy Houston. TX 77098 (713) 529-8464 o•t.. 529-1414 &~TME 11 • f f''-"Cl - ALL BRANDS VACATION IDEAS?-- See 'Vacations• following .. On the Town·• an the previous page VENDING 1307 Fairview 3 Blks Wesl of Montros" .. I - Only $8.95 208 pages 8Yix11 I Nome I The Far Side GALLERY At lost. The For Side Goll&r1 ls here. All Iha motenol from Gory Lorson·s previous three bOOks. The For Side. Beyond The For Side. and his newest bestselling collectlOO, In Search of The For Side - rv::m together 1n one omni bus collection Conto1n1ng over 6CXl comic panels plus 8 lulk::olor min~posters. The For Side Gollery brings us the beastly \NOl'ld where ani­mals often make monkeys out of people. Order a copy for your favorite Far Side Ian! -------------- Please send me: copies of The Far Side Gallery ot SS.95 per copy plus 51 postage ond hondhng lotol omount ---- (tt check. make poyooo to Androws. McMeel & Porker.) Please allow 4-6 weeks tOf delivery. 0 Check 0 Money Order 0 VISA O MasterCard I Address _~ I City Stcte _Mo-st~~- 1 Credit cord "----- lntertx>nk # I : Signature os on credit cord Exp11 Dote I Send to The Far Side Gallery, c/o Montrose Voice 1 ---------·I ---4-40-0 J-oh-ns-on- D-riv-e. -Fa-irw-ay-. -KS -66-20-5 --·I Montrose Voice Classified Advertising :.~:: c ,.~ "'i,r tJ,.r~' 7VI;:,, ''',~1"'!h~ ~:;:~.;,;~~,;~n;::r >41' FOi • ..,. ,,, 1r•av ,,,.,,no THE HEADLINE: You get up to 3 words on bold, all capital letters and centered on 1 lone, for a total cost of $3. (Or up to 6 words. $6. Or up to 9 words, $9. Etc ) THE TEXT: Then, each addotoonal word in regular type os 40¢ (Addotoonal regular words on "ALL CAPS" or Bold Word• not in all caps are 55¢ each. Addotoonal BOLD WORDS on all caps are 70¢ each.) If centering lines m the text or at end of ad. compute the cost of the words individually, then add $3 for each lone centered EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 -Then each additional -word like this 40¢ THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1t1ona1 word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLO, $9.00 Thon each additional word ltke this is 40¢ ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE sse EACH Addltlon1I bold words like this In tut ere SSC 11ch. ADDITIONAL BOLO, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run in advance. and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll conf1dent1ally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail. Rate os $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded ondefinotely, however, for as long as they come on.) