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Houston Voice, No. 1071, May 4, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1071, May 4, 2001 - File 001. 2001-05-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/435/show/406.

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(2001-05-04). Houston Voice, No. 1071, May 4, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/435/show/406

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1071, May 4, 2001 - File 001, 2001-05-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/435/show/406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1071, May 4, 2001
Contributor
  • Mohon, Wendy K.
Publisher Window Media
Date May 4. 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Staying gay in Galveston Island offers two hotels catering to queer clientele Page 15 ISSUE 1071 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. MAY 4, 2001 INSIDE Sean Carter resigns post as president of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus, citing health concerns as his reason for leaving. Page 2 Real estate is booming on Galveston; Historic Home Tour offers glimpse at isle's past. Page 2, 11 With six to choose from, Galveston's gay bar scene offers something for everyone. Page 15 Senate committee passes hate crimes bill Ellis says he's one vote away from bringing legislation before full Senate for debate FR0\1 STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS A Senate committee passed a hate mmes bill Wednesday designed to strengthen penalties for cnmes mott\'at­cJ by race, religion, sexual preference, age and gender. The Senate Criminal Justice Committee approved the bill on a 5-1 vote after hearing testimony on it and a proposal that would wipe out any men­tion of specific groups that would be pro­tected under the legislation. No vote was taken on the proposal by Sen. Todd Staples, R-Palestine. Senators Kenneth Armbrister, D­Victoria, Mike Moncrief, D Fort Worth; Steve Ogdl·n, R-Bryan; Royce West, D­D. 11l.1s; ,ind John Whitmire, 0-Houston :i:> Continued on Page 12 Sen. Rodney Ellis, 0-Houston, is shown at the side of the Senate floor during the session on April 18, in Austin. Ellis is Senate sponsor of the James Byrd Hate Crimes Act, which was passed by a Senate committee on Wednesday. Galveston going gay Rainbow flags abound in Galveston and the city's tourism bureau wants mainlanders to know their business is welcome on the island. The Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau is about to launch a marketing campaign to attract gay men and lesbians lo the Gulfside city which boasts six gay bars and two gay hotels. Island set to launch marketing campaign to attract gay tourism by D.L. GROOVER Galveston wants you• Before you can say Seawall Boulevard, a hefty campaign is soon to debut courtesv of the Galveston Island Con\'enhon ·& \'bitors Bureau, and vou are the target. ---- . Gay B&Bs on isle • Six gay bars in Galveston Page 15 Page 15 • Real Estate booming on island Page 2 In the trade it'~ known as the "alter­nallvt• market segment," \\ e call 11 gay men and le.bians. The pnnted brochure is imminent. Galve~ton wanb your :i:> Continued on Page 13 2 INSIDE NEWS Heolrh news ••. . •••••..• •. •••• ••. •. 4 Notional news ..•.... . .•. . . •. ... .. . 3 Police news •••• •••.. . .. . .. ..... .. . 6 Southern news •••••• . ..... . ....... . 5 Quote/ unquote •••• . •.• ••• . . . . . .• . 10 Bunnies distribute monies .••.... . .... .7 VOICES & ECHOES Minicucci: Day in the life of a gay islander ... 8 Murphy: Home again, this lime on •he isle ... 9 'Dykes to Watch Out For' .............. 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Staying gay in Galveston ....•.. . ••••. 15 Goy bars abound on isle . .. . .. ... . •. . 15 Home Front: Container gardens •.. •• ••• 16 Eating Out at Fish Tales . . . .... . . .. . .. 20 On Stage: Armed and dangerous . . . . . .. 21 Bayou Calendar • • • • . • . • ••••. •••. 19 Community Calendar •. •. .. . .•. . . . 22-23 Occasions My Stars! . .......... 26 ........... 27 ClASSIFIEDS . . . • . . . . • • • • . • 14·25 Issue 1071 Al materia 111 Houston VOice s protected by federa copyright l.lW and may not be repro­duced Wllhol.t tile wnnen consent cA Houston VOIC(O The sexual orientatlOO ol adllerllSers. phOtographers. wr~ers and cartoontSts pub­~ ed herein IS neither "'!erred or omphed. T'le appearance of names or poctoroal representa· liOn does llOI necessar ¥ llldica•e the sexual <ltM!f'!atlon of that persor °' persons ~:on Voice accepts unsofieited editorial material but cannot take responsib ty for ts reti.rn T'1e editor •eserves the rlgN to accep~ reject or edit any submiSs1on. All nghts revert IO auth<>rs upon pubficalion. Guide ones for freelance eo:-tributors are available upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Sean Carter resigns presidency of HCLPC Deborah Rogers appointed interim president until July elections by MARIA MINICl.iCCI EDITOR'S NOTE: In an exclusive intervu-w with the Houston Voice, Scan Carter spoke about his decision to resign as tire current president of tire Gay and l.e;bian Political Caucus Sean Carter announced his decision to resign as president of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus at a Caucus meetmb on Wednesday, May 2, a ting health conccm as his reason for leaving. "l have had a wonderful time working \\ith thb orgaruzation. As many of you knO\\ I am HIV-positive. I have always been a strong voice to others living with HIV, and now 1t is time to take mv own advice. "The amount of pres'sure and anxiety that this posttion requires takes a lot out of a very healthy individual, but it has taken even more out of someone with a deficient immune system." Carter said he is proud to have been affiliat­ed with the 25-year-old political organization. "When 1 became involved in the Caucus in 1998, I was awed by the group of passion· ate people involved and I quickly became one Sean Carter submitted his resignation as presi· dent of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus at the group's Moy 2 meeting, citing health concerns as his reason for leaving. more of those passionate people." Carter was elected president of the Caucus in 2lXXl. At that time, he viewed the organiza­tion as continuing to be quite viable and began his term with a set of goals and a \ision. ''When I became president, the Caucus had some obvious priorities: increase membership, fund-raising. solidify voter registration." Eighteen months later, Carter acknowl­edges the success of making the Caucus financially solvent and the successful voter registration process. He adds that the mem­bership did not increase and attributes that mainly to the changes, positive changes, in the community over the years. "We have seen the expansion of political organizations in Houston with the Stonewall Democrats, Log Cabin Republicans, Progressive Voters in Action. Of course, this spreads the resources around, particularly the volunteer base to several places." Carter was quick to clarify any mispercep­tion about working against Progressive Voters m Action (PVA) or the Caucus becom­ing obsolete. "We see our work as very compatible and have always been eager to work with them. 1 think they are doing a great job-they are wdl organized, have paid staff and we are on the same page as far as our goals and our mission." Carter also negates the suspicion that the Caucus may be obsolete. "Absolutely not! This upcoming city elec­tion is 1ust one example of our viability. Our endorsement process has a respected reputa­tion throughout the city of Houston. We have been and continue to be consistently fair and clean with regard to screening candidates. "This upcoming election, we will be on board to continue that process." Carter also mentioned plans for the Caucus board to organize a joint fund-raiser with PVA in the near future pertaining to the November election. Carter readily admits that the decision to step down as president was a struggle. During ~ Continued on Page 11 Galveston real estate offers buyer's market From historic Victorians to beach front condos, isle has affordable options for a home away from home by ELLA TYLER Perhaps your day or weekend on Galveston leaves you wanting more More sun, sand .ind water. Or perhaps you want less. Less traffic, hassle and stress. Or per­haps the home tour kindled a desire to restore a Victonan cottage All of a sudden, the idea of havmg a weekend home on Galveston may seem worth mvesllgating. After drivmg around with the Sunday Galveston County Daily News real estate ads, which list addresses and pnces, the idea seems absolutely compelling. For example, the Deem Realty ad showed a updated Victorian duplex for $100,000 and a little cottage in the "Silk Stocking" area that was being auctioned with a minimum bid of $30,000-and a closing date for bids of May 1. Sorry David Bowers of the House Company also is member of the Galveston City Council. He also 1s a lawyer and sells rt>al estate. He bought his first house m Galveston more than 15 years ago and com- Galveston is home to many Victorian-style houses, many of which have historic designation for surviving the storm of 1900. muted to downtown Houston for five years. "The drive wasn't any worse for me than for people who were coming in from Sugarland and Katy." Bowers said a lot of people who buy weekend houses in Galveston are like he was. "They're buying the house really to sec if they would like living here full time. They come down Friday nights and go to work from here on Monday and eventually this house becomes their primary resi­dence." Bowers said many people are attracted to Galveston because of its stock of vintage ~ Continued on Page 11 HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 NEWS around the nation San Fran becomes first city in country to cover sex-change operations SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-San Francisco has gone one step beyond offenng domestic-partner benefits by becoming the only city in the nation to offer insurance coverage to transgender employees seeking sex-change operations. The measure passed the city Board of Supervisors 9-2 Monday and will go to Mayor Willie Brown for a signature before the benefits would begin July 1. "It is land­mark legislation," said Supervisor Mark Leno, who has worked two years to have the benefits added. Supervisors Tony Hall and Leland Yee were the only two to vote against the benefits Monday. "To set one group apart and factionalize our society creates more animosity, more hatred, more big­otry," Hall said. The city currently has 14 identified transgender employees out of its 37,000 workers. The added1benefits would cost workers $1.70 each a month. There is a $50,000 lifetime cap for each employee. The state of Minnesota offered similar benefits, but the program was phased out in 1998. San Francisco Supervisor Mark Leno's pro­posal makes the city the only one in the country with the benefits. VT House committee continues plans to repeal the civil union law MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP)-Vermont's House Judiciary Committee voted last week to continue working on a bill that would repeal that state's civil unions law. The committee is one vote shy of approving a bill that would repeal the law that grants same-sex couples most of the rights and benefits of marriage. Committee members who support the law's repeal hope to get an up-or-down vote on the House floor for a bill that would create recip­rocal partnerships. If passed, the reciprocal partnership law would repeal civil unions and offer such partnerships to all couples who are currently prohibited from marrying under state law. Ml·anwhile, more the 150 Vermont residents who have entered into civil unions gathered on the Statehouse steps for a photograph marking the first anniversary of the law. Over the last year, 427 Vermont couples, and 1,556 out-of-state couples have used the law to formally recognize their relationships. Curators object to toning dovon of AIDS exhibit by NYC museum NEW YORK-The curators of a new exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York about a gay health agency's struggle against AIDS arc upset th.1t museum officials altered the exhibit's rontents, the New York Times reported. The exhibit, "AIDS: A Uving Archive," opened April 21 minus some sexually graphic materials, said Jane Rosctt, who curated the exhibit with her part­ner, jean Carlomusto. The exhibit is part of ''Gay Men's I foalth Crisis: 20 Years Fighting for People with I !IV I AIDS," and includes art and historical items dorumenting the fight against AIDS. "It's very disturbing. It s<.>t.ms like real censorship and distortion of history," said Dr. Lawrence D. Mas.~, one of GMHC's founders. Mass and Rosctt said that photos were eroppt.'<l to exclude imagL>s of intimacy betwt'Cn men, and that museum officials excluded condoms and pic­tures of male genitals from the exhibit. GMCH spokesi:x-·rson Marty Algaze said the group understood the compromises that were necessary to be in partnership with the museum PA man wants anti-gay harassment suit against Coke reinstated PHILADELPHIA-A Coca-Cola bottling plant employee is trying to get an anti-gay harassment suit reinstated that was dismissed by a lower court judge, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported. John J. Bibby said he experienced a hostile work environment the entire time he worked at the plant because he is gay. But his case was dismissed last year when a federal judge found that litle VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 does not protect gays from workplace harassment. Bibby's attorney, Arthur B.Jarrett, told the three judge appeals panel that l itle VII must be read to include more than just gender and sexual conduct. Otherwise, Bibby could sue if he is the target of sexual advances by a woman or another gay man, but not if harassed by a straight man. Coca-Cola attorney Michael G. lierce countered that Bibby was trying to get the courts to give him what Congress has declined to provide, pointing out that other conditions, such as obesity, are al.so not protected under federal law. Teen who sued CA school district for gay-straight club sues again ORANGE COUNTY, Calif.-A bisexual teen who successfully sued the Orange Unified School District to hold meetings for a gay I straight alliance is now suing over her suspen­sion, the Orange County Weekly reported. Heather Zetin, co-founder of El Modena High School's G.1y/Straight Alliance, said she is innocent of charges that she bit Canyon Hills l ligh School l'rincipal St;mley Pasqual. Zetin was amsted following the incident, but the Orange County dbtnct attorney's office declined to prosecute the case. The lawsuit stems from a school bo,ml meeting in M.1rch 2000. A v1dl'otapl' shows several dozen protesters standing m sill•nt protl'St dunng the m~cting. When two protesters went to the front of the room .111d knocked the microphone from another ~pe.1kl•r's h.rnd, the altercation erupted The v1dcot.1pe does not clearly show the biting. For more news, visit Li1st ye.u, Zctin successfully sued the school dis-www. houstonvoice.com trict for the alliance's right to hold meetings ' -From staff and wire reporls LET~ Imagine WORKSHOPS love Now Available! 