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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
File 012
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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 012. 2005-04-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4119.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-04-08). Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4119

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 012, 2005-04-08, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4119.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 8, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 8, 2005 11 ■Pi Oillt RICHARD J. ROSENDALL John Paul II was an eloquent defender of human rights, yet objected bitterly to inclusion of gays and women. A pope of contradictions LIKE MANY FORMER Catholics, I have never lost my fascination for Holy Mother Church. When she gets you early, she never quite lets go. I thought of this while the news stations were in deathwatch mode for Pope John Paul II, and as his death was reported I recalled his first visit to America. I stood atop the steps of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C, on October 7,1979, listening via loudspeaker as Sister Theresa Kane, welcomed His Holiness on behalf of women clergy by urging him to accept women into all the ministries of the church. As the polyglot pontiff understood, she meant women priests. It was an exhilarating moment, witnessing the speaking of truth to power. Many of the women inside the shrine wore armbands, blue for the Blessed Virgin Mary, as an expression of solidarity with Kane's message: "It is appropriate that a woman's voice be heard in this shrine." There was hesitation in the pope's voice as he responded, obviously appalled. He awkwardly urged the nuns to return to wearing traditional habits. A week later (speaking of troublesome modern developments), the first national gay march came to Washington, and I remember the street vendors along the march route still hawking papal memorabilia. JOHN PAUL II WAS A POPE OF contradictions. He played a significant role in bringing down the Iron Curtain, yet he was one of the last authoritarian rulers in Europe. He was the first pope to recognize Israel, and initiated unprecedented ecumenical outreach to leaders of other churches, yet he aggressively suppressed heterodoxy within his own church. He was an outspoken advocate for the poor, yet he opposed the Marxist-inspired liberation theologians of South America, even though the leading oppressors on that continent were the oligarchs whom the leftist theologians were resisting. He was an eloquent defender of human rights, yet he objected bitterly to civil authorities granting a permit for a gay rights march in Rome. Three years before John Paul's ascension to the Chair of Saint Peter, the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith had declared that "homosexual acts are intrinsically disordered." Deciding this was insufficient, the new pope's chief doctrinal enforcer, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, issued a pastoral letter in 1986 stating that "the inclination itself must be seen as an objective disorder." Ironically for an organization that purported to defend families against a demo- nized minority, John Paul's church was Pope John Paul II is seen at the center of the judges of the Roman Rota, the Vatican tribunal that can grant marriage annulments, at the Vatican Thursday Feb. 1,2001. The pontiff said there was no possibility for marriage to be re-defined according to different cultural models, stressing again the Vatican's opposition to gay unions. Marriage is not just any old union between human persons, susceptible to being configured according to a plurality of cultural models, the pontiff said. (AP Photo/Arturo Mari) excruciatingly slow to respond to revelations that it had acted in effect as an organized crime network facilitating the sexual abuse of children by priests. Indeed, its first instinct was to stonewall and hire aggressive attorneys. In this scandal the church's insular and unaccountable men's club demonstrated in the clearest manner its feet of clay. Boston's Bernard Cardinal Law was rewarded with the highly prized post in Rome. Thus the idea that the church's ruler is divinely ordained and answerable only to God, long outdated in the secular realm, is extended by the Vatican even to criminal matters. ULTIMATELY, HOWEVER, IT IS NOT John Paul II's shortcomings or blind spots, but his many good works that point to the greater tragedy of this man and the world wide church he led so firmly for so long. Anyone who claims special access to divine wisdom, and leads a large organization dedicated to promulgating it, is bound to find himself, however good his intentions, at odds with what Thomas Jefferson called "the illimitable freedom of the human mind." Each of us is born with a priceless gift, a brain. Surely that gift should not be dishonored by refusing to think for ourselves. As the world mourns this contradictory man, this authoritarian freedom fighter whose pastoral journeys took him from Auschwitz to Jerusalem, my heretical brain cries out amidst the hymns and eulogies: No one has a monopoly on the truth. Richard J. Rosendall is a Washington- based writer and activist and can be reached at rrosenQall@starpower.net may be propc at the upcoming conference on the future. What are your thoughts? I think it is a great idea. Many of our community have moved out of Montrose. A GLBT business district with a good business mix targeted to our market could be an attraction to bring people back into Montrose. RICK TAYLOR, 51 Houston Business owner We have reached an era of GLBT buying power. If we work together, we can make changes in the GLBT community. "Knowledge is power." JOE REYES, 42 Houston Sole proprietor, 10 Inches To Go I think we should not segregate GLBT businesses into one district, but integrate all GLBT businesses into the Houston business community. JO CASADY, 40 Houston Management I think it will be a wonderful idea to create this business district in Houston. It'll show the rest of the nation and the GLBT communities how strong our community really is. ABEL RODRIGUEZ 46 Houston Funeral dwector/embalmer It's time for the community to band together and show a united front. STEPHEN OU BAY, 48 Houston Sates Rep, First American Title Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Interviews and photos by Datton DeHart
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