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad on or phone ot in You can pay by check. money order, Mastercard, Visa, American Express, Diners Club or Carte Blanche DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by noon Wednesday woll be placed in that week's newspaper Ads received later will be placed on the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number, c/o Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 It woll be for­warded, unopened, to the advertiser. Enclose no money $3 bold line - ---- _____ ----- $3 bold line $3 bold line --~-~ text words - - -- -- --- - ------------ ------ -----------~-- ------ - ------------ - Use add1t1onal paper 11 necessary CATEGORIES· OAnnouncements O Accomodatoons (lodging for Houston vosotors) 0 Cars & Bok es 0 Commercial Space O Dwellings & Roommates 0 Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale O Models. Escorts. Masseurs O Personals O Pets 0 Rides 0 Services 0 Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales _ __ bold lines for headlines at $3 each· _ _ regular words on text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words on text at 55¢ each· __ Bold words In text at 55¢ each: __ BOLD ALL CAPS on text at 70¢ each -~ _ Add1t1onal lines centered within the text or at the end of the ad. add $3 per line • (on addotoon to the per word cost) : Blond ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper woth my ad on ot mailed to me, $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times __ weeka: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) · o Also. I wosh to receive The Voice home delivered each week. I have enclosed (or will be bolled or charged, as indicated below) an addotoonal o $29 for 6 months or 0 $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged: ---~­METHOD OF PAYMENT· 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed o Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge O Diners Club charge o Carte Blanche charge 0 Amerco an Express charge If charging, card exp1rat1on date Credit card number Signature Name Address Phone(s) for verihcatoon of ad, of necessary MAIL OR BRING TO. Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006- 3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 10am-5·30pm SEPTEMBER 2.7, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 23 ·- MONTROSE RESOURCES .... SELECTED STATE NAT ORGANIZATIONS Bir ~rs Aun ol Tx (80AT-- 720 BtazOli "902. Auslin· t512) 472·3333 AIDS Ac.bCWI CounclL Fedef•ion of AIDS A9ta11d Orl)ln1Ut•Ont. 1115"' lndep..-.d•nc• A" SE, w-DC 20003. 12121 S-7-3101 Gay & IASblan ~ Asan- POB A . Old Che!Hll Sta New York. NY t0011-{212) il9-&622 G•y Rights Nat lobby-PO& 1992. Wahington. DC 20013--(202) S46--1801 Human Rights C•mp.,gn Fund POB 1396, Wasf't.. tngton. DC 20013 ·f202J SA&-2025 latnbda Legel o.t.,.._132 W 43rd. NftW YOftt NY 100»--(212) 9'44·9488 l•biar\/Gay Rights AOvocatM POB 822 AutM 78787 Media Fund for Human Rights- POB A. Old ChelsN Sta. New Vorit. NV 10011- (212) 989--8622 Na1 Aan of Bu11n.u Counclla- Box 15145. San FrandscO. CA 9'411!