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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
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Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 001. 2005-04-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4108.

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(2005-04-08). Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4108

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, April 8, 2005 - File 001, 2005-04-08, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/4133/show/4108.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, April 8, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date April 8, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript MARRIAGE BILL: It now bans civil unions. Page 3 LOSS IN KANSAS: Muller, gays lose in Kansas. Page 5 Mixed emotions for gay Catholics Millions mourn pope who opposed gay rights By EARTHA MELZER ~any gay Catholics arc reflecting with mixed emo­tions this week on the life and legacy of Pope John Paul 11, uplifted by his dedication to world peace yet disappointed b)' his staunch opposition to gay rights and same-Sf!X marriage. John Paul II, who died on April 2. led the Catholic Church for 26 years and was the longest reigning pope in recent histor}: Some observers believe that the pope's strict tra· ditionalist views had to do with his exper ience lead­ing a church within a communist state he was a cardinal in communist Poland. As such, he was iso· lated from the liberalizing forces that were impact­ing the Catholic Church in other countries. "He has set us back to the early '60s," said Daniel Helminiak, a former Roman Catholic priest and author of "What the Bible Heally Says About Homo~xualil):" Helminiak, who is ga}; is now a psychology pro­fessor at the State Univl'rsity of West Georgia. He left the priesthood after 28 years in part because of the church's teachings on sexualit): John Paul II "institutionalized all of thl' restric­tions very solidly. They can be changed but it'll take some doing," Helminiak said. "And eventually thl'y will be ch:mged, I'm absolute!~ convinced, becaus" they're totally foolish, totally off base. But he's set the process hack decades." While the pope spoke out for peace in the Middle East and apologized for some past mistakes of the Catholic Church. he rigidly upheld the church posi tion th<it sex was for procreation onl}: The pope callPd homosexuality "evil," and used his position as head of the Catholic Church to oppos1• the use of condoms as birth control or to curtail the spread of A IDS. Especially the latter years of his papacy, John Paul exerted significant politir.al pres­sure iu:ainst gay rights and any form of secular recognition of gav relationships, from domestic part­nerships to civil unions and marrtage Please see POl'E on Page 7 Dunng lus 2b-year reign. Pope Jolm Paul II wrote a letter calling homosexuality evil and fought the use of condoms m curtailing the spread of HIV and AIDS. (Photo by Domenico Stmellis/AP) dish Time it was Time to remember the first-ever gay protest outside the Whitehouse Page 12 AWARD FOR DEAN: Some question his stance Page 6 Award-winning basketball coach Meny Stephens faced harassment in the Bloomberg School District because she IS a lesbian. Award winning lesbian coach settles discrimination case Basketball coach Merry Stephens was subjected to harassment at school because she is a lesbian By BINNIE FISHER Merry Stephens was named Teacher of the Year in Bloomberg, Tex in 2004 and Coach of the Year in three out of five year;. in her tenure as head coach of the Lady \nldcab basket ball team, but suddenly all that no longer mattered. There came a pomt about two years ago when her \\Ork was­n't good enough, and the Bloomberg School Dbtnct began pro­ceedings to term mate her employment What had gone '' rong? Shannon Minter. legal director for the Kational Center for Lesbian Rights (NCLR). said there \\as an explanation. Stephens Please see COACH on Page 4 local life When Equality l<nocks, supporters of equal rights for gays and lesbians are often found. PAGES The Village Voice dumped a load of gay gossip but left readers to name the suspects. PAGE 19 2 APRIL 8, 2005 HOUSTON VOICE v -GARDEN 2 0 0 5 A special issue, dedicated to your home, your garden ... your reflection. li fdlkitd 1i voice Look for it on the shelf on April 15th To Advertise in this special issue, Contad : Jason Wilson 500 Lovett Blvd, Ste 200 Houston, TX 77006 713.529.8490 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • B T X R • M 0 HERA WEI • MICRODERMABRASION • LASER TREATMENT • LASER PERMANENT HAIR RED TION • LASER TATTOO REMOVAL • PHOTO FACIAL • LASER BLUE LIGHT ACNE TREATMENT • PERMANENT MAKEUP • VARICOSE VEIN TREATME T • DERMA FILLERS FOR LIPOATROPHY Skin Care Cheri A. Post, M.D., offers the following services: • Laser Hair Removal •Acne & Acne Scar Removal • Botoxe and Restylanee • Facials and Peels • Vein Therapies • Microdermabrasion • Waxing and Tinting • Permanent Make-Up DermaHealth LASER ASSOCIATES 713-270-6505 your first visit! 6363 Woodway Dr., Suite 850 • Houston, Texas 77057 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com local ne s briefs Auctioneer Renee Jones Introligator Master of Ceremonies and Channel 2 Chief Meteorologist Frank Billingsley actress Sharon Gless and Maria Todd from KRBE all posed for a photo when the program con· duded at the HRC Gala HRC Gala goes down as group's most successful The annual gala staged Saturday night by the Human Rights Campai!,'ll's Houston chap­ter will go down as the most successful yet, accord mg to the three chair-persons for the event. In addition to drawing more than 1,000 guests, the event grossed more than $220,000, with $93,000 of that coming from the silent and live auctions. The theme for the 2005 gala, held at the downtown Hilton Americas Hotel, was "Masquerade.'' The featured guest was actress Sharon Gless, who plays Debbie Novotny on Showtime's 'Queer as Folk.' Gless, who was presented with the Humanitarian Award, chatted with guests and posed for photographs prior to the start of the dinner. 