Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1001, December 31, 1999
File 001
File size: 12.47 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1001, December 31, 1999 - File 001. 1999-12-31. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4333/show/4304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-31). Houston Voice, No. 1001, December 31, 1999 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4333/show/4304

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1001, December 31, 1999 - File 001, 1999-12-31, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4333/show/4304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1001, December 31, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 31, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript ISSUE 1001 A challenge to the state's anti­gay sodomy law went to court, a lesbian politician took her second term in office and a gay man was appointed municipal judge-a recap of news from metro Houston. Page 3. And from Paul Hope to Simone Cunningham, Cher, Rufus Wainwright, Scott Wolf and Donna Garrett, year In review see what local artists and national celebrities told us during interviews in 1999. Page 1S ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 31, 1999 2 .KOLBE No Dues, No Membership With Franciscan Hospitality PROJECT CALENDAR Friday Dec. 31 Thursday Jan. 6 New Year's Eve Potluck. Centergy 7pm Kolbe Prayer Line Office Closes at Noon !Dr Jackelyn Rcinosek) 713-861-1844 Saturday Jan. 1, 2000 Friday Jan. 7 e-mail: Kolbe@neosoft.com Corimunion Service l 0 am or visit our website at Happy New Year! Saturday Jan. 8 www.neosoft.com/-kolbe Office Closed Kolbe Breakfast C.ib 9 30 pm Monday Jan. 3 Monday Jan. 1 0 Pll.(113) Gl-1800 • 1030 lleighls Blvd. Eucharist 7:30 pm Eucharist 7·30 pm Houston, TX Ti NEW 2000 JEEP s299fe999 PER MONTH! IC>«=-""9'8 !! RlliHT ON TARliET PRICINtil . •1 RANm MITIO MAIDA Dwu IN (USTOMH SATISFACTION IN THE U.S. • WINNU OF THE 1tfl hEslDENT'S AWAID • MAIDA Cannm Sws S1an! • ICJHD, hlENDlY honssioJW. Sws Pt1sONN1L NEW 1999 MAZDA B2500 Air C ,,... · """9· S - •990525 -1 Only DECEMBER 31, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE ForAuto, Home & Health Regina Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Rruint.n l:i J•lranct ,. WorA:trs Cnmptn atinn Gro11p Jltaltl1 • U/t ln.lurancr I- much morr 6575 iv. Loop Sout/1, Suite 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 NEW 2000 PLYMOUTH VOYAGER ~~DAEWOO) 0.9°10 Affordable Luxury! ~ Introducing Daewoo. You'll be Surprbed At How Much You Con Get For Your Money! Our Cars Come Well Equipped With Features Others May Consider Options. Eoch Of OUr Amn1ng!r Rolioble And Comlor111ble Coro Is So Well Butl We Cover Them For The First 3 YNni or 36,000 Mt lest on All Regutorty Scheduled Moimenonco (Evon Oil ond Wiper NEW 199 DAEWOO LANO$ •S!I0073·10ntr $6999 SM. Pr1:;e $84')1 $1500 Rebate &lodes) At Absolutely No Cost To You! You Alao gtil Oeewoo Priority M9'•tence (24 Hour Roed•lct. Aul•l8nce) For the Flr9t 3 yNr9 or 36.000 Mlle• Should You Need It. tt Daewoo ... Styled In Italy ... Engineered In Germany ... Research & Development Done In England ... Provides An Exceptional Value For Your Car Buying Dollar. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 NEWS 3 INSIDE NEWS Around die South ...•......•......... 6 Two Texas gay men convided of fraud ..... 6 Texas Instruments to offer DP benefils ..... 6 Center issues guides oo ovoiding arrest ..... 6 Bolon Rouge gay student group on hold .... 6 Around the Notion .••....••......••... 8 Ohio cily rejects gay rights bill .•...... ... 8 SChools sued over onli·gay harassment .. ... 8 J !idge delays ruling in bid lo dismiss suit .... 8 Jiidge denies eval for 12-yeor-old •.•.••... 8 Wyoming school oHows onti-goy program ... 8 VOICES & ECHOES T1ie Year in Cartoons • • • . • • • • • . • • . . ..1 0 Vaaasco: Balay steps b lesliions in 1999 ... 11 OUT ON lHE BAYOU Oaliath&arts ••••••••.•••••••••••.. 15 °"' in Prillt 1lae Besa of '99 ••••••••••.. 16 Bestselers • • •..•..•.•.•••.••.••.. 16 Omasiaas •••••••.••••.•••••••••. .. 22 Community Cr'8ndiir • • • • .......... 23 ,.,. Stil$J .......•...••.••........ . 25 CARMAR{ ........... 22 BUSINESS DIRECIORY •••••••••••••••••••. . 24 AROUND HOUSTON 1999 year 1n review January 'Good chance' of winning sodomy appeal A two-pronged legal argument may be enough to convince a Texas appellate court to strike down the state's 119-year­old sodomy law, according to an attorney representing two men recently charged under the statute. Tyrone Gamer, 31, and John Geddes Lawrence, 55, stand a "good chance of winning" their appeal to one of ~ two state appellate courts, but if they ~ don't, their legal team will take the case to < the U.S. Supreme Court, said Mitchell ~ Katine, a Houston attorney representing ~ the two men. Sheriff's deputies arrested ~ Garner and Lawrence Sept. 17 as the two An estimated 7,000 people crowded the south steps of the Texas Capitol in March to rally against men were allegedly engaged in consensu- anti-gay adoption proposals before the slate Legislature. al sex in Lawrence's second-floor apart-ment in northeast Harris County. March Authorities entered the apartment after a Thousands of gay men and les-report of an armed intruder inside. bians from across Texas rally Texas is one of five states with a Some 7,000 gay and gay-friendly sodomy law that bans sex only between marchers came together in Austin in what same-sex partners; 12 other states ban oral was one of the largest events of Equality and anal sex for same- or different-sex Begins at Home, a week-long series of 250 couples. The state's sodomy law makes actions in all SO states this week. The two-gay anal or oral sex a class C misde- hour rally and march came as part of a meanor punishable with a fine of up to three-day series of events in Texas spurred $500. Gay men and lesbians have tried for by a handful of anti-gay legislative propos-years to invalidate the law, which was a als and a measure that would expand and felony until 1974. But with no defendant toughen the state's hate crime law, in part in a criminal case, efforts to strike the law by including sexual orientation. have met with mixed success. Bush supports adoption ban for gays Popular Texas Gov. George W. Bush, a possible Republican presidential candidate in 2000, would sign into law legislation banning gays from adopting children or serving as foster parents, a top aide said. Two conservative state lawmakers filed bills last month seeking to keep gays from adopting or becoming foster parents. If either of the bills were passed during the Legislature, which opened Jan. 12, Bush would sign the measures, said Terral Smith, the governor's legislative liaison, according to a report in the Jan. 21 Houston Press. February Two gay men slain in Texas City Two gay men in Texas City were brutal­ly shot to death and burned Jan. 17 in the city's first double homicide in more than 25 years. Investigators have combed gay bars, collected mounds of forensic evidence and interviewed more than two dozen people since friends Laaron "Larry" Morns, 28, and Kevin Tryals, 30, were discovered by police early on Jan. 17 as they responded to reports of smoke near Loop 197 South. Police have yet to say what motivated the killings, or if they were hate related. And the shocking crime has received a muted reaction from gay rights activists in Houston and across Texas. First openly-gay municipal court judge in Houston confirmed John Paul Bamich, 53, longtime commu­nity activist and lawyer was unanimously confirmed by city council, March 24, becoming the city's first openly-gay munic­ipal court judge. He will serve a two-year term and will judge class C misdemeanors, such as traffic tickets. He was nominated to the post by Mayor Lee Brown. April TV Montrose signs off after months on 'life support' TV Montrose is going off the air. After months of being on life-support, show pro­ducers are reluctantly pulling the plug cit­ing financial and community concerns. Producers Steve Baker and Russell Byrd had been hoping to give the 16-month-old program a new lease on life by hooking up with a Dallas producer. It was hoped the collaboration would work to create a statewide news program called Out TV. But the marriage didn't stick. May Hate crime legislation dies in Texas The Texas House gave initial approval on April 27 to a hate crimes bill that would toughen penalties for crimes that target Texans because of their race, "sexual pref­erence," and religion. Passage was secured by expanding the bill's coverage to dis­crimination based on "sexual preference," "age," and "pregnant women." One sup­porter, GOP state Re. Pat Haggerty, told colleagues that the dispute wasn't a parti­san or racial fight. "This bill even covers white male Republicans," he said. Even then, the 83-61 vote was neither over­whelming nor final. But the bill died May 14 in the state senate, where supporters said Texas Gov. George W. Bush privately urged Republicans to kill it. June Man awarded $7.3 million in same-sex harassment case An El Paso jury awarded $7.3 million to a Dillard's employee who claimed his male supervisor sexually harassed him. In a unanimous decision, the six men and six women of the jury voted, May 20, to award $5 million in punitive damages and $2.3 million in actual damages. In addition to a sexual harassment claim, the case also included a claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress. Spurgin said settlement negotiations are "ongoing," but if they fail, an appeal by Dillard's is likely. If a settle­ment is reached, the amount awarded to Gonzales will likely be lowered. Tens of thousands pack Montrose for annual Pride parade Pride, power and pizzazz was the theme of the 21st annual Gay and Lesbian Pride Parade held in the heart of Montrose. And there was plenty of all three P's. Gays, les­bians, bisexuals, transgender and families and friends came out in force to show their pride and growing power. This year's parade, the only nighttime parade in Houston, was the largest yet with over 120 floats and an estimated 85,000 spectators. July Caucus votes to include transgen­dered in mission statement In an effort toward inclusion, mem­bers of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus unanimously voted July 7 to include bisexuals and transgendered in their > Continued on Page 7 4 DECEMBER 31, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE A fresh approach for restoring the skin you are born with. Available NOW for men and women. SPECTACULAR RESULTS! • improve skin tone, clarity, elasticity • effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentation ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 TRANSDERMAL HAIR RESTORATION All natural transdermal skin and transdermal lace technology 1 System ... $650 2 Systems ... $1200 reg. $990 each Offer valid ONLY January 1 - February 1, 2000 WE SERVICE AND REPAIR ALL TYPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. FULL SERVICE, $30 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 5 6 SOLD! NEWS DECEMBER 31, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Around the South Two gay men convicted of fraud through Texas AIDS agency L.lJBBOCK, Texas (AP)· A federal 1ury found a man and his seven-year life partner guilty of more than 70 fraud charges Dec. 22, including charging AIDS pallents rent while receiv­ing money for them to reside at an AIDS center and redbtributing dead clients' med1ca­ttons. David Crader, former South Plains AIDS Resource Center executive director, and Gerald Eckert, a former care coordinator at the f.ioht}. each face up to 1,000 years in pnson and a $32 m;lhon fine. A third m,m was also chJ•ged m the sawe crimes, Jeff Echols diC'd pnor to the trial. Crader founded the crnter in 1988 from his hving room, onginally pro­viding AIDS informJtion <md food to those in need. Among the cJllC'gations against the p.11r 1s thcJt they defrauded the Social Security Admm1strat1on by paying s.ilaries to "phantom emplo}CC5" instead of actual ones man effort to prC'vC'nt them from losmg disability bene­fits. Maxine Schoenrock, once a fnend ot Crader's, said he told her in 1990 that he had test­ed positive for 111\', and that over the next four y(';ir~ sh(' ga\'e him more than $15,000 for AIDS-related medication, doctor nsits a11d tests. Last week, Crader told the court hl' was not HIV-pos.t.ve US Attorney Wil 1am M.iteja w.1med the jury, "This is not a Robin I food situ.ition .. what the dtfcndJnts were doing was stealing from the poor and taking this money and doing whate\'er the} wanted to do." Texas Instruments to offer DP benefits to employees in 2000 DALLAS-Texas Instruments 1s the latest Portune 500 company to authorize domestic part­ner benefits, officials said, man attempt to keep its edge in the competition for qualified employees, the Dallas Voice reported Dec. 24. "We made this change for the same reason that we make any other changes in our benefits, to stay compellti\•e with other companies in the industry,'' said Teguin Pulley, vice president for staffing and diversity issue~. The benefits ha\'e been offored to heterosexual employees m common-law mar­riages for some time, Pulley said The change will not be implemented until sometime in 2000, she added. She said Tl would not require employees signing up for domestic partner benefits to sub­mit any kind of legal documents or affidavits as proof of the status of their relationships. "If an employee wants to add a child to their insurance, we don't ask them to show us a birth certificate," said Pulley. "It's all part of trusting our employ-ees." Texas Instruments is the latest Fortune 500 company to add same-sex DP benefits, and a spokesman said Tl won't require employees to submit documents to prove the relationship. Gay center issues guides on avoiding public sex arrests SAN A~T0'.\10-Gay achv1sb have followed up a tra\'el advisory they issued earlier this month with a wallet card intended to help protect gay men from alleged abuses by local law enforcement, according to the Dallas Voice. A pocket-sized "Survival Guide" is a con­tinuing effort by the San Antonio Gay and Lesbian Community Center to warn about undercover operations in the city's parks, which some gay activist say unfairly targets gays. Since 1997, more than 500 people have been arrested on misdemeanor sex charges by San Antonio park rangers. "You'll sec that [the Survival Guide] advises the kind of behavior to keep you from being arrested in many cases, in addition to suggestions that will preserve your constitutional rights," Silid Michael McGowan, the community center's executive director. Ron Smudy, assistant d1n'<"tor of operations for the Parks ilnd Recre,1tion Department said that law-abiding citizens have nothing to worry about. "We told [:\kGowan) that we welcome anyone in our park.