>-1415) 885-$3$3 Nal Aun of Gay & Leablan Demo Clubs· 1742 MIA Av SE. WHh1t1gton. DC 20000~202) 547·3104 Na1 Gay tteatth Educ Founda11on- POB 784 NeoN York NY 10036-(212) S&J.6313 or Or GrMnbet; (713) S23-62(M Nat Gay Rtghtl Att¥oeal•- 540 Cutro. San f'8n OICO. CA 9'4114 {415) 883--3624 Niii Gay Tak Force 1NGTF1-ao Sit\ Av.~ Yor• NY 10011-(212) 741·5800 NGTFs Criailbne- Ceoc» 721· 7GU (outtid9 ~ York Stmte) Rura1 Coal.ltion.. Clo WaU.,.·Z..nghi, Box 111 Slum.. TX 71827 h Gayl\..i>11n hsk Force-- POB AK. Denton 76201-(817) 387-8211 JS Tranavestite--Transe:.:ual Contact Svc 1017-8 E Pttoe. S..ttte- 98122-(206) 824-12£ll ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listong We list here each week name of organization. address, phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ~n~~~r~~t~~~:~o~!2tt~nf1~r~~~d~s!~"f~! Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVED IN THE COMMUNITY A•d 1otA10S::P08669!>2·257. 77008- 528-6077 An A Capella Chorus,~~hOat:.-PQe 66734 77266 ~hes:n· 522-7&96 ACLU.:.1236: W Gray~24-5925 AIDS Hothne-529~3211 (Gey & L11b1en Sw1td'lboerd) ~G~Cita:.POB ee111. 77266- 527-ws5 Astro-Ra-;nbow Alliance 520-073" (TTY) Altro Rainbow SOCietV tor the Deaf-Sl2,i':5074 (TTY or vOk:e). 60-0074 (TTY) Avondale Assn-POB 86064. 77~ meets 7 30pm 2nd ThUtl. women·1 CtulstJan Ctr. 310 PadllC Azutao Womyn's Magaz1ne- ii30 SW Fwy •335- 26&-5237 ~~ftror:~;s:• Rebert Maon. d1r 209 ~~"f..~.;'~~~~J;~v~~'=~ t,~ufCh: ~irrut&d-POB 7099e. t7270-~29- 3211 (Gay & Lesbian Switchboard) meets tpm 3rd Sun. Masterson YWCA. 3615 Willia. Social Mni:et'· 7 30pm allefnate Fridays, Sunday bfunch 12.30pm 3rd Sun Christ;ailehurch ot tl'le Good ShePherd-1707 MQr'ltfOH 1vc 1pm Sun, Bible atudy 7 JOpm Thu" Church of Chrbtta;;f.e1rh= 18"'0 Westheimer- 529-8005 aves 10 45am SI.In.; B1bf11tudy 1 30pm Wed. Rev Chr11 A AJC:e. putor Citizens lor Human Equality (CHE)-POB. 3045. 77253-680-33"6. 937-35111; meet 2M Tues. Hou House, 1817 Fennen. 9th ttoor activity room C1w;;;stor Uru1ed Hou !CUH) 3317 Montroee •832--659-6148 Ctippera-342-6502 COi~m9et1 at Bruos~BOti'Om. 2.coO Braz.os~192 Conim1n•.-clor.:.:.:P:.:-ub,-,.- H- e.-1,,,-.,-.,-.,-. -- - 1-Poe 30'5. 77253- 52&-6333 522-508' "Shanng Groop for the Worried Weil'" meet Fri. 7-8pm. Montrose ColM"lul1ng Ctr ______ _ Community Pof1hcal Act.on Committee (C· PAC)- POB 200S. 77252 - 23&-8666 Community Goape1 Ct~7 Montrose- 521- ()!)11 Svcs 11em Sun. 7 30pm Thurt Congregahon Aytz Che~&40 ----­Westhetmer - 68&--8997. 72&--5181 IYC & IOClal Spm 2nd & 4th Fn Cr1s1s Hothne- 228-1505 Oemocomm1tt• of GPC- 52&-Mf.c Oharma Study Group· .cosAvon _ d•-••---5-2-•--9S54- 0.en-aFOundit•on-2700 Mason - 52.t-5791-- 0.gnityiHou-3217 Fannin- 528-0111. 