'The After Party' is seeking audience members each week "The After Party." the new Houston PBS arts and entertainment talk show is looking for people to make up the audience each week. Hosted by Ernie Manouse, the show airs at 11 p.m. Wednesdays. Each week, the audience 1s made up of 20 people who come in a group. Drama clubs. arts groups and other community groups are encouraged to participate. Groups must consist of 20 per­son~. Audience members are expected to show up at Houston PBS on the University of Houston campus no later than 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays (1 p.m. if they wish to tour the studios before taping begins.) Taping is com· pleted by 2:-15 p.m. To book a group, e-mail Manouse at Ernie(l1 HoustonPBS.org and include the name of the person making the request, name of the group, contact infor· matlon and available dates. Montrose Counseling Center assists victims of crimes The week of April 10 has been desii,'llated Crime Victims' Rights Week, and the Mont~e Counseling Center wants to make Houstonians aware that it has programs to a55ist victims of violent crlffie. The center's Anti Violence Program helps victims of vio­lent crimes including sexual assault. domCli· tic violence and hate crimes me for Crime Victims Compensation through the Texas Attorney General's Office. The State of Texas provides up to $50,000 for individuals who qualify, but the crime must be reported to police as quickly as possible, preferably within 72 hours. In addition to its oU.er scrv· ices, Montrose Counseling Center provides counseling and case management services to victims of violent crime. Information regarding crime victim's assistance is avail­able at www.oag.state.tx.US!victims. Further information on services offered through the center's Anti-Violence Program is available at 713-529-0037. Banned in Singapore but not in Houston The gay singing duo of Jason and deMarco. recently banned from performing in Singapore, will perform at 7 p.m. April 17 dur· ing Bering Memorial United Methodist Church's annual Apri!Fest. AprilFest at the church, 14-IO Harold St., kicks off with the annual 2nd Blessings Rummage Sale from 7 a.m.·2 p.m. this Friday and Saturday. Church members have brought household goods, fur· niture, clothes and more to help raise funds for the church. Apri!Fest closes with a Carnival and Pancake Breakfast from 7:~ Noon April 30. Cost for the event is $6 for adults and $4 for children 5-12. Admission to the Ja<;0n and deMarco concert is $10. The goverJJffient of Sing1pore dcnied a request for the pair to smg at a concert to raise money for AIDS charities because they celebrate a "gay 1 ifestyle." www.ja<;0nanddemarco.com. Sir Elton helps HGO celebrate its 50th Elton John, Renee Fleming and lesbian soprano Patricia Racette will be among the celebrities to help Houston Grand Opera celebrate it's 50th birthday April 30. The party gets underway at 8 p.m. at Wortham Center. Individual tickets are $250 and $."iOO. www.houstongrandopera.org. From staff and wire reports APRIL 8. 2005 3 lo al ws Committee is still considering proposed marriage amendment HJR-6 now contains language that would also ban civil unions By JIM NUU The Texas House Committee on State AffatrS is expected to vote as early as '.\tonday on House Joint Resolution 6, a bill that would not only ban same-sex mar­riage in Texas but would also outlaw "con· tractual agreements" designed to afford legal protections to unmarried couples. The committee last Monday conduct­ed a public hearing on the resolution introduced by State Rep. Warren Chisum (R·Pampa). Although Chisum initially proposed a constitutional amendment that would define marriage as being between one man and one woman, he later amended it to include the "contractual agree­ments" wording. The hearing began at 2 p.m. Monday and ran well into the evening as mainly opponents of the amendment showed up to testify. The 100-seat capacity chamber was filled to overflowing as Chisum read his proposed amendment. To a comment by Rep. Jessica Farrar (0-Houston) that the amendment would write discrimination into the constitution, Chisum said. "This doesn't discriminate against any­one. It discriminates against a practice, not a people" Randall Ellis, executive director of the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby of Texas, argued that the additional word· mg would have many "unfortunate unintended consequences." Kelly Shackelford, president of the Free Market Foundation and a support· er of the proposed amendment, arguPd gay couples would still be able achieve certain rights by having attorneys dra\\ up agreements for various issues, but it would be \\Tong for the state to give them marriage rights as a package. "This is clearly something that we can't put our heads in the sand about," he said. "Marriage between one man and one woman does things that no other relationship can do." Virtually all who testified were either PFLAG parents, representatives of organizations or gays speaking against the proposed amendment. Their testimo­ny was often emotional and included personal stories about themselves and their children. Dick and Jimmie Sue Francis, Austin parent~ of two gay children. pleaded with the legislators. saying, "This will harm you, particularly when you learn you have a gay child or grandchild. Someday you may have the opportunity to explain to them why you voted in 2005 to support discrimination against them." Dick and Jimmie Sue Francis of Austin were among those who testified in opposition to a pro­posed constitutional amendment banning gay mamage. (Photo by Jim NulO Marriage has changed over the years April Ayers of Houston noted that marriage has changed significantly over the years and that some states once pro­h1b1ted interracial marriage. She asked committee members. ''Twenty years from now, will we - society as a whole - be ashamed of our decision to discrimi· nate against the GLBT population as we are now ashamed of discriminating against interracial marriage?'" Contacted late Thursday, Farrar said, she hopes the language limiting ch•il agreements will be removed from the proposed amendment before the com­mittee votes next week. "One Republican member of the com· mittee approached me and said he was really moved by the stories," she said. The Committee on State Affairs will decide whether to send the proposed amendment to the full Hou,,e. Farrar said, some legislators who don't favor amend· ing the constitution are stlll likely to vote in favor of the resolution. ''That's the political climate we're in." she said. "If the situation is that it's OK to hate gays, then that's the political climate." Once the bill goes to the house, it will need to be approved by a two-thirds majority before being sent to the Senate, where it will need another two-thirds majority before being placed on the statewide November ballot. Ellis said LGRL is bracing for an ugly fight. Another Houston legislator sits on the Committee on State Affairs, Rep. Martha Wong, a Republican. She could not be reached for comment regarding the proposed amendment. @MORE INFO l.esbiaiVGay Rights Lobby of Texas www.lgrl.org 4 APRIL 1. 