~. We say that if they break the law, then we will ha\'e to react to it That's the bottom line" The contro\'crsy over the undercover program, which sometimes includes notifying employers of those arrested, promptl'd Mayor Howard Peak to call for a meeting bchn>en city officials and gay leader~ dunng a recent rad.ft tal~ shw. Baton Rouge gay student group on hold as district drafts policy BAT00: ROCCE A student's request to start ,1 gJy-straight alliance chapter has been denied, and the school dL~trict says it will not approve any more club~ until it can dr,1H a written policy, the Bato11 Rouge Adrrocate reported Dre 23. Martin Pfeiffer, a McKinley I ligh School senior, said he has endured name-c,1lhng and social harassment ever since middle school. I le 1s openly gay, but classm,1tes ridicull>d him bdorc Pfeiffer even realized hl' was gay. When McKinley Prinopal Almcnia WJrn'n denied him permission to start the club, Pfeiffer asked to sec the policy they were enforcing. Schools Superintendent G,1ry Mathews acknowledged in a letter to Pfeiffer th.it school system administrators ha\'e fallC'n short in guiding schools on such matters, and suspended all requests to start clubs until a policy 15 drafted "It prompted us to say, 'Good point. We don't have a pohc},'" said Assistant Superintendent Don Mercer "I don't think we can ha\'e ii pohcy that cvC'ryone can mCC't except this club." -From $/aff and Wirt' report~ HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 31, 1999 i ~J!Jj] AROUND HOUSTON 1999 year 1n review .- C.ontmued from Page 3 mission stall'ment. "It shows that m Housto11 Wt' are moving along with the national trend towards mdus1on," s.ud c.iucus president Carl Smith. Longtime transgender ach\ 1st Phyllb Randolph hye said the unammous vote was 111 a word, 'glorious." She said her quest for mclus m m the caucus began over nine years ago, and members wouldn't even dis­cuss the issue. Mayor, police chief decry Gay bar 'inspections' during Pride hbpl·Ction of 1 louston gay bars should not be done during Gay Pride celebrations, Police Chief C.0. Bradford ruled following his internal investigation as to why three popular gay nightclubs were inspected June 24 He called the inspections of JR's, 611 Hyde Park and Cousins "inexcusable." One of the bars was insp<'Cted twice in one evemng. Mayor Lee Brown said he has con­cerns the inspections were not better han­dled between the two agencies conducting them-1 IPD and the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC). August Texas court tells mother she can't take daughter to gay church A rexas court ruled in a custody case that a child could only attend a "mainline" church with her lesbian mother. The par­ents are of diffcn'nt faiths-a Christian mother and a Jew sh father-and part of the divorce proceeding was about deter mming what fJllh the child would be rai~L'd in. The father objected to the !T'oth­er's decision tt' t.ike her child to the prc­dom111antl) gay ?\letropohtan Commuruty Church. Thl' Tnas Court of Appl'ills agreed with the fathrr, holding that only "mainline churches would be utilized by the parties for the relig10us training of the child," and hstmg whJCh Protestant denommallons qualify as "mainline." September Black community declares HIV state of emergency African-Americans in Houston are figh ting back against the number one killer of its youth-AIDS. According to data from the national I llV Prevention Conference held this month in Atlanta, AIDS is now the number one killer of young blacks in America, moreover, death rates in the African-American community are 10 times those in the white population. Locally, the statistics are equally as sobering. Increased publicity within the black community about HIV I AIDS has prompted some pro­gressive African-American civic leaders in to call for action. The prevalence of infec­tion rates in this commumty is now being discuss('d in the press, via presentations in front of political leaders and in the organi­zation of a town hall meeting. er;~ ~etVI! of cg>~ Worship with us in 2000! Receive and Enjoy Sundays 9am & 11am Wednesdays 7pm October Gay business expo draws record crowds Some 5,000 people attended fu\1PO\\ FR '99 at the Georgl" R Brown Conventmn Center, setting a record attendance and help­ing the ewnt meet most of ib goals this year, organizrr5 said A church service orgamzed l:-y a handfu: of gay and g.i>·friendly churchl's-mcludmg Bermg l!nited ~1ethodist Church, Gr,m Lutheran Church, Interfaith ~lmistm•s, Metropolitan Commuruty Church of the Re~urrectlon and ~laranatha Fellow~hip ~ICC-dosed the day­long event. "They did a wonderful service of health and wholeness." said Coy Tow, an !;: E~IPOWER organizer. "They had a wonder- ~ ful procession with all their banners down 5 the middle aisle at the end of the day. It was 8 a wonderful way to end a day of celebration. ~ The whole day was truly like a f~hval." November Annise Parker, Houston's first openly lesbian city councilwoman,. was elected to a second, two-year term in November. 7 Open lesbian wins second term on city council Houston's first openly lesbian city counal member easily defeated her challenger on Election Day, but three gay men hoping to join Annise Parker on the council failed to make it into the run-<>ffs that will d('cidc their races. Parker was among a handful of gay and ll'sbian candidatl's that did wdl m elec­tions this week across thl' country." Although I had antiapated thewm, I'm glad to haw job security for the next two years," Parker said. "I'm very glad the dection is over." Jury awards former dental professor $448,000 in harassment suit Former dental professor Luis Mota was awarded $448,000 on No\·. 8 after a federal jury found that the he was sexually haras~d by tht.' man who was at the time the acting dean of his department. The iury also found that Mota's employer, the Un1vers1t\" of Texas Houston Health Science Center, failed to take prompt action to stop the harassment, then retaliated against ~1ota by firing him when he com- :;.. Continued on Page 9 If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. As one of the oldest viot1col settlement brokers we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. M. Bryan Freeman looaler & Ouil (ienl ldYomle * One quick, simple oppl cation * Competitive bidding process among multiple funding sources * Any size policy * No cost or obligotion at any time * All policy types considered, mcluding some less than two years old * HIV and other serious illnesses * Qualify up to 900 kells * Your settlement may be tax-free * Confidentiality, new and olwoys ~~BENEFITS ~AMERICA Return yotX completed applicabon and receive a free videotape. Exercises for People with HIV by People With HIV. 800-777-8878 Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. www.benefitsamerica.com Member Viol1cal Auoc1aloon al AmerlCO Benefits Am«ico NA. Inc 8 NEWS DECEMBER 3 1, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Big City Video & Emporium 10105 Gulf Freeway Houston, Texas 77034 Whv Pav More? All Rentals s1.99 Videos Priced to Sale! BLKiRWiTCH D• sn w.. saa11n 111 '19.9S $21.95 s19.95 Big Daddyj ·L-~~~~~~~~~ arge selections o previously viewed movies starting at 54. 99 Paperback Romance Novels at $1.99 Greeting Cards All Ratings Available Big City is Bigger and Better! Don't Settle for the Wanna8ees! Around the Nation Dayton rejects gay rights bill; Lakewood considering DP benefits DAYTO"\, Ohio (AP)-{:ity leaders on Dec 22 refused to change Dayton's anti-discrimination law to protect gay men and lesbians in employment and housing. More than 40 people spoke before the city commission voted 4-1 to remove Commission member Mary Wiseman's proposal from the calendar, effectively killing the proposal for now. After the vote, the commission unanimously approved an mformal resolution stating that it does not condone d1s­crimmat1on against any group, mdudmg gays, and opposes any attempt to deny gays their rights. Meanwhile m Lakewood, a Cleveland suburb, the city council b consider· Dayton Gty Commission ing providing unmarried partners of city employees, indud- member Mary Wiseman. ing same-sex couples, with the same benefits as married couples. A council vote could come as early as Jan. 17. Washington, N.Y. schools sued over anti-gay harassment SPOKANE, WASH-School officials in two states have been sued by students who charge that they were harassed for being gay, or for having gay family members. In Spok.:ine, Wash., two brothers-one who other students thought was gay, and one who was taunted because of his brother's reputed sexual orientation-have sued for unspeci­fied damages, charging that the actions the school district took "only increased the harass­ment to both children." The younger brother says he is not gay, "but it doesn't matter if you're homosexual or heterosexual," said Sheryl Phillabaum, the family's lawyer. "It':. still not okay to be called tho~e derogatory names." Meanwhile, in Sand Lake, ~.Y., the mother of a student who dropped out of high school because of verbal and physical abuse from classmates is suing the school distnct and the Board of Education, the Albany Times Union reported Dec 22. The 17-year-old boy dropped out of school in April after years of almost daily mocking, ridicule and torment. In a letter to Averill Park Central Schools Superintendent Michael Johnson, attorney Richard L. DiMaggio wrote· "The viciousness of the student body is no worse than the deaf ear your faculty has turned on !him]." Judge delays ruling in school's bid to dismiss DP suit PITTSBURGH-A judge withheld hb ruhng until at least Jan. 12 on the University of Pittsburgh's latest attempt to kill a four-year-old same-sex benefits case, the Pittsburgh Post Gazette reported Dec. 22. Pitt asked Common Ple.1s Judge Robert C. Gallo to dismiss seven current and former workers' complaints that the university discriminated against gay and lesbian employees in denying health care coverage to their same-sex domestic partners. The university is arguing that the Pittsburgh City Council had no authority to enact anti-discrimination protection for gay and lesbian citizens. In November, Pennsylvania passed a Jaw that sought to exempt state and state-related universities from any local ordinance that might require them to provide same-sex benefits. Judge denies eval for 12-year-old who had sex with HIV+ man COLORADO SPRINGS (AP)-A 12-year-old boy will not have to undergo a psychiatric evaluation as part of an HIV-positive man's defense against an attempted manslaughter charge. Defense attorneys for Anthony Dembry, 32, contend the boy may be gay and ini­tiated the sex that led to the charge. Dembry signed a confession admitting to sodomizing the boy Feb. 17. ln his confession, Dembry said the boy "wanted me to make love to him, and I did." Dembry's defense attorney Pat Behan said a psychiatric evaluation would help jurors grasp the victim's mental state and provide insight into whether the sex was con­sensual. But Judge Thomas Kennedy denied that request Friday. "I don't want to try a 12- year-old boy in this courtroom when he is the victim," Kennedy said. Prosecutors charged Dembry with attempted manslaughter, claiming he knew of his HIV diagnosis at the time of the alleged assault Wyoming school allows anti~ay program as 'counterbalance' CASPER, Wyo. (AP)-A Casper College instructor who believes homosexuality is wrong will be allowed to give presentations on campus supporting his ideas, the Casper Star Tribune reported Dec. 13. Mike Keogh said his prospective program, "Anchor," will pro­vide a counterbalance to the school's "Safe Zone" program. The school offers one-hour training Safe Zone sessions on a voluntary basis to college employees about two or three times a year The proposed counterbalance to Safe Zone characterizes homosexuals as "sexual deviants" who may try to seduce others into a "homosexual lifestyle." It was pre· sented to Casper College President Leroy Strausner in 1998. The college has agreed to allow Keogh, a photography instructor, to use campus facilities to present his views, although it does not endorse the program." A college should be a bastion of thought," said Strausner. "People should disagree but without being disagreeable." Keogh said his anti· gay stance would not affect his relationships with those students in his classes who are gay or who oppose his views. - From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 9 i~IJJj) AROUND HOUSTON 1999 year 1n review _. Continued from Page 7 plained to officials. Sexual harassment suits involving two gay men are rare because judge~ typically dismiss the cases as simple horseplay, legal observers noted. Transsexual can't marry man, Texas court ru les A transsexual who transitioned from male to female remains legally a man, despite having completed sex reassignment surgery, a Tel\as court ruled late last month. Christie Lee Littleton, a male-to-female transsexual, married Jonathon Mark Littleton in 1989, a decade after completing sex re.:iss1gnment surgery, according to court documents. Littleton sued Dr Mark Prange for medical malprachce after her husband died in 1996. Prange's attorneys argued th;it Christie Littleton did not h;ive standing to bring the lawsuit, because she rrmainrd a man and therefore could not qualify as :vtark Littleton's "sur\'ivmg spou e." A Tex.is district court agreed, and Littleton appealed the ruling to the 4th Court of Appe.1ls in San Antonio. The three­member panel of the appeals court upheld the lower court's deas1on on Oct. 27, ruling 3-2 that chromosomes-not genitalia, out­ward appearanc-e, or even legal documents like a birth certificate-determine gender. Ministe ring in the suburbs An openly gay rookie minister with experience in caring for people with AIDS has found an unlikely home-a small church in suburban Houston in Fort Bend County. Rev. Bill Clark began his duties as the first full-time minister of Henry David Thoreau Unitarian Uni\·ersalists Congregation in Stafford in September Since then, the 80 or so members of the congregation have been nothing but sup­portive, Clark said. Texas sodomy appeal moves forward The 14-month-old legal battle of two men against the state's ban on gay sex continued in a packed courtroom, mark­ing the next step in what legal experts have ca lled one of the strongest fights yet against the 120-year-old sodomy law. And when Tyrone Garner, 32, and John Geddes Lawrence, 56, walked into the 14th Court of Appeals with a team of attorneys, it started the second challenge in three days to sodomy laws m two Southern states. "In 1999, it's too late m the day to say we can draw a line that dis­criminates along sexual orientation," Ruth I Iarlow, an attorney with Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, told the three-judge panel of the Court of Appeals. "It's too late in the day to deny the right to privacy between two consent­ing adults." I larlow told the Appeals Court the state ban on gay sodomy 1s unconshtutional and violates privacy rights. December Mayor declares 'AIDS emergency' Houston Mavor Lee Brown marked ~Vorld AIDS Day Wednesday by announc­ing a nearly five-year, $3 million effort to battle a growing AIDS epidemic in the city's black community. Brown was flanked by local elected officials, AIDS activists and service providers in declar­ing a state of emergency in Hou~ton's black community over AIDS, two weeks after the Ryan White Planning Council, the area's leading funding source for AIDS care, criticized Brown for not speaking out on the issue. City health officials had repeatedly said they first wanted to de\·elop a com­prehensive approach to addre,,ing star­tling new statistics that show 61 percent of new Ill\' infccl!ons in the Hou~ton area this year are among Afncan­Americ- ans. Texas act ivist takes new role with Millennium March After two years of planning, the departure of its founder and numerous attacks on the way 1t is bemg planned, details of the Millennium March on Producers Steve Baker (above) and Russell Byrd made the difficult decision to close down TV Montrose in April. Washington planned for April 30 are finally becoming dear. The march's new vbion 1s largely due to the work of Dianne Hardy­Garaa, executhe director of L£'sbian Gay Rights lobby of Texas (LGRL). She has taken over a:. co-executi\e drrector of the march and is running the event's Washington D.C. office. A.' executive director of a large and powerful statewide gay and lesbian organi­zation, Hardy-Garcia has become one of the mo~t vocal and influential acti\ists in Texas. Do the Math and you'll see how the all-new Saturn LS-2 has become a benchmark in its class. To arrange for a test drive contact one of these Retailers __...