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NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE health news Typhoid found in gay man, part of overall jump in STDS, feds say ATLAl\TA (AP)-Health offic1.ils believe that rimming may have contributed to the natmn's first sexually transmitted outbreak of typhoid fever A Cincinnati gay man passed typ~oid to seven other men who had sex with him last summer, federal researchers said last week. Typhoid is most often transmitted by swallowing food and water contaminated with hum.in feces. The disease likely orcul.:ited by oral-anal contact among the men, said Megan Reller, an ep1dem1ologist with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Judith Wasserheit, the COC's STD prevention chief, said the discovery was disturbing but not necessarily surprising. "We are seeing substantial Tncreases in sexually transmitted dis­eases among men who have sex with men in multiple locations across this country," she said Typhoid is marked by high fever, weakness, headache and, in some cases, flat, red spots on the skin. About 400 cases are reported annually in the US.; nearly 80 percent of the cases can be traced to overseas travel. Typhoid is treatable with antibiotics, but is occa­sionally fatal for victims who do not seek treatment. Children of gay parents more likely to depart from gender roles LOS ANGELES-Two Southern California soc1olog1sts are taking issue with 20 years of research on lesbian and gay parenting, suggesting that the sexual orientation of parents docs have some effect on children, the Les Angeles Times reported. Study authors Judith Stacey and Timothy). Biblarz argue that the emotional health of children raised by lesbian parents is not significantly different from that of children raised by heterosexual parents, but that the former are more likely to depart from traditional gender roles. The researchers argue that teen boys are more sexually restrained than peers in heterosexual households, while teen girls show the opposite trend. The children are also more open to same-sex relationships, the study found. Stacey and Biblarz suggest the differences have been glossed over because gay parenting is such a volatile issue. Their study found no significant differences between the groups in anxiety, depression or self-esteem in their children. Stacey also said there were some advantages to lesbian parenting, as both partners tended to be highly involved in the children's lives, and more in synch in using parenting techniques. The study primarily focuses on children raised by lesbians, since there are far fewer children raised by gay men. Lesbians less likely to seek routine gynecological care, survey shows WASHINGTON-Surveys indicate that lesbians may be less likely to undergo routine gynecological exams because they believe they are not at risk of contracting sexually trans­mitted diseases, the Orange County Register reported. A survey by the U.S. Department of Health &: Human Services found that more than one third of lesbians do not receive rou­tine gynecological care. Fear of anti-gay bias from their health care provider also seems to play a role in their avoidance of scheduling gynecological exams, the studies found. But lesbians may face higher cancer risks, since they don't take hormonal birth control pills, which have been known to reduce the risk of contracting certain types of cancer. Effort to reduce tobacco use among gays, minorities gets $21 million WASHINGTON-The Amencan Legacy Foundation announced last week that it will donate $21 million over the next three years to organizations that are working to reduce tobacco us.? among gays and other minorities. "Accumulating evidence shows that smoking rate; arc high­er among adult and adolescent le;bians and gay people than straight people. What's worse pre­vention and cessation research and interventions for LGBT arc virtually non-existent," said Greg Greenwood, an investigator for the Queer Tobacco Intervention Project. The foundation wa:; established by the 1998 Master Settlement between the tobacco industry and a coalition of state attorneys general. According to the foundation's press release, each group will have access to $3 million in grant money, with $3 million going to agencies that work on col­laborative, cross-<U!tural projects. Information about the grants, to be awarded later this year, can be found at www.AmericanLegacy.org. Helen Lelllow, director of program development for the American Legacy Foundation, said gays are one of six 'priority populations' being targeted to curb high rates of tobacco use through $21 milfion in grants. New studies cast doubt on theory that AIDS spread through polio vaccine W'.\'IXl'\ New studies have cast more doubt on the controversial idea that AIDS am;e from an oral polio vaccine that was contaminated with a precursor to the AIDS virus. For yean;, some researchers have speculated that the polio vaccine wa:; grown in chimpanzee kidney cell cultures that carried the precursor virus, which was then pa5!.ed to people when the vaccine was adminis­tered in Africa in the late 195(}.;. But in the April 26 issue of the journal Nature, British and Swedish scientists report that they found no chimp DNA in a stock of early polio vaccine used in Africa in the 195(}.;. Also, an evolutionary analysb of HIV For more news visit strains in the Congo indicates they trace back to a com-www. houstonvoice.com mon ancestor that infocted people rather than chimps. -From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 NEWS around the south GA court agrees to hear case testing VT civil union in custody case ATLANTA-The state Court of Appeals will review the first case in Georgia to test Vermont's civil unions law. Atlanta resident Susan Freer, 36, seeks to regain visitation with her three children. Her ex-husband and th~ boys' father, Darian Burns, charged in court that because she visited the boys in the home she shared with her partner, Debra, she should be held in contempt of a 1998 consent order in which both parents agreed not to v1s1t the children "during any time where [one] cohabits with or has overnight stays with any adult" to whom they are not married or related. The Freers obtained a Vennont ci\11 union last year. "By virtue of the fundamental nght to privacy, their marriage should be honored," said Adrian Lanser, Susan Freer's attorney. But Mathew Staver, president and general counsel of Orlando-based Liberty Counsel, the law finn representing Burns, said marriage is only for opposite-sex couples in Georgia. The court 1s expected to hear the case sometime this fall. Police in LA label anti-gay slurs in altercation as 'free speech' BATON ROUGE, La.-Pohce charged two men and one woman in an April 15 alter­cation that allegedly involved slurs and violence toward four lesbian LSU students, including one of the women later charged in the incident. The women allege that Regan llgenfritz, who was later charged with battery, moved to protect her girlfriend from a physical attack and was beaten while the men called her a "dyke." Michael Holdeman, 18, and Tommy Lott, 36, both of Livingston, also face simple battery charges. Baton Rouge police did not classify the incident as a hate crime, and a police spokesperson said that the alleged anti-gay slurs were a matter of "free speech." The women also complained that police later interviewed them about the incident between 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., waking them from bed. Police said that investigators wanted to dispose of the case quickly. AL House again okays measure to add gays to state hate crime law MONTGOMERY, Ala -The state House approved adding sexual orien­tation to the state's hate crimes law last week. The measure now moves to the Senate, which Jet the bill die with­out a vote last ye.u House Bill 423, which includes sexual orientation as a protected category-and defines it as heterosexuality, homosexuality or bisexuality-passed the House by a 45-42 vote. The bill's sponsor, state Rep. Alvin Holmes (D-~1ontgom<'ry), s.11d it simply makes it clear that the right to be free from reasonable fear, intimidation, h.irJssment and physi­cal harm extends to everyone in the state. But the measure faces strident opposition from legislators who argue that it creates a special class of protec­tion for gays. Alabama state Rep. Alvin Holmes says his gay­indusive hate crimes proposal, which passed the House last week, would protect all citizens-gay or straight-and should be .ok ayed by the Senate. LA lawmakers dump civil union ban, consider several gay-friendly bills BATON ROUGE, La .-A flurry of legislative activity last week directly affects gays, including the failure of anti-civil union bill to pass the state Senate. Lawmakers also intro­duced a bill to repeal the state sodomy law, which already faces a court challenge, and two competing bills that would ban anti·gay workplace harassment. Another measure would remove gays arrested for having consensual sex under the state's sodomy Jaw from public notification provi~ions of a sex offender law. On April 26, the Senate failed to pass a meas­ure by state Sen. "Clo" Fontenot to ban civil unions in the state, ~ven though the vote was 17-16 in favor of the bill. The bill needed a two-thirds majority-or 20 votes-to pass. Fontenot brought the bill up a second time on Tuesday, when it again failed to gamer the necded vote. The legislative session ends June 18. SC woman who embezzled from AIDS charity gets 15-year sentence I-LORENCE, S.C. (AP)-A woman who embezzled more than $30,000 from an AIDS charity has been sentenced to 15 months in prison. Karen Rochelle Beckford, 34, was sentenced April 26 for stealing funds from Hope for the Pee Dee, which provides health care services for people with AIDS. The agency receives between $200,000 and $400,000 in federal funds a year. Beckford, who directed Hope for about a year, will serve the sentence consecutively with a sentence she is serving in Arizona related to a 1991 incident in which she embezzled funds from another employer. She also was ordered to pay $30,511.31 in restitution. Beckford admitted typing her name on checks for Lab Corp., a local company that performed For more news, visit tests for the clinic, and depositing them in her www.houstonvoice.com personal account. ~From staff and wire reports 5 6 When you have issues to deal with, being gay shouldn't be one of them. If you're struggling with addrction o depression, you need a treatment center where you can be yourself .... Where you can talk frankly and safely to people who understand you. We're Pride Institute. the nations leader in providing treatment for the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered communities. We have programs offering residential, outpatient and halfway house services. You have the power. Call us today. TPRIDE INS'll'l'U'l'E 800-54-PRIDE Medicare and most insurance plans cover our programs www.pride-lnstltute.com Sa111e Sex Couples •nd their entire household Now aualifJing for great health benefits for . ONE LOW MONTHLY FEE! Save up to 80% on: • Dental • Prescription • Vision • Chiropradic care o Pre-existing conditions okay o @ No waiting O ' www.HPhorizons.com • 281.610.4417 • career app0rtunities available .THE. CA LENDAR Friday • May 4 Saturday • May 12 KOLBE Morning Preyer IOam Breakfast Club 9:30om PROJECT Monday • May 7 Monday • May 14 Eucharist 7:30pm Euchorisl 7:30pm e-m:ul: info@kolbeproject.org or VISlt our website at Friday • May 11 • Friday • May 18 www.kolbeproject.org Morning Preyer 1 Oom Morning Prayer 1 Oam Movie Night 7pM Saturday • May 19 PH (713)S61-1800 • 1030 Heights Bl\'11. "Howard's Ena• Doy of Prayer HOUSlon, TX 77008 9om • Jpm NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE police beat PA man claims anti-hetero bias prompted grocery store assault NEW HOPE, Pa. (AP)-A PennsylvdJlia man who accused a gay rights advocate of dlS­criminating against him because he is straight has been charged in a supermarket scuffle they had March 31, police said. David Vine, 59, was charged with simple assault, disorder­ly conduct, harassment and stalktng for allegedly shoving, shaking and striking store employee Elaine Mc.\;eely, who also organizes New Hope's Gay & Lesbian Task Force. McNeely said Vine asked whether she was involved with the task force and told her he thought she was discriminating against him, a straight man. When McNeely tried to leave the store's deli, Vine allegedly "took hold of both of the victim's arms and shook her back and forth while yelling at her," police said. Vine 1s accused of hitting McNeely twice with his cane and pushing her into a soft-drink display. Vine's attorney Christopher Serpico, said he and his client "look forward to having our day in court." South African man sentenced to life for killing gay youth activist CAPE TOWN-A 24-year-old South African man h.ts bcen sentenced to hfe in pnson for the premeditated murder of a gay youth, SAPA reported. Mome Langeveld was convicted of the murder of Johan le Roux Theunissen, who had just recently reconciled with his father, Darue Theunissen, by debating gay nghts on a South African television show. The father said the debate had changed his views about homosexuality, and he had moved to be near his son, who was living with a partner at a gay commune. Theunissen told the court that he hoped his son's murderer would be "sent to Botswana, and I want to be the hang· man." Lange\'eld was sentenced to an add1t1onal two years for stealing equipment from the commune. "The deceased showed you friendship and hospit.1lity, and your response was to kill him and steal from him," Justice Selwyn Selikowitz said in sentencing Langeveld. D.C.'s top cop denounces anti-gay, racist messages sent by officers WASHlNGTO'.'J-Distnct of Columbia Police Chief Charles Ramsey denounced anti-gay, racist and sexist messages that his police officers sent each other, the Waslrington Blade reported. Ramsey dis­cussed the messages at a hearing of the D.C. Council's Judiciary Committee. Police officials said they discov­ered the offensive language in March during a routine review of e-mail transmissions that officers send each other from computer terminals in police squad cars. Of the 971,000 messages transmitted over the past two years, a keyword search identified potenttally improper language used in 27,000 of the messagt.