2005 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I local news Case of Merry Stephens is one of "mob mentality" COACH, continued from Page 1 is a lesbian, and school district officials decided she needed to go. :-ICLR and attorney Michael Shirk from the ~atlonal Education Association/Texas State Teacher's Association earlier this week negotiated a settlement agreement on behalf of Stephens. Under the agreement, Minter said, the school district agreed to ;iay Stephens for the last two years of her contract. "This wasn't about trying to get a lot of money," Minter said. Instead, he said, the settlement was about Stephens and all the other lesbian and gay teachers who have been fired because of their sexual orientation. "This has ~cen going on for a long time," Minter said. "Lesbian teachers and coaches have had therr careers destroyed by msidious campaigns like this." In Stephens' case, Minter said, not only had she been honored numerous times, but she had led her team to district, regional and semi-state championships, breaking school and district coaching C) MORE INFO National Center for Lesbian Rights www.nclrights.org Shannon Minter, legal director for the National Center for Lesbian Rights. said the case of Merry Stephens was settled without going to court becduse someone did the right thing. records in the process. All along the way, she received excellent evaluations. Then, Minter said. leadership of the d1Strict changed and Stephens found her­self fighting for her job. Stephens said she was suddenly sub· jected to intense harassment by superiors. On Dec. 14, 2004, the Bloomberg School Board began termination proceedings. We specialize in cosmetic laser procedures. si<rn- &J.?.aissance LASER CENTER Hair Removal Enhanced Skin Rejuvenation • remov~ blemi$hes and wrlnldN an alternative to facelift. Acne (Active & Scars) Rosacea, Shaving Bumps Face & Leg Veins Laser Peel/Resurfacing Restylane~ Botox® Gay owned and operated! Free consultations' Se hab/a np11nol Octavio Barrios, M.D. Carol Donnelly, P .A.-C 106 Westheimer at Bagby and Westheimer 713.942.SKIN (7546) "Merry Stephens is an extraordinary coach whose leadership and teaching skills were highly respected on the basketball court and in the classroom," Minter said. "This settlement agreement sends a power· ful message that discrimination will not be tolerated. The days when schools could dis· criminate with impunity against lesbian and gay teachers and coaches are past." .Minter said the settlement came days before a schEduled administrative hearing, after School Board President Derous Byers testified under oath in a deposition that the Board's decision to terminate Stephens was based on the personal anti-gay animos­ity of several school board members. Byers also testified that several school board members publicly disparaged Coach Stephen because of her sexual ori· entation. including stating that she "did not deserve to work" in the district because she is a lesbian, Minter said. 'Mob mentality' He describes what happened to Stephen as "mob mentality. You have a group of people who because of their own bias decide to ruin a teacher's life." Had it not been for Byers, Minter said, the case likely would have gone to court. "What was so umque to this case was to have that unequivocal testimony," Minter said. "Usually these things happen in silence and behind closed doors. Mr. Byers is just a good man who thought he ought to tell the truth." TSTA attorney Shirk noted, "In my 15 years of representing workers throughout Texas, rarely have I seen such bigotry and flagrant discrimination," He added, "I hope this settlement will teach the board members who set this in motion a lesson they should have learned a long time ago· that G<>d's grace and the laws of this State protect everyone equally." Stephens. who does not plan to ask for her Job back in Bloomberg, said she hopes that by standing up. she will give courage to others. "My focus has always been to be the best coach and teacher 1 can be," she said. "No one should have to endure hostility and prejudice. I hope that by speaking out, I will give others the courage to stand up for their rights.'' Helen Carroll, Sports Project Coordinator for the National Center for Lesbian Rights. applauded the settlement. "Coach Stephens' courage in refusing to silently endure this blatant discrimina· lion is an inspiration to the many others in her position; she is a pioneer in chang· ing hearts and minds.'' Minter said the outcome is bittersweet because, "Part of the sad thing about all this is that she ;-eally loves this town.'' Officials of the Bloomberg School District could not be reached for comment. Fort Lauderdale Real Estate ANDY WEISER Put Coldwell Banker's Top Producer to wor1< for You 954-560-9667 COLDWeLL BANl(C!RO www.AndyWeiser.com · RESEARCH VOLUNTEERS NEEDED • Did you know that sn estimated 40 ODO Amencans become mfected With HIV every year" • Thousands of rre women, srd children ere now living With HIV disease, and theres still no cure ADULTS AGES 18-45 UP TO $400 FOR TIME ANO TRAVEL we are looking for adults between the ages of 18 and 45 with no history of HIV infection to participate on an onvest1gat1onal vaccine research study for HIV If you qualify. you will receive free screening tests for HIV and up to $400 for tinoe and travel FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL CENTER FOR CLINICAL STUDIES 713.528.8818 Houston Medical Center Office 281.333.2288 Clear Lake Office www.ccstexaa.