523-7844 mm 730pmSat ESOPS Prwate Profnst0nal Social c1ut)"":ii1': 91176 ;:;,e;;r;onorct:;;;t.n·u-Mec:1 iOf Soc----:ai S«v1· ~~~~~~~u':'~:,'~ •f~o~d~~~ Montroae Chnte. Montrose COunseUng Ctr tst Unitarian Churel"l- 5210 Fannin - 521--1571 SVC 1115am Sun Frontrunners· Randy 681~5'679 or~ 520-8019 runs Sun. lut!'I & Thurs Memorial Perk Tenm1 Ctr. runs Mon. Goff Ctr, Hermann Park Gay & Alive Shanng hPf'rtenr;fGASE)- 52&- 1311, r.2&-0elll Gey & Leablan ArehNes ot T• aH1hate of l!H Inc Gay & l.Mb1an Mormo-;;::111-3 -wftthe.m&t •60'0. 77099-668-1'13 Gay Hispanic C•ucus- 868-5252 Giy Nurse. ~111.nce-880-9'86 G•y Pohbeal C.UCIJs tGPC) .. POB 66664- 77266 - 521-1000 meets 3217 Fannin 111 & 3rd Wed. 10U\ enn1.,erury C1nner hotted by Pres.., Gents Oub Sep 14 ~--~----- t~~~~::;_~m:c.-;h~l~=~ ~ Gay & l•blan Switchboard - POB ~1. 77266-"9-3211 Nlformeton.. counsehng. r•' errats. TTY. AIDS HotliM GrMter MontrOM Business Guild-M 1ke Netso,,. 8J0.0308 or Bruce WOOiley 529--&464 meet• 7pm. 4th Wed. Brennans R•t 3300 Sm•ll'I The Group tPleat• workshop-Joe Wert• 522- 22')4 meittl 7pm Thurs. Oeg"'ty Ctr.3217Fal'W"l1n Ha.zelw•teft Productions-2615 Waugh Or .-268,, 77006 lesb•an concerts. tree matting hst Homophi1e Interfaith; Alliance-- 729 Minor- 523-6969 Hou Area Gay & lesbian Eng~ Sctent•ts-POB 66831. 77008·-771·6488, 7· t~m mwts 7pm .C1h Tull Hou Bar Ownef'1 Assn (HOBO ~-cloVentur•N 2923 Main-522-0000 ______ _ _ Hou Com~rtYC)Owns-862-831• Hou Council of Clubl-526-8-054- ---- Hou Oat• ProhtS510na11-523-6922, &&4-M59 meets 7 30pm 2nd Tues ____ _ Hou Gay Health Advocates-79(>.9"8 Meets 7 30pm 1st Sat Hou Gay Students A•n-747-3098 Hou lnter-Fa•th Alliance contect""through Integrity Hou HOUMOtorcycht Club-C.'o Mary·s. 1022 West• hetmer-528-8851 Hou North Profeu•onats-POB 38'0. Humble 773"7-Sill at 821·7126 meet 7 30pm 2nd Sat Hou Outdoor Group-Ken 522~ ICUba dl'l- 1ng COzumet. Me•1CO. Aug 31-$ep" :=n~:~:~=;1::;t~ Center participant ann.1al T•-OU CluiC.. 0.11111. Oct. Hou--TxVNov~~n'-------­VH lnc- POB 16<M1. 77222~·1732. 529-701• etfl11ated groups ere Interact. e·n:amos A P1aot an the Sun, Montrose Art Al 1ance Gay & L•biln Archives or Tx Gay & L..t>ien Sw•td'lboerd MOr"llrOM Symphonic Band. board meet 7 30pm 111 Thurs (varied IOCataontJ, educabonal forum 7 30pm 3'd T°"rs Ingersoll Speakers' BurMu-POB 391. Beii'81re 77401- 669-4064 1n'tegr1ty,Hou <Ep1scopa11an)-POB 66008. 77266~ 524-1489 meets 7 30pm 2nd & •th Mon, Autry House. 8265 Main Looking for PHOTO DEVELOP­ING? Look in the Greater Montrose Service and Shopping Directory Interact POB 16041. 