>S, or less than 3 percent of the messag~ sent. Offioals said the officer.; appeared to have \iolated police procedures by using police-owned terminals to send unprofessional and unproper messages, even though the officers never intended the messages to be released publicly. "There is no place in the [police department] for racist, sexist, homophobic, and malicious speech or actions of any sort," R.tmsey said. District of Cobtmia Po&ce Oief Oaies Rmmey oiticized the 27,000 messages felow officers sent to eodi other last ye« that ilduded ~' racist or sexist biguage. San Fran district attorney won't fight venae change in dog mauling case SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-Although 1t hasn't yet been requested, District Attorney Terence Hallinan said last week that he won't oppose any attempt to move the trial of Marjorie Knoller and Robert Noel in the dog mauling death of lesbian lacrosse coach Diane Whipple. "We don't intL'nd to fight a change of venue. We want a speedy trial," H.tllinan said. The two lawyers charged in the death of their neighbor had their arraignment postponed for a third time while they continued to seek legal counsel, a tactic that riled prosecutors. Knollcr and Noel appeared before Judge Herbert Donaldson, who continued their arraignment until May 9. Knoller faces a second-degree murder charge in the Jan. 26 death of Whipple, who was fatally mauled by two Presa Caruuio-mastiffs under the couple's care. ~oiler and Noel both face charges of involuntary m.tnslaughter and keeping a mischievous dog that killed a human. During the court appearance last Wl'('k, Knoller and Noel never turned to face Whipple's partner, Sharon Smith, who was seated in the front row. Smith and Whipple's mother h.tve filed wrongful death suits against the couple. CA judge doesn't free gay awaiting hearing on parole case VAN NUYS, Calif. (AP)-A judge denied on Apnl 27 a request by gay convicted mur­derer Robert Rosenkrantz to be released from prison while awaiting a hearing next month to decide if he was wrongly denied parole by California Gov. Gray Davis. Superior Court Judge Paul Gutman denied Rosenkrantz's request to be released on bail or on his own recognizance pending the decision. Rosenkrant7. is serving a sentence of 17 years to life for lhe murder of high school classmate Steven R!!dm.1n, who outed Rosenkrantz to his father Lawyers for Rosenkrantz have filed a lawsuit claiming Davis has a "blanket policy that all prisoners conVJcted of murder should never be paroled." Davis has said he has no arbitrary policy against granting parole to murdert'rs. For more news visit Three religious groups filed friend-of-the-court www.houstonvoice.com briefs on behalf of Rosenkrantz last month. -From staff and wiri• reports HOUSTON VOICE• MAY 4, 2001 LOCAL NEWS Local Nevvs Bunny money distributed Bunnies on the Bayou contributes $31,000 to area organizations by D.L. MURPHY While the annual Bunnies on the Bayou celebration always offers a good excuse to don a frilly bonnet and have fun, the Easter event also is a big fund­raiser for area gay-related organizations. Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc announced donations to six area groups totaling more than $31,000 at a ceremony held April 22. The Art League Houston provides a creative outlet for those suffering with HIV I AIDS. The $4,000 they received will allow them to expand their current pro­grams so that an evening class can now be included. AssistHers received $5,000 to help fund their ongoing programs to educate the hea lth care community toward being more lesbian-friendly, to continue volun­teer education, and to continue to pro­vide vital services to women suffering from acute and chronic health problems. Bering/Omega Community Services received $2,500 for their adult day care center. The center provides care for those who should not or cannot be left alone during the day. The money will be used to install an awning and ceiling fan on the patio. This will enable those who have become light sensitive as a result of their drug regimens to spend time out­side during the day. The Houston Buyers' Club will use the $2,500 they received to fund an educ.ition program concerning treat­ment information and the use of nutri­tional supplements to help alleviated the side effects of current HIV I AIDS mrdin1t i on~ The Houston Gay and Lesbian Film Festival plans to use the $5,000 they received to support their unique, six­venue festival beginning at the end of May. PFLAG is planning the fifth m their series of "Healing the Hurt" conferences. The $5,000 BOTB, Inc. donated also will be used to help fund the various PFLAG public aw,1reness campaigns. People With Aids Coalition has been receiving grants from Bunnies on the Bayou for several years. This year's grant of $7,000 will be used to continue to pro­vide furniture and household items to PWA's clients. Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc. hosts the annual Easter party held at the Wortham Center. This past year was BOTB's 22nd party, and set an all-time record for funds raised. More than 2,000 people helped raise more than $57,000. This was a huge increase over the previous record, $41,000, set two years ago. Another source of fund raising at the party is the Easter Bonnet contest. This year's winner, the Krewe of Olympus, donated their $1,000 grand prize and the $693 raised in votes to SNAP (Spay Neuter Assistance Program). Bunnies' nine board members, 30 hosts, numerous volunteers and gener­ous in-kind con tributors help insure that every penny collected at the party goes back to the community. Bunnies' members are beginning to move to year-round community service. This was the second year members pro­vided stuffed bunnies to hospitalized children. The members went bed to bed, personally giving the toys to the chil­dren. The Bunnies board hopes to do more of this type of work in the fu tu re. Representatives from the six organizations receiving donations from Bunnies on the Bayou, Inc. gather for a photo. The Art league of Houston, AssistHers, PFLAG, the Houston Buyers Oub, Bering-Omega, the Houston Gay and lesbian Film Festival and PWA shared in the $31,000 raised al this year's Easter event. A MOTHER'S LOVE DESERVES EXTRAORDINARY QUALITY. This Mother's Day, show how much you care with the gift of an elegant Rolex t1me­p1ece. No matter which style of Rolex you choose, you'll be giving a grft of quality, beauty and durability. Think of how your mother loves you Then tell her how much you love her, with a Rolex lady-Dateiust. 'W' RO LEX 1wmark1 3841 Bellaire Blvd. 713-668-5000 Open Mon.-Sat. 10-S Thurs. 10-9 Convenient Storefront Parking Always Free Glftwrapplng THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-to1vn guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banq11et Facilities • Jacuzzi S11ites • Pool/Hot T11b Near Downtown, M11se11ms and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Ho11sto11, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! 7 8 STAFF Editor Wendy K. Mahon ed1torOhoustonvoice .com Production Senior Gr11phic Designitr·Natasha Marqu~z Gn1phic Desigller-Oeborah Duplant Contributors Rich Aronschieldt. Kay Y. Dayus, Trayce Diskin. Earl Dittman. D.L. Groover, Robert 8. Henderson, Kathreen Lee, Mana E. M1n.cuccl, D.l Murphy. Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. Kimberly Thompson Advertising Sales Tom Robbins uobbinsOhoustonvoice.com Wanda Faulkner wfaulkner houstonvoice.com Administration & Sales Support Carolyn A. Roberu aobertsOhoustonvoJCe.com Niltion1il Advertising Representative R1vendell Marketing Company, Inc. 112-242·6863 A , Publisher- Window Media LLC President- Wilham Waybourn Editoria1I Director· Chns Crain Fln.,nci"I Director- Kelly Smink Sales Director- Peter Jackson Art Director- Rob Boeger Marl<eting Director- Erk May rn ....... ~ ..... Guild MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Established 1974 as the Montrose Star. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (713)5~90 Fa.: {713) 529-9531 Contenu copyright 2000 Office tQn: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edit for content and length. We will withhold names upon request, but you must include your name and phone number for verlficauon. Please send ma I to Houston Voke. 500 Lovett Blvd, Suite 200, Houston. Texas n006; f~ (713) S29-9S31 or e.ma1I to ed1tor@houstonvo1ce.com Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of !he Houston Voice. VOICES & ECHOES MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE VIEWPOINT At home in Galveston: A day in the life of a gay islander by MARIA MINICUCCI Sure, Galveston is a great place to visit, but would you want to hve there? As a gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgendered person, would you choose a much smaller town lifestyle •over the hustling, bustling temperament of the fourth largest city in the country? This is a glimpse into the life of one lesbian, who, indeed, made a deliberate choice to live in Galveston. Cindy Lucia is a 37-year-old woman who moved to Galveston 11 years ago from Beaumont. "I needed to make a major change in my life and leaving Beaumont was among those changes." \Nhy did she move to Galveston7 "l considered all of my options and also took mto account the things that were impor­tant to me and the kind of person I am and Galve;ton iust fits in with those priorities." Lucia describe5 the ease with which you can maneuver around the island. "You can be iust about anywhere on the island within minutes." This no-hassle mobility is just one of many advantages. "l couldn't believe how warm and wel­coming everyone was. It was pretty obvi­ous that I was moving in with my female lover and no one batted an eye. They came by, introduced themselves, offored help, brought over food, tools, whatever In fact, they are still doing that. My neighbor just gave me some watermelons and can­taloupes that they picked up." Lucia works in the medical field so employment opportunities would be ample almost anywhere. Her first job was at the University of Texas Med1Cal Branch in Galveston. According to Lucia, she had no problem !inding employment that she was trained in and that was enjoyable to her. More surpnsing, how· ever, was once again the openness and acceptance in the workplace for diwrsi· ty, mduding sexual orientation. "UTMB was great as far as not toler· atmg any form of prejudice. It simply was not a big-deal to be who you are. No one feared losing their JDb because of their sexual preference. This level of acceptance was quite a surprise to me." Luaa says an "open atmosphere" permeates the entire island. "You know, I have never, in the past 11 years, really encountered any blatant hostility or rejection against gays." It is quite common to equate small towns with small mindedness. Lucia has not experienced this and in fact recoilnts the last election for mayor m Galveston when an openly gay candidate was campaigrung. "Throughout Bowers (David Bowers was the gay candidate running for mayor) campaign, hb sexual orientation was never the focal point; it was simply what his pohtical platform was about." What does Galveston have to offer as far as a "gay" social life? Surprisingly, on an island with a population of around 60,000, there are six gay bars, so if club· bing is your thing, there is quite a choice. For Lucia, who does not particularly fre­quent bars, she still claims that having a sat­isfying social life was not difficult for her. "I have had a steady group of lesbian and gay friends. We usually plan a differ· ent outing every month-dinners, gam· bling, boating. things like that. And, for the past several years, there is a monthly poker night that is also a time to socialize." Lucia also explains that gays and les­bians tend to be much more integrated into all of the acti\'.ities that the island has to offer such as Dickens on the Strand, Mardi Gras, Galveston Home Tours and the like. "It is just not a big deal. You can vir­tually go anywhere and be gay without dire repercussions." Ironically, it is no secret that Galveston has at lea:;t as high a crime rate as any targe aty. 1 lowever, hate crimes ag.1mst gays and lesbians do not seem to be among the cate­gory of crimes being committed. "I am not saying that it never happens, but since I have lived here, I do not recall anyone being victimized by a criminal act bec.-iuse they were gay or lesbian." Is Galveston paradise? Probably, not quite. One of the things that Lucia docs cite as a bit of a disadvantage is the hm· ited cultural avenues. "We have the Opera House, the Strand Theater and other very fine cultural ven· ues, but they are limited by the 'tourist sea­son.' This means that access to theater or concerts is based on a very quick and short seasonal calendar rather that year round. "That," Lucia says, "is one of the rea· sons she would make a trip to Houston." Would there be anything else that could lure Lucia to move to the "big city?" She sits on her patio, sipping coffloe, glancing at the star-filled sky pondering this question very seriously. After a cou­ple of minutes, she shakes her head slow­ly and says, "Well, maybe a fantastic iob opportunity, but, actually, no. I love \'isit­ing llouston and I love coming home." HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 VOICES & ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT Home again, home again . • • this time on the island by D.L. MURPHY My partner and I, in a fit of nesting frenzy, bought a house in Galveston a year ago. This house was bought as hope for the future, since it was not at all inhabit­able in the present. We were excited to purchase a home together, and lo\'ingly planned and began the house's rehabilitation. We envisioned our house as a weekend retreat, as a refuge from the day-to-day stress of the citv. And, ,1s these things always go, we started talking about living on the island full time I was reluctant to talk about it at all, since moving to Galveston would mean lea\'ing Montrose. I remember when I left ~liami, all those years ago, broken hearted that I had lost my home long before I ever left it. Lucky woman that I am, I immediately found a new home in Texas. One look at the Montrose, and I knew this was it. I thought I would be here forever. I laving happily settled in Nirvana, why am I now leaving? And going, of all places, to Galveston? Galveston is a small place; the popula­tion is about 60,000. Okay, for years we have joked that living in the Montrose is like living in a small town, you see the same 300 people over and over and over. So why move? Easy, Galveston is a town, with its richness and diversity all present in one very small geographic space; just like the Montrose used to be; before it began to bl'Come an inner loop WASP suburbi;i. Galveston reminds me of the Miami I grew up in. Okay, I left South Florida 22 years ago and have not returned, not even once, since. Seems like a contradic­tion that I long to return? No, not really. Not-So 0.UiGt Desperation , . I ~I I left Miami in total disgust-the par­adise I had grown up in had been invad­ed by people who did not understand or appreciate what made my home so spe­cial. They destroyed the character of a truly beautiful place; eager to remake it into the homes they were leaving, just without the snow. Sound familiar? No? Then think about the changing demographics of the Montrose over the past three years. Yuppies are eager to make the ~fontrose just like the suburban neighborhoods they arc leaving, 1ust without the daily commute. My neighborhood m Galveston has a joyful sexual diversity. My street has married couples, married couples with kids, single straights, single gays, at least one gay couple, at least two lesbian cou-pies. My street in the Montrose has my gay neighbor, straight white people, and us. I can't tell you how upset I was the day I realized this. Our neighborhood in Galveston is one of the historic districts. People have a serious interest in restoring and preserv­ing the grandeur of these homes. They were beautiful before, they will be beau­tiful again. I cry regularly as I drive through the Montrose and see what has been destroyed so that city tract housing can be constructed Galveston 1s "live and let live." My new neighbors there came over immedi­ately, eager to meet us. They continue to come over when we are there, just to see how we are doing. My new neighbors in the Montrose see me and mo\·e closer to their children, eyeing me warily. People try to talk me out of moving. "But, think of the culture in Houston." Galveston has the 1896 Opera House, summer theater productions, and mo\ies enough to fill my urge for "culture." Besides, for the six times a year I go to the museum I can drive to Houston. "But e\·erything is so close here." YC!i, and I can walk to e\'erything I want m Gal\'eston. It on!\· seems close here because ewrything' else 1s so spread out. "But, you'll miss gay life" 0Jope, this little island ha..