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I national news b iefs Kansas voters approve constitutional ban on gay marriage TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) - Voters in Kansas yesterday overwhelmingly approved a constitu­tional amendment to ban same-sex couples from marrying or entering into civil unions. With more than half of the precincts reporting, 276,876 votes, or 69 percent, were cast in favor of a constitutional amendment, with 121,836 votes, or 31 percent, opposed. Gay mar­riage is already banned under Kansas law, and the law is not being challenged. But sup­porters of the ballot measure said the ban must be in the Kansas Constitution to insu­late it from legal challenge. ''The marriage amendment is an unfortunate, necessary reaction to activist courts," said Republican state Attorney General Phill Kline. Among the opponents was Democratic Governor Kathleen Sebrlius. Kansas became the 18th state to put a prohibition against same-sex marriage in its constitution, and the 14th to pass such an amendment since the Mass:1chusetts Supreme Judicial Court deci­sion in 2003 that legalized same-sex mar­riage in that state. Lesbian Tiffany Muller lost her spat on the Topeka City Council to lawyer Richard Harmon. who captured 64 pcrcmt of the vote. Couple's effort to annul Conn. same-sex union rejected STA~1FORO, Conn (AP) A same·sex couple married in Massachusetts can· not get an annulment in Connecticut because the state does not recognize such marriages, a judge has ruled. The ruling was the first to address an attempt by an out·of-state gay couple to dissolve their Massachusetts mar· riage, according to Mathew Staver. president and general counsel for Liberty Counsel, a conservative group that opposes gay marriage. Granting the dissolution would have recognized the validity of the marriage in anoth· er state, he said. Hartford Superior Court Judge Linda Pearce Prestley, in a March UI ruling announced last week by Liberty Counsel, reJected an attempt by two women who live in Connecticut to annul their marriage. The women had filed a notice of inten­tion to marry in Provincetown, Mass .. but said they were unaware that the ~fassachusetts law excluded nonresi­dents. Prestley said the marriage was invalid because it violated Massachusetts law. so Connecticut had nothing to dissolve. N.Y. high court declines to hear gay marriage lawsuits ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - The state's high· est court last week declined to hear two cases contesting the state law that bars same·sex couples from getting married. The Court of Appeals ruled it does not have the jurisdiction to hear the cases before they first go to a lower appellate court. In February, state S\lpreme Court Justice Doris Ling-Cohan ruled the state law is unconstitutional, find· ing in favor of five same-sex couples who had been denied marriage licenses by New York City. The judge said the city clerk may not deny a license to any couple solely because the two are of the same sex The city is appealing the judge's ruling. Lesbian Tiffany Muller earned only 36 percent of the vote and lost her seat on the Topeka Kan. City Council on Tuesday (File photo) ACLU wants fonner students in religious group's Ky. suit ASHLAND. Ky. (AP) The American Civil Liberties Union has a~ked a federal court to let five former students and a par­ent join an eastern Kentucky school dis· trict in a lawsuit filed by a religious foun­dation over anti·harassment training. The suit, filed by the Alliance Defense Fund on behalf of a student and parents at Boyd County High School, alleges that anti· harassment training violates the stu· dent's first amendment rights of free speech and religion. The training is part of a settlemrnt of a previous lawsuit by thr Gay.Straight Alliance, a gay-rights cluh that had sought the right to meet on school grounds. The five students askmg to g1•t mvolved in the new case were plain· tiffs m the earlier suit. The settlement mandates that the anti-harassment tram· ing emphasize sexual orientation. Gay Foreign Service officer wins ruling in bias case WASHINGTON - A U.S. D1stnct Court judge in Frbruary ordered a State Department review panel to reconsider whether two U.S. consular officials in Brazil gave a gay foreign service officer a less than favorable job performance review in 1994 based on alleged anti.gay bias. Judge Gladys Kessler ordered the Foreign Service Grievance Board to disregard an earlier decision to dismiss a complaint by Karl Olson. who chargl'd that his two supervisors gave him a negative performance review for his duties as Chief of the Non·Immigrant Visa Section at the U.S. Consulate General's Office in Rio de Janeiro. He served in that post from 1993 to 1996. The supervisors, David Zweifel and Edwin Beffel, denied they had an anti ·gay bias and claimed they gave a favorable review to another gay official at the U.S. consular post m Rio de Janeiro. Zweifel and Beffel said their review prai.<;ed Olson for his work but said he was overly "officious" and too demanding. From staff and wire reports APRIL 8, 2005 5 ALLEY THEATRE ONE WILD AND CRAZY PLAY! STEVE MARTIN Is THE UNDERPANTS ADAPTED FROM A COMEDY BY CARL STERNHE M APRIL 1 - APRIL 24 HUBBARD STAGE $19 "CHEAP THRILLS" TICKETS AVAILABLE! lllE HUMPllRE\S FOL:-iDATIO~ www.alleytheatre.org MA•• u•• •ow.---"lllG Continental g 713.228.8421 Airlipes m e r.,.. oP~.al.41rl~dwAA.y ~ 6 APRIL 8, 2005 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I national ne s NLGTF honors Dean's record By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHL\;GTON - The :-.:auonal Gay & U!sblllll Tusk Force has been among the gay community's stro11t,<>eSt advocates for legaliz­mg samc-&!X mamage. So its dec1S10n to pres­ent Its annual Lifetime Achievement Award this week to a same-se.x maniage opponent drew attention to what many activists consid­er a vexing and complex issue that must be addressed cautiously and creativel): The Tusk Force was scheduled to present its Lifetime Achievement Award to former Vermont Governor and Democratic Party Chair Howard Dean on Thursday at a fundraising ceremony at the Omni Shoreham Hotel here. Kate ~fichelman, for­mer president of NARAL-Pro-Choice America. and Adam Ebbin, an openly gay member of the Virginia House of Delegates, were scheduled to join !l.'LGTF Executive Director Matt Foreman m pre­senting the mvanl to Dean. The event was expected to attract about 400 people and raise more than $75,000 for NGLTF. Dean emerged as one of the nation's most gay-supportive politicians In 200l when, as governor. he played a key role in shepherding through the Vennont legislature the nation's first bill to legaliz.e same-se.x civil unions. While remaining popular among gay actMsts, Dean disappointed many in the gay community during his 2001 campaign for president when he said he opposed same-sex marriage because he believes, on religious grounds, that maniage should remain an