__......,,......~--- The 2000 LS-2 V6 Sedan (fhat's funny, we haven't seen this chart in any Camry, Accord or Passat ads.) FEATURES 2000 SATURN 2000HONDA LS.~ Vfi ACCORDEXV6 6CYL STD STD BWAYPWRSEAT $32~ STD ALLOYS STD NIA FOG LAMPS STD N1A LEATHER $1095 STD HEATED SEATS SlD W·LEATHEH NIA AM'l-M CO CASS SID NIA AU.(}TE,l\E'll.ESS STD STD PWR ROOF $725 STD PWRWINDOW STD STD PWRLOCKS STD STD CRUISE STD STD INT VOWME 97 98.3 WHEEL BASE 1065 1069 FKl:. E<l.ffED s22 rlil.OO $24.965.00 2000TO'l'OTA CAMRY LFV6 STD $385 NIA NIA $1100 NIA NIA STD $1000 STD STD STD 97 1052 $25.99800 2000VOLKS PASSAT GLS VC STD STD WIPKG PJt N'A STD WILEATHER NIA STD NIA STD $1500Wl'KG P.1. STD STD STD 95 106.4 $28.175.00 ~99 MONTH 2.310/oAPR $995.00 down+ TT&L P1ywcn1 ts based oa 35 1DOatf.. f jt!i P1yltCftb Nwd on ~000 LS-l .. itb I.NIP ol Sll,720 00 Pri!Nty lmdlfta '"""" ..... •pptoYC lkL>tf)' """be tll(ll from ponidpotuli """Im by 1/1110o A1 lh< end oldie 1<1111, bvytr Illy rcfuwxt die &ml poyinct1t of S 11 l 17 00 oo lhc 15 l or sell lhc .. Irick to 1h< kndine insblunoo and P'Y 1 di•poul ft< of Sl 10 oo pl"' u7 .,.,, ind 1<11 cllorvu Mltoi< clloric ol So 1 i pn lllik OYC1!9.000ml1ct 01999S.1UfaCorpon- woulUnl.- Saturn of Houston Sorth Fr.:rway 8355 :\otth Fruwa~ 281-ti47-8700 Saium of lfomton South"est Fnn 10050 Southwest Frwy 713-i77-6100 Saturn of Houston Kat> Fret\'.a\ J 1602 Old Katy Rd 281-556-1400 Saturn of Hou~1on Gulf Fm:" a)' Across from Alrn.:da .\fall 713-94-H550 Sat um of Houston l\'onhwcst 290 18i00 Sorthwcst Frn) 281-894-3100 Saturn of Humble 59 North 2 blks south of FM 1960 281-540-8b55 '"· SJ\TlRN. A Different Kind of Company. A Different Kind of Car. w ww ~aturn com 10 STAFF Associate Publisher Mike Fleming m ke@houstonvoice com Editor Mattrew A Henn1e ed1torGhoustonvo1ce com Production Bethany Bartran - GraphtC DesJgner Mike Swenson Graphic Designer Contributors Rich Atensch eldt. Kay Y Dayus, T•ayce D1sk1n. Earl Dittman. D L Groover. Robert B. Henderson, Gip Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Dalton DeHart. Kim Thompson. Terry Sullivan Advertising Sales Richard B. Hayes Ken Burd Office Administrator Marshall Rainwater Clusifieds a. Directory Carolyn A. Roberts Carolyn White Nat1oni1I Advertismg Repr.s~ntative R1vendell Marketing Company. Inc. 212-242-6863 A Publishers Chris Clam Rick Ellsasser rn ........ ~=p1p1r MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE EsUbhsh~ 1974 as the Montr~ Star 500 Lovett Blvd S.. te 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (71 l) S2!Hl490 (800) 729-8490 Fax (713) S29-g531 Conterts copynght 1999 Offoce holn: 9 am. to S IO p.m. weekdays To submit a 1.tter letters should be fewer than 400 words We reserve the nght to edit for content and ler19th We will withhold names upon request. but you must include your name ;ond phone number for verrfocauon. Please send mail to Houston Voo<e, 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200, Houston. Tuas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editorOhouston votCe.com Opu11ons e:xpr~ therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. VOICES AND ECHOES DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE i~I!IH year 1n review The year according to cartoonist Ron Williams f\5WE VlfYJ HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 31, 1999 VOICES AND ECHOES 11 VIEWPOINT Only baby steps forward for lesbians in 1999 by JE.'\:\IFE.R \ANASCO The last vear of the decade wasn't a banner one for lesbians and bisex­ual women. It came with no major break­throughs- no bbians declaring a run for the presidency, no laws passed that would unambiguously make our lives ea~ier, no major public figure coming out and changing the world. Yet change is often brought about in small ways, and this year highlighted many individual women and organiza· hons slowly pushing the lives of lesbians and bisexual women forward-Qr back­wards, as in the case of Donna Brazile. Debra Clias11off Academy-Award winning documen­tary producer Debra Chasnoff crossed a major hurdle this year. Her 1996 docu­mentary "It's Elementary: Talking About Gay Issues in Schools," was aired on 100 of the 347 total PBS stations nationwide, despite demonstrations and a write-in campaign from opposition groups. "It's Elementary" has also been distrib­uted to 2,000 educational institutions and, thanks to a $10,000 grant from tennis legend Billie Jean King, was made avail­able to every principal in the Chicago public school system NOW Lesbia11 Rights Summit Eleven years after the last one, NOW hosted a Lesbian Rights Summit in Washington, D.C. Speakers included Congresswoman Tammy Baldwin, Elizabeth Birch, executive director of the Human Rights Campaign, NOW President PJtrici.i Ireland and t.:rvash1 Vaid of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. Though the April gathering garnered little press cowr.1ge, the conference reminds us all that lesbians gather to talk about our rights all too infrequently. Lesbian Herstory Archhes One of our community's best sources of history, the Lesbian Herstory Archives, based in Brooklyn, N.Y., cele­brated its 25th anniversary in October. What began with an arn{ful of books from the personal collection of Joan "\estle and Deborah Edel has grown to 20,000 books, 12,000 photographs, miles of film and video footage and hundreds of artifacts. There's no better place to soak in the weight of our history. Lesbian moms Battles O\·er parental rights were fought on several fronts this year. In the case of J.A.L. vs. E.P.H .. a Pennsylvania lesbian sued the birth-mother of their child for v1s1tation rights-and lost. The family court judge, Allan L. Tereshko, said his ruling was not anti-gay, but based on the limited amount of full-time parenting J.A.L. had done. This was different from a Colorado ruling, in which the court ordered Kelly Cunningham and Leanne Bueker to split custody of their 9-year-old daughter, even though they now reside in separate states. The non-biological mom in a New Jersey divorcing lesbian cou­ple, meanwhile, won visitation rights but not joint custody. In Boulder, Colo., a judge was the first to give lesbians full rights over their children when he awarded full parental rights to both members of a lesbian couple, including the right to both be named on the birth certificate, even though one had no biological tie!> to the child And, in a move that affected both gay male and lesbian parents, 0;ew Hamp­shire hfted that state's anh-gay adoption ban, lea\'Jng only Florida with a law pro­hibiting gay adoption. But then Utah and Arkansas went the oppo;.ite way, adopt­ing a policy to ban unmarried couples from providing foster care. Melissa Etheridge After a long, four-year wait, our favorite lesbian rocker Mehssa Etheridge released a new album, "Brt'akdown," which featurl'S a heart-wn•nching song called "Scarecrow" about thl' hate mur­der of Matthew Shepard. Etheridge is more than a musical role modl'I; her long-term relahonship with Julie Cypher and her commitment to her two ~ns make her a light within our community Donna Brazilr The reticent Donna Brazile, formerly on the board of the Millennium March and cho­sen in October as Al Gore's campaign man­ager, has con­tinually side­stepped the issue of whether she is a lesbian or bisexual. "If I had a personal life, I'd have a sexual onentahon," she told the Washington Post. Gore Sl't'mS proud of the fact that she's an African­American, so why shouldn't he be high· lighting her (presumably gay) sexual ori­entation, too? We can only hope that Brazile's silence is not used as the model for lesbian political appointee;. of the next decade. Transphobic code speak To the Editor: Michael Alvear is fooling no one ("Log Cabin Republicans play the civil rights doormat," Dec. 17). "Perpetual victimhood over incremental victory" is just more code speak for transphobia by a known trans­phobe. Alvear needs to go join Log Cabin Republicans-he has more in common with them than he thinks. thing that he shouldn't and gel~ into trouble, there is an outcry of injustice. Please. There are places that gay men can go to if they want to exhibit that kind of behavior. But that place is not in a public park, where chil­dren and families are present. Take it some­place else guys. Georgia LCR :.talcs so for the record. We are neither apologbts nor chCC'rleadcrs for the GOP, but we are a partisan political group. Our role and approach are different from a community activist organiz.ation. Public places To the Editor; Katrma Ro~ via e-mail I read the article on the arrest of so many gay men in the parks in San Antonio ("Weapon of Homophobia?" Dec. 17). and thought it was an insult to the general gay population. My first thought was,"Give me a break." Every time a gay man does some- Neither apologists nor cheerleaders To the Editor; Paul Couclr Hou..~lon Michael Alvear's column was based on the premise that the Georgia Log Cabin Republicans are unprincipled ("Log Cabin Republicans play the civil rights doormat," Dec. 17). This is totally unfounded. We do hold Republican candidates, elected and party officials, accountable on the gay issues our members support and have done so repeatedly, publicly. First we seek to educate them, privately. Where we cannot agree, What Alvear apparently fails to realize is that our agenda is not that of the gay left, of other state or local LCR clubs, nor even of the LCR national office. Generally. Republicans choose the rights of individuals over the rights of groups. We will not be coerced by anyone to take positions deemed correct by the collec­tive gay community. It is a diven;e communi­ty, even in political matters. Finally, Alvear's characterization of the World Cup Soccer Women's sporb had never seen any­thing like the hoopla surrounding the U.S. women's \\orld Cup champions. ~lore than 650,000 people attended the 32 games, according to Sports Illustrated for Women, making the tournament the largest women's sporting event in h1storv. All th~ attention, though, brought les­bians some internal conflict. Sure, the women on the learn weren't being dis­missed as "d} J...e.;," as so many female athletes have bl>cn in the past. But was 11 worth it, whm they were sold as "babes" or "soccer mammas" instead? Samantha Geller L.fe \'ersus the Paperback Romance," bv 17-vcar-old lesb1.m Samantha Geller, \\:as sclected as one d the ·se best pla}'s submitted for the Charlotte Young Playwrights Feshval. What a shock it must ha\'e been to Geller, then, when her play was banned from production by the North Carolina fe5tival due to "inap­propriate'' lesbian content-a kiss, as it turns out. Happily, the Great Aunt Stella Center staged the production. Geller's experi­ence serves as a reminder that even in more "hberal" fields like theater, we still can be silenced. On a more hopeful note, we can be proud that a 17-year-old lesbian would feel enough self-confidence to wnle a play about le.sb1ans for a state contest If any event this year showed we should have faith in the future, this was 1t. Jennifer \1anasco is a C/11cago-based freelance writer and can be reac/ied at 1-vanasco@ucl11cago edu or 111 care of tliis p11blzcatw11. September fund-raiser chain.>d by me for Go\· George \\'. Bush'~ pn'Sidcnhal campaign and attended by Senator Paul Co\erdell, a nation­al co-chauman of Bush's campaign, .:l!> a Log Cabin e\'cnt i.-. abo wrong No more than fi\'e of the 80-plus attendees are now or e\'er have been LCR members. This event was held prior to George W. Bush's foolishness regarding gays and LCR. He is wrong now to say that he will not appoint openly gay people to his administration and wrong not to meet with LCR M1clrael Braum Presuient Log Cabin Republiams Georgia 12 NEWS DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE The Gay '90s: 'Our' decade brings dramatic change by LAURA BROWN Despite some d1sappomtments and set­backs along the way, the decade fulfilled its pronusc of bemg the gay '90s-WJth dra­matic changes that could not have even been envisioned 10 years ago, leaders of several nat10nal gay organizations said this week. Perhaps the greate::>t change has come in the treatment of HIV and AIDS, and the subsequent social changes as many of those affected by the virus adjusted to hving, rather than quickly dying. with the disease AIDS dominated many aspects of orgamzed gay life in the 1980s and early 1990s, as countless fnends and lovers succumbed to the disease and orgamzations, many gay-led, offered care to the dying and comfort to tlie bereaved Out of the ab1ect IO!