~ abundant gay culture And more of us are mO\ing there C\"Cr) da) "We'll miss you." And, my friends, l 11 miss vou too. I am too old to blitheh­think' ''I'll make new friends on th~ island " I know I'll make new friends, but they will not be replacements for m} companions of 20 years. I know and trust the>e women, 1 know and trust myself. And, as alwa)S, we'll find a way to make our !ins togeth­er work, regardless of whate\ er chmcc.' we make. "But you'll be bored". Wanna bet? I'll ha\'e peace and quit>!, so idle time ,,,11 be r<'5tful rather than boring. I'll ha\'e the pace and rh\'thms of a small town, full of all the scanda'Js only the locals know. I'll once again ha\'e a $CO-"f of neighborhood, of pl.Ke. I'll ha\·e to learn a new libral); new grocery stores, new people, new ways. Crazy I may become, bored I will not be. And again I'll ltve some place that feels like home In some wavs like the Miami I grew up in, in some way:.. hke the Montrose I came of age m. And I'll learn the thmgs that make the island spe­cial. And I'll love it, 1ust like I loved ~hamt, just like I loved Montrose. And, the \'ery most important thmg, I'll feel like I'm home again. 11W's ~r r;.. 'WX1M::. "'8<11Jfl LOCK l\T yOU ! )OJ R"t /\oJ £Wlft>N"\(,,...TA[. ........' l'tR /\~'!> )tlJ >rC 'J'oJS'f' flo.l~ on ~P-rAlt""'~ 111 F 10 Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church 6:30pm Sunday Evenings May6 .. "Compassionate Prayer'' Rev. Janet Parker Please Join Us For fa·ening Services And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! ................................................................................... Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery 1s available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group" services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more Info .•. 713-528-6756 or ema// maranatha@ev1.net I/~ ~~\\ Maranatha ~'Y' t! Fellowship "-tropolltan Community Church ·A-....-_..., . .....,Ood.. Our Church Can Become Your Home! Give Us A Try! We Would Love To Have You Visit Anytime! NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE 11 ~llil@'ls®/unquote11 compiled by REX WCX::KNER "I know that's the yuppiest thing imaginable." -Gay writer Andrew Sullivan to the Washington Post on the fact that his beagle went to doggie day care that day. April 19 "If you want to be a writer, learn Latin." -Lesbian author R.ta Mae Brown (right) ("Rubyfru1t Jungle") to the Houston Voice, April 6 "We have a president who was selected rather than elected. He stole the presidency through family ties, arrogance and intimidation, employ­ing Republican operatives to exercise the tactics of voter fraud by disen­franchising thousands of blacks, elderly Jews and other minorities." -Barbra Streisand at BarbraStreisand.com "The last time I was in Chicago with Champions on Ice, I walked into [the popular gay bar] Sidetrack and I was mobbed. People were asking me all kinds of things, mostly about skating, and you know, I love it, because I rarely get a chance to meet new friends." -Skating champ Rudy Galindo to the Windy City Times, April 18 "To be forced back into the heterosexual cage of coupledom [via gay marriage] is not a step forward but a step back into state-imposed definitions of relationship. With all that we have learned, we should be helping our heterosexual brothers and sisters out of their state·defined prisons, not volunteering to join them there." -Lesbian author Jane Rule, who wrote the book that was made into the classic lesbian film "Desert Hearts," to Toronto's Xtra!, April 5 "I love my minivan. I'm thinking now of really souping it up and getting some, like, really hot rims for it. Make it some bitchin' Soccer Mom ride." -RuPaul (left) to the Phoenix gay newspaper Heatstroke News, April 19 "By now we've seen women kissing each other on everything from 'Ally McBeal' to 'Buffy, the Vampire Slayer.' For 'Friends,' the idea seems not only old-hat, it smacks of desperation." -New York Post columnist Adam Buchman, April 26, on the kiss shared by Jennifer Anniston and Wynona Rider on 'Friends' "We live in a Toronto bubble, working 14 to 15 hours a day. We were just trying to figure out where the grocery store is and how to get there. Last week was our first trip to the states as a group and we felt the impact [of being celebrities now]. How did it feel? Amazing. People come up to me and say, 'I came out to my mother because of your show."' -Actress Thea Gill (Lindsay on Showtime's "Queer As Folk") in a March 22 appearance at American University in Washington, D C. "People already knew me from 'Talk Soup.' It's a little different now knowing that when someone comes up and says, 'I've seen your show,' they've seen my bare butt-they've seen me naked. That's the peculiar part of it. But they're respectful." -Actor Hal Sparks (right) (Michael on Showtime's "Queer As Folk") in a March 22 appearance at American University in Washington, D.C. "I timed it. It's like a 5 1/2-second mouth-to­mouth kiss. We haven't seen anything like this before on network TV .... This is a huge leap and a huge kiss. We might now start seeing physical affection and romance between other gay characters." -GLAAD's Scott Seomin on the kiss between two male teens May 1 on TV's Dawson's Creek, to USA Today, April 30 HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 NEWS 11 Island has rentals for weekend getaways .- Continued from Page 2 houses. "We have more than 5,000 prL'-1900 structures on the island. There are more shotgun cott,1ges than gmnd mansions, but they all have character and every house has a story." he said "These houses are like the California redwoods. Once they are gone, they can't be replaced." \.\'hen asked if the prices remind him of pnces m the Montrose and Heights in the l,1te '70s, Bowers said, 'Tm not sure they are the same, but the prires here are \'ery good. "We just sold a two-bedroom house with a g<Jrage apartment, with central air and heat, in livable condition, for $61,000. We have a raised artisb cottage for less than $50,000 and a cute Victorian duplex that needs work for $37,500." for people who don't want to spend their weekends working on the house, Bowers offers, "a big, fancy, completely restored Victonan for $280,000. "The market is active right now, but there's things that have been on the market a little too long, and might be overpriced, so we're encouraging offers to see what folk want to do." Bowers hedged when asked him to com­pare the cost of buying a weekend place in Galveston has many resort rentals available for summer vacations or weekend getaways. Beach front homes like the one above, range from about $1,SOO to $3,JSO weekly during the peak sum· mer season, depending on size and proximity to the beach. Galveston to the cost of spending one week­end a month at the nicest hotel in Galveston. "l don't think you can compare them," he said. "A weekend home is a place you can get away physically and mentally, and with all the festivals and events in Galveston, you'll always have friends coming down. "I think people would use their house more than once a month. New restaurants and coffeehouses are opening. Besides, a house is a long-term in\'estment which may appreciate, has tax advantages and can be ren j Bowers suggested that condos appeal to many. "Places like the San Lms, the Breakers and the Galvestonian ha\·e a great beach set­ting and lots of amenities. These properhes ha\e apprL'C1ated v.ell, some sell for up to S~S0.000." There are many less expt.'IlSI\ e condos available, Bowers said, and many ha\'e rmtal pools to handle renting the unit Bowers said that many second homes can be financed with conventional mort· gages with 10 percent down. "One of the mer tlungs about buying a second home in Gah e~ton 1s that we aren't in t~ wildel'fless," he said. Bowers "We ha\'e good !oral mortgage companies and good local insurance compame> and I louston mortg;rge companies like Galveston business, too. Ha\fog a local insurance agent makes a lot of difference." www.barneyrapp.com www.TheHouseCompany.com www.tramonterealty.com www.galveston.com/zapp Election for new Caucus president to be held in July Galveston home tour starts this weekend ::- Continued from Page 2 the Caucus meeting, Carter shared that "three weeks ago, I was m Denver, Colo. and had soml' time to step away from thl' daily, ,1lmost hourly, responsibilities of the Caucus. This was not an easy dcet:;10n to m,1ke." At the same time, Carter also ,1cknowl­edges the ups and downs of not only .in all­volunteer organization, but one that revolves ~olrly around political issues that more often than not are a hotbed for con­flict, stnfe and as Carter .does not fall to include, passion Carter said he feels that he is leaving the Caucus in good shape and in good hands. Dcbor.1h Rogers was voted to become the interim president until elections are held in Jul}'. Jessica Redman, the current vice-president declined the position. Rogers has been serving as secretary. Carter offered praise for Rogers abilities and commitment to the Caucus. "Deborah has been a longtime support· er of the Caucus and was on the boanl <lur­ing the 1985 referendum on non-discrimi· nation in Houston. She has a history with the Caucus, she has a strong voice and much needed energy to this year's agen­da." Sue Lovell, among several esteemed past presidents of the Caucus was at the meeting on May 2 when Carter resigned Lovell applauded Carter's efforts and deet­sion leJVl' and added, from expenence, "Being the president of the Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus is the toughest 1ob m the GLBTcommumty" Carter's resignation speech not only moved people and encouraged their ongoil:lg support for the Caucus, but it also exempli­fied Carter's approach to life as he quoted Ralph Waldo Emerson. "Whatever you do, you need courage .... Peace has its victories, but it takes brave men and women to win them." Carter plans to continue living· with the courage of his convictions. ''My volunteer work is where my heart is, so ~. will definitely not d1.SJppear Prom the GLBT community. I am working with Jack Valinski, (executive director of the Pride Committee) to create a joint data base between the Caucus and Pride," Carter said. " I will also devote my time and energy to AIDS charities." Two-weekend event gives glimpse at eight privately owned, his­toric homes by ELLA TYLER Galveston was once known as the "Queen of the Gulf," and the tour of its historic homes to be held this and next weekend will show how it earned that title. The tour, sponsored by the GJlveston Historical Foundation, fea­tures eight privately owned homes that are not usually open to the public "This is an especially comprehensive tour," said Margan•! Doran, chair of the Tour Selection Committee. "The houses span almost six decades of Galveston architectural history and illustrate several different styles of architecture. In addi­tion, they give visitors an opportunity to explore several histonc neighborhoods, each of which has jts own particular ambiance." Galveston Historic Homes Tour tick­ets are $20 each. Each of the homes will be open for continuous guided tours throughout al!Jour days of the e\·ent, and tickets may be used during both week-ends of the tour. Tour hours are 10 a.m to 6 p.m. on Saturdays and noon to 6 p.m on Sundays. Homes can be viewed m any ordeJ. Each ticket provides one admbs1on to each of the homes on tour Tickeb may be purchased at each home on the tour. Two Champagne Tours are offered on the ewmng of May 4 and May 11. The'e tours mdude tour!> to pm·ate homes that are not on the general tour. 1ickeb are 60 each for one e\'erung or $100 for both evenings, and include a ticket to the weekend H1:;tonc Home.-; Tour The Edwin D. Chadick Home at 3328 Ave. O, built in 1909, is one of eight houses featured on the Galveston Historic Home Tour, being held this weekend and next on the Island. 12 NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Ellis won't support removing specific groups from bill ;;;;... Continued from Page 1 5upported the legislation. Sen. Todd Staples, R-Palestine, voted "no." "We are one step away from passing this incredibly important act," Dianne Hardy-Garcia, Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas executive director, said. HThis is closer than we have ever been to sending the clear message that Texas will not tol­erate hate crimes. Now is the time for Gov. Perry to show leadership on this issue and see this bill through as it is written." Sen. Rodney Ellis, D-Houston, is the Senate sponsor of HB 587 authored by Rep. Senfronia Thompson, D-Houston, which was approved by the Texas House last week in a 87-60 vote. Ellis said he would not support any language that would take out the specific groups listed m the bill. "l am against that language," Ellis said. "I did not take a knee-jerk political reaction m opposing that language, but I have been down that road before. It has been well-traveled " The James Byrd Jr. Hate Cnme Act, n.imed for the black man dragged to death behind a pickup truck in 1998, strengthens penalties for crimes motivat­ed by race, religton, color, disability, sex­ual preference, national origin or ances: try. The sexual orientation part of the bill, wMch enhances protections for gays and ksbians, has been the sticking point for conservatives. Shapiro said she is not concerned that gays and lesbians are protected, but she 1s worried about singling out any group bec.iuse other states that h.ive hate crimes statutes that list specific groups keep having to update their lists. For example, she said some hate crimes statutes on the books specify crimes motivated by classes such as mar­ital status or union status or political affiliations. "States have added to enumeration almost to the point of silliness," Shapiro said. Her amendment, which still is being drafted, would target the motive of the offender rather than single out certain groups. Ellis called that argument "hogwash." Staples said he agrees that the state needs to send a message that race, big­otry and hatred, but "if we're going to have a law, it should apply to all Texans." Staples' proposal would have added a provision that would have made a crime a hate cnme if it was committed with the intent to oppress, harass or inhibit a large group of people. Ellis said Wednesday he is one vote shy of being able to bring the bill up for debate by the full Senate-the last step before the bill can move to the governor's desk to be signed into law. He said if the bill is changed when debated on the Senate floor, he will take it to conference committee and restore any stricken provisions. Ellis again blamed Gov. Rick Perry for thwarting his chance to bring the Senate version up on the floor earlier this ses­sion. Perry had voiced his concern that two Republican senators would not be pre­sent for the planned vote on the bill last "This is the bill that the president of the United States, I think, .... when he was governor killed the bill," -Sen. Rodney Ellis month. Ellis said he had the support he needed before Perry intervened. Perry's office said the governor was just trying to bring all groups together on the bill. "It is unfortunate that Sen. Ellis is not willing to compromise on a bill as impor­tant and emotionally charged as the hate crimes legislation," said Perry spokeswoman Kathy Walt. "Instead, he is resorting to n;ime call­ing and political rhetoric, which does nothing but further divide people on this issue," Walt