institution onl>· between a man and a woman. He said full equal rights and benefits for same. sex couples should be pursued through feder­al recognition of civil unions. Josh Earnest. a spokesperson for the DNC, said Dean fully supports the Democratic Party platform plan.ks on gay rights. He said that in his role as DNC chair, Dean would not be speaking on specific policy issues but would instead concentrate on building the party's infrastructure and financial support. Foreman said "'LGTF selected Dean for its Lifetime Achievement Award because of Dean ·s "extraordinary" support for both gay ciVII rights and non-gay progressive causes. "Dr Dean has been an ally for the gay com· munity for decades," Foreman said. ''He also has advocated other causes that the Tusk Force holds deai:" Although he opposed same-sex marriage, Dean's decision tc make his overall support for gay rights a central part of his presidential camp.1ign "moved" the other Democratic presidential contenders to a more supportive position on gay rights, Foreman said. Foreman noted that Dean also spoke out against a proposed constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. Robm Tylei; oo-founder of the national group DontAmcndcom. disagrees with the selection of Dean for the award. "What civil rights movement has ever given an award to Saturday, April 30, 2005 Hermann Park Golf Course 7:30 a.m. Registration 8:00 a.m. Shotgun Start S75 per player Sponsorships $100-$500 For Information, call 713-952-2617 Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church 2025 \\. l lth St. - Houston, TX 77008 - 713-861-9149 www.Resurrectionmcc.org someone who doesn't believe in total civil rights for that movement?" Tyler asked. Tyler noted that Dean's push for civil unions in Vennont came after the Vennont Supreme C.ourt ordered the state to adopt either a civil union or gay marnage bill. Although some gay activists wanted the legis­lature to pass a marriage bill, Dean and state legislators chose the civil unions option at a time when opposition to both was fierce among many Vermont voters. "OK. that was years ago," Tyler said. ''Hov.-ever, he kL>eps saying over and over that he still believes that marriage is between and man and a woman. In other words, he still believes in 'separate and unl'Qual' or mar· riage segregation," Tyler said. Added Tyler, "NGLTF should have given this award to a courageous, out5tanding Democrat who is an absolute frlend of the LGBT community - San Francisco ~1ayor Gavin Newsome. Instead. like abused chil· dren, we continue to grovel at the feet of those who continue to reject full equal right:; forus." Eric Stern, the DNC's former outreach director for the gay community and current executive director of National Stonewall Democrats, said Dean's record in support of gay rights offsets his position on gay mar riage. "We must push for full GLIIT marriage equalit):" Stern said. "But we would not move as fast in our efforts If we did not have some­one as boldly progressive a~ Howard Dean." Stern said Dean mentioned gay issues in Howard Dean. the chairperson of the Democratic National Committee, was scheduled to be honored on Thursday by the Task Force despite his opposi· lion to gay marriage. (Photo by Rudy K. Lawidjaja) his campaign speeches last year and contin· ues to raL<;e gay right:; issues in his appear­ances across the country as DNC chair, includ­ing his appearances in conservative Republican or "red" states. "Having someone like Dean go to red states to address our issuC'S is a big advantage for us," Stern said. JefT Sorer. chair of the DNC's Gay & Lesbian Americans Caucus. said Dean has yet to name a replacement for Stern as the D!\C's new gay outreach director, but he expects IX-an to fill the position. The gay caucus issued a statement at the DNC's winter meet· ing m February calling for the post to be filled. MOmOSE TABERNAClE THE PElllTECOSTALS OF MONTROSE OLD TIME• HOLY GHOST• CAMPMEOING BETHEL EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH (UCC) Q) No matter who you are, or where you are on life s journey, you re welcome at Bethel, the Church with Open Arms." Visit our Open and Affirming community this Sunday! 1107 Shepherd Drive@ Centw Strllt Houlton, TX nfJl/7 • 71i.161-4170 www~.org Sunday School Sunday Wonhlp Wednesday Worahlp 9:00AM 10:30AM 6;00PM HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 8. 2005 7 a s cover story Pope opposed recognition of gay couples, condom use POPE. continued from Page 1 He also attempted to scapegoat homosex­ual priests for the church sex abuse scan­dals. according to Sam Sinnett, president of Dignity USA, a group for gay Catholics. Different time for gay Catholics During the 1970s, ministries were developed for gay men and lesbians within the Catholic Church. "When polls have been done among var­ious religious groups, Catholics come out among the highest in supporting gay and lesbian rights. This could be because Catholic teaching is more complicated than some think, it docs not condemn homosexual orientation," said Francis DeBernardo of New Ways Ministry. a 28· year-old ministry that seeks to build bridges between gay Catholics and the broader Catholic communit}: Despite a broadening sense of acceptance of gays within the Catholic Church. in 1986 Pope John Paul II issued a "Letter to the Bishops of the Catholic Church on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons." The letter, which was written in English and was seen as aimed at American Catholics, called same-sex attraction an "objective disorder"' and "intrinsically evil." "I think it was obviously on his watch and his approval that we got the 1986 letter on homosexuality as a problem," said Mark Jordan, a religion professor at Atlanta's Emory University whose books include "The Silence of Sodom: Homosexuality in Modern Catholicism." ''The view of that letter is now part of the official catechism of the Catholic Church and also been written into a number of other official documents. so it would be very hard to reverse," said Jordan, a gay Catholic. Dignity USA, founded in 1969, had been holding meetings in Catholic churches at that time.In response to the pope's 1986 let- The Vatican conducted an ll·year investigation into Sister Jeannine Gramick's ministry to gay Catholics before admonish111g her in 1999. (Blade file photo) ter, Dignity chapters nationwide voted to no longer meet at Catholic churches. "This was quite traumatic," Sinnett