>S also rose a new political spirit a spirit born of the activist ACT UP mantra, ''Silence equals De;ith"-that brought gay men and les­bians mto the streets hme and agam, first to fight for better fundmg and access to HIV tre;itment then for other gay nghts issues as groups like Queer Nation formed chapters around the country based on ACT UP's grassroots model But the face of AIDS, and many AIDS orgaruzations, changed dramahcJ!ly m the mid-l 990s, when protease inhibitors became available to treat the drsease. Taken as part of complicated medicine regimen dubbed "drug cocktails," proteJ"C inhibitors offered The brutal October 1998 kilfing of college stu­dent Motthew Shepard was covered more extensively in the general press than any other anti-gay crime and exposed the dears of gays to the rest of the world. the first real hope of significantly prolongmg the hves of those with HIV. De;ith rates began dropping and headline:. filled with stories of those who appeared to have been literally resurrected from the grave. In the wake of the renewed hope, many AIDS groups found themselves restructur- Chat I Personals I News I Travel I Entertainment I People ~:com engage "'* enj<7f ing to focus on managing life with HIV, rather than mostly on hospice and other care for the dying. Agencies, many formed and led by gay men in the beginning of the epi­demic, also struggled to target their out­reach and programs to people of color and women, as HIV began spreading most rap­idly m these populations. Further study ~oon proved that protease mh1b1tors were no miracle cure: Some patients did not respond to the drugs, devel­oped serious side effects, or were unable to adhere to the complicated dosing schedules, developing drug-resistant strains of I !IV and sparking fears of a new epidemic But the success of the new treatments for m.my offered breathing room to activists focusing on other gay rights causes, and the later years of the decade offered victories that would have seemed impossible 10 years earlier. To be certam, major battles remain to be won-as m 1989, the U.S. still has no federal law bannmg job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation, no federal law recog­mzmg the nghts of same sex couples and no law allowing federal intervenhon m anti­gay hate crimes. Yet an unprecedented level of \'IS1b1hty in tlus decade has led to advances in the fights for each of these, as well as mynad other changes, both in pubhc policies and pnvate opin10ns, which many say will pave the way to larger victories to come. The U.S. Senate fell only one vote short of passing the Employment Non­Discrimmation Act to ban anti-gay )Ob dis­crurunation m 1996, and a bill to add sexual onentation to federal hate cnmes laws passed the Senate m 1999 attached to a spending bill, although 1t was cut from the final version of the bill. Meanwhile, ga} lobbyists and their Congressional supporters battled back numerous anti-gay bills and amendments dunng the heyday of Newt Gingrich's "Republican revolution," includ:ng a meas­ure that would have O\'ertumed President Ointon's executive order banning sexual onentation discrimination in the federal avilian work force. "Don't Ask, Don't Tell"-the 1993 "com· promise" bill that banned gays from serving openly in the military while supposedly protecting them from witch hunts-and the "Defense of Marriage Act," which banned federal recognition of same-sex marriages, were the only maior anti-gay bills to pass Congress in the 1990s, despite repeated pressure from right-wing organizations. Still, "the single greatest accomplishment of the '90s was not legislative," said Wayne Besen, spokesperson for the Human Rights Campaign, the national gay rights lobbying group. "Before the 1990s, when you heard coming out stories, they always began with, 'I thought I was the only one,' and you don't hear that anymore. "In the 1990s, we blew the door off the closet .... Even though someone might not know another gay person in their small hometown, they know there are role models out there, and they know there are places they can go and be safe." The historic efforts of this decade created numerous markers of how far we've come, from the growing attention to gay righb issues in the current presidential campaign to local victories ranging from more openly gay politicians, and an increasing number of local and state go\'emments banning anti­gay job discrimination and even providing domestic partner benefits. In addition, gay leaders pointed to the fol­lowing as key moments of "our" decade: • Gay youth come out Gay youth arc among the biggest benefi­ciaries of the role models and safe spaces that emerged in the 1990s, creating an ever­expandmg area of civil rights activism that was virtually non-existent until this dl'cade. "For all practical purposes, there was no movement to end homophobia m schools 10 years ago, and the entire LGBT youth mo\•e­ment was very embryonic," said Ke\1n Jennmgs, who founded the Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network m 1990 and now serves as its national executive director "Ten years ago, gay youth were an issue no one wanted to touch-the gay movement didn't want to give the right-wing the ammunition of us bcmg recruiters, and the mamstreJm education community didn't believe there were gay students. .. I think there has been a complete sea change, tram an ISSue no one even acknowledged, much less addressed, in 1990 to a front-burner issue now," he said. Jennings attributed the "sea change" to young people commg out at earlier ages and "demanding to be treated equally," as well as an ever-mcreasing number of schools recognizing their duty to educate and protect all students • Fighting anti-gay tide in court In the face of sometimes hostile school systems and public officials, gay routh joined other gay righb activists in t.1king their battles to court, resulting m kt•y legal victories that will influence policies for years to come. In one of several landmark legal decisions of the 1990s, the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in 1996 that public schools, and school officials, may be held liable under federal law for failing to address anti­gay abuse of a student by other students. Jamie Nabozny, a s tudent from Wisconsin, sued his school district after enduring years of anti-gay abuse in middle school and high school, and his ca~e offered powerful leverage to gay youth facing dis­crimination around the country. "From youth issues, to sodomy laws, anti­gay referenda, family law and custody, mar­riage, the military, asylum, immigration, employment, HIV issues-from all of these issue areas I can pull out key cases, and it is an amazing thing to me," said Kevin Cathcart, executive director of the Lambda Legal Defense & Education Network, the national gay legal group involved in many of the precedent-setting cases of the 1990s. "There has been dramatic change in the last 10 years, ... and I don't think anyone HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 could have predicted either the amount of litigation that has taken place or the range of victories that have occurred over the course of the decade," he said. Based on breadth and impact, Cathcart picked the 1996 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Romer vs. Evans as "the highlight of the decade." In November 1992, Colorado voters passed Amendment 2, which would have repealed all anti­discrimination measures for gays and lesbians statewide. The measure touched off a firestorm of sim­ilar attempts in other states, and became a key issue at the 1993 March on Washington. With the Romer case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Amendment 2 unconstitutional, in one of the high court's first pro-gay decisions, deflating many of the efforts to pass copycat legislation in other junsdictions. "Up until the time of Romer, it looked like we as a community were going to be faced with putting extensive time, energy and money into fighting these bad anti-gay referenda, which was time and energy that could be spent pushing for positive steps," Cathcart said. l:ven high profile defeat, like the 1 lawaii Supreme Court's dl'cision in December 1999 ending hopl's for gay marriage there, helped advance the cause of gay rights in the courts by at least bringing the issues to public .:ittention, Cathcart said. This month's dec1swn by the Vermont Supreme Court that gay couples in that state must receive equal rights is proof of the growing success in that debate, he noted. • 'Visibility and access' For many who don't follow politics closl'ly, one of thl• most t.mgible moments of gay progrt•ss in tht• dcc,1dc came in 1997, when Ellen Degl'ncres c,1me out on her prime-time television show. The e\·ent, hypL•d in the mainstream media for months m ad\"mce, put NEWS gays in America's living rooms as never before, although the show lasted only one season longer. And while "Ellen" showed mainstream America the daily life of a gay person, the 1998 murder of gay Wyoming college student Matthew Shepard, covered in the general press more extensively than any anti-gay hate crime to date, showed the world our greatest fears. "I don't think, even as optimistic as we were, that any of us thought we would see the amount of change that has happened m the last 10 years, and the level of progress we have made in terms of vis­ibility and access," recalled Cathy Renna, commu­nity relations director for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. "In the very early 1990s, the only way to get access to the media was through mass protest or picketing," she said. "Now, there is an unbelievable increase in the level of access we have, whether it is lime magazine or one of the TV stations or movie studios." Like HRC's Besen, Renna said she believes the rise in gay visibility in the media began with "a ground swell of people coming out," especially those involved or interested in journalism. Increased coverage of gay issues in the news media, in turn, helped change the hearts and minds of those in the public, creating a climate where television producers were willing to take a chance on "Ellen'' m 1997. "What this really shows is the challenge that we now have," Renna said "The level of media visibil­ity has prompted an enormous amount of public discussion, and now we have to translate that into more legislative victories and institutional victo­ries. "Now that we han" all of this visibility and access, what do we do with it?" she said. "That is the what our community needs to be asking as we hl•Jd into the next century." Have you met this agent? You should meet her, get to know her. She has the answers for your life insurance problems­Auto, Life. Business, Home. She may save you money, too. Call her soon. POU TICS Openly gay elected officials 1991 49 1999: IBO (including four in Ga.; Atlanta City Council member Cathy WlXllard tiecame the state's fiM in 1997) YOUTH U.S. ~oob with gay-straight alliance dubs 1989: two (both New England private schools) 199<1:600+ MILITARY Gays di~harg~ fami the U.S. military 1994 617 (first year of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell' policy) 1998: 1,163 MEDIA Gav lead characters on pnml'-time T\ 1996: :zero (Ellen IA.>Genere~ became the first on "Ellen" m 1997) 1Cl99: one (Will on !\'OC's "\\111 & Grace'; plus 2S more ~upf'C'Itmg and recurnng charades on cai>le and bniadcast shm•·s) LEGAL States with sodomy laws 1990: 25 Cplus the bistrict of Columbia) 19<19:1() Statt.'S with non-dt..<crumnatwn law5 that include :.exual ori<'fltation 1990: one \Wis.) 19<19:11 DOMESTIC PARTNERS Companit?S offonng domestic p;irtner h<>nefill> 1990: 17 1999· about 3,000 (mdudmg W Fortune 500 companies) SOURCES C.ay & Ltsl>ian Virtant Fund Wiy. Lts/:oian & Straight f.ducnlion Jl;ct;ror~·. Scro1un1tmbm Ltg.zf Defrost NchrorA, Gay [.. Lt,;!Jum AUillncc .4gamst Deftzn111tum, L..arr.bda Ltgal Defrost & Educahtm F1111d, Hmr.an Rigl1ts Gzmpaig11 THIS YEAR I will set out GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY to do something great 5414 Katy Freeway @TC jester • Houston, Texas 77007 713-961-9455 fax: 713-850-0856 Native T.A.N. Private Dancersl 713 669-9966 for myself. 13 Let's make a toast to Houston's newest alternative! One on One Private Dancers Very Discreet! MUSCLE MECHAN ICSSM 14 DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE This Year's Resolutions 6-xvlvdc.. the. phvd<;o; ttMi~~ Tha~, ttYov 0io 0iivfl' and (t0iinfvic-vid1 ' fvom m~ Voc.dbvlaVZJ. cr?vit Mdf::1f'l~ dVdMa+:c-- c.x it~ b~ ~rtappr~ m~ f lrtg'V~ fYI fhc- aiv. l-c,avc. a([ baf;fj~ c--onc--c.rni~ M"J 6-X in the- f ~t miUc.nnivm. Watdi move. ~how~ on Pi~VC-VZJ avid I~~ ~how~ on L-ifc..tiMc-. Ed Kinser BSMI, CRS Director: Kinetic Sports Out in the arts ' My intent for Sundance was to focus on unheard voices. ['Longtime Companion'] proved to the industry that there was a market for gay and lesbian films and that they should be taken seriously." -Robert Redford, Sundance Film Festival founder, January "The four different lines represent different male body fluids. The red ones are blood, the yellow are urine, the blue is the sweat of the brow, a metaphorical notion of sweat, and the white ones ... are semen. It's a reference to Onanism-you know, 'spilling the seed.' That's why they're on the floor." -Artist Michael Petry explain­ing his "Fluid Man· during a showing in Houston, January "I've not missed any­thing by not being in the closet. I can't imagine having to keep my life in the closet. Life's too short, and there are too many wonderful things to expe­rience along the way­whether you're gay or straight." -Glenn San Marco, "Les Miserables· cast member, January "Cher and Diana Ross and David Bowie were my role models." -RuPaul, Apnl HOUSTON VOICE •DECEMBER 31, 1999 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME "I tend to shoot for the stars in what I want. With music and fashion and stuff like that. that's pretty feasi­ble. But in terms of love and relation­ships, you're most often disappointed if you keep such high standards, which I believe a lot of gay peo­ple do. Growing up in the '80s, the whole AIDS freak-out-you did put a lover on a "I get a lot of letters from gay fans, and I do a lot of interviews with gay publications. They always tell me that I'm a hero to them, which I consider an honor ... I always take it as a compliment when gay guys hit on me-which happens fairly often." -Punk rocker and poet Henry Rollins, February "People think because [the Queerstock tour] is called 'queer' that it is this raging political music. .. but 'queer' is a new word and it's a great word, because it encompasses everything-it's not just black and white, gay or lesbian, it in includes the gray areas." pedestal, because they were 9oing to save your hfe. Or theY. were going to kill you. It's like a life-or­death situation." -Songwriter and recording star Rufus Wainwright, March -()ueerstoek organizer Doria Roberts, March "After reading the script, I didn't think twice about the sexuality of Adam ... From the moment I finished reading the script, I just knew it was a story I wanted to be a part of telling." -Scott Wolf on "Adam,· the doseted gay character he plays m "Go," Apn7 " ... I've never regretted anything I've said, even the stuff about being a male prostitute. I'm not ashamed of it. It was necessary for me at that time in my life. I was going for a career in acting, but I wasn't com­pletely successful. So, I year 1n review became a male escort." -Rupert Everett, June "I like to think that if I were gay I would be out, Rupert Everett-style." -Ben Affleck. September 'Tm queer and I'm proud but I'm also mentally ill-so don't expect me to be a role model. I must be gayly incorrect. I'm perhaps the only gay man who has never been to the baths or the gym-I've done much worse. But certainly I can't be your leader." -John Waters, September "When you look at it all, ~ realistically, gay roles only ii make up two percent of ~ prime time's lead charac- i:: ters. That's really not a good number ... It's very disappointing." -Scott Seomin, GIAAD Entertainment Media Director, on the unprecedented 28 gay, les­bian or transgender characters in the current TV /me-up, September Strange beaf ellows "The existence of an extreme left wing as the representation of gay peo­ple prevented me from coming out ... The establish­ment of these left-wing elites actually impedes the )'>- Continued on Page 18 "So many women, particularly African­American women, are oftentimes left unsatisfied after sex­ual encounters. Millions of women have yet to explore their full sexual curiosity. Women need to take time to find out what they want in a sexual relationship." -Houston poet Simone Cunningham, December 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 31, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE Out In Print BOOK NEWS Top shelf reading from 1999 Three of our reviewers-f.S. Hall, Debbie Fraker and Colleen McMahon-pondered their 1999 reading lists for highlrglrts of the year m print. THE BOOK OF LIES bv Felice Picano, Alron Publications .n th next decade, an up-and-coming queer studies scholar d1sco\·ers both more and less than he bar­gained for when he learns of a previously unknown member of the gay male writing group, the Purple Circle. Picano shows his considerable range in excerpts from nine different fictitious authors in this sprawl­ing tale, which is part literary mystery, part aHectronate tnbute to his fellow mem­bers of the Violet Quill. BRUISED FRUIT by Anna Li\·ia, Firebrand Books. Po~sibly the funniest novel ever about childhood trauma, abu­sive relationships, .md senal killers. The scene m which one character uses a Mickey Mouse mask to disguise herself while shopping in Good Vibrations 1s 'l\orth the pnce of adm1s~ ,., e Cl.