said. Perry has argued that the proposed hate crimes law would create "new class­es of citizens" and that all Texans are adequately protected under the current law. Ellis also lashed out at President Bush. "This is the bill that the president of the United States, I think, ~ when he was gov­ernor killed the bill," Ellis said. "I can't prove it. It was clearly my impression." The state has hate crimes legislation passed m 1993 but lawmakers say prose-cutors have complained that it is too vague to enforce. The fire fueling the hate crimes debate increased on Thursday as state senators stood on the Senate floor, pushing for debate on the bill. The series of speeches was promoted by news that swastikas had been painted at a Dallas church. "Think about the psychological impact (the vandalism) will have on the kids attending that church," said West. "It's time members to do something about this issue." The push for the debate on the bill could be the only time the bill is heard on the Senate floor this session. Senate rules require that two-thirds of the 31-member Senate must agree to bring it to the floor. Republicans hold a 16-15 Senate majority. The session ends May 28. As the lawmakers made a rare series of speeches on the floor, they were joined by more than a dozen House members who came to show their support for the legislation. Among them was Helen Giddings, D-Dallas, who attends St. Luke's Community United Methodist Church. Ellis, who has been leading the push for the legislation, told lawmakers he did not believe any of the members were homophobic, despite comments he made Wednesday. "This fear of ultra·right wing homophobics is unwarranted," Ellis said Wednesday. "I am not homophobic," Shapiro said. "I am not in a right-wing conspiracy." Isle has rich, interesting history by ELLA TYLER Galveston, even by Texas standards, has an interesting history. According to the Texas Almanac, in 1528 ·Spamsh explorer Cabeza de Vaca had a shipwreck and washed up on an island he called Isla de Malhado (Misfortune). Many think 1t was Galveston. He and his crew encountered Karankawa Indians, who, de Vaca reports, brought them food. The Indians were dnvel\ away by pirates and treasure hunters, and m 1817 the pirate Jean L.ifitte moved to Galveston and estab­lished a fort. Lafitte left in 1820. Pirates, and later settlers, were attracted to Galveston because 1t is the best natural port on the Gulf of Mexico between New Orleans and Verzcruz. Mexico built a customs house there m 1825, which was used by Texas revoluttonanes. The town was founded m 11>3l> by Michael ~1enard . Gah·eston bfCame a major port city and immigration center In 1854, 82,000 bales of cotton were shipped from Galveston. In both the 1870 and 1880 census, Galveston was the largest city in Texas. By the 1900' census, it was the forth largest. The hurricane that struck Galveston on Sept. 8, 1900, covered the island with a storm surge of more than 15 feet Six-thousand people were killed in the city and thousands more on the rest of the island and the mainlana, making it the United States' worst natural disaster. Property damage was estimated at $30 million and 3,600 homes were destroyed. Following the Storm, the cit~ reinvent­ed itself. The Seawall, still a visible mon­ument, was built What is invisible, and little known today, 1s that the entire city was raised. Between 1903 and 1910, 500 city blocks were raised from a few inches to more than 16 feet. Some 2,300 structures were raised and more then 16 million cubic yards of sand were pumped from the harbor. Though not a historic landmark, the Flagship Hotel, standing on a pier in the Gulf of Mexico and alongside the Seawall, is a Galveston icon. " HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 NEWS 13 Variety of events planned on isle this summer ,,.... Continued from Page 1 money, but they're going to ask politely. Mark Bellinger, director of the Galveston Island Convention & Visitors Bureau, couldn't be more upbeat about the work his bureau's accomplished, especially sales manager Justin Turner, in getting out the word and targeting our community. "In fact," Bellinger said about Turner, "he has gotten a lot of the attractions, hotels, anybody on the island who's interested in catermg .to the gay commu­nity. We've gotten a great response to that. He's actually put his brand new brochure together right now as we speak, and he's getting some good returns down here. "I think Galveston Island comple­ments that market We have a lot to offer that community. People are really open­mg their eyes." Naturally, families are Galveston's prime resource, but no busmessman is going to turn their back to the numerous, cash-filled pockets of the gay scene "I know the market \'cry well," Bellinger added. "I think it's going to work out verr good. I personally don't have any hesitations whatsoever." Summer's almost here; watch for that brochun• any day now Isle lias gay 11istory Buccaneer Jean Lafitte lived here on Campeachy Island (a.k.a., Galvez Town, later still, Galveston) in the years follow· ing the War of 1812 with his probable lover Pierre-circumspect historians stress that Pierre was his h.11f-brother, although there's not a shred of evidence for tlus fam1Ji,1l whitewash. In their I.wish home, the pirate boys dmed on yams and oysters, dressed 111 the fmest togs from Pans couturiers via New Orie.ins, ate their gourmet meals on sterling silver sen·1ce tnmmed with gold, and threw el;iborate p;irttes for their famous ;ind mf,1mous ,1cquaintances and triends. That he was still slave trading and scuttling ships wasn't looked upon f,wor;ibly by the United States go\'l'rn­ment. which had p;irdoned him and his roughneck gang bdorl' the Battle of New Orle,1ns, so they asked him to lea\·e the isl.ind. Burning his fortress city, he and Pierre sailed aw.1\' from Galnston in 1821 never to be sr.en again. Ever since thrn, there's always been something to do on Galveston, coupled with n laissez-faire attitude toward being gay. Openly gay D.wid Bowers ran unsuc­cessfully for Gal\'l'ston mayor !<1st vear, but his opl'n g.1yness didn't scuttle his ch;inn•s .is much ,1s did political pre­d1ct. ibility ;ind O\'er-familiarity. Voter ennui helped, too. G.1y on G.1lveston is no big thmg; it ju:;t is. It's this island's refreshing out­look that ~eparate:; it somewhat from the oh-so-consl•n•,111\'e mainland. Islands .ire like th.1t, just ask l afitte. From spring through summer, there The Galv!ston lsla~d Convention & Visitors Bureau has designed a brouchure and is about to start a markeltng campaign to attract gay men and lesbians to the island. are more than enough annual events and fcs!i\·als to m<1ke any pirate among you :;mile. May HISTORIC HOMES TOUR The first two weekends in May (5, 6, 12, & 13) are set aside for interior beauty as the Galveston I listorical Foundation spon­sors this favorite island event for the 27th consecutive yNr What makes this tour especially notable is the fact th;it these stately houses are pnvately owned and not usually opened to the public's gapes and env10us ahhs. Among the island's crown iewels of architecture and interior design art> the 1873 Elizabeth Ruhl Cottage, a raised Greek revival gem; a peek into recent, state of the art rehab work with the 1879 I lenry 1 lomberg Home, the queen of bargework, or what's known as carpen­ter gothic, in the 1887 Jacob Sonnentheil llome, the 1909 Edwin D. Chadwick Home with its melange of Queen Anne, Craftsman, and Colonial influences-yes, all in the same house; and" the clean Spanish mission style seen to exquisite advantage 111 the 1922 Adnan F. Le\·y Home. $15 will grant you access to the­rich and powerful 409-765-7834. OLEANDER FESTIVAL. Exterior bl•auty gets the once-over as Galveston's offici;il flower is extolled, praised, and downright worshiped. Brought onto the 1sl~nd from J;imaica in 1841, this shrubby poisonous e\'ergreen took on a Ii fe of its own in the salty gulf breezes. It's ne\·er left Although the entire month is devoted to the hardy bloomer, with its own offi· ci,11 procl,1mahon, May 18-20 at ~1oody G.irdens is the site of the floral design competition and the art show; while the patio s?le on May 26-27 at Bishop's Palace 1s a chance to buy your own showy plant. Free scenic bus tours are also available during this weekend, just in case you haven't seen enough olean­der the prev10us weeks. 409-770-9077 MEMORIAL DAY WEEKE:\'D. This is the island's summer beginning, and beach parties with loud music are m order. East Beach, to the far nght of the island at Seawall & Boddeker, will rock to the DJ hosts from 97.1 FM; while Stewart !leach, the alcohol-free family beach, Seawall & Broadway, will compete with a concert hosted by 106.9 F~1. While the dolphins wash up dead from noise pollution, downtown's his­toric Strand district 1ams with a c/w con­cert and a "Beer and Taco" 1 K run, wh;it­ever that means. There's also a classic car rally at Pier 21. On Sunday, May 27, Houston's Buzz 94.5 begins its summer concert senes back on East Beach, after the dead deaf dolphins ha\·e been swept up. If you hke men in uniform, here's your chance to see real live ones. To com­memorate the significance of the National holiday, there's an open house on board the USS Cavalla and USS Stewart, docked at Seawolf Park on near­by Pelican Island, accompanied by a 'r\'W II naval display. June AIA SANDCASTLE COMPETITION If you remember sand­castles as drizzles of wet sand, maybe a moat, and an off-kilter turret or two, if you were lucky, just wail until you see the fantasy spectacles created by the Houston chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Nobody kicks sand in their faces. Teams consisting of architects, engi­neers, contractors, water and sand haulers, shovelers, trowlers, compactors, sprayers, and all purpose slaves are nec­essary to complete the imaginative designs that are true works of art, if tran­siton ·. E~·eryone \'ies for the Golden Bucket award m one of the nation's largest com· petitions for this sort of thing. Bring plenty of sunblock (and the requisite beer or two) June 2 & 3 to East Beach (at bland's far end)for one of Galveston's most unusual parties. CARIBBEA"i CARNIVAL. Hey, Mardi Gras s such a big hit down on the bland, let's have another. It's the 9th annual Caribbean Mardi Gras Festival, June S-10 at Harbor House Park, Pier 20, on the Strand. To commemorate the lt\34 freeing of the slaves on Trinidad, this weekend celebrates the culture, food, music, and dance of island living. start­ing with the party of parties: "Jour Vert," pronounced "joo-var," a steel drum band competition/parade with some masquer­aders in traditional blue paint (the blue devils) or slathered in mud (the mud mas) or topical humorous costumes. J thmk George W. may make an appearance this year. I'd say let the good times roll, but that's been appropriated by some other event. July WATER~fELON FEST A:\D ICE CREA~f CRA:-.:K OFF. !.:sher in our na.tion's birthday (that's July 4th, you W1ccans) with two of my favorite food groups and a fireworks display at Moody Gardens, a three pyramid sClence theme park with its own aquarium, rainforest, a~d white sand beach. Science goes Disney; but the whole place is rather cool, so you end up learning something m spite of the Dancing Waters Fountam. Did I mention, to top it off, there's ice cream! These are but some of the official hol­iday e\'ents. To truly experience the island and all its glories you must: see the nestmg least terns on the barricaded 37th Street 1etty; ride a horse on the beach from Gulf Stream Stables; go birding for those nearctic-neotropical m1granb at East Beach's Big Reef :\'ature Park; learn all about oil drilling on the Ocean Star':. offshore drilling rig and museum; gam­ble away your rent money on a casino cruise from Pier 21; see anything at the awesome Galveston Grand Opera House; go dolphin watching, wear down your heels on a ghost tour of the Strand dis­trict, reli\'e air combat at the Lone Star Flight Museum; experience the romance of train tra\'cl at the Railroad Museum, sweat through a day of deep sea fishing. Best of all: sack out on the warm Gah·eston beaches and watch the eye candy. This costs nothing, and the memo· ries, fleetmg and insubstantial, seem awfully important at the time. 14 MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE "Most deli owners go home at 8 p.m. Mere mortals!'' by D.l~ GROOVER It SL'l?ms Lke an event out of .moent history, but it was only three years ago when protesters (i.e., one ubiquitous Baptist minister, a KKK member in hood and sheet latt'r n:.'movrd because it was so damned hot ,md a few unemployed skinheads) picketed the site of the former Silver S.mds motel, 3028 Seawall &iulevard, where Bob Wilkins and Sherman Houck, partners from Bay City, renovated the decrepit comer pile and transformed it into Galveston's first gay guest house. The rainbow flag rising ovN the construction area was both J symbol of pride and visible heat-seeking missile for the handful of right-wing placard bearers. As usual, especially on this free-wheeling island, the feeble protests came to naught, and HOLLYWOOD HOTEL celebrates its second anniversary this June Wilkins and Houck have succeeded in keeping its 21 rooms full, its swimming pool clothing optional, and its gay and gay-friendly patrons corning back for more, season after season. Across the street from spiffy Boulevard Saloon and HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 within spitting distance from the warm waters of the Gulf of Me.xiro, the dun brick extcnor of Hollywood still res­onates \\'Ith '40s film nou flair The first floor office win­dows that face the heat of the sun have a protective cover­ing that gives the building the look of wearing sunglasse;. There's not much exterior decorative planting to cool the midday, and the building's plain style is downright unobtrust\'e, so much so you might drive right by thinking the building's unoccupied. Once you are admitted through the green Scawall­facing door, and read the warning that you are being monitored on vidl'O, you entu the two-story atriurn­style guest house. The rooms, arrayed in a U, face the center courtyard's large swimming pool and hottub. This type of plan, beloved by the Romans, gives a blank wall toward the street, painted inside with a cinema.scope rainbow flag, yet opens up to the sun as soon as you step into the interior On the second floor, facing front, is a spacious wooden balcony/deck with a sweeping seascape panorama, where complimentary happy hour commences. This floor ~ Continued on Page 17 With gix to C!hooge from, Galvegton hag a bar for all fagfeg From low-key neighborhood atmm:pheres to high-enargy dance clubs. tha isle offern ~omething for every gay tourist and native by D.L MURPHY People often don't realize that the httle town of Gah'eston has six gay/ lesbian bars, most Within walking distance of one another. The bars usually have a rruxed crowd, both men and women. And, because you are in a tourist resort, a fair number of straight people from time to time, especially for the drag show:.. Drink prices are pretty much the same across the island, as the club m;mers try to match one another's spl'Cials. ~ Continued on Page 18 Most of Galveston's six gay bars feature a mix of men and women, but depending on the night of the week, some places, like Garza's Kon Tiki (above), attract a male-domin11ted crowd. 