said. "People are hurt by the church's Ian· guage. We exist to support people who are integrating spirituality and sexualit):" Dignity now has 3,500 to 4.000 members, Sinnett said, and has about 50 chapters. "There is an ultra-Orthodox belief that the church is the people of God," Smnett said "The bishops may have shut out gays and lesbians, but gay and lesbian Catholics are still able to practice." Sinnett said that he attends a Roman Catholic mass with his Dignity chapter in St. Louis and the service is held in an Episcopal church. Why did some gay men and lesbians go to such lengths to stay close to a religion that had rejected them? "During the Vietnam era. conserva­tives used to say to protesters 'Love it or leave it' - they didn't understand the con­cept of loyal protest." Sinnett said. "Faith is a lot more [than the church's statements on homosexuality) we can dis­sent faithfully." Grassroots change In 1987, moral theologian Charles Curran was fired from his position at Catholic University because he refused to follow the Vatican line on homosexuality and birth control. Sister Jeannine Gramick began pas­toral work with gay men and lesbians m 1971 as a nun with the School Sister~ of :\otre Dame in Baltimore. Gramick said she was encouraged and supported in this work by her church leaders at the time. "Gays and lesbians felt so abandoned. some hadn't lx.oen to chm·ch in 10 or~ years and felt there was no place for them." Gramick said. "I told them every baptized person has a place in the church. it belongs to you as much as it belongs to straight people. Despite the support for her work. the Vatican conducted an 11-year investiga· tion into what she was doing and in 1999 issued an order forbidding her to speak about homosexuality or about the church investigation of her ministry. "During [John Paul's) papa<:); the move­mmt for gay and lesbian rights at the higher level of the church deteriorated, .. Gramick told the Blade this week. "But the movement of middle management in the church in the US. progressed due to advocacy by gays and lesbians and their families. "The pope's pronouncements became much more repressive than pastoral. The documents produced by U.S. bishops show the contrast between what we see on the Vatican level and on the national level," Gramick said. Gramick said that the movement toward acceptance of gays within the Catholic Church will continue no matter what nega· tive pronouncements come from the Vatican. Pope and politics State-by-state roundup of legislation MINNESOTA ST. PAUL (AP) After a passionate debate last week that stretched over three hours. the Minnesota House voted 77-56 to put a gay marriage ban before voters next year. The bill would ask vol ers to amend the state constitution to define marriage exclusively as a union between a man and a woman. Supporters of the constitutional amendment said it would prevent courts from allowing same-sex marriages, even though state law already prohibits them. "The only way to ensure that activist judges don't circumvent the will of the peoplP is by allowing the people of Minnesota to have their voices heard," said Rep. Dan Severson (R·Sauk Rapids), the bill's spon· sor. "That definition may stand in our books." Democrats who opposed the ban said it would trample the civil rights of a mmority without helping troubled het­erosexual couples. "What single hetero­sexual marriage that exists today will be saved by the passage of this amend rnent?" said Rep Keith Ellison (DFL· Minneapolis). "Nobody thinking about getting divorced today will change their mind based on this amendment. .. MAINE AUGUSTA (AP) Gov. John Baldacc1 last week signed legislation that protects gays and lesbians from discrimination. Within hours, a religious group launched a campaign to overturn the new Jaw. 'This act not only offers essential civil rights, but serves as a welcome," the Democratic governor told suir porters who packed the State House Cabinet Room. "Our doors are open to all people. This is a proud day for Maine." The law, which received final House and Senate passage the night before the governor signed it, takes effect in late June. The measure amends the Maine Human Rights Act bY making dis­crimination illegal in emplo:yment, housing, credit, public accommodations and education based on sexual orientation or gender. Maine law now prohibits discrimination based on race, color: sex. disabilit); religion, ancestry and national origin. The new law will e.xempt religious organizations that do not receive public funds. It also makes clear the law does not condone or authorize gay marriages. COLORADO DENVER (AP) A Republican-led news conference last week calling for a voter­approved ban on gay marriage included a sharp exchange after a state lawmaker brought up bestiality as he said the issue needed to be addressed. Rep. Jim Welker (R-Loveland) said voters need to draw the line on what marriage is and noted a woman in India had married her dog a year and a half ago. Democratic Rep. Angie Paccione (D·Fort Collins) confront· eel Welker. "Come on, Jim. It's not the same :_ it's not the same to have someone marry a dog than it is to have two loving people get married," she said. Paccione said the "moderate majority" that elected The Catholic Church. under John Paul II. argued not only that homosexuality is against natural lav.: but that gays should no protections under civil Jaw either. In 1992 the Vatican issued a letter to bishops urging them to oppose gay rights initiatives. The pope pressured the Italian govern­ment to withdraw support for the World Pride Celebration in Rome in 2000. The pope al~o supported the Federal Marriage Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to limit marriage to oppo­site- sex couple::. and asked bishops in America to become involved in campaigns against same-~ex marriage. \\'hen the Roman Catholic Church in the U.S. became embroiled in the scandal mvolvmg pnests sexually abusing teenagers, usually malb, the Vatican <:ug· gested that gays should be excluded from seminaries. Sinnett, of Dignity CSA, said John Paul II attempted to scapegoat gay priests during the scandal. In November 2002 the church relea$• a Jetter entitled, "Doctrinal l\ote on Som• Questions Regarding the Participation of Catholics in Political Life" which stated that Catholic politicians should advance Cath. lie teachings in their work. AIDS activists say that by travelmg to Africa and speaking