\'.\'AMO:-; GARDEI\IS t Shyam Selv dura1, Hyperion '\ r"freshing change of scenery from the present day gay ghetto that takes place in 1920s Sn Lanka Its leisurely p.ile rec.ills a bygone er.i of writing. and as its ch.ir<1cters evoke classic English literature, the novel con­tains pride, prejudice, and a passage to India as well. Tl IE CRISIS OF DESIRE by Robin Hardy with David Groff, Houghton Mifflin With a striking combination of elo­quence and pulling no punches, Robin Hardy reaches from beyond the grave lo remind us that AIDS is not over and i~IJJj] year 1n review explores the not-so-obvious ways in which the \'irus affects the daily interactions of gay men. Ch ng and thought provoking THE ELUSIVE EMBRACE: DESIRE AND THE RIDDLE OF IDENTITY by Daniel Mendelsohn, Knopf Personal mem· rnr mixed with gay cultural research .md a touch of phtlosophical musing make this a very thought-pro\'Oktng book on gay 1den- E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net visit us on the web: www.europinedirect.qpg.com 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer WESTHEIMER ROA 3: CLARKCREST !!::! *~I/) RICHMON 0 a: 0 ...... N tity, how we define it and how that identity interacts with our various communities. FULL EXPOSURE by Susie Bright, Harper San Francisco. The queen of sex writing has done II again. She can always come up with new, original and exciting material, e\·en when you think she's said everything she could possibly say about sex. THE GUMSHOE, THE WITCH AND THE VIRTUAL CORPSE by Keith Hartman, Meisha Merlin Publishing. One of the best books of the year, queer or oth­erwise. Keith Hartman combines a sus­penseful plot and on-target cultural com­mentary with a near-future Atlanta setting, lots of well-drawn characters, and oh yeah, it's laugh-out-loud funny. What more could you ask for? A sequel TALES OF THE LAVENDAR MEN­ACE. A MEMOIR OF LIBERATION by Karla Jay, Basic Books. A personal account of the gay and feminist move­ments of the late '60s and early '70s. The two movements have not always worked well together, causing difficulty and con­fusion for lesbian feminists like Jay. Though she has done a lot of work in aca· demia, this book 1s \'cry readable and close to the heart THAT'S MISTER FAGGOT TO YOU: FURTHER TRIALS OF MY QUEER LIFE by Mich.id Thomns Ford, Alyson Publications. Ford's follow-up to his huge­ly succt'Ssful "Alec Baldwin Doesn't Love Me" is darker, angrier and iust as b1tmgly funny. Fabulously testy and trenchant, he simultaneously exposes our foibles for ridicule and embraces them The essav dealing with a disastrous first try at activ~ nnal sex will have readers rolling on tht• noor with laughter TO BELIEVE IN WOMEN: WHAT LES­BIANS HAVE DONE FOR AMERICA by Lillian Faderman, Houghton Mifflin. Though it is thick and densely academic, this is a very important account of les· bians in the early history of the women's movement. One hopes that it will inspire an equally brilliant historian to fill in the gaps of lesbians of color missing from these pages. WEDDING BELL BLUES liy Julia \\'alts, Naiad Press. A zany marr 1.ige-of· convenience tale about a gay man and a lesbian in a sham marriage to protect her daughlt'r from her dead lover's vengeful family. It's light entertainment with some­thing serious to say about the tenuous state of child custody for queer non-bio­logical parents A WOMAN LIKE THAT editt•d by Joan Larkin, Bard Books. Who'd have thought that in 1999 an anthology of coming out storie:. could still be fresh and worthwhile? The \vr1ters filling this book are top-notch, from established lights of the community like Judy Grahn and ~1inne Bruce Pratt, to newer \:oices like Cecilia Tan. The stones range from funny to sexy to ht·artbreaking, just like real life. What yo!lr neighbors are reading . . . Cybersocket 2000 by Gaynet Directories, $9.95 2 Comfort & Joy by Jim Grimsley, $21.95 3 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 4 Let Nothing You Dismay by Mark O'Donnell, $12 ~ Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 95 6 Murder Undercover by Claire McNab, $11 95 7 Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up by Andrew Tobi,"\S, $12 8 Outfoxed by Rita Mae Brown, $24 9 The Hours b) Michael Cunningham, $13 10 Girls Will Be Girls by LL'Slea Newman, $12.95 Crossroads Market B 0 0 ~~!_Q .~ £. & C A F E 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11 95 Chop Suey Club by Bruce Weber, $60 Sensual Men by Bruno Gmundcr, $29 95 Best Lesbian Erotica 2000 ed by Tristan T.1ormmo, $14 95 Best Gay Erotica 2000 cd by Rich.ird Libontc, $14 QS Innuendo by R.D. Zimmerman, $21.QS Mayhem at the Marina by Culene Miller, $11.95 Down From the Dog Star by Daniel Glover, $26.95 The Woman Who Rode to the Moon by Bctt Reece Johnson, $12.QS 10 Girls Will Be Girls by Ldea Newm.in, $12.95 LOBO ~\\"" 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 ifOM!&LD P R E S E N T S HOT! NEW! FUN! EXCITEMENT NEON GLOW SHOTS 2 BODY SHOTS & DRINK SPECIALS ALL NIGHT HAPPY HOUR WED • FRI 5 • 8pm 1 ST DRINK $1 • ANY WELL OR DRAFT 17 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE " I have quite a few really, really close gay friends. In fact. maybe most of my friends ... You know the reason why I think I inspire a lot of female impersonators? Because it 's not difficult to try to look like me! Put on a nice, big, fluffy wig and lots of eye makeup. It's such a blessing for me to know that gay people really like me." -Diana Ross, May i ~JjJj] year 1n review ,.. Continued from Page 15 possibility of gay people's living fulfilling lives. It keeps them back in the ghettos." -Gay wrrter Andrevv Sullivan, January "I suggest we work together to flush Judaism, Christianity and Islam into the Mediterranean and restore the Greco-Roman world, where, believe it or not, there was no word for fag or dyke, nor was there any conception that an occasional sexual activity consti­tuted an entire personality." Writer Gore Vidal, February "Watch your back, be care­ful who you come out to. I've been with my partner 10 years, but I'd never hold his hand in public-because in Ala bama, it's a death wish." Gay Men's Chorus of Houston Dr. J. David Faber, Artistic Director Y2 K 1s JUSt the bcgmmng! The }ear 2000 has got us busy prepanng Spnng and Pnde concerts hostmi; chola Cantorosa, the Ga}' Men's Chorus of H.imburg, Germany for a spcaa: July performance, and putting together a smashing conci;rt set for GALA Festim/2000 mjuly. Consider Jommg the Gay Men' Chorus of Hou ton. \\nether you sing, dance, play an mstrumcnt, or u. ea computer. you can be a valuable part of the chorus. If you have a flair for organizing, you can help us coordinate with our German friends. Rehearsals are every Thursday at 7 p.m. beginning January 6, 2000 at Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh Drive (at Missouri Street; parking lot is on Missouri) On the Internet, visit us at http://www.gmch.org or call 713.521.SING Dur Vim .. Entertain, Change Live~, Win freed om Tiie Gay Men 1 Chorus of Houston is a 50l(cX3> non-profit organization. -Alabama Gay & Lesbian Alliance spokesperson David White, March "I think if I had a gay son, I would hope he would be in a committed, loving relationship-I would worry about the safe sex part. That's one reason why it's so important for parents to be supportive and give their chil­dren a sense of self-worth, so they can make good choices." -Betty DeGenere~ April "I, William J. Clinton, President 7 of the United States of America, ~ by virtue of the authority vested < in me by the Constitution and ~ laws of the United States, do ~ hereby proclaim June 1999 as Gay illil __ ..., and Lesbian Pride Month." "Poetry can offer the -President Bill Clinton, June world peace of mind. You "It would be great for straight people to read this and say, 'You know, next time somebody makes a joke I'm not going to be silent.' It's the little things as well as the big things that will make a differ­ence." -Dan Woog, author of "Friends & Family: True Stories of Gay America's Straight Allies, • September need somewhere your mind can go, where your mind can go and chill, to cool your mind." Hou•;ton poet Donna Garrett, May Join Us at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Corner of Montro~c and Hawthorne) Fina out how to receive ''God's Grace for the New Year" Sunday, January 2nd, I 0:30am Home Groups meet Tuesdays & Wednesdays Look for "Ask The P.astor" in upcoming issues! NURSERY AVAILABLE FOR ALL SERVICES. For more information, call 713-528-6756 HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU "I'm single and available. If I had a personal life, I'd have a sex­ual orientation." Gore 2000 Campaign Manager Donna Brazile, December "Gays in the military, I find absurd. I came from a time when people were being killed by our government in a war in Vietnam. My cousins and school friends came back in pieces in body bags." -Novelist Felice Picano, December ~wiUbe~ (and girls) "Talk about a motivator. I had gotten in the best shape of my life. We should all have to be naked on "This is the hardest thing I have ever had to do, but I owe it to our fans, as well as to myself, to be com­pletely honest. I know this may come as a bombshell to our followers. Many of them may be upset. I only hope the understand how impor­tant it is for me to reveal I am gay." -Stephen Gately, 23, of the Irish band Boyzone, July stage all the time. I lost 30 pounds and lived at the gym and tanning salon. Before the Second Act, you'd see us doing crunches in the wings and pushups and lunges. Boobs, butt, and abs; boobs, butt, and abs." -Actor Paul Hope on his role in a Houston production of "Love! Valour! Compassion!," December Women rock! "I was making a joke the other day that I'm a 'female-bodied Southern gentleman.' I identify as a trans, but it's hard to describe that to people in a way that readers under­stand it. .. I don't really know how to Experience the Art of Dining "If my husband would ever meet a woman on the street who looked like the women in his paintings, he would fall over in a I dead faint" -Mrs. Pablo Picasso 1.._ A:m:::: rate New Years Day at Fox Diner! Mon-Thu Friday Saturday Brunch Served 10:30 om - 2:30 pm Hours Lunch 11 OOam unlll 2 OOpm Dmner 5:00pm until 10 OOpm Lunch 11.00am until 2 OOpm Dinner 5 OOpm until 11 :OOpm Dmner 5 30pm until 11 ·oopm Sunday Brunch Buffet 10 30am unlll 2:30pm 905 TAFT HOUSTON, TEXAS 77019-2613 713.523.5FOX Proudly seNing all hungry Houstonians! say it but I don't feel like a lesbian anymore." -Recording artist Angela Motter, Apn1 "She's a rather spunky kind of lady, extremely outspoken and much more modern than the other wome~ that sounds familiar, doesn't it?" -Lily Tomlin on "Georgie, • the lesbian character 5he plays m "Tea With Musso/mi,• May "There are actually women out there who are shaped like Barbie, but they're not real women. There are drag queens who do a good Barbie. Men have no hips. With the help of some surgery and some male genes, it's funny that they can be this feminine icon." -Houston Oty Councilwoman Annise Parker; February "My gay fans have been so loyal, and so great-at times­when other fans weren't there. Gay fans usually love you when you're in the dumps, the toilet. I have a very Judy Garland feeling about it. It's a special thing." -Cher, August "A great nude photograph of (713) 978-DECO (3326) 2990 Briarpark Drive at \Vestheimer 19 "Nightlife is a subject that has always fascinated me ... Why do we all have to go out at night? What is it we're searching for?" -Neil Tennant on the Pet Shop Boys' new album "Nightlife,· October Martha Stewart and David Letterman's job. I think that's not asking too much." -Comic Suzanne Westenhoefer's Chnstmas fist, November Enjoy exquisite culinnry creations at the Adam's Mark Hotel induding made-t0-0rder omelets, homemade pastries, savory seaf oo~ mouth­u• atenng pasta, seasonnl salads, delectable entrees, plus an unbeliemble array of our finest desserts. Then sit back, relax and sip champagne uhile listening ro some of Houston's fine.st ja~z musinans. Every unday, 10:30arn • 2:00pm Adults: 22.50; Seniors: $20.50; Children 5-11: 12.50 l'ndcr 5 Free 20 Amilahli: for the Ho/ida:\'.'i Chocolates bV ffiark Gourmet fresh Ground Coffees for sale bv fhe pound 1209 CAROLINE AT DALLAS 713.759.9323 ' FAX 713.759.6812 Lunch: M-F 11am - Spm Drnner: M-Th Spm - 9:30pm • Fri & Sat Spm - 10pm "HOME COOKING - ITALIAN STYLE" Delivery to all lofts & apartments in Downtown Houston Catering available for lunch and dinner meetings. banquet faci lities, and take-out available! Plan your Christmas party with S:r?~N~S~/6 -"""V7r.J OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE ... ..................... : ff :\UNf : .~ ......\..f..1.f.1.N... .....~ iPI!I!l AROUND THE NATION 1999 year 1n review January AOL, Merriam-Webster dump anti-gay thesaurus In response to pressure from activists, Merriam-Webster announced 1t would remove offensive synonyms for the word "homosexu­al" that had been included IIl a thesaurus on the company's web-5ite and America Online. Words rncluded as synonyms for "homosexu­al" included fag, faggot, fruit, homo, invert, queer, uranian and uranisl 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' discharges highest since 1987 According to figures released in January, the military discharged 1,145 service mem­bers in 1998 for violating the DADT ban on openly gay soldiers, the highest number of discharges since 1987. Discharges from the Air Force were more than 30 percent higher than 10 1997. 'Barebacking' on the rise, new epidemic feared A study releasro by the Center; for Disease Control showed the proportion of gay men who reported engagmg in unprotected anal intercourse, known as barebacking, rose from 30.4 percent in 1994 to 39.2 percent in 1997, a near 30 percent increase. The report fueled fears that a new generation of gay men would be decimated by HIV I AIDS. February Tinky Winky outed by Jerry Falwell According to the February issue of Rev. Jerry Falwell's National Liberty Journal, linky Winky-a character on the popular "Teletubbies" television show-is gay and a dangerous role model for children. "He is purple-the gay pride color, and his anten­na is shaped like a triangle-the gay pride symbol," the group said, also noting that Tinky speaks with a boy's voice but carries a red purse-like bag. March Billy Jack Gaither, an Alabama man who cared for his amng parents, was stabbed, beaten to death with an ax hondle and his body burned on a pyre of tires Feb. 19 by two men who claimed a pass by Gaither prompted the attack. Gay man brutally murdered in Alabama Steven Eric Mullins and Charles Monroe Butler confe.~sed to the Feb. 19 murder of Billy Jack Gaither, a gay textile worker from Sylacauga Alabama. Gaither was stabbed, beaten to death with an ax handle, and his body burned on a pile of tires. Mullins told authorities he killed Gaither because Gaither made a pass at him. In June, Mullins pleaded guilty to capital murder; m August, a iury convicted Butler of mur­der and kidnapping. April Shepard killer gets life in prison Russell Henderson, one of two men charged with the October 1998 killing of gay University of Wyoming student Matthew Shepard, pleaded guilty to kid· napping and felony murder to avoid a pos· sible death penalty. He was given to two consecutive life sentences. May San Francisco 'Equal Benefits' ordinance upheld A federal judge upheld important por­tions of San Francisco's landmark "Equal Benefits" ordinance, which requires compa­nies th.it contract with the city to provide domestlC partner benefits. In July, United Airlines, a plaintiff rn the ATA suit, became the first atrline to offer full domestic partner benefits, including health insurance. American Airlines and U.S. Airways quKkly followed suit. June Hormel appointed ambassador to Luxembourg While Congress was on a 10-day break for Memorial Day, President Clinton offered a "recess appointment" to James I lormel, which will allow the openly gay philanthro­pist to serve as ambassador to Luxembourg until January 2001. Honnel, who bt>came the United States' first openly gay ambas.