16 BARTLETT T REE EXPERTS UirlngforAmmaz's 1rNt Stna IJ/07 y Fertilize 0 All Phases of Tree Care: Residential and Commercial rees? Our lawns are a foreign environment for landscape plantings. Without the constantly replenished rich layer of humus from the forest floors. thq arc left to compete with our lawn for the scarce nutrients available. Bartlett has formulated its own fertilizer for trees and shrubs, BOOST~ Injected directly into the root zone, provides both immediate and long-lasting nutrients, improves plant vigor and resistance to insects and disease while ti.>stering growth. Don't trust your tree care to anyone but an expert - Bartlett Tree Experts! (713) 862-4777 www.bartlett.com Guided by The Bartlett Tree Re~carch Laboratories and Experimental Grounds, Charlotte, !liC. \Ve also feature dramatic residential & commercial fountains and accessories Business Highway 290 Ean in Hempstead Open ever ca 1ut Wed. ~ . '' I· m 9 10 6 409-826-6760 Orn.-mcnl01l om<l An:hilectural C:(')n<:rtlc NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Homefront Well contained In a small space, container gardens offer versatility, simplicity and decorative options by ELLA TYLER This historic Galveston cottage, sitting on a townhouse-sized lot, is a perfect place to experiment with container gardening. The house is still being restored, so container gar­dening allows the owners to enjoy their out­door spaces now. Plants can be moved away from construction areas as needed. Even when the work is complete and per­manent plantings can be made, the majority of the plants will_remain in pots because thl" garden is so small, An amazmg \'aricty of plants grow so fast here that you have to watch out that pets and small children don't get covered up while your back 1s turned Pots 'l'estnct a plant's growth ana keep the plant (and i o1fsprirfg) where it was put. Containers also add their own decora­tive colors and textures to the garden, and ma small space, contribute needed height. In addition, the soil can be mixed to accom­modate a specific plant's requirements, a particular consideration in Galveston, where the soil tends to have an excess of phosphorus. Many plants will thrive in 5- gallon pots for many years. The backyard is small and very shaded. The ex1Stmg brick must be re-laid to correct a drainage problem, so it will be re-set in a more decorative design. The area IS too small to put a fountain in the middle, but a small one can be hung on the wall. funana tree. will be planted outside the fence in the sunny no-man's land between thts house and the commercial property in the back. Bananas grow fast and tall and will stay green through most Galveston winters, hid­mg this ugly view. One side fence is covered with confederate jasmine, which producl'S masses of fragrant, white flowers in the late spnng and is evergreen The rL'mainder of the pl.ints for the back patio will be in pots and hangmg baskets. Few annuals flower in such deep shade, but impatience and wax begonias arc reliable performers. Cane and angel wing begonias, which are perennials, like the shade. Gingers wi:J bloom in deep shade and are tall and skinny, but will make a jungle unless con­tained. Fems come m a \'aricty of shades of green and many different textures. Caladiums, coleus, and polka dot plant offer colorful foliage. Mints like shaded, damp con­ditions, if brushed against, smrll wonderful. There is a very sunny deck upstairs in the back. The owners want to grow herbs and vegetables up here. Most herbs will be possible but vegetables might be limited to peppers, small tomatoes, and salad greens. Squash and melons could be grown with vertical support for the vine and fruit Dwarf citrus is an enticing possibility for this area. These plants need pots that arc Still under renovation, this historic Galveston cottage on a townhouse-sized lot is ideal for container gardening. at lea>! 15-gallon sized, but some citrus pro­duce flowers and fruit year round. The veg­etables and citrus will require frequent watering and, because the watering leaches nutrients from the soil, fertilizing. If the owners want to get fancy, a drip irrigation system could be set up. The front of the house gets full sun, so a cQmplctely different set of plants will be grown out here. Here, the owners want hlS· torical accuracy and a tropical look. "Why have a house in Galveston that looks like it is in Houston?" they ask. The owners thought that Oleanders, which arc the Island's signature flower, would be too big for this yard but there are ~ome dwarf vMiehes available. Oleanders were brought to Galveston in 1841 .lnd May is Oleander Month. There arr several Oleander events this month includ­ing an Oleander Society plant sale May 26 and 27 at the Bishops Palace Final plans for the front yard await Historical Commission appro\·al for the removal of several plants, including some sort of fan palm tree. The palm takes up too much room in the yard. Possibilities include bougmmillea, hibiscus, and perh.1ps some old garden roses from the Chma family. 'Ihe front yard shows outlinl'S of flower beds, a futile .ittempt to order thb .small space. When final plant selections are made, they will be checked against the lists showing date­of- introduction from the book, 'The New fraditional Garden" for h1stoncal accuracy. Also, we will look at the pictures of old gardens at the Rosenberg Libr,1ry. My prefer· l'l1Ce 1s for pots that are at least 10-mches (or 5 gallons) because they don't require con­stant watrring. I often use a soil polymer that helps hold water in the bOil as well. Even still, in hot, dry weather, the plants may need to be watered every day, and hanging baskets might need to be watered twice. I raise plants about two inche> above the ground to permit air circulation. I like the looks of clay pots bl'ltcr than plas­tic pots but they are heavy, breakable and dry out more quickly. Big pots that arc good look­ing, whether clay or plastic, are not cheap. l have taken ordinary black nursery pots (available used at Teas on &'Ilaire and new at Southwest Fertilizer) and sprayed them with a faux stone finish and they have lasted quite well. They can be covered with a vanety of matenals, iust do not plug up the drainage. HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 Paradise and Hollywood off er gay home away from home on isle ;; Continued from Page 15 also contains the Lucille Ballroom, decorated with all things Lucy and dominated by a black baby grand piano that has been neatly convert­ed with a bar top. It is here where complimen­tary full breakfast is served, and where Marcy Rae's Original comedy and songs entertain most weekend evenings. The rates run from $79, single, to $399, for a weekend package in king-size suite. "Normally, it's 80/20," said co-owner Wilkins, explaining the hotel's percentage of gay men to lesbian visitors. "But we've had weekends where it's been the reverse. And we've had wonderful times." Another sweet smeller is PARADISE, 2317 Avenue P (Galvez Boulevard). but again you wouldn't know it from the street. It's another unassuming two-story brick building that could house a dentist office. Only standing on the street at the correct angle do you spy the rainbow flag waving in the protected back yard. "What you sec out front, is not necessarily what you'll sec out back," winked Oscar Placker, Paradise's general factotum. Walking through the first floor offices and home of owners Eldridge Langlinais and Tun Jenrungs, in 1998, Ku Klux Klan members and others protested at the future site of Hollywood Hotel in Galveston. Three years later, the island's first gay guest house, owned by Bob Wilkins and Sherman Houck (inset), is a thriving business and the city's tourism department is now actively pursuing gay visitors to the island. IF YOUR CLOSET HAD LOOKED THIS GOOD, YOU NEVER WOULD HAVE COME OUT! closet • home office • garage • pantry you arrive at the back door, where hke Dorothy, the world explodes mto Technicolor. Pathways, pools, lanais, potted plants, songbirds and koi, besiege the senses as the immense complex reveals it.~elf like an intri­cate, convoluted bloom of a double hibiscus. It's quite a rush, and Galveston's second­newest gay guest house is aptly named This eye-filling backyard houses five suites and two guest rooms. Each suite, three \\ith full kitchens, is like a spacious apartment and can sleep four; while the upstairs singles sleep two. The two smaller rooms share a bath, and are the closest to the Commuruty Room where coffee, ice and sodas are always available, as are extra towels and supplies. Rates, which change seasonally, comfort­ably range from $75 to $200/night. All accom­modations are decorated in seashore motif, and you have the sense that you're visiting your rich maiden aunt's beachfront cottage. "We have a tremendous amount of repeat customers," said Placker proudly. A world map in the upstairs gift shop is dotted \\ith pins, testament to the Paradise's international allure: Yugoslavia, India, Non\.'ay, Kenya, Argentina, Australia are just a few of their patrons' countnes of origm. A couple from Nova Scotia, on their second \is1t, just left ear­lier in the day and told Placker they wouldn't think of going anywhere else. The guest house's allure is growing, and Placker said that summer's no longer their only busy time. "We're starting to pick up at other times. So much goes on down here in Galveston all year, that we stay busy." The Paradise is alreadv sold out for :\ew Yr.ar's. Although thei; clientele is mixed, this 1s an "adult facility not designed for children," as their brochure states. Nestled m the shadr comer of one of the numerous patios is a one-armed bandit. ''We ha\'l' a wonderful mix," Placker said, "and e\'erybody gets along. The two couples who were staying up there, one couple was lesbian, and one male. \\'hen they were entertaining m their room last night, you should ha\'e heard the iokes. "One thing about Galveston, we don't say we don't have a lesbian bar, or a men's bar, we have gay bars. They're all very mixed. For everybody. "Once in a while you get that one phone call when we say 'you know we're gay/gay­friendly,' and I've had four people pray for me. 'Wonderful, thank you,' I say." No, thank ,;uu, both of you-Paradise and Hollywood. You've gi\'en us a gay home away from home: friend!); caring, filled \\ith lovt.', and all those fragrant smells. Hollywood Hotel 3028 Seawall Blvd. 409-750-8900 Paradise Guest House 2317 Ave. P 409·762-6677 U.S. CONSTRUCTION & SER\!lCES Our Capabilities Include: • Kitchen & Bath Remodeling • Ceramic Tiling •Interior & Exterior Painting • Room Addition and Siding We are an owner-operated company serving the Houston area for over 25 years. specializing in residential and commercial remodeling. We have many satisfied references. both res1dent1al and commercial. for your review. If we can be of assistance, please call Thank you. Call for free estimate. Turn your house into the home of your dreams. U.S. CO~S'fRUCTIO;\l & Sl·:R\ lCES (713) 526-7679 • Pager 7131698-0103 E-mail: uscon@pdq net • Joe Hlavac. Owner 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE GalvQgfon'g half-dozQn gay barg within walking digfanf!Q of Qaf!h ofhQr ,,.... Continued from Page 15 BOULEVARD SALQO'.'j Scawal & 31st 409.750.8571 The Boukvard Saloon 1s one of the re\\'1.st bars on the island. It fe.itures .i great view of the beach, vtry gay decora­tions .ind <i de.in cn'<1ronment The bar­tt? T1dc.•o; re always friendly T"e cl.ib IS H!'}' wo"TJ\en-fncndly Special events arc schedl.ilrd to coincide with other island feshvihes The crowd 1s generally mixed with regard to gender and age. The bartender, who did not know he was being inter­viewed for a review, spent a lot of time .inswcnng my questions about what w.1s going on <}round the island This club is next door to the Hollywood. Overall, this is .1 nice pl.ice to h.ing out with friends in the afternoon and a great p:ace to party in the evening. ROBERT'S LAFITIE, 25th & Avenue Q 409.765.9092 Lafitte's 1s one of the island's gay insh­tullons. It features drag shows on Saturday and Sundays. The crowd is most­ly men, but women are always welcome. There is a large patib out back, a small pool table up front. This bar wins the prize for being the smokiest smelling bar on the ISiand. This club is open whenever it's legal to be open, so you almost alway~ have some- The club·s decor lets you know this bar is owned by the same folks who bring us th!! Vcnture-N here in Houston. The club has recently reopened after a fire upstairs. Further renovations are under way, a game • 0 room is being added upstairs, a stage 1s • f: being constructed downstairs. There 15 ~ never a cover. The bar's crowd is mostly lil men, but tre bartenders are fncndly toward i:a;; ...... ::::t1~~.c:::::.-....J~ women Robert's Lafitte is Galveston's oldest gay bar. EVOLUTIO~ Featuring drag shows on Saturday and 2214 Mechanic Sundays, the crowd is mostly men, but women 409.763.4212 are always welcome. place to have a beer with a friend. This is the place to be if you don't want to drive down to the Strand district. GARZA'S KON TIKI 315 23rd Street 409.763.6264 0 The crowd here is very mixed, gay and ~traight, as straight people go he.re for the music, dancing and ambiance. PURGATORY 2515 :\lechanic 409 770.9389 a z Purgatory is one of Galveston's newest gay This venerable island hangout has recently changed hands and has been redec­orated Drag shows are scheduled for Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There is a $3 cover for the shows. ~ bars catering to a mixed crowd. .__ __ _ :__ ________ __. !'.j This b another of the islands newt!r bars. When asked "why the name?" the owner replied "because everyone is welcome " This club features a large patio for sun­bathing, has dancers seven days a week, and offers free cab rides home (on the island) if you are unable to drive. Pool tournaments occur every Sunday at 5 p.m. Underage (18 to 21) people are allowed admittance, but are not served. There is a very nice, but very small, patio out back. VENTURE-N 2405 Post Office 409.762.8088 Evolution features more modern music and has a younger crowd including gay and straight, as straight people go here for the music, dancing and ambiance. This club featu res more modem music and has a younger crowd. The crowd is usu­ally mixed. Women are very welcome. Hours are limited, 8 p.m. to 2 a.m., so this is not a place to go to have an afternoon beer with friends. However, this is the place to dance. This club has a mixed crowd, and is the most women-friendly bar on the island. Tuesday is Ladies Night, 8 p.m. to midnight. There is never a cover. Plans are in the works for adding an after-hours diner to the club. • (') ,.... c m :E m )> D • Gl -< s: :E m )> D • (') )> en c )> ,.... :E m )> D • )> ' (') (') m en en 0 D HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 National Clay Court Championship Jan-Michael Gambill is rated #5 in the world in the men's tennis racket, but his abs are #1. If you haven't seen the ful~page ads of buff Gambill shamelessly hawked at the boy bars on Pacific Street, or Jim Mclngvale's giveaway promotions at JR's, you'd think this was a promo for a new porn video, ·Ball's in Your Court; perhaps. If the mar· keters are this desperate to court the gay dollar, do they know something we don't, or are they just playing catch­up? Catch JM and the other hotties Andrew Ifie, Todd Woodruff, and Andy Roddick for this weekend's final matches. U.S. Men's Clay Court Championship Through May 6 Westside Tennis Club, 1200 Wilcrest Dr. 713-783-1620 'Three Days of Rain' Richard Greenberg's three-character study could be called, "Forward to the Past • All three characters (Walker Janeway, sister Nan, best fnend Pip) are caught in the inextricable mesh of their parents past hves; so much so that Act II scurries mto yesteryear where the parents' stories unfold, illuminating the present. It's a talky cham· ber piece, but full of glinting commentary on what we do to our children, whether we mean to or not. HOUSTON BALLET IEN STEVENSON, 0.1 .E., •TRINIDAD VIVES ARTISTIC DIUCTORS 2001-2002 /]JeaM»t * THl l'llD PIPUI (HOUSTON BALLET PREMIERE)/ INDIC:O ~plember 6 - 1 6,2001 • SWAN lAKl ~plember20- 30, 2001 • THI CULLIN CONTlMl'OIAIY SUIU November 1 - NO\lember 4, 2001 • THl NUTC•ACU• November 23 - December 30, 2001 • CLlOPAUA February 28 - M.irch 10, 2002 • l'lTE• PAN (WOUD PREMIER[) March 1~ - March 24, 2002 • WORLD l'UMllH IY NATALIE Wlllt / SlHNADl / THl auus OF THE C:AMl M~y 23 - June 2, 2002 • DON QUIXOTl Ju~ 6 - June 16, 2002 To SUBSCRIBE 713·5·BALLET OUT ON THE BAYOU Through May 26 Theater LaB Houston, 1706 Alamo 713-868-7516 'Don Carlo' Last chance to see, or rather hear, Verdi's sumptuous epic. It's all here In the music: religious fanaticism, state loyalty, family love, unbridled passion. However, the pro­duction from San Franc sco Opera is a mess: Charles' crypt 1s busier than Grand Central Station (hey, everybody into the tomb!), and the souls of the heretics being burned alive literally fly to heaven as if on trapezes; but the singing, like Verdi's score, is sublime, especially Patricia Racette as unhappy loyal wife, the ultimate pro Samuel Ramey singing better than ever as Philip II, Beatrice Uria­Monzon as or~yed fatal beauty Princess Eboli, and Peter Coleman-Wright as the sel~-sacnficing best friend we'd all like to have. Through May 5 Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center, 501 Texas Ave. 713·227-ARTS 'Blowup' Michelangelo Antonionrs 1966 opus to mod London and -~....,.,,_._,,,-. ,_,.,,_0.