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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 008. 2005-04-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4115.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-04-08). Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4115

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 008, 2005-04-08, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4115.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 8, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 8, 2005 7 I arts cover story Pope opposed recognition of gay couples, condom use POPE, continued from Page 1 He also attempted to scapegoat homosexual priests for the church sex abuse scandals, according to Sam Sinnett, president of Dignity USA, a group for gay Catholics. Different time for gay Catholics During the 1970s, ministries were developed for gay men and lesbians within the Catholic Church. "When polls have been done among various religious groups, Catholics come out among the highest in supporting gay and lesbian rights. This could be because Catholic teaching is more complicated than some think, it does not condemn homosexual orientation," said Francis DeBernardo of New Ways Ministry, a 28- year-old ministry that seeks to build bridges between gay Catholics and the broader Catholic community. Despite a broadening sense of acceptance of gays within the Catholic Church, in 1986 Pope John Paul II issued a "Letter to the Bishops of the Catholic Church on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons." The letter, which was written in English and was seen as aimed at American Catholics, called same-sex attraction an "objective disorder" and "intrinsically evil." "I think it was obviously on his watch and his approval that we got the 1986 letter on homosexuality as a problem," said Mark Jordan, a religion professor at Atlanta's Emory University whose books include "The Silence of Sodom: Homosexuality in Modern Catholicism." "The view of that letter is now part of the official catechism of the Catholic Church and also been written into a number of other official documents, so it would be very hard to reverse," said Jordan, a gay Catholic. Dignity USA, founded in 1969, had been holding meetings in Catholic churches at that time.In response to the pope's 1986 let- The Vatican conducted an 11-year investigation into Sister Jeannine Gramick's ministry to gay Catholics before admonishing her in 1999. (Blade file photo) ter, Dignity chapters nationwide voted to no longer meet at Catholic churches. "This was quite traumatic," Sinnett said. "People are hurt by the church's language. We exist to support people who are integrating spirituality and sexuality." Dignity now has 3,500 to 4.000 members, Sinnett said, and has about 50 chapters. "There is an ultra-orthodox belief that the church is the people of God," Sinnett said. "The bishops may have shut out gays and lesbians, but gay and lesbian Catholics are still able to practice." Sinnett said that he attends a Roman Catholic mass with his Dignity chapter in St. Louis and the service is held in an Episcopal church. Why did some gay men and lesbians go to such lengths to stay close to a religion that had rejected them? "During the Vietnam era, conservatives used to say to protesters 'Love it or leave it' — they didn't understand the concept of loyal protest," Sinnett said. "Faith is a lot more [than the church's statements on homosexuality] we can dissent faithfully." Grassroots change In 1987, moral theologian Charles Curran was fired from his position at Catholic University because he refused to follow the Vatican line on homosexuality and birth control. Sister Jeannine Gramick began pas toral work with gay men and lesbians in 1971 as a nun with the School Sisters of Notre Dame in Baltimore. Gramick said she was encouraged and supported in this work by her church leaders at the time. "Gays and lesbians felt so abandoned, some hadn't been to church in 10 or 20 years and felt there was no place for them." Gramick said. "I told them every baptized person has a place in the church, it belongs to you as much as it belongs to straight people. Despite the support for her work, the Vatican conducted an 11-year investigation into what she was doing and in 1999 issued an order forbidding her to speak about homosexuality or about the church investigation of her ministry. "During [John Paul's] papacy, the movement for gay and lesbian rights at the higher level of the church deteriorated." Gramick told the Blade this week. "But the movement of middle management in the church in the U.S. progressed due to advocacy by gays and lesbians and their families. "The pope's pronouncements became much more repressive than pastoral. The documents produced by U.S. bishops show the contrast between what we see on the Vatican level and on the national level," Gramick said. Gramick said that the movement toward acceptance of gays within the Catholic Church will continue no matter what negative pronouncements come from the Vatican. Pope and politics State-by-state roundup of legislation MINNESOTA ST. PAUL (AP) — After a passionate debate last week that stretched over three hours, the