<;ador, wa~ first nominated to the post by Clinton in October 1997, but Republican senators opposed the nomination and refused to allow it to come to a vote. July Vatican shuts down ministry to gays In a move that rocked the already shaky relationship between gays and the Catholic Church, the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith ordered a well-known American nun and priest to halt their 25- year minbtry to gay and l~bian Catholics. The Vatican had been investigating Father Robert Nugent and Sister Jeannine Grannick for more than 10 years. Senate passes gay-inclusive hate crimes bill Gay rights advocates declared victory July 22 when the U.S. Senate passed the llate Crimes Prevention Act as an ;imendment to a spending bill. But bec;iuse the House version of the budget bill did not include the measure, 1t required approval by a conference com­mittee In November, under pressure from Republican Congressional leaders, confert'es and White !louse nrgohators allowed the hate crimes bill to be dropped. The HCPA would add sexual orientation, gender and d1s.:ibility to existing federal hate crimes laws. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 August New Jersey Supreme Court rules against Boy Scouts The Boy Scouts ban on gays 1s illegal under state law, the New Jersey Supreme Court ruled Aug. 4 in the case of James Dale, an assistant scout master who was kicked out nine years ago after leaders learned he is gay. Jn May, the Boy Scouts formed a com­mittee to study the causes of homosexuality. September Democratic candidates come out on gay rights Vice President Al Gore and former Sen. Bill Bradley, the two candidates vying for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2000, came out as strong proponents of gay nghb in dueling inteniews with the g.1y news magazine, the Aduocali'. Fir:;t, Gore told the magazine he favored a more "com­passion. lie" impll'mentation of the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" b,in on open gays in the mil­itary. Then, Bradley told the Ad110calc he would on~rturn the military ban completely. Both men opposed gay marriage, but Bradley said he supported domestic part­nersh1 p .ind would oppose the Knight lmt1ahve, a California ballot measure to hmit m,1mage to "one man and one woman." Gore !Jter said he too would oppose the Kmght lnihallve. Drug·resistant HIV on the rise lhghly drug·rL'Sistant strains of the AIDS virus are on the rise, showing up in as many as 4 5 percent of newly infected patients, according to two studies in the Journal of the American Medical Association. While power· ful "drug cocktails" including protease inhibitors have helped many with HIV, the complicatl·d drug regimen has prO\·ed diffi­cult to ,1dherl' to. Anti-gay harassment 'the rule' at school A first-ever national survey conducted by the GJy Lesbian Straight Education Network found that 69 percent of gay stu­dents surveyed around the country said they had experienced verbal, physical and sexual hJrassment and assault at school. Results show 61 percent reported verbal harassment, 47 percent sexual harassment, 28 percent physical harassment, and 14 per­cent had been physically assaulted. October Calif governor signs landmark gay rights bills California Gov. Gray Davis signed into law three landmark gay rights measures passed by the state legislature, including a measure to outlaw the harassment of gay students and teachers in public schools and colleges, a Jaw creating a statewide domes­tic partners registry for couples who are gay or over age 62, and legislation to ba.n job and housing discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Falwell meets with gay Christians Rev. Jerry Falwell, the Moral Majority founder Jong known for his condemnation of homosexuality, held a weekend meeting with 200 gays from 30 states organized by Rev. Mel White's non-violent "Soul Force" movement. White, a former ghostwriter for Falwell and other religious right figures before coming out himself, organized the meeting with his former boss and his church members to try and reduce \'iolence against gays and Christians and lower the rhetoric between both groups. November Gay S.F. supervisor forces mayor into run-off On the strength of only a write-in cam­paign l.iunche<l 1ust 20 days before the elec­tion, Tom Ammiano, the openly gay presi· dent of San Francisco's Board of Supl'rvisors, shocked man} by qualifying for a run-off in the city's mayoral election against incumbent Mayor Willie Brown. The contest, between the openly gay Amm1ano and strong gay rights ally Brown, divided some in San Francisco's huge gay community, but Brown beat Ammiano deci­sively in the December run-off vote. Ammiano would have become the first openly gay mayor of a major American city. December James Hormel finally became the United States' first openly gay ambassador in June, three years after he was first nominated. Bradley, Gore, Clintons oppose 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Politicians continued lining up against the mihtary's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" ban on openly gay scmce members, prompted in part by the July murder of a gay soldier at the Army base in Fort Campbell, Ky. Former Sen. Bill Bradley, running for the Democratic pn-sidenhal nomination, led the pack in September. Jn Dlwmber, First Lady Hillary Clinton-planning a run for U.S. Senate from New York-joined him in declaring DADT a failure that ought to be scrapped. President Clinton was next. Finally, Gore said he, too, would overturn DADT. Hawaii court rules against gay marriage Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a 1998 constitutional amendment against gay mar­riage, closing the door on three gay couple:; who had sued the state for the right to marry. But gay rights activists said the ruling does not reverse the high court's 1993 that failure to recognize same-sex marriage amounts to gender discrimination. Gay couples win 'equal' rights in Vermont In a first of its kind decision, the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that gay couples must be given "equal" rights and benefits. The court stopped short of calling for the state to issue marriage licenses to same-sex cou­ples, holding that the state legislature should decide whether to grant the benefib through marriage or a separate system of domeshc partnership. Vermont officials, including Gov. Howard Dean, predicted the state would adopt a DP system. Expert Grooming & Attentive Boarding Under New ownershlPI Ask For Ruth Romero •• 908 w. Alabama 713.527.0707 •9 Everything you want Right Herel Right ow! Sales Hours: 9-9 M-f • 9-9 Sat. Service Hours: 7-7 M-F • 8-2 Sat. 12230 Southwest ffeewoy •Stafford, 1X • 281 -243-8600 • FAX 281-243-8635 1 's . ~ Nissan-Oldsmobile Dealer 22 Occasions Birthdays Lisa Garrett celebrated her birthday on Dec 26 PUPk rocker Patti Smitt- on Dec. 30. Orrgmal 'Simpson' Tracey L11'Ilan on Dec. 30 Norman of Toopee's celebrated the big 5-0 on Dec. 30 OUT ON THE BAYOU Super singmg c;ensalion Susan Mas.ir sings her birthday song on Jan. 6. The one and only Darrell (a.k cl Darla K) toa~ts his birthday on Jan. 6 DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Spot is a year old male domestic short hairtcl cat. He loves to cuddle and wlll even leave his food to do so. He Is an indoor only cat and is &tterbox trained. ~e1th app1er ads a jewel to his birthddy septer onJan 1 CCCC nember Sonny ads a mile on !us birth· day odometer on Jan. 4. Singer Michael Stipe on Jan. 4. The Houston Voice ire/comes your speCUll occa­s1on5. Se11d e-m.ii/ to crobertSli!.lwu~to11vozcc com Fax 713-529-9531 Mai1: Occasions, Hous/011 Voice, 500 Lo-llett Blvd S11ite 200, Houston, Texas 77006. Please rndude a telephone 1111mber so c>ecnsions can be iierified and considered far publication. Houston Voice coltlntllist Gndy Abel celebrates her birthday on Dec. 31. To adopt Spot, call the Houston Humane Society at 713·434·SS38. Car Mart '93 Mitsubishi Eclipl>e Monrcgo Green w/ grey mrenor. au1o=t1c, AIC, A!'.1/FM Cassette. Ocan & sporty fun 1 • $3500 • For mon: det:uls. c:ill 711660 7746. '96 Mcrt:ul)' Cougar XR7 • VS. 1..e:uhc:r. pow er package, and much. much mon:, Srk #26161-1 • S9.97~ • c.atl S:itum of Houston Sou1hwcs1 Frwy. 71'3777.6100 '96 N1ss:in 200SX SE • l2K upcr low miles. spoiler. :in<l many sporty excirmg opuons' • Only $8,9 • Call Frank LO\e :u Loncsrar S1ssan-Oldsmob1le. 281 241 '600 '98 Volkswagen Beetle • Blacl. Only 17K miles. PW. PL. ~­P<-' Cd. k.'t 1his one ukc you back 1 • Sl6.9 • Conbe1 Frank Love :u l.oocsbr Niss:m·Oldsmobile. 2 1.243 8600 '96 lnfimu I· 10 • Gru."O, sunroof. le:uhcr, full power pkg. low miles • S 16.295 • For ioon: mfor­m: i11on. Cilll Henry Craft at Archer Motor Sales. 281 445 f>UXl '97 k1..11 Wr.:mglcr • Black, lors of fun to dnve, go anywhere' • S 15.120 • For dctuls, call Hcniy Crafl :u Archer Mocor Sales, 281 4456400 '91 Oldsmobile Nmcly·Eight • Gre:ii twg:un m an nffordlblc. good-dnving vehicle' • Only S4.995 • To find out more, c:ill Saturn of Houston - Gulf Frwy~ 7139444550. '9 S:Uum SL-2 •Allio. PW. PL. uh. speed conrrol. only 2'.?K miles. Saturn CemfieJ Warran1y • $12,900 • Call Saturn of Housron Nonh Frwy .• 281.847 . 700. ''17 Sarum Sl.-2 • 46K miles. uh. cnnsc:. grc:u fun-dming vehide, Stk #SI I07 • S I0.975 • Call Saturn of Houston • Southwest Frwy. 713.777.6100. '96 Saturn SL • 4-Door, NC. grc:u dnvmg econom1cal car wnh plenty of room • S:lle pnc-.:d al $5.995 • To dme today. call Saturn of Humble - Hwy. 59N. 281540 55 '98 Ponllac Sunfire • 4 Door. pcrfccr car for school. don '1 rruss this one' • $9,898 • For your 1es1 dnve, see Frank Love al l.onesrar N1ssan­OIJsmobile, 281 24) 8600. '97 Nissan Parhfmdcr Champagne, ready 10 go w 11h lors of c4u1pmcn1! • Sl9,290 • For more mfonn:lllon. sec Henry CrJfl at Archer Mulor Saks. 281 445£1400. '93 Salum SL-I • Aulo, AIC. low m1 lcs. very economical and dependable vehicle • Only 5:\995 • For dcratls. call S:uum of Housron Kary Frv. y 281 556 1400 ·95 Chevrolcr Suburban I 500L<; •Only WI\ miles. dual NC & Hear, CD. IOW mg plg • pnvacy glass, musr see' • 518,995 • Call Salum of Houston NW290. 281 894.JIOO. '9.5 Ford fl 50 Exrended Cab • Cusrom Conversion y./ ground cffec1s. don '1 miss 1h1s one' • S 11.995 • S1..-e Henry Cr.1fl al 1\ re her 11.1 olor Sales, 281 44Hi400 ·94 N1sSJn \1axun:i • 4-door, auro. P\\, PL. and much more' • Only S7 .998 • For mon: mfor· ma11on. see Franl Love al Loneslar 1ssan·Oldsmoh1le. 281 2H8600 '97 Toyora LnndCnnser • The Cn:am of rhe Crop' A one of a lmd bcauly • S30.595 • For all rhe details. call Henry Crafl al Archer Molor Sales, 281 445.6400. ·97 Honda Passport 4X4 • V6, PW, PL. 1111, cruise. nerf bars and more! • Sale pnced al only S 15,760 • A'l fur Henry Crafl ar Archer Moror Sales, 281 445 6400. ·97 Ford Wmd,rar GL • Grrar. roomy van loaded wnh many fea1ures1 Rear A/C • SI 1.995 • For all rhc: dc-1a1ls. call Sarum of Houston - Gulf Frwy. 713.944 4550. '97 Salum SC-2 • Lcalhcr. 5· specJ. PW. PL. 1111. crw;e, 58K miles, Cenified Sa1um 12/12 Wamnry • 59,950 • C:ill Salum of Housron • Nonh frwy. 281.847.8700. '99 Saturn SL • lih, 5-spu:d. gre:u vehicle ru a great deal' Srk.#S 1108-1 • S9675 • For derails. c:ill Saturn of Houslon • Sou1hwes1 Frwy .• 713.777.6100. "98 Dodge Neon • 4-dmr, NC, auro. good lrall<ponauon at a dove anywhere pncc' • S8.688 • To t1..'S1 dnvc, call Frank Love al Lonesrar N1ssan·Old mot-lie, 28124l8600 '98 Chcvrok.1 Prum • 4-door, auto, NC, only 35K low miles. \Cl)' affordable and ccono1111cal vehicle • S8.895 • Call Salum of Humble Hwy 59N. 2. I 540.8855 '99 SJlum SL • Ver) econom1cal, dnve anywhere' • S:ilc pnccd al onlv S9.995 • For dc1ails and a 1~· dme, 1..-all Salum of Hou.,1on • Kary Frwy .. 281 556.J-l(X) '9J GMC Sonoma P/U • 6· Cylinder. only 69K miles. NC, bcdhner. very clean !ruck' • Only S5.995 • Con1ac1 Salum of How.ion NW290. 281894.JICXl '95 :0-:issan Exr...'llded Cab Pickup 4X4 • Be<!lmcr and much more' Gn.':11. go anywhere truck! SI0,9SS • Call Frank L<we a1 Lone tar Nissan-Oldsmob1le. 281 2418600. '99 Chrysler LHS • 17K , Supl'f clean vehicle w/ lo<s of oprions, Let's do bu"ness! • $24.180 • C:ill Henry Craft al Archer M\Jlor Sales, 281 445.6400. '98 SJlum SL-2 • Loaded w/ all !he options, a muM sec. great vehicle, save 1housands! • Only S 11.995 • Call Sarum of HouMon -GulfFrwy. 713944.4550. '96 Sarum SC· I • Black Gold. aulo. alloy wheels. PW, PL. O:n1f1<.'d Salum Warranry. a rnUSI see' • Only S8,600 • c.atl Salum of Hou$10n • Nonh Frwy .. 281 847 .87(~. '96 Sruum SL-2 • Power pack­age, rear spmlcr. ~pony and lots of fun 10 dme, Srk. #90987-1 • S7,975 Call Salum of Hous1on - SoulhY.est Frwy., 711.777.6100. '97 Ckvy S-10 falcndcd Cab Piclup • Grc:ir !ruck, auro, V6. Like 1'ew1 • Priced 10 sell ru only S I0,988 • Coniacr Fr.:mk Love ru l.oncMar Nissan-Oldsmobile, 281 2418600. ·97 Fon! Fl 50 farended Cab XLT • )rd door. many grear OpllOll.5 and fe:11ure. • $18,120 • For mfonnation. c:ill Hcniy Crall a1 Archer Moror Sales. 281.445.6400. '97 Jeep Grand Cherokee • \\ b11e. real clean. low 1111les • S 15.790 • For more mfonn:i11on and a lest drive. c:ill Heniy Crafr nt Archer Motor Sales, 2814456400. '96 Salum SC-2 • Auto. ~unroof, le:uhcr. pJu, much more. dme m style' • Only S8,995 • To tc-st dm"C. con~KI SJium of Humble. Hwy. 5'1N, 281 540.8855. '98 Salum SL·2 • PoY.cr srocnng. JIO"-Cr brake,. ca.~scue. and much mon: • SI 1.795 • For further details, call Saium of Hou,lon • Knty Frwy, 281 556.140.I '98 Fonl \1ustang Com·cn1tile • Mo:ullic red w/ black lop and inrcrior,auto, CD • $15.995 • For your lest dnvc, call Salum of Housron • NW290, 281. 8943100. ·94 Nissan Maxim:i • Fully loaded. rhis one won ·1 slay around long. pnu:d 10 :.ell' • Huny! Only S7.498 • Call Frank Love al l.one>lar Nissan­Oldsmob1lc. 281.2438600. '98 Jeep Gr.ind Cherokee • Red. rcal ~harp vehicle w/ IOIS of room • S 18.860 • Call Henry Craft for de1a1b ru Archer Mocor Sales. 281 445.6400. '98 SJlum SL· I • Many exciring opuons ! Grcat-Onvmg vehicle nt a gn::ii pnce • Only $9.995 • For all rbe details. call Salum of Houston Gulf Frwy .. 7 I l.944 4550. '97 Toyota Ten.cl • Gnxn. au10, NC. only 30K low nub. much mon:! • S8,<)(Xl • For more mfo« ma11on. contact Salum of Houston Nonh Frwy .. 281 847 8700 ·97 Buick l..cs..hn: • Leather. alloy wh1:cls, all lhe bells and wh1'>1Jc.,, a rnusr see' Slk #S 1119 • S 11,975 • Call Sar um of Houston • Sou1hwc I Frwy., 71J.777.6J<Xl. '96 Chevy Bla1.er u; · CD, alarm. and all lhc hells .uid wh1s· lies, very nice, clean vehicle' • Only Sl4.W8 • For d1:1ai1,. call Frank l.ove a1 Lonestar N1s.s:m­Oldsmob1lc, 28 I 24 l861Xl. '95 Ma7Lla 626 • PW, Pl~ 'Jill, cruise. and many gn:ai IC:i1urcs • S:ile pm:ed at only S8.595 • c.atl Hcniy Crafl at Archer Mowr Sales, 281.445 6400. '94 Fonl Escon S/W • Aulo y./ full poY.er p;K lagc. A rrue 111us1 see 10 apprcclatc 1 • Sale pnccd ru only S1,995 • Call S.uum of Humble • llwy 59N. 281.540 8855 . '96 L.cxu' [~') JOO • Pearl wh11c, loodcd. CD & casscue, lea1her, al) lhe OJlllOOS, CXlrJ cJC<Ul1 • SI 8.W5 • f·or mfonnalmn. c-.tll Salum of llo1L\lon • Kruy Frw y. 281 556.1-llXJ '94 lnfinou HO • Rc'll w/ hcigc lcarhcr mlcnor, CD, sunroof, only 62K 1111le.,, musr see' •Only Sl2.995 • Ju Im ume for Xmas. Salum of Hou ion • NW290. 