•1111 o.... ,_ .w,.... ""-''....,''-­....... iroA Mt'f""' ,..,_....._...,-.J.'CaU..l,.MI ,.._,_, ........... ......... 1...&.1 ... ,. • ....,,......,,,.MkA,........,,.,._r.....n.-- the swing.ng singles scene made mov1egomg hip and cool and defined a generation that was learrung to thumb its nose at authority. Slim, neurasthenic David HelT'mmgs May or may not have photographed a murder and Vanessa Redgrave 1s ready to take off lier top to get the pix from him. Incredibly tall Verushka could eat most of today's supermode s for breakfast. With Antomom's dazzling eye and comPoslt1ons, everything takes on a high mod gloss, except that horrendously over-mimed tennis game. May 5, 7'30 p.m.; May 6, 7 p.m. Museum of Fme Arts Houston, Brown Auditorium, 1001 Bissonnet 713-639-7531 'Star Wars: Episode IV-A New Hope' Our hope 1s t'iat t'11s incredibly lucrative franchise would iust go to a galaxy far, far away and leave us alone. It's no surprise ' tell you there's nothing new here: another t •ed retread of everything from w'iatever episode started this whole mess. Persol"aily, give me "Forbidden Planet" or the sight of BJster Crabbe's Flash Gordon. Maybe I II Just click my heels and get outta here May 4, 7 30 p.ri.: May 5, 11 a.m Museum of Fine Arts Houston Brown Auditorium, 1001 B1ssonnet 713-639-7531 SUBSCRIBE TODAY • ON SALE NOW! Continental • /',..AJl,r,l_ln.e,s_H .. ... • 19 20 ~ ~ OWATOURNEWLOCATION! "" \ I Experience the Art of Dining "If my husba nd would ever meet a woman on the street who looked like the women in his paintings, he would fo ll over in a dead faint" -Mrs. Pablo Picasso Hours Monday-Thursday Fnday Saturday Sunday Brunch Buffet 11am-10pm 11am-11pm 11am-9pm 11am-3pm 2815 S. SHEPHERD AT KIPLING HOUSfON, TEXAS 77019-2613 713.523.5FOX Proudly serving all hungry Houstonians! P R E S E N T S T~i .nou®ium ~oom SATURDAY NIGHT DANCING _, s.ATUIDAY NIGHT """' 1 Ol'M UtmL 2AM ah.ors NOCOVll """' DIUS TO IMPaESS oal 713 523 5230 """" 1312 W. A.LAaAMA ...... DJnUYFLOllS 12 Years and Counting • Kolaches • Muffins • Croissants • Biscuits Christy,s Donuts Pick-up a 16 oz. Christy's Coffee Mug for $1.99 w /Coffee (Ref•I 55< \Jnl;mdedJ NEWS MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Eating Out RESTAURANT REVIEW Catch of the day Fish Tales worth the drive to Galveston for great food, courteous service, Gulf view by ELLA TYLER FISH TALES RESTAURANT, at 25th and S.·awall, got the Houston Voice writers' Sunday afternoon m Galveston off to a fine start. It is easy to find, not only does 1t have a large revolving fish tail on the roof, it is directly across from the Flagship 1 lotel. The Flagship is built on a pier over the water, making it a landmark. And, any les· bian who doesn't notice the busty mer· maids in the murals on the front of the hotel, should lose her credential:;. Our waiter earned the immediate affcc· lion of David, our usual banker, when he asked who wanted separate checks. This courtesy is appreciated by large groups. Since it was a Sunday, bar service wasn't available until noon, but our waiter appeared promptly at noon for drink orders. Dalton rated his margarita "Excellent, Four Star" and David just smiled over his "vodka martini-very dry." Our Heineken-drinker noted that her frost­ed glass was a nice touch. Maria, who thinks iced tea is one of the great inventions of the South, commented that the iced tea, "Very good-nice, full body." Oysters on the half shell were slurped down with no lack of gusto by several in our party. Wendy noted that they could have been colder, but the overall reaction, ·including from her, was that they were "wonderful, fresh, gnt-free and well shucked " Oysters were $9 a dozen, quite reasonable for their size and quality. Another appetizer that won rave reviews was the "Hot Combo." This is a mix of shrimp, oysters, calamari and craw­fish tails all battered and fried and served over French fries. It costs $14 99 Two of us Fl!!H TALE!! 25th & Seawall Galveston, TX 77550 409. 762.8545 Food: tptptptp Service: tptptptptp Value: tptptptp Scene: tptptptptp "'Opt for bread, water at home "'tfoK, 11 you really must ti-ti-~ Fine for most ~Wtf.tf.worth the drive, so live a little t!-if "-tl-tf<As good as It gets ordered it for lunch, but it would serve four or six as an appetizer. "It was a sensuous array of fresh seafood, extremely well prepared, light and not greasy," Maria dictated. Deb Murphy and I have allergies that can cause problems at seafood restaurants, but we like Fish Tales enough that this is our second trip. She is allergic to shellfish and isn't especially fond of fish, but was pleased with her chicken fajitas ($12.99). "Unlike most seafood restaurants, they do chicken well," she said. The rice was fluffy and hot, and there were enough tor· tillas for the chicken, she reported. There are a few items for non-seafood eaters­grilled chicken breast, two steaks and chicken fried steak. I am slightly allergic to corn, which eliminates many restaurant's fried items from consideration. Our waiter was know!· edgeable enough to know which items arc commealed and which are floured without checking with the kitchen I !ere several items, including shrimp, are floured, so I could order one of my favorite foods, a shrimp po-boy.($6.99) It wasn't quite perfect, but pretty close. I would have liked a bit more lettuce and tomatoes, but there were lots of shnmp, perfectly done. If I had been paying attcn· tion, I would have noticed that David was laking the lettuce and tomatoes off his crab cake sandwich ($7.99) Though happy with the crab, pronouncing it "very tasty" he is used to a plainer sandwich. In two visits here, I have yet to be a part of a group that has had any significant amount of the grilled seafood. On an earli· er visit, I tried a lunch special that included grilled shrimp that were very good, but that is the extent of the testing. There are plenty of Selections, which look good. My companions and I have yet to try a dL'SSert. There is an ice cream bar that serves 32 flavors of Blue Bell and makes waffle cones on the spot, filling the pl.1ce with a delicious aroma. They also have a tantalizmg-lookmg bread pudding and a fluffy key lime pie. HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 NEWS On Stage THEATER REVIEW Three-armed and dangerous Atomic Cafe goes out on a limb w ith Albee's critica lly unacclaimed, under-appreciat ed play by D.L. GROOVER When Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee's THE MAN WHO HAD THREE ARMS premiered in 1983, it received some of the worst reviews in theater history. Typical of the lambasting was Frank Rich's NY Times excoriation: " ... a temper tantrum ... pf unearned self-pity and abject ran­cor. .. Albee makes no attempt even to pretend that Himself is anything other than a maudlin stand-in foi himself, with the disappearing arm l'l'presenting an atrophied talent...a viru­lent and gratuitous !Jtlsogyny that has little l'C'l­evance ... the craftsmanship is rudimenta- 1)' •.. mostly an act of self-immolation ... " It's no wonder that Albee ran away into the sheltering embrace of regional theater and academe. It would be a decade before he showed himself on the Great White Way with ''Thn.>e Tall Women" (1994), winning himself another Pulitzer and showing his detractors that he had lost nothing in the interim. Seeing this legendary play after 18 years, it's hard to fathom why all the fuss, other than the gross disappointment critics felt at Albl·e for not being more of a success. They seemed to take it personally that the arch of Albee's career had taken a notice­able nosl' dive. It had bl'en 20 years since "Virginia Woolf," after all, and Albee still hadn't topped that, or equaled it. To be fair, who could? Shepard, they cried, or Stoppard The most original word­smith in the contemporary theater had a s.mdbag dropped on his head. Certainly, "The Man Who Had Three Arms" wasn't ahl'ad of its time; Albee's central thesis that celebrity isn't worth the fame wasn't exactly a new idea even in 1983. ~1.lybe the critics didn't like being yelled at so voraciously, vicariously, and with such relish. Himself takes us all to task during his screed. The play is bold and brash, naked in its simple premise: Himself (Drake Simpson) was Ken Watkins, Drake Simpson and Lisa Marie Singerman star in the Atomic Cafe production of Edward Albee's 'The Man Who Had Three Arms.' the most famous man in the world because of the sudden appearance of a third ann that grew out of his back. Today, he's a nobody, having lost all notoriety and fortune when the arm 1ust as suddenly withered away. - He's a gin·n~dy replacement lecturer at a nameless plywood-paneled community hall, a last minute and much cheaper stand­in for the announced speaker. He's a mess and he knows it. Two committee members, Woman (Lisa Marie Singerman) and Man (Ken Watkins), sit on opposite sides of the stage through­out, becoming characters from Himself's life story. His motivational speech, which is the play, gradually dissolves into a dark wail from the heart as he bemoans his fate and our complicity with lacerating force. Himself's descent into hell is vintage Albee: amazingly funny and bitchy, intelli­gent and adult, with a brazen felicity for putting words together, and a mastery of theatrical craft. Albee adores the theater, and no other contemporary writer knows how to structure a play with such dramatic instincts, knows when to stick in the knife, knows when to relax. There's a flow to an Albee play that is musical, no less so in this one. To say, as did the carpers, that Albee lost his touch is totally untrue. He's at the top of his form here; great swathes of comic riffs on the rubber-chicken circuit, the dizzy heights of celebrity, the abyss of self-immolation and deceit, the wounded cries near the end, the rightness of the secondary characters. It's a deliciously fake world Albee con­jures up for us-showy, theatrical. over­the- top, wonderfully sure of itself-a world fit for the stage. The three actors incomparably embody the many characters Albee paints with such sure,, quick insight. In the tour de force role of Himself, Simpson gives a standmg ova­tion of a performance. Just the right age so we get uneasy parallels between Silicon Valley overnight multi-millionaires or over­ly manufactured movie stars, Simpson,, with director Wayne Wilden's sure touch, hits all the emotions full target: depression, elation, pride, lust, envy, pity. Singerman and Watkins match Simpson every step, whether a~ solicitous matron, smarmy agent, loving-yet-pushed-to-the­edge wife or clueless parents. They add thetr own l'l.'SOnance to the distinctive Albee sound. Time hasn't mellowed this play. If any­thing it's sharpened its meaning. Why blame Albee for what he says here about obsession and fame, blind ambition, naked aggression, emotionless fate. He's only the messenger. 'The Man Who Had Three Arms' Through May 12 Atomic Cafe, 1320 Nance 713·222-ATOM BED BOYS & BEYOND ' A Musical Revue abo~t be og Gay Today APRIL 6 - MAY 26 Friday & Saturday only Music by Alfredo Alvarez Book & Lyrics by JeffDobbins Directe d b y Joe 'Watts Music Direction by Michael Harren Starring: Jeff Dawson, Basil Anderson, David Barron, Ronnie Boyd, & Laurence Edwards 6 monfhg: ~4550 1 yoar: ~91 21 22 OUT ON THE BAYOU MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Home Sweet Home IDE ~dtaxi~ 50°/o OFF First Cleaning -New Customers Only- VISI(, ~ RESIDENTW. HOUSECU:ANING ~ New to Houston Gay Owned & Operated • Weekly & BiWeekly • Bonded & Insured • Same Housekeeper 713.522.1900 www.pridecleaning.com see urt for on-line uote Detail Cleaning ' o Service • Residaitial • Commercial • Make Rl<ady • Since 1994 • lnsund • Rl<f C'1'.nus 832.251 .0723 •Cell 713.851.3425 In Business Since 1989 Perfection Plus Domestic Services Specialists in Detail Cleaning FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED BONDED FOR YOUR PROTECTION MOVE·INS/MOVE·OUTS • SPECIAL PROJECTS WEEKLY· BIMONTHLY IN BUSINESS SINCE 1989 r1--$-io00-0f'"F-: :~ First Cleaning : I ~ We Supply All Cleaning I I Products & Equipment I FREE ESTIMATES By Phone (713} 895-2766 Make Rudy • Residential Ii! Commucial • f.anti11111lly tit Btst 713.861.6181 ""'Bod , Mind and S irit /~ if your hair isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APPOIHTMEHT ONLY CHIROPRACTOR Dr. Richard W Fletchet • Neck/Back Pain • AutoNJork Injury • Medicare/Medicaid 1245 Yale• 713-862-3897 In The "Heights" at 13th & Yale IY•lo is I Blod Wat"'-' pni/41 *' HEJGKTS Bl.YD} Penis-Enlargement.net FDA Approved vacuum pumps/surgical. Gain 1-3" . Permanent & safe. Enhance erection. FREE Brochures! Latest enlargement info: (312)409-9995 or 900-976-PUMP ($2.95/min.) (/) ~ t-1 ~ 1207 Spencer Hwy @ Allen Genoa ~ ~ 15 minutes south of downtown 0 Take I-45 Sout h, exit g z College/ Airport, go east 3 miles 1--j • Club Wear • Swim Wear • Call 713-529-8490 for Directory Ad Sales BLESSED SACRAMENT LIBERAL CATHOLIC CHURCH .,. An Affirmine Catholic Community >:I< Holy Eucharist each Sunday at 12:30 PM 4606 Mangum (Between W. 43rd & Pinemont) 281-398-9646 • wwwblessed-sacramentnet community saturday, may 5 Alter Hours. KPFT 90.1FM.12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713'526-5738 (}Patrol walks the streets 8:45 p.m. 713·528·SAFE. Dignity mass. 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics 71H80.28n St. Stephen's Ep11copal Church. Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W Alabama 713'528-6665. Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Oub. call for ride locations. 7l3- 863·1860. Gay & lesbian Breakfast Oub. 9:30 a.m. 281437·0636 Houston Wrestling Oub. Practice. 