17222429-70_1_4 __ _ KPFT Rae2.10. FM·90-419 Loven Btvd-626- 4000: 'Breaktru·oug:h· 1estwen-tem1nis1 pgm Fri 8 1~10:309m Wilde n S1 .. n" gay pgm Thurs 7'3<>-900pm KS/AIDS FouodettOn- 3317 Monlrote Bo• 1155:' 77006- 524-2•37 AIDS R1tk ReducttOn CSafe Sex) Workshops Spm 2nd & •1h Mon e•cept Dec m con1unction w1th Montrose CounMhn; Cen· !or tr•1n1ng weekend & Sep 21-_2_2 __ _ J9i"ry Kaulf.Tian.'Cancer Fund-778-.C t06 Ku•we of Hydra· -811 Gr ace land - B1U M~,.; 726-11Xl2 ~r Gay Alcohohcs & Alanon- 121• Jo Annie-521-8772 LesbtaiNGay Re9ource Svc-untveraity ot Hou 4800 C.lhOun. t.» 309_ 7700.C-7•9-1253 meets 2 .3Qpm atterf\at• T uet. SpincUetop Room. 2nd noor, Un•v•rtity. Ctr.::;;.. ___ ___ _ Let Ut Entena1n You Weetc.end-proiecl or Hou Council ot Clubl-526-1()$.t Lone Star Nudist Group-POB f.c~ LUtheraM - Concerned-meets a1 Grace Luthe­ran Church. 2!>15 Weugh-521-0863. .c!)3..1i..:i rneet 2nd & .cttt T uea evenLOQS ~ House-clo KS.AIDS FCMJndabon. 3317 Montroae Bo• 1155-524-2437 M;:;;--Agi.nst Deception Courtesy Cl~ S•t871, 7725-C-529·3211 (Gay & lesbian Sw1tchboatd) rneels bt-weekty Metropolitan Community Church of the~ rechon (MCCRl-1919 Oecalur- 881-9149 pot· luck dinner 7 30pm 1st Sat monthly, svca 10 45am & 7 tSpm Sun & 7 15(>m Wed. member· 1h1p 1nqu1ref'1 class 7 JOpm Mon, lducahon cia1• Tum & Wed eves 1Houl MetropoMan Wine EnsemtMe--529--9610:­MM11 St Stephens EPllCOC'.>81 Church. 7 30 Wed MOfitrose An All1al'\C;8-e94-1732,86&-93l4. ~ S332· aH;llate l/H tnc: meets 2nd Mon MonttOieB Ul;;;;Gu.id Me GrMler Mo;;t;O;;' Bus GuOd Montrose Church ot C~t -1700 Montrose- 777-9286 ""c 11am Sun Moritl'OH Civic Club Me Nnl't<M-n Assn Montrose Clinic:-803 Hewth0me-52&-SS31 <>pen Mon. Tue Thurs 6-9Pm ~~,~~';i't~~~;g~: rneet7· Montrose Counseling Ctr- i00t:O;;t\a203=- 529-0037 AIDS victim M.ipport group 6 30pm Mon women·s Suppol't Group 7pm Tws. AIDS R1Jk ReductJQn fSafe Se•) WorkshOPI 8Pm 2"d & •ti'! Mon excepl Dec. +n coniunct1on with K5'AIOS Foundation Montrose Singers-can Lawrence 17•~359• alter fSpm rehears.a~ Mon eves, Bering Church. 1••0 Haro~------- Montrose SOttball League POB 22272, 11227= &24~3144 Series 9. Gay ~ orld S~tel. M•IWIU· k•. Aug 2&-Sep 1 Montrose Spions Assn ,MSA) tee apecif1c subgroup MontroH SymohonJc Band- POB 61813 77266-527-9454 meel 7 30pm Tues. Oognily Ctr. 3217 Ferv11n partfOpal'\1 T•n Freedom Parade Della .Cpm s.p 22:. •ff are llH Inc MOAE- 526-MORE, 529-0037 projeC! MonllOle CounMhng Ceoter ~ ~~~t~~:l,~ted1Um Lanes. MSAITl'lu .. Noghl 1M"'od league) Bowlong­M, ke W• kert at 973-1351 play 9pm Sttldlum l•,,,.__ "'°° 81' ... l'Nllft • • • • • • • • • • • ~~!~~dL;g:,~oe:n,~..!7! competlbOn vartOUS k>Cauons &pm Wed MSA!Voueyoen-..-.f'k 522~1'69 games 1pm Tues. Gregory-t.ancoln school. 1101 Taf1 Montrou Watch eubgroup Neartown Alan Mill1angs-m.ets a1 the Bam, 710 Pecif.c-52&- 9'27 Club night T°"" National Gay Hearth Education Foundation- 523-5200 ~l:~~h~l=~':"~~~~~~m;..es· Nearto ..... n Aun (Montrose Civic Club)- i413 W•thetmer meet 7pm •tn T"-u._ . _ ___ Neartown Bus•nNI Alllance-529-7010. meels 7pm 2nd Wed, Liberty Bank. 1001 wes111~1mer NewFrMdom C1Vist1at'I Church-829 Y1Je-. 