281.894 3100 '95 GMC Yukon 4X4 • l..caiher. one owner' Like new! Sa\c lhou· sarid'' •Only Sl6.998 • To find our 1mrc. conla(;I Franl Love al Lonesrar N1>san Old1mobilc. 281.2418600. '97 GMC Bravada • Low miles, lca1her. CD, PW, PL. 1111. and much more' • Sl9J60 • Ask for Henry Cm fr al Arc h<:r Mor or Sales. 281.445 64<~ ·9g Saturn SW-2 • Grca1 dnving. 'Cl)' affordable and 1..-cononucal car. gas and go 1 • Sale pnccd al ooly 512.295 • Call Salum of HouMon Gulf Frwy. 713.9444550 '97 Honda CRV 4X4 • Red, auro. NC. PW, PL, 47K miles, mus! see• • Only $14.950 •For more mfonnarion. call Salum of Houslon - Nonh Frwy. 281 847.8700. '98 VW Beerle • 17K miles, alloys. PW, lei rh" car 1ake you back 1 Srk #S 1117 • Sale priced al S 15,975 • Call Sarum of Hous1on • Sou1hwe;1 Frwy., 713.777.6100. ·97 Nissan Maxuna • Pearl white. PW, PL. rill. cru1 c, snappy vehicle! • $17.260 • To 1cs1 dnvc, call Henry Cmfl al Archer Molar Sales, 281 445.6400. '96 Toyora Camry • PW. Pl~ T1l1, cruise, grcal vehicle' • A grcal deal al only S 12,350 • for dc1ails. ask for Henry Crall al Archer Motor Sales. 281 445.6400. '97 Sarum SL-I • 4·Door, NC, power sunroof, many grcal op11ons, Salum Cen1lied 12 mos/12 K 1111 Warran! y • S8.250 • Call Sa1urn of I lumblc - Hwy 59N. 281 540.8855. "18 Toyo1a Camry LE • Auro. PW, PL. uh. cruise. and llKirc. Dq1cndable and reliable! • $13,995 • For more, call Salum of HnU\IOn Ka1y Frwy. 281.556 1400 '96 Lexus ES300 • Chainpagne w/ Ian leather, sunroof. CD, pnvacy glas;. only 57K mile> • Only $ 18,995 • To IN dnve, call Salum of Housron • NW290. 281.894..1100 ·99 GMC Yukon • The: one and only. 9,875 low miles. mu t drive 10 apprecimc! • S26,395 • Call Henry Crafl al Archer Moror Sales. 281 445.6400. '99 BMW 3 I 8T1 • Avus Blue. sunroof, cass.. Srk #30067 • MSRP S25.975. rhis week's special S2 I, 969 • Call Maunc10 Huss· mann - Advan1agc BMW, 7136538300. HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 31, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 23 community calendar (Some events may be changed due to the hohd.iy.) saturday, jan. 1 After Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM. 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713-526· 5738 Q Pat ol walks the streets a l 8 45 p.m 713 528 SAFE Visual Arts Alhanct" 10 am 28'-583-8408 Oognot~ mass at /·JO pm. for gay Cathohcs. 113-880-2872 St \tept-en s Episcopal Church Rosary at 8 am 1805 W. Alabama 713 528-6665. ttouston .. esblan and Gay drop n hot..rs from noon to 4 pm 803 Hawt~orne 713 524 38'8 Piyth1c Fair •nd Whohn1c Health bpo CenterPoint. 1920 l<olhster I• l 9)2 7224 sunday, jan. 2 The Womens Group 1045 am 113 529 85/1 Houston Area Teen Coal1t1on of Homose:icuals meets. 713 942 7002 Rcunbow Riders A bicycle .. lub for women. 713 869-1686 Church of th• XII Apostles Anghcan Rote Old Catholoc Church Holy Commun10,.. 10 30 a m at 239 Westhe1mer 7131665· 7903 St Stephen·s Eposcopal Churth. Hor; Rrte Euchans1 I at 7 45 am; Holy Rite Eucharist II at 8.55 a.m.; Education .,our at 10 a.m.; Choral Euchari\t at 1 • a.m. 1805 W Al•bJm• 713-528-6665. Maranatfla Fellowship Metrnpolitan Church •preathmg tho Gospel" Boble study at 9 30 p.m. 713·528 6756 ResurrectlOI" MCC Strv1ces at 9 am and 11 a rn. 713-861· 9149 Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages at 9·10 am Servic. at 10.30 am. 713-528 3269 First Unitaoan Urnverul1st Cf\urcf\ Serv1cts at 9:30 am. and1130am Community Gospel Service at 11 a ~ . 7 pm Sunday Scliool for choldrer> 4 305 Lolloan 713-880-9235 or wwwcommun1tygospel org. Houston M1ss1on Church Service at 10:10 a.m 713 529· 8225 Covenant Baptist Church SefVlce at 1 30 p m education hour at 3 pm. 713 668-8830. Bering Memorial l.lmted Methodist ChLrch. Services at 8 30 am., 10 50 am Sunday school at 9 40 am 713 526· 10t7 Resurrection MCC t-iandbell Choir retaearsal at 1 30 pm 713 861 9149. Unnanan Fellowship of Galveston County. 402 Church St. 1n Galveston Servoce a t 10:30 a.m. 409-765 8330 fa1tti. and Hop~ Fellowship. Servtce at 11 a.m 713-510· 7847 First Congregattoral Churct-i (Memorial). Service at 11 a.m 713-468-9543 or fcc·houston org Church of Kindred Spmts (Beaumont). Service at 7 p m 409-835-4765 UmtJnan Fellowship of Houston Adult forum at 10 a m Service at 11 a.m. and .-ioon. Open Cucle famdy Support at 12·30 p.m. 1504 Wirt 7•3-686·5876. lntNfa1th Worship CcJebrat10,, 7 p.m. 2515 Waugh Or. 713-528 3601 Thoreau Unitarian Umversal1st Congregation Adult dis cuss1on at 9 45 am service at 11 a.m 3945 Greenbr ar Stafford 281 277 8882 www neosc'l com/ thoreau. monday, jan. 3 Gay Fathers/Fathers F rn support qr u~ 8 pm 713 861 6t81 Calendar/Computer work.shop for Pude Week. 1 p m 71 J. 529 1221 Gay Men Survivors of Domestic Violence support group 713-526 10'7 Beung Support Network Gnef and Divorce Gro ps at 7 p.m. 113 526-1017 Frost Eye Ointc frel" eye exams for people with HIV 113 830-3000 AIDS Caregovers' Support Group. 6 pm 713-732 4300. H.IV testing free from AVES from 1 pm. to 6:15 p.m 713 626 2837 FrontRunnotS 6 30 p 'Tl. 7U ~12 8021 Kolbe Prowct Euchamt at 7·30 p.m. 713-861 1800 lntl•gr.ty Houston For gay and lesbian Episcopalians 1 30 p.m Autry House. 6265 Mam Mor< Loght Presbytoroans Mcet•ng 1110 Lovett 9:30 pm 281 <144 886' X309. Black lesbian and Gay Coaht1on's weelly mee-t1ng at 7 pm. 803 Hawth< rne 7'3 524 3818 Houston lesbian and Gay Community drop n hours from 6 to 9 pm, 803 Hawthorne 713·524 3818 Classic Chasm. Car Oub. Monthly meetmg at Blue Agave GVBUICKllaol com. t uesday, jan. 4 FREE HIV testing at Oub Houston at 8 30 pm to rn1d f'1ght the Montrose Clinic 713-830-3000. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous. 7 p m. 239 Westh0tmer. 713-495 8009 Gay Men HIV+ PsydlOtherapy --Jhe Survivor's Circle• cere­mony and celeb1at1on. Montrose Counseling Center at 4 30 p.m. 713-529-0037 Youth·Rap. 6 30 pm. 713-1122 8511 . Aftercdrt" Group Treatment. Mont rose Counseling Center at 6 p.m. 713-529-0037 AIDS Alhance cf the Bay Area. 7 p.m 7•3-488·4492 PROTECT. An HIV--negat1ve support group at 7 pm 7"'3 516-1017 Women Survivors of Ch1ldhrod Abuse Montrose Counselong Center at 6.30 pm 713-529-0037 Beung Suppo1t Network lunch Bunch Gang at 1 1 a m 713-526-1017 Gay Men's Process G1oup. 7 p.m, 3316 Mt Ver"'t.OJ" 7t3. 526-8390. Men's Network Discussion group for social eduut1 >nal development of gay and bisexual men, 7 p m Montrose Counsehng Center 713-529-0037 More on Relationships 01scuss1or group 7 p m 415 W Gray 713-861·9149. lambda Skating Club skat6 at 8 p.m. at the Tradewmdl. 713 523-9620 Gay & 81 Male Support Group suppcrt group forming Sponsorod by AVES 713 626 2837 Houston lesbian ilnd Gay Commun.ty Center drop tn hours 6 to 9 pm; Lesbian Corrnng Out Group meets at 7:30 pm 803 Hawthorne 713 528-3818 wednesday, jan. 5 Free HIV testing by the Montrose chmc at Mary's ,4 -8 p m ~and M1dtowne Spa (8 p.m to midnight), and Ropcord (9 pm to modnoght).713-830-3000 81Net Houston 7 30 pm. Soc1cll meeting at Clf~ Tooprcs, '830W Alabama. 713 467-4380 Women's Network. 7 p n Muntrose Counseling Centei, 701 Rochmond 7'3·529 0037 HIV survivor support group 7 p m.. 7 • 3 782--4050 Mind/Body Connection Alternatrve Approaches 7 p m 1475 W Gray 713 524-2374. Pro1ect: Coeur 1 pm AFH, 3203 Weslayan 713-623 6796 Out Skate Roller>katmg Cub, 8 to 10 pm at 8075 Coo• Road 281 933-5818. Houston Lesbian and Gay Commurvty Center drop·tn hours noon to 9 pm Comput • Cass 7 to 8 pm 803 Hawthorne 713 524-3818 thursday, jan. 6 Free HIV testing at Toyz (9 p.m. to m1dmght) by the Montrose Chmc 713 830-3000 Ar1Labs The Art League at 1 pm. 713 225 941 t Gay Men's Olorus of Houuon. Open rehearsa1 at 7 p m 713·521·7464 HIV+ Men Psychotherapy. Montto~ Counseling Center. 1 •s p.m. 713-529 0037 R~laipse Prevention. Montrose Counseling Centier. 2 pm 713-529-0037. Aftercare Group Treatment. Mont rose Counseling Center. 6 pm. 713 529-0037 Women·s Therapy Group Montrose Counseling Center. S 30 p m 713 529-0037 Center for the tlealmg of RaCtSm. 7 30 p.m. 713 738 RACE FrontRunnen at 6 30 pm. 713-522-8021 HIV Art Course Program 1 to 4 p.m Patncl Palmer at 7135261118 Women's C m1c Montrose Ch~1c. 713-830-3000 Faoth and Hope Fellowship. Boble study 7 pm. 7' 3 520- 7847 Commuf'l.1ty Gospel Choir practace. 6:30 pm ~rv1cc at 1 30 p rr. 7' 3 880-9235 or www commumtygospel org lllV/AIOS Support Group 2 30 at famoiy S.rvoce C..nt 71Hl61-4849 Womens HIV/AIDS 5uppon Group. 4 30 pm Farmly S.mce C..nter 713 247-3810 HIV AIDS SupPof1 Ciroup 7 p m Family Service Center m Conroe 88$ 247 3810 Housto,, Lesh~,,. and Gay Commurnty Cent drop tn hours 6 to 9 p rn 7• 3 S24·3818 friday, jan. 7 Housto" Arca Teen Coaht1on of Homosexuals (HATCH l meets 113 942 1002 Aftercare Group Treatment Mortrose Counseling Center at 6 p m 71 l 529 0037 Frost Eye Om1c Free eye exams for people With HIV. 7 tJ 830-3000 lesh1an Avengers Cafe Toopees, 1830 W Alabama at 7 pm 0 Pauol walls the streets at 8 4S pm 71) 528-SAFE K lbc Pro1ect Park Plaza Hospita v1s1tat1on 713-861 1800 Posit ve Art Workshop 1 pm. to 4 p m. Patrn.k Pa mer at 713 5261118. Lesbian and C'.ay Vo1Ces. KPFT 90 1 FM. 1 pm 713 526- 5738 MoYte Time ot the Kolbe Proiect- 7 30 p m 713 522 8182 Life Beg ns at 40 Pot luck dinner 6 30 p m. 1440 tlarold. 71352&1017 M shpachat Aunm Shabbat S.nnces. 8 p.m 713 748-7079 C<K!ependents Anonymous 7·30 pm. at MCCR 113-861 9149 Houston L~1an and Gay Community Center drop tn hours 6 to 9 pm. 713 524 1818. Healing Eucharist at Ch--1st Church Cathed1al 7 pm 1117 Texa< 713-222-2593. Community Awareness for Transgc:tder Support (CATS) monthly meet ng 409 927-1705. To /isl an event ca// Carolyn Roberts al 713-519-8490. fdx ar 111·529 9531 ore-mad ~1tor@houstonvo1C~ com ~ddlm~ is Fnday at S p.m. Selling your life insurance • decision• IS a When you're ~my. living with HIV and thinking of selling your 3701 Kirby Drive life insurance. shouldn't you be given a face-to-face Suite 1036 consultation in a no-pressure, no-obligation environment? Houston, TX 77098 Shouldn't this option be discussed 713 528 6777 Linked Viatical Benefits is proud to be the only gay owned e-mail: jtxf@hotmail.com and operated viatical broker with a local office in Houston. After all, we believe in providing you the Registered in Texas personal attention you deserve and getting you the Member of most money in the shortest time! National Viatical Association Call 1·800·275·3090 today! LINKED VIATICAL BENEFITS 24 DECEMBER 31, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Business & Service Directory GOT KNOTS? Tim of L.A. Power ~lassage 7 Days a Week -....i.....-....;7;.....;;13·508·7896 if your hair is not BECOMING to you .... YOUR OUT & PROUD 'ti _T CLOTHING STORE ,,....__ ~ M GET PAID TO CRUISE THE INTERNET! ~ for info S please email :E lazwizrd1@yahoo.com a: 1J !_ BASIC BROTHERS DA SHOP ON LINE you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL ~---- ----- ---- hael A. Bartley M.D., P.A. our Near-Town Psychiatrist" General psych1atnc evaluauons • Appropnate medicabon management • Cash transaction receipt provided for insurance purposes • Medicare also accepted • Confidenuahty strictly respected • Se habla Espanol 500 Lovett Suite # 275 Houston, Tx 77006 713.521.3334 STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 ~lC: - 24-HOU R SERVICE - .:;:m 6, 8 & 10 Passcngtt Eq;ant Scretdt limou.sims. (713>6 86-3337 1 1 0 1 M 1 1 \ www.basicbrothers.com American & Foreign TAFT STREET AUTO I Aull Repair & Service 713-526-3723 1411 Taft Hoost1n.TX. 11019 T,\l\ E Our MYS TE RI ES Mystery Cafe Has Performed Hundreds of Private Shows for America"s Most Prestigious Companies. Bnng Your Company To Us or We'll Come To You! u\IL 713-944-CilIE BY APl'OIKTMEHT ONLY 1 307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 • AUTO • HOME • LIFE • LOW COST AUTOS LOW COST RENTERS MONTHLY PAYMENT PLANS TONY MAY INSURANCE AGENCY NATIONWIDE INSURANCE 713-807-8264 +11AC l~IllS'J1 AID+ FAST CASH! • Onsite Service •Repairs • Network Troubleshooting • Hardware Upgrades • Software Installation "We Make House Calls" 281-537-2842 Highest Price Paid! "Anything of Value" Houston's largest cash buyer of antiques, estates, furniture, col­lectibles, jewelry, automobiles, and glassware. FREE PICK-UP! 713-994-5986 281 -391 -7515 Call An ime • 7 do s a week G ~ r 20% off When You Mention Thia Adi CLAIRE BROTHERS FUNERAL HOME ~ Crcmatinn S431 00 Burials y,1th Metal Ca5kct $995.00 Trad1t1onal ~ uncral y, 1th Metal Ca.,kct Sl ,795.00 "Serving all Faiths with Compassionate Care" 7901 llillcroft I louston, Texas 77081 (7 13) 27 1-7250 In Business Since 1991 Perfection Plus Domestic Services Spedalists in Detail Cleaning FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED BONDED FOR YOUR PROTECTION MOVE-INS/MOVE-OUTS• SPECIAL PROJECTS WEEKLY • BIMONTHLY • ONE TIME ORGANIZATION OF CLOSETS & DRAWERS HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 31, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU My StarsL _ YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE by JILL DEARMAN Dec. 3 I - Jan. 6, 2000 ARIES (MARCH 21 ·APRIL 20) The new moon falls in your career house on Jan. 6, so get focused about what you really want to do for a living. It's a good time, too, to print up some business cards and let the right people know who and where you are. Make your presence known, especially to a Leo. TAURUS (APRIL 21 ·MAY 21) Jupiter moves forward in your house of the unconscious, so write down your wild fantasies and listen to what your dreams tell you. In love mat­ters, it may be time to commit rather than stay on the fence. A rela­tionship with a Capricorn may not completely make sense, but it sure could make you happy. GEMINI (MAY 22 ·JUNE 21) The moon will be in your house of love Jan. 3-4, so it could be hard for you to concentrate on work-you'll want to concentrate on another Gemini. But you could do extremely well financially if you hook up with the right business partners. Just be sure to follow through. CANCER (JUNE 22 - JULY 23) You have the resources to move on with your life and make the changes you've been too scared to make in the past. Friends can be a great source of support. The new moon on Jan. 6 falls in your house of love, so cuddle up with someone you care about, maybe a Libra. LEO (JULY 24 · AUG. 23) You should keep plugging away at the projects that give you the most JOY and the greatest sense of integrity. Stay quiet for awhile. You know who to charm and who to stay away from. Not everyone has to love you Let them go and focus on a Capricorn who does. VIRGO (AUG. 24 • SEPT. 23) Mercury (your ruler) moves into your house of creativity early in the year, so try your hand at writing something clever. It's also a good time to spruce up your home and give yourself the sense of safety and beau­ty you need. A Sagittarius, by the way, would look lovely in your bed· room. LIBRA (SEPT. 24 ·OCT. 23) Family members can provide you with important information in the days ahead. Pick their brains. You' ll get lots of insight. Build on your strengths: your creativity, your love of people and your belief in true love. You and a Cancer can make beautiful music together. SCORPIO (OCT. 24 • NOV. 22) It's fine for you to get into a little mischief. In fact, those closest to you (and your newest fans) are wondering what crazy scheme you'll pull next. But with Venus in your money house, you should think long and hard about how to make your dough grow. A Pisces has faith in you. SAGITIARIUS (NOV. 23 • DEC. 22) Jupiter (your ruler) brings you luck in all of the arts, especially the per­forming ones. Consider getting on stage and letting your bawdy and righteous sides shine. These days you're hard to resist. An Aries appreci· ates you· in and out of costume. CAPRICORN (DEC. 23 • JAN. 20) The new moon falls in your sign on Jan. 6, making this a power-time for you. Other people look to you for answers and advice. The more you give, the more you get. In love, you should take charge. Do some secret rituals to build your willpower; a Scorpio won't resist. AQUARIUS (JAN. 21 · FEB 19) Mars in your money house promises great rewards for your hard work. People expect you to ask for what you're worth. You're extremely sen· sitive these days, so keep your nearest and dearest on call at all times (especially a Pisces). A psychic breakthrough is coming soon. PISCES (FEB. 20 • MARCH 20) Enjoy the lighter side of life: Read more, see more movies, hang with your friends. You've isolated yourself in your dream world for too long. The more objective opinions you hear, the smarter and more successful you will be in the months ahead Learn from a Taurus. Jill Dearman is the author of two new books, NQueer Astrology for Men# and NQueer Astrology for Women.