1:30 p.m. 713-453-7406. R.linbow Fishing Oub. Meeting. 713·526'7070.713·88°'9235. HoUlton Gay & lesbian Community Center Drop-in hours noon to 4 p.m. • Positive Art Workshop Photography exhibition • 803 Hawthorne. 713·524-3818. Oassic Chi<os car aub. Lakewood Wheels & Kneel. 9 a.m. 713, 797·8615 sunday may 6 Rainbow Riders. A bicycle club for women. 713-869-1686. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rite Eucharist 17:45 a.m., Holy Rite Eucharist 118:55 a.m.; Education hour 10 a.m.; Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 713·528-6665. MaranatN Fellowship Metropolitan Church. Service. 6:30 p.m. 713·528-6756. Resurrection MCC. Services. 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10 •.m. Youth Sunday School 11 ;15 a.m. Handbell Choir rehearsal 1:30 p.m. 71H61·9149. Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713'528-3269. Community Gospel. Service at 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Sunday School for children 10 a.m. 713-880-9235 or www.communitygospel.org. Houston Mission Church. Service 10:30 a.m. 713·52g..8225. Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist. Service 930 a.m. & education hqur 11 a.m. 713-668-8830. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 8:30 a.m. & 10:50 •.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 713·526-1017. TheWomen~ Group. Mttting & Discussion. 10:45 a.m, 71.Vi2<J.8571. Unitarian FeUowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Serv1ce 10:30 •.m. 40<J.76S.8330. first Congregational Church (MemoriaO. Service at 10 a.m. Chnshan Education. 11:30 p.m. 713~9543 or fcc·houston.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum 10 a.m. Service 11 a.m. 713~5876. Gay catholics of St. Anne's·Houston. 5 p.m. worship service. Dinner and social. alexcamctwt.net. 713-623-0930 Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation: Adult discussion 945 a.m. Service 11 a.m. 281·277·8882. www.tuuc.org. First Unitarian Universalist Church. Services at 9:30 & 11:30 a.m. Brunch available 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion: Bisexuality. 1:30 p.m. 713'526-5200. church@lir<tuu.org. Anarchist Black Cross Federation/Anarchist Reading Group. 1 p.m. www.houstonabc.org. 713·595·2103 Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713'692·2703. Houston Gay & lesbian Community Center Drop-in hours 2 to 4 p.m. • Positi'tlie Art Workshop Photography exhibition. • Polyamory Houston Discussion Group. 3 p.m. 803 Hawthorne. 713·524-3B18. monday, may 7 Gay Fathers/Fathers First. Support group. 8 p.m. www.Ga)'fathers-Houston.org or 281-505· 1788. Frost Eye Oinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 711-830- 3000. HIV testing. STD Exam< & treatment. free. AVES. 1 p.m, to 6:15 p.m. 713·626'2B37. Kolbe Project. Eucharist 7:30 p.m. 71H61·1BOO. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry Open. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936'441·1614. Houston Tennis Oub. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713'692·2703. lesbian & GayVoim Radio Show. 8to10 p.m. KPFT 90.1. 713· 529·1223. AIDS Mastery. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037 Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713·526'1017. E<t. 208 gayOAR. Wellness community. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713·526' 1017, E<t. 211. Houston lesbian and Gay Community Center drop-in hours from 6 to 9 p.m. • Positive Art Workshop Photography exhibition • 803 Hawthorne. 713·524-3B18. tuesday, may 8 for Mature Audiences Only. Support group. 1 p.m. Bering Memorial UMC. 713·526-1017. HTGA Support Group. 7 p.m. 713·52°'°439. free HIV Testing by the Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m. to midnight. Oub Houston. 713·830-3000. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous. Support Group. 7 p.m 713· 524-0439. Bering Support Network, l unch Bunch Gang 11a.m.713-526-1017. Gay Men's Process Group. 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713'526·8390. Men's Network. Discussion group for soc/al, educational develop­ment of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713·529·0037. RJJSURR.JCTION M ET RO PO LITAN COM MU N ITY C H U-R CH mtJ~ C4mf llme~® pe.~ ~ t1u. buufit 4 OltJ1wimUm. meet Join t\S $crlwrdd~, f\-1d~ 1~ <rl H.ich's • 7-1C)pm Mi$s C«mp .Rmerica's top ten entertainers, incl"dins Miss Cdmp .Rmericd~. will perform. .RU pl'oceeds/ doncrlions l'eceived wilt be fol' the H.eswrrection MCC Comm"nit!:f Cdpit«L Cdmpaisn !Jl'ive No entl!:f fee! 2025 W. 11th St. @ T.C.Jester 713-861-9149 /y- www.resurrectionmcc.org HOUSTON VOICE • MAY 4, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU calendar Northwood• AIDS Coalitoon Food Pantry Open. 10 a.m to 6 p.m. 28 63l255S CPR Oasm 3 P·'"· 713-607-7700. Houston l01boan ind Goy Community Center drop-In hours 6 to 9 p m • lesboan Commg Out Group • Poslt•v< Art WoOOhop Photogr1phy eichibltton. • 803 Hawthorne 713·524-3818 Gay Men'< Health Monttose Counser.ng Center. 711-529"°°37 wednesday, may 9 ~~~s~°!~01~~~~~.eet Oinic. 9 a.m.10 I p.m. 2015 STD ba1!1$ & treattnenL HIV Testing free AVfS. free AVfS 713· 626-2837 free HIV Tei tong by the Montrose C' nic 4 p.m. to Ip m. Mary'<. Ventur .. N & El'~ 713 830-3000. 8 Net Houston. 7:30 pm. Women\ Social 713-467-4380 Women's Networt Montrose Counser.ng Center Oi1CW11on group f0< SOCIJI, educattonol dettiopment of gay and bls.,ual women 7 p.m. Montrose CoU11stling Center. 711-529-0037 NorthWQOd> AIDS Coal111on food Pantry open. 101.m. 10 6 p.m. 936-441·16'4 Project Caeiar Workshops. AFH. 3203 We~a)'3n 71U23·6796 Out Skate Rollenkottng Oub. 8 to 10 p.m. 8075 Cook Road. 281 93H818. Rainbow Ranglrrs free C&W di1nce lessons. Brazos River Bottom. 1 p.m. 71 J.880-0670. Bible Study Noon & 6JO pm. St. si.p1ion·, Episcopal 713526-6665. Sp rituol Uplift lemce 7 p.m. B•bte Study 7:30 p.m. Reiurre<toon MCC. 713-861-9149. Frttl1nce Art Clain.es by Kermit E1senhvt for HIV+ ind1viduats. 1 to 4 p.m. lunch provided. 711-523-9530. Houston Tenn" Oub. 9 a m. Memonal Part at the TeMil Cemet 713-'92-2703. • esbian literature Discumon Group. 7 p.m. 713-523-3037. Houston Pride B•nd. Open rehears.I. 1]07 Y•l" 711-527-0931. www.houstonpridebond.org 8tring Mernor~I Unit~ ~thodist Church. Dinner it 6:30 p.m. Vanous Support Groups 7 pm. 713-526-1017. Houston leib,.n and G•y Communoty Center drop-in hours 6 to 9 p.m. • Pos.tlive Art Workshop Photog,,phy exh1b1t1on • Fttt HIV ~trng by the Montrose Oinic 6 to 9 p.m. • 713524-3818. Houston Area Bun. Monthly meetong. 7:30 p.m 713·867-9123 thursday, may 10 Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehears.al. 7 p.m. 4807 San Fehpe. 71).521-7464. Rainbow Rangl,rs free C&W cUn!f lessons. Bruos River Bottom. 7 p.m 713 880-0670. American & Foreign TAFT STREET AUTO Auto Repair & Service 713-526-3723 1411 Taft Houston.TX. 11019 H•p C Recovery. Support Group. 6·30 p.m. Bering 71J.52i-1017, bt.211 STD Exams & treal AVfS 713-626-2837 Frt• HIV Teit1ng by I M< st Clinic. 8 pm. to modrught Toyz Disco. 713-830-30C-NO< thwoodi AIDS ~ P•ntry op•n. 10 •.m. to 6 pm 281-'3J.2555. L•mbd• Skat ng Oub skat .. 8 pm. Tr.idewmm. Skat ng Rin<. wwwl•mbdarollorg 1tμ10-121s FrontRunnen. RuM1ng Club 6:30 pm. 713-522-8021. HIV ArtT'lerapyProgr>m..I to 4 p.m. Kermit E1senhut. 713-523- 9530 W0<nen~ Ouuc. Momrose Oinoc 713-830-3000. Commuruty Gospel. S•mce 7 30 pm. 7' J-880-9235 Of www commu011)'901pel.0<g HIV Teitong. free. AVES. 713-626-2837. Houlton lesb"n and Gay Communny Center drop-in hours 6 to 9 p.m • Po~bvt Art Workshop Photography uhiblllon 6'30 pm. • 7 pm. • 803 Hawthorne 71).524-3818. Kolbe Proje<t. Pr<>vrowove o·nner. 6·30 pm 71).861 llOO. Famny 10 Fomdy Adoptoon. Seminar. 6·30 pm. friday, may 11 Houston Area Tttn Coalition of Homosexual5 (HAT C.H.) Meetong 713-942·7002. Fie• HIV Teiting by the Montrost CliNC 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. Rid>'L 71 J.BJ().3000 STD bams & truttnent Free. AVfS 713-626-2837 Frost Eye OinK. free eye •XJ1!1$ 10< peopl• with HIV. 71 HB0- 3000 Q-Patrol walks the stree~ 9 p.m. 713-528-SAfE Kolbe Proje<t. Morning Proyer. 10 am. 713-861·1800 . Houston Tennis Oub. 9 1 m. Memori•I Park 1t the T~tS Center: 713-692-2701. Pogt•v< Art Workshop. 1 pm. to 4 p.m. P•trK• P•lmer. 71 J.526- 1118 lesbian and G•y v .. ,~ KPFT 90.1 FM. 7 p.m. 71).526-5738 Houston lesbilin 1nd Gay Commuruty Cent'' drop-tn houn 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. • Po111;,,. Art Workshop Photogrop"Y txhibibon. • 801 Hawthorne • Women'• G•m• N•ght 7 p.m. 713-524-31tl Kolb• Proie<t. Movie Noght "Howord's End." 713-861-1800 Houston Outdoor Group. Enchanted Rock 71l-S28-6174, Famil)' to famtfy Adoptions. Semi~r. 6:30 p.m. To /,,tan •vont call C•rolyn Robert> at 711-519-1490. l•x ff 111· 519-9531, or •-mill ~1torQhouston~i<e.com. CHMJl.ne Is Fri<hy ot Spm. •••• • THI 11al PLACI •Alignment •Brakes • Inc. 1307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 Call 713-529-8490 for Directory Ad Sales aa ·M ail Boxes Etc. 8Afrc 0Jillr1r;t STAN FORD 713·443•3333 p;n;~;r.1 S'Nlll£Y~DSON • AUTO • HOME • LIFE • LOW COST AUTOS LOW COST RENTERS MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS TONY MAY INSURANCE AGENCY NATIONWIDE INSURANCE 713-807-8264 We buy anything of value! Antiques, Estates, Furniture, Collectibles, Jewelry, Automobiles, and Glassware. BUY • SELL • CONSIGN Highest Prices Paid for anything of value!! 713-994-5986 pgr. 281-391-7515 Call 713-529-8490 for Directory Ad Sales 24-HOUR SERVICE 6, 8 & 10 P.mcnger f.kgant Scrcldt Llmousino . (71:'J6 86-3337 20% off Whe " Yo u Me nti o n Thi• A di 23 24 CLASSIFIEDS Classifieds Announcements TGRA TcxlS Gay Rodeo Assoc1Jt1ons meeting and BBQ May 6 2 pm. cw members welcome • Call Michael 7 I l523 7663 QUEER AS FOLK Looking for QAS aired Apnl 15. VHS Call DaVId after 2 30 pm. 936-524-0ln. Auditions I heaue New \\est announces nud111ons for" Key West" Lookmg for 6 males 20-45 }ears old. Bnef nudity Tho month run Opens in June 713·522- 2204 QUICK and WO'.';DROLS REI KI Levels I • 1 aka Master • For ONLY S500 • May 18 to 20 •In Houston • Master Teacher Bill O'Rourke • 713 864-2233 www rainbow prod comlb1lbo. Employment l\'E\\ CLUB ON F\l'i:\1:\ Looking for Floor, Door, Bartcndc~. and baroocks Call R.ibert@ 832-725-7232 CARTER & COOLEY G .. y owned and operated Deli in the Heights lookll'g for reliable counter person • Call Doug @ 713-864-3354 for appointment .\llLA.\l HOUSE Hoas.::g assistance .needed for transmonal hving program • Knowledge m the ·areas of HIV/AIDS, substance abuse (recovery) preferred • Fa~ rc.sume to 713 522 '.!674 RO.\JA~ HAIR SALON Independent cosmetology B:ubcr stylist to le:ise space • Montrose area Frank ~ 8576 •Very reasonable. PACIFIC STREET Now accepting apphcauons for all positions• Apply in person at 710 Pacific • Monday-Friday, 1 lnm-3pm • Recent photo required • No phon~c alls please BERING ~1EMORIAI. U.\IC Church-rosed AIDS Spmtual Support Network servmg a d1\crse community including GLBT and minonues seeks Program Dircctoi: Quahfic:lllons Creative, dynamic professional with cxpenence in commumty oulre:ICh, GROUP and individual counseling program development and man:1gemcnt • LPC OC' MSW· ACP preferred. Interested md1v1d· uals shoul<J Forward resume nnd qualifications 10: Benng Memonal UMC. do COSM, 1440 Harold, llouston, Texas 77006. • 1'l ph : . · c.d Is please_ CLUB NS0\1NIA Now hinng r ,,, ·. :r ,,· noor help ·Please cal 713 521 1613 EJ's Now acccplmg apphcauons for Bartenders. Barbacks, Oean-Up and Door Security Apphcanons accepted l\1onday through Fnday, 2·00-4:00 pm onoly • Recent photo helpful • Absolutely no phone calls, plea.\c •Apply m person al 2517 Ralph :\llDTOW~ SPA llOUSTO:-.i Apply m person • Slan al S6.SO per hour N1glitmgafe ADC" oricrs Tree cmplo} mcnt ass.istance to HIV+ 1nd1v1duals • Including Job pre· parednes.\ trammg. resume development. Job search ass1S­tance • For more mformauons call 713 981 1541 Tiie ('fob Houston 1s now accepting apphcJt.::s For Certified Personal Trainers • Appl} m per on nl 2205 Fanmn or nt www the-clubs com FULL Tl.\tE RECEJYfION IST Cnnd1d:itc must be well-organ 1zed, detail onentcd, computer Ill· crate, have a couneous phone dem.::inor and be able 10 work m a fast-paced sm ice company • K"°" ledge of Qu1ckBooks nnd ~!~"Word 1scsscn1Jal •Smoke free cm ironmcnt • Please fa.l resume to 7 IJ.524 2643 Monday through Friday, 8am to 5pm Licensedlt1assage LET YOURSELF GO Rela.l to an hour of Swedish massage • Rl\IT #013700 • Dewayne• 7'!521 06_5_4 __ .\1A~SSAGE Do your se. · J · ir • EFfecuve, therapeutic, relax mg or deep Us· sue • Don't settle for the less 1 • 'Whal are you waiung for? RMT # 4397 Tom 713.520.6018 PATRICK! Swedish massage by Patnck • Relaxation. Myotherapy, Deep Tissue • (MT#0)4589) • 711oJ7.71J9•1-1/2 hours $50 \tASSAGE THERAPY Thcrapcutk & Deep Tissue by• JASON (RMT#l8436) 713 863 8888 PAGER 71; ') lh 8020 MASSAGE THERAPY AT IT'S FINEST! Swed1~h • Deep Thsue • Sp< rts • Renexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out, Hotels, 7 Days • Nationally cerllfied • Jeff (RMT#( ,f.<'74 • "'13 'c5.; lli2 JOB STRESS? Tough w· :'k.iuts' • C·1ll now 10 make your appointment for a relaxing, therapeutic Swedish massage • Bodybuilder & Llccns.:d Ma.,sagc Therapm • Ra-ndal #-00593-0 -• 71-3.529.3348 FOR ACTIVE MEN Your time for personal attcn· tion' • Full Body Swcd1~h MJssage • Jose #17116 • 7\3 397 8286 i .... w .:ihoustonmover.com Chuck French TXDOT#534438B 713 861 1212. 281 536.8530 Pet-sitting BOOKYOLR VACATION l'iOW! "Pets love th<'lr ''"' :1 h m. even 1<hen you can '1 be there" Established 1995. loyal980 @aol com 7 I) 9.\2-88: 1. Products & Services •We Let the Big Dog Out!! • • Custom leather by appomunent • • 713.880.2628 • • www.bigdogleathercom • t\O HEALTH l\SL'RA\CE? Save Up To 50% On Prcscnptwn Drugs• Save Up To 809! On Dental • www hp.hon· zons com• 281.610 4417 Rent lo Own 50" Big Screen TVs• Stanng al $29 99 a week • I 800.774-.45-53. ----- EROTIC WEAR! Huge vanety of men's sexy wear at Basic Brothers • l 232 Westhe1mer • 713 522.1626 • ww w.eroticallire com Professional Services BRANDT'S CLEANING SERVICE I clean 11 all. The beol in the bu sines' Call Brandl today! 713-460-175(! NEED PC SERVICE? f-ull ·:rv1ce scl·up, upgrades, nnu virus, troubleshooting, uaimng and web design Small bu~mess, >ludenL~. individuals. Stand alone, LAN, Internet wwwVGC.com. 713-218-6788 TOP CHOICE Town Car service • Airport uansfcrs FromS52. Hourly rates available • Call Frank • 713 494.4023. RAI~BOW CO'.\tPUTER SERVICE Computer Not Performing? 1'eed A Little Help w Hh Set Up? Call Jim • 713.880.0072. PRESSURE WASHING College Guy • Dri\eways • Walkways • Patios • Bnck & MOC'e1 •Call Jason• 713.863 S888 • Pager713.908.8020 LANDSCAPING Spnng Beds • Shrubs • Color • Reasonable • 713.861.9949 ____ , ___ lntu111ve Counsehng1 • Reik1 Master Teacher Bill O'Rourke uses Rcik1,Taro1, Role Playing and Guided Meditallon (and teaching same) lo help you• • 713 864.2233 • www rainbow prod com/btlbo. -WDY WAXI~G-- FOR MEN Personal grooming by Dale Waxing spcc1ahst & licensed Cosmclolog1st Private Location in Montrose • Call for nppomlmenl 713529.5952 MAY 4, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Real Estate for RenUSale ~\T! • Near lntel'(Ontinental AilpOrt ·Value packed apartment homes for t~ lu~ry shopper ·Please call us today for information on our outstanding speoals 281-820-9342 www.cityview-apts.com Newly remodeled. 2 & 3 bed· room homes & upartments. Near Enron Field Stanmg
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