Minnesota House voted 77-56 to put a gay marriage ban before voters next year. The bill would ask voters to amend the state constitution to define marriage exclusively as a union between a man and a woman. Supporters of the constitutional amendment said it would prevent courts from allowing same-sex marriages, even though state law already prohibits them. "The only way to ensure that activist judges don't circumvent the will of the people is by allowing the people of Minnesota to have their voices heard," said Rep. Dan Severson (R-Sauk Rapids), the bill's sponsor. "That definition may stand in our books." Democrats who opposed the ban said it would trample the civil rights of a minority without helping troubled heterosexual couples. "What single heterosexual marriage that exists today will be saved by the passage of this amendment?" said Rep. Keith Ellison (DFL- Minneapolis). "Nobody thinking about getting divorced today will change their mind based on this amendment." MAINE AUGUSTA (AP) — Gov. John Baldacci last week signed legislation that protects gays and lesbians from discrimination. Within hours, a religious group launched a campaign to overturn the new law. "This act not only offers essential civil rights, but serves as a welcome," the Democratic governor told supporters who packed the State House Cabinet Room. "Our doors are open to all people. This is a proud day for Maine." The law, which received final House and Senate passage the night before the governor signed it, takes effect in late June. The measure amends the Maine Human Rights Act by making discrimination illegal in employment, housing, credit, public accommodations and education based on sexual orientation or gender Maine law now prohibits discrimination based on race, color, sex, disability religion, ancestry and national origin. The new law will exempt religious organizations that do not receive public funds. It also makes clear the law does not condone or authorize gay marriages. COLORADO DENVER (AP) — A Republican-led news conference last week calling for a voter- approved ban on gay marriage included a sharp exchange after a state lawmaker brought up bestiality as he said the issue needed to be addressed. Rep. Jim Welker (R-Loveland) said voters need to draw the line on what marriage is and noted a woman in India had married her dog a year and a half ago. Democratic Rep. Angie Paccione (D-Fort Collins) confronted Welker. "Come on, Jim. It's not the same — it's not the same to have someone marry a dog than it is to have two loving people get married," she said. Paccione said the "moderate majority" that elected The Catholic Church, under John Paul II, argued not only that homosexuality is against natural law, but that gays should no protections under civil law either. In 1992 the Vatican issued a letter to bishops urging them to oppose gay rights initiatives. The pope pressured the Italian government to withdraw support for the World Pride Celebration in Rome in 2000. The pope also supported the Federal Marriage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to limit marriage to opposite-sex couples and asked bishops in America to become involved in campaigns against same-sex marriage. When the Roman Catholic Church in the U.S. became embroiled in the scandal involving priests sexually abusing teenagers, usually males, the Vatican suggested that gays should be excluded from seminaries. Sinnett, of Dignity USA, said John Paul II attempted to scapegoat gay priests during the scandal. In November 2002 the church released a letter entitled, "Doctrinal Note on Some Questions Regarding the Participation of Catholics in Political Life" which stated that Catholic politicians should advance Catholic teachings in their work. AIDS activists say that by traveling to Africa and speaking against the use of birth control and condoms, the pope set back efforts to curb spread of the disease and that many have died because of the pope's theological rigidity and opposition to condom use. While many gay advocates expressed hope that the next pope will develop more progressive positions on sexuality, 114 of the 117 Cardinals who will decide on a replacement were appointed by John Paul II, and many doubt that any major doctrinal changes are on the horizon. Van Cower contributed to this report. Democrats to power at the Capitol last fall wants lawmakers to focus on "kitchen table" issues like jobs, education and health care and not gay marriage. The child of a biracial couple, she also bristled at denying citizens rights because of their sexual orientation, saying it was once illegal for blacks and whites to marry TENNESSEE NASHVILLE (AP) -- A freshman Republican thinks his Web log is refreshing, but other lawmakers are offended. They say Stacey Campfield's blog is unfair and violates decorum. Campfield. who represents Knoxville, calls gay adoption and abortion "the new face of the Democrat Party" Under the title, "15 Ways to know if you are a Democrat in the Tennessee Legislature," Campfield offers such quips as "You believe that the gender roles are artificial but being homosexual is natural." From staff and wire reports
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