# For information on charts and consultations, call 212-841-0177 or e-mail QScopes@aol.com. "':\~ .. [ ... ti llLLltl DtLLAISI#• • Prices May Vary. See Storr For Details. 25 26 Classifieds Announcements Prism PRISM is an employee network for employees of Equilon Entcrpnses LLC, Motiva Enterprises, LLC Equ1va Services LLC, and Equ1va Trading Company. This net,.,ork JS open to any employee of these companies and includes Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual employ­ees and their fncnds. The nus­s10n of PRISM is to provide sup­pon for members and co-work­ers, promote equality for employees regardless of sexual oricntallon or gender idcntifica­uan and create awareness in management of issues and con­cerns affecting people in a diverse "'orkplacc inclusive of sexual oncntation and gender idcnufication. For more informa­tJon call Jim at 281.544.8138, Robcn at 713.241.1238 or Dick at 281 544.8730. STELLA LINK SEVILLE JANUARY 9. 2000- Stella L1nlc Seville, Candidate for Empress XVI of the RSICSS will be host­ing a candidate show entitled "Millennium Madness", held at the Brazos River Bottom. Show tJme 1s 8:30 drag .iandard time p.m Some of Houston's biggest and bnghtest stars will be per­forming. Draft Beer and Hot Dogs. Benefactors for the show arc Emperor & Empress XV for their stepping down at Coronatton XVI. Place To Play? If you play bass/acousuc guitar, brass or keyboards. a gay Chnst1an praise and worship team needs you Call 713686.7735. PROTECT PROTECT provides a safe place every Tuesday at Bering Memorial United Methodist Church, 1440 Harold, for HIV negative people to share their cxpencnccs in a cffon to under­stand and change behaviors that could lead to infcctJon. Visitors and new members arc welcome at every meeting. For more information. call 713.526.1017, ext. 211. DOMESTIC ABUSE Gay Men Survivors of Domcsuc Abuse offers suppon for gay men who arc 1n a current or past relationship with an abusive or violent partner. For infonnation or asscSliment/screcning. call Russ Rob1nen al 713.526.1017, ext. 211 . Leave your name and a safe telephone number where your call can be returned Community Resale Shop. 515 Richmond has been providing clothing to people living with AIDS for 14 ycan. We urgently need fall clodlCs. Open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. except Sunday. Purveyors of couture to starving artists of all ilks. Independent 501 (c) (3).713.528 2555. Education Spanish Classes Alfredo Samano B.AJM.A. Conversational Spanish • Be­ginning Spanish • Intermediate Spanish • Spanish College Instructor • Individual or Groups classes • 713.521.7805. Entertainm£nt Alfredo Samano B.AJM.A. PianisUOrganist Holiday Panics, Dinners. Company/Corporate Events • Weddings, Anniversancs, Rcccpuons. Over 30 years cxpe­ncnce. 713.521.7805. Employment CARTER & COOLEY Busy Heights area deli needs counter help. Apply in person • 375 W 19TH Street or call Doug at 713.864.3354. Window Media Window Media, the pubhshcd of the Southern Vmcc (Atlanta), Houston Voice (Houston) Impact News (New Orleans) and eclipse magazine is cxperi· cncing unprecedented growth with ambitious plans for the future. Talented, hard-worlang, creative and dedicated individu­als arc constantly in demand as opponuniucs arise within our publication areas: Sales, Adnunistration, Circulation/ DistributJon, Ed1tonal, Design/ Production. If you arc interested m a career path with a growmg orga­nization, please submit your resume to: Window Media. Attn.: Human Resources Dept., 1095 Zonolitc Road #100, Atlanta, Ga .. 30306. Help Wanted NEED SPACE? Seeking motivated massage therapist. personal trainer, nutri ­tionist and other health thera­pists to lease space in a new muhi-disciphnc health center. Historic Heights location. Convenient to Downtown, Montrose, River Oaks. Fax inquincs to 713.426.1258. MIDTOWNE SPA All shifts and positions. $6.50 per hour. 3100 Fannin. Apply in person only WAIT STAFF Wait Staff needed, Evenings 4 p.m. 6 nights • Mon-Sat •Apply in Person • Josephine's Italian R1storantc • 1209 Caroline <I Dallas • Behind the Four Seasons Hotel• 713.759.9323. Resurrection MCC Houston. Texas is seeking a director of Administration and Accounting. Please contact us at 713.861.9149 foqob dcscnption and application RESURRECTION MCC Expencnced musically degreed individual to direct and adminis­ter the music and worship pro­gram of Resurrection MCC­Houston, Texas. Full time • Contact us at 713.861.9149 or mccr@neosoft.com for an application. Nightingale Employment Services (Division of NADC) 1s a non-profit organ1zat1on that provides job seeking skills train­ing and placement assistance for persons with HIV. For more infonnauon call 713.981 1543. EROS 1207 Houston's newest crouc bou­tique super store 1s now accept­ing applicataons for energetic sales staff • Full/Pan-time, excellent opponunity • Apply in person, 1207 Spencer Highway, South Houston, TX, IOAM to 2PM, Monday through Friday • 713.944.6010. BASIC BROTHERS Now accepung applicauons for Management positions and full/pan-time Retail employ­ment. Prior retail/sales experi­ence and computer knowledge a plus • Come join our team and cnJOY one of the best benefit packages around • Apply M-F, 10am-4pm, 1232 Wcsthe1mer • No phone calls please. Executive Director Houston based pnvatc founda­uon is looking for an Executive Director posnion • Accounung, wnt1ng, propeny management stalls needed. • For more infor­matJon call 713.861.7063. Home Improvements BOOGIE & MARCELA Home Rcpat.r Service • 40 Years cxpencnce • Call us for all your repa.ir needs• 713.856.6188 GNP REMODELING Industrial • Commercial • Residential Painting • General House Repairs of all types • Free Estunates • 10% Senior Cihu:n discount• 281580.1900. Moving Services American Movers Visit us on the web• www.amcr­icanmovcrs. OIJ • 2412 A Taft • Houston, Texas, 770-06 • Now Statewide • TxDOT# 00528 2035C. • 713.522.1717 Licensed Massage Paul Rutledge• RMT #012781 • 7 days • Flexible hours 713.592.0444 Tim of L.A. Stress Rcducuon • 7 days a week• 713-508-7896 Massage Therapy at ns finest. • Swedish, Deep Tissue, Spons, Reflexology • Don't settle for less • In/Out, Hotels, 7 Days • Jeff #016074 (Nationally Ccnified) 713.524.5865. BODY TOUCH • Experience what cxpenencc can do for you! • Galleria Arca • Chaz Kolb (RMT#l3136). 713.712.0270. You Need Therapy! Massage therapy now available at Muscle Mechanics personal training & wellness studio - spons massage, therapeuuc massage, relaxauon therapy. Call now for your appoint­ment! Muscle Mechanics 713 523.5330. Pets The Homeless Pct Placement League 1s a Houston area, non­profit animal welfare organ1za­uon. HPPL provides for the rehabilitation of stray and aban­doned dogs and cats through its unique foster care program. All animals arc spayed/neutered and have their first set of shots. For more mformation call 713.862.7387 or view website at www.HPPL.org The Spay Neuter Assistance Program will provide FREE spaying/ncutcnng, rabies vacCJ­nations and city licenses for ani­mals belonging to qualifying low income dog and cat guardians. For qualifications and transponation infonnahon please call 713 522.2337 Professional Services BODY WAXING Personal groonung by Dale • Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist • Pnvatc Loc­ation in Montrose • Call for appointment 713.529.5952. Real Estate For Rent Heights 2/1 $575+ electric • New pa.int • Carpet • Central AC/H • Security Gates • Small complex • Gay managed/ fnendly 713.298.8999 or 713.868 2890. Heights House• Charming 1920 bungalow with many upgrades • 3/ l • new washer, dryer. refrig­erator, dishwasher. Central air/heat. No dogs/ $990. per month. 713.426.0319. DECEMBER 31, 1999 •HOUSTON VOICE HEIGHTS UPDATED GARAGE Efficiency • $400/mo • Bills paid • Low Deposit • No Pets • Available Now • No lease requtrcd. 713.8629775 MONTROSE Commercial & rc,1dent1al for lease • 2 SUllCS 675 & 875 Ml ft .(S700 & $90CVmo), 211 1500 <q ft ($1100/mo). Jn 875 <q ft. ($900/mo). All available now. Reduced S for qualified non·profit orgs. Hollyfield Founda110n 713.523.6900. MONTROSE Large 2BnB unit in 3 unit tropi­cal compound with pool. Hot tub, sun room, centrals. Fresh paint, carpet & hardwoods. Owner/agent 713.529 9304 MONTROSE $100 OFF FIRST MONTH'S RENT One bedroom in small gated complex • $450 plus ut11i­uci. • $200 deposit • Convenient to clubs and shopping • 713.524.4551. GREENWAY PLAZA 3308 Branard @ Audlcy • I/I 8 $475. per month• $150 deposit• Free basic cable • Move in spe­cial• Agent 713.524.9660 Apt. 4 Lease • Montrose New ITllnt-blinds /carpet • $495 per month with S 150 deposit • SI 00 off move-in special •Agent 713.524.9660. Exccuuve office sublease $250 per month. • One office in a very nice building located West Loop 610 near Bellaire Blvd. • Private entrance & suite number. • Call Rob at 713.661 7700. Real Estate For Sale LIVFJWORK LOFfS Non-tradnional lifestyle? Why not try a non-trad1t1onal way to live and work. New concept for Houston excellent South End locauon Call Alan Morlan CB Swilley Hudson 713.520 8888. Y2K? Don't worry. Call Alan Morlan at CB Swilley Hudson 713 . 520.8888. MONTROSE S250's • 3 Bedroom• 2 bedroom • I bedroom • Lots of potential . Call Alan Morlan or Bob Bczborn @ 713.520.8888. MUSEUM S60's • I bedroom • Nice Unn • Call Alan Morlan @ 713. 520.8888. HEIGHTS SISO's • 2-3 Bedroom • 2 in bath • 2 car garage • Townhouse • Pauo and landscaped counyard • Close to the Boulevard & 19th Street shopping. Call Alan Morlan @713.520.8888. Looking for a home on the Nonh side? • Call Bernie Johnson, Agent Keller-Williams Realty your Real Estate specialist, 281.364.4862 Roommates 1400 RICHMOND SGWM <eeks roommate (non­smoker/ drug user) to share 2/ I apartment. • Includes cable, sccunty gates, and pool • $375 month plus in of utilities • 713.520.7662. Travel/Resorts Island House • South Beach's Largest All Gay Gucsthouse • Rooms & Studios • Compli­mentary Breakfast and weekend Happy Hours • Walk to every­thing • 1428 Collins Ave. • 800.382 2422 • 305.864.2422 • 1hsobe@bellsouth.net. WAIKIKI Luxury ocean view • 18th floor • One bedroom condo in Waikiki • All amenities, fully furnished, including linens and remodeled kitchen. • Lovely terrace looks out to Diamond Head. • Secure building, non-smoking $99/night (double), 10 day nuni· mum, security deposit plus cleaning fee •Available Oct. '99 • Rates for mid Dec. '99 to mid Jan. '00- $199/night. •For more information email : glarp@carth­link. net or call 310.473.1871 (Los Angeles). ThcAbbett Inn, Atlanta's newest gay-owned B&B is also Atlanta's oldest, most authentic Victonan Inn. • www.abbct­tinn. com or 404.767.3708. Volunteers Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Volunteers needed at the Gay & Lesbian Switchboard-Houston www.gayswitchboardhouston. org. To sign up please call 713.523.4390 Web-sites www.sovo.com www.gayswildlboardhouston .org www.stevmdavld.com PET LOVERS Unique Pd Products www.pathpetproducls l~t!ji~~ ClASSNEDS REii.LY WORK Call Carolyn A. Rob«ru or Carol)"' Wbfce for Ra ... A I.to. 713-529-14,. HOUSTON VOICE• DECEMBER 31, 1999 HAPPY HOLIDAYS The new millenium is quickly approaching. We are kicking off Danburg Campaign 2000. I appreciate and look forward to your continued support. Please call (713) 52-Debra and sign up to volunteer. I need your help! 713.520.8068 District 512.463.0504 Capitol 27 AVAILABLE AT LOCATIONS ALL OVER HOUSTON r-------------------------------------------------------------------------• I 1 I I I I E:!f t I] I I voice Classified Order Form Fax: 713-529-9531, Phone: 713-529-8490 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON. Bring completed order form wrth payment to Houston Voice offices (M·F. 9-5:30 pm) 500 Lovett. surte 200. BY MAIL: Mail completed order form wrth payment to Houston Voice Classifieds, 500 Lovett. Surte 200, Houston, TX., 770CY6. BY PHONE: Call in wrth completed order form to 713-529-8490 BY FAX: Fax completed order form and credit card 1nformat1on to Classifieds 713-529-9531. BY E-MAIL: feedbad<Onoustonvoice.com AD POLICY: Houston Voice reserves the right to edit, reclassify or reject ads not meeting Houston Vo1Ce standards. No refunds for early cancellat!OO. Mispnnu: Houston Voice os not responsible for mK!>nnu appearing after first week. Check ads promptly PICK YOUR CATEGORY FREE: Call for guidelines HIV Services & Education Volunteers Non·Profit Organizations INDIVIDUAL RATE S7: Announcements _Auditions _ Employment-Seeking Pets-Free or Lost & Found Roommates Per•,onal Websites BUSINESS RATE S12: Auto Repair _ Business Opportunities =En tertainment Help Wanted _ Help Wanted-Seeking _ Home Improvement Items For Sale - Licensed Massage - Moving Services Professional Services Real Estate For Rent - Real Estate For Sale Call 713-529-8490 for other categories Deadline for ad submission is: MONDAY at 12 NOON WRITE YOUR AD Please print clearly CATEGORY: ________ #Of ISSUES: ____ _ Giant or Bold Headline - Not to exceed 14 characters and spaces L [l 1 IJ I LI I I [J_IJ TEXT: TOTAL YOUR COST CALL FOR BUSINESS CARD DISPLAY RATES INDIVIDUAL RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S7.00 per week Additional words at SOt each per week Up to 20 words: 7.00 Additional words __ x 50¢: ___ _ Bold head!~: lOO (pet week) Giant headhne S.00 (per week) BUSINESS RATE ADS Up to 20 words per w>ek. Subtotal. ___ x Total. s #of issues 1-3 weeks: 12.00 • 4-7 weeks: 10.80 • 8 or more weeks: 9.60 Additional words __ x 60¢ per word (per week): __ _ Bold headline: 300 (per week) Giant headline: 5 00 (per week) Subtotal x # of issues Total S __ _ Name: -----------------~ Address: ------------------ City ___________ State _ Zip _ _ Phone __________________ _ Check Endosed __ Charge to my 0 AMEX 0 MC 0 VISA Card # Exp.__J __ ----------- --------------------------------- --------------------------- - B R 0 T H E R S
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1001.pdf