863-8377 '"" 1oam Sun ('5;'9rM1ers Anonymous-clo Monlrose coun- =~~~ ~,~:~-::rr!;~~r;:: Bering Cllu<Ch. 1«0 t<•rold Parents & Friends ot LeatMans & Gays (Parents FLAGl-484-6663 ,,_,. 2pm 3n:t Sun. - t.O.n Ctr 41 Oakdale----- Park People-clo Neartown CorTimuntty f 1rehauD-741·2S2• Pil'Y~-~~POB~-600063~-. --77-260-U2--.~ ,.76 PrHby1enans 1or leabian1G1y Concer1's­Prftbytenan Ctr 41 O&ke!l:le-52&-25&1 meets 7 3Qpm 2•n~d:....:.T::;Ull::.., _ _ _____ Prwidents Club (past presidents GPC) Poe 1168'4. 77266-523-E02• Recrut1onal Land Fund Comm'rtt...-=-MUSt.-ng Club orojeCI ~ Ga._y_ll_oobi_o_n~Supoo--rt-G_'°_uo~--~ 3211 (Gay & Lelblan Sw•lchbolird) RothkO C--1409 Sul ROll-!>24-11839 Shanti of T:.: couns9hng fOf l1fe-thr•ten1no illnesses -&22-.,_:;;5084=-------~ SOC..ty -icir 2nd Seff (ln-Ess). Gutt Coast Transvestite CN.pter- POB 90335. 77090 Society for the Promotion of Amazon Sado­Muoch<• m (SPASMJ-POB 70996. 77270 Gay & Lestuen Sw tehbolird 529-3211 S°Undance Cattle Co sociat ctub-clo The Barn. 710 Paeitic- 52&-9427 T• Gay Rodeo Assn-Ora..- 119' P08 66373. 77006-526-5001 JU,Oging Mr & Ma r. Gay Rooeo Nov ,. T• Qay Rodeo Nov 15-17 ~~~h~~~~~ounda~ ~R-iders-clo R pcorCS. 71 • Fau•view- 521-2792 Thursctay MIXed Bow1mg i.~ Mark $41· 6099 bOwls 8pm Thurs. Stad1t.1m Lanes W.....811ow1on(l- -...Y,, 723-1455 tiow s 130pm SUn Post Oak Bowt ng Linn Wealayan FetlowShq:i-86'~c:__~--- ~i Evef Happeoed 10 Baby Jane'" BowUng 1..eague aee Tl'lUt'lday &c-'11-lrng ..,.,....,,, Bcw.ong Leegue-~3-1358 5pm Sun Stediwn Lanes. 8200 Braesma. n women'• LobbYA11;ance-.cche1see-521~39 Women;; sOttt>ell Leagve-6431 P1nMh1de 77008-C.rotyn at 968-6256 1st Annual Gey women"• Sottbl I Wortd Ser• Aug 29-Se-p 1 M1twaukee---==-==---=-=== BAYTOWN Baytown Lambda Group •27·1378 meets 730pm odd Fn CONROE-Conroe Arn_lamDcla Gay .V.-1409) 3"~70 Conroe ArN 1..est>ians-Kathy et (409) 756-9069 meet BPm 2'nd & .Ctt'I Fn G .. LVESTON-lambesa AICohOlics Anonymous- 763-o'WO, Metropolitan Community Church of G1•veston llland - 182' Broadway 7~1626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) AIDS Hot11ne=5:~ AMBULANCE-222-3434 CtY Han- 222.3011 60ctor~ edt or S21-.-.3;..2.;.11_ ____ _ FIRE-227· 2323 Gay P01111cai C.ucus-521· 1000 Gay & Laat>oan SwttchbOanl-~3211 KSiAiOSF"ounciat1on- 524-2437 L-twy«-ue .01 or S&3211 _____ _ Llbrary-224-5441 Montrose Clinic-52&-5531 Montrose Counseling Center-529-0037 MONTROSE VOICE-5~90 POLICE-222-3131 f ax1-6S4-.cocO or::...:236-..:..:~.1-11_1 ____ Time temp,. WMther-144-~7171 ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classi­fied rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here "by
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