against the use of birth control and condoms. the pope set back efforts to curb spread of the disea.;e and that many have died because of the pope's theological rigidity and opposition to condom use. While many gay advocates expressed hope that the next pope will develop more progressive positions on sexualit); 114 of the 117 Cardinals who will decide on a replacement were appointed by John Paul II. and many doubt that any major doctri· nal changes are on the horizon. Yan r.o-- contributed to this report. Democrats to power at the Capitol last fall wants lawmakers to focus on "kitchen table" issues like JOb.s, education and health care and not gay marriage The child of a biracial couple, she also brbtled at denying citizens rights because of their sexual orientation, saying it was once ille­gal for blacks and whites to marl): TENNESSEE t-;ASHVILLE (AP) A freshman Republican thinks his Web Jog IS refresh· ing, but other la\\makers are offended. They say Stacey Campfield's blog is unfair and violates decorum. Campfield, who reir resents Knoxville, calls gay adoption and abortion "the new face of the Democrat Part):" Under the title, "15 Ways to know if you are a Democrat in the Tennessee Legislature," Campfield offers such quips as "You believe that the gender roles are artificial but being homosexual is natural." From sbff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 8, 2005 PAGES When Equality l<nocks, gays find supporters In just over a year, Equality Knocks has found more than 9,000 Houston voters who say they will vote in support of gay rights By DAWN RORIE Anyone who questions whether one person can rrolly make a diffl'rence may find the answer by looking at the leader­ship of Equahty Knocks. Tammi Wallace had no idea what lay In store for her a little over a year ago ·when she sent an e-mail to the Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas, asking how she could get involved. When LGRLexpressed interest In startmg a project In Houston that would identify voters who would be likely to support gay 1Ssues in the voting booth, Wallace agreed to lead the effort. With that, Equality Knocks was born. At first, the project consisted only of Wallace, her partnl'r, Beth Tudor, and a small group of dedicated volunteers. The group worked out of the couple's home. Ml\ly dining room was basically con· sumed with Equality Knocks stuff," Wallace remembers. Within a month, fifty people had signed on to help with exit polling in the 2004 primary election. Seeking to identify people who would vote in favor of gay civil rights ISsues such as marriage equality, volunteers organized block walks, stafieded phone banks. and set up tables at various gay events. By the end of last year. Equality Knocks had identified 9,000 voters who said they would support equal rights for gays and lesbians. At the beginning of this year, Christina Gomez stepped into the role of project drrector for Equality Knocks. Citing a proposed federal constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriage as the catalyst for her initial volunteer work for the project. Gomez decided to take on a leadership role wtth· in the group after seeing the devastating losses in the 2004 election. "That was the push I needed," says @MORE INFO Corrm.l1ity Worlc Day 10 am.-2 p.m. Saturday Houston GLBT Community Center 3400 Montrose Blvd, Swte 227 When Tammi Wallace asked. "What can I do to help· she found herself leading Equality Knocks. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) Gomez. Refusing to accept defeat. she real­ized that ''this is our chance to do some­thing about it. We are going to take hold of this and we are not going to let go." While identifying fair-minded voters is an important part of the project, Equality Knocks also works to fight for gay civil rights and educate citizens about the importance of those rights. Over the past year, the hot-button issue on the Equality Knocks agenda has been gay marriage. Many citizens, Wallace says, are not aware of the more than one thousand rights provided by a civil marriage, Including the right to visit a sick partner in the hospital. "Whether you agree or disagree with gay marriage, ''she says, "denying people basic rights and responsibilities to pro­tPl't thPlr families is wrong." Pushing for job equality Lq.i · lity Knocks has also been pushing for emp1o;ment non-discrimination pro­tections for gay men, lesbians, bisexuals and transgendered persons, as well as safe school environments for gay students. This year is shaping up to be an espe cially busy one for Equality Knocks. The group has recently been working to edu· cate voters about House Joint Resolution 6, the proposed marriage amendment to the Texas Constitution. State Representatives Martha Wong (R· Houston) and Jessica Farrar (0-Houston) are on the committee that has been con· sidering the amendment. Since Wong has not demonstrated sup­port for S3)' and lesbian equality issues, vol· untccrs worked tirelessly to encourage her con~tituents to contact her and encourage her to vote against the discriminatory amendment. It meant walking from door to door, talking to voters one-0n-0ne. "It's Important that we put a face on the issue," explains Gomez. Volunteers are encouraged to share personal stories to inform voters of the dangers that such legislation poses to families and children. In addition to fighting discrimination, the members of Equality Knocks have been working on restructuring the organ· '1 J(ffi:I "0 ~>:ID ~llilTII:~ ft Equality Knocks Founded. 2004 Founded by. Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas and the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus (PAC) Address: 1302 Waugh Drive, PMS 536. Houston TX 77019-3908 Web site www.lgrl.org/equalityknocks Phone 713-521-1000. ext. 2 ization itself. Originating as a result of a coalition between LGRL and the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus (PAC), Equality Knocks has been growing at such a pace that the leadership has decid· ed to create Equality Houston, a stand· alone organization that will house the proJect and continue its work. Wallace, who is currently serving on the board of HGLPC, will serve as presi· dent of Equality Houston. The challenge, she says, lies within the need for resources: dollars, supplies, and most importantly, volunteers. "Volunteers are needed in all areas," Gomez explains. Every person can add something to the group, no matter what their skills or level of involvement. It was because of the need to reach out to the community, other organizations, and potential volunteers that the Community Work Day was born. Group leadPrs and volunteers gather to work on projects and to meet people and talk one­on- one with them to fmd out how they can get involved. Gomez stresses that equality will only be won by people making a personal deci· sion to help bring about change. '"Every voice counts," she insists. Besides being a po. itive way to get involved. volunteering for Equality Knocks is a good way to make friends. "You meet so many people doing this," she acids. On Saturday, Equality Knocks and the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus will conduct a Community Work Day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Houston GLRT Community Center at 3400 Montrose. Anyone interested in learning more about the work of Equality Knocks is encouraged to attend. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 8, 2005 9 out in houston (Photos by Dalton DeHart) At the Human Rights Campaign Gala last Saturday, actress Sharon Gless, who plays Debbie Novotny on Showtime's 'Queer as Folk' talked with attorneys John Nechman. who received an award from HRC. and Mitchell Katine, an attor­ney who worked on the landmark case that struck down the Texas sodomy law. Actress Sharon Gless (right) received the Humanitarian Award from Maria Todd of 104.fM KRBE during the HRC Gala Pranksters in Pumps, a fundraiser for the Montrose Softball League, was a rousing success last weekend. Houston City Council Member Gordon Quan threw out the first pitch at last week­end's season opener for the Montrose Softball League. and observers reported it sailed directly over home plate. Randall Ellis (center). executive director of the Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas and Sue Lovell (right). who is running for At-large Position 2 on the Houston City Council, JOined Houston City Controller Annise Paricer (left) at the kickoff of her next re-election campaign. Kim Padgett (far left), owner of The Padgett Group, welcomed (from left) Monterey County vintners rep­resentalive Rhonda Motil Ramon Ontiveros. Krystal Peoples and Jennifer Eberi1ard to a wine tasting event hosted by the Monterey County Vintners and Growers Association. can You ... • M,1. people hke you? 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ELLA m.ER. SHANA NICHOLSON. JA CHAPMAN. ANO ANAS BEN MUSA PhotO!Japhets DALTON DEHART. KIMBERLY THOMPSON Procklttion JAMES NEAl Wellmaster ARAI.I VARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION GeneraUm1ger JASO~. :. LSOt jwilsoo(iz:houstOl1VOICe.COlll Sales ExecutiYe DAVID TRUONG - dtruong:_a.houstonvoice.axn Classified Sales I Office MrWistrator JOHNNY HOOKS - Jhooksa.houstonvoice.ax National Ad'll!rtising ~ Rivendell Media. 212-242-6863 N>isher- WINOOYI MEDIA LLC President· WILLIAM WAYBOURN Elit.orial Di'ect.or- CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNITTE HOLSTON Art Din!ctor- R06 BOEGER Din!ctor of Operations- MIKE KITCHENS Di'ect.or of Sales· STEVEN GUERRINI Di'ect.or of Classified Sales- NATHAN REGAN ~~·RON ROMANSKI rn ........ co., I c;..,. 11E1111ER CHARTER MEMBER 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas n006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 www.houstonvoice.com Office hours: 9 am.-5:30 p_m. weekdays To Sliimit a letter letters shat! be Mr- than 400 words. We 11!51.'M! th! rJjlt ID ecit for a>ntent nf lerJ;;tl!. We wil witfl. lllld nanl5 ~ mμ5t. but yw l11JSI udd! your name and i:fme rurber b' verificaticn Please send mail ID Houstoo \tice,. 500 LIM!tt BM!. StAte 200 Houstoo. Texas 77006: bx (7l3) 529-9531 or e-!1l.1il IDe!itor.i ~~expri=d therein oo not refled those of th! lbistcrr Von>. edi orial A papal smear Against the torrent of media coverage of the pope as much-beloved, we should not forget the human cost of his policies on gays and condom use. By CHRIS CRAIN TWAS LIKE RONALD Reagan all over again. For the second time in less than a year. we have witnessed a tremendous outpouring of grief and love for a major historical figure whose record on HIV I AIDS and the treatment of gay people was disturbing, at best. Except this time the mourning masses and fawning media coverage has been world....,ide, not nationwide, and the his· torical record is downright pernicious, rather than unforgivably neglectful. We all knew Ronald Reagan, even if he wasn't a friend of ours, and Pope John Paul II was no Ronald Reagan. Where the former president responded in an irresponsibly slow manner in the early years of HIV I AIDS, the former pope actively blocked HIV prevention in an unconscionable fashion. Where President Reagan largely ignored early attempts to enact gay rights legislation, Pope John Paul heartlessly campaigned against gays and their families. The laudable role played by the Polish pope in bringing down the totalitarian communist states of Eastern Europe has been told and retold countless times since his death. But as was the case in the days following the death of the former presi· dent, the media has reduced to passing mention - or ignored entirely the for· mer pope's controversial record on the issues of particular importance to gays. THERE ARE VARIOUS THEORIES about why this pope was so aggressively regressive In his views about sex in gen­eral, and homosexuality in particular. Some say he had been sheltered m Poland by the Iron Curtain from the groY.ing scientific. psychological and social understanding of homosexuality and the aspirations of gay people. Others argue that he was more concerned about re-establishing authoritarian order in a church whose believers had largely rejectcc: Vatican teaching on sex. Like all priest~ and nuns who take a vow of chastity, he was uniquely unequipped to plum the complex depths of human sexu· ality in any meaningful fashion. Whatever his reasons. his record is clear. John Paul II inherited Roman Catholic doctrine that viewed "homosexu­al acts• as "intrinsically disordered," and he quickly expanded that insulting label to mere •homosexual attraction" as well. In the face of a universally recognized population explosion of crisis propor­tions, and the global pandemic of AIDS that was killing millions and orphaning tens of millions, this pope adhered to tra· ditlonal Catholic dogma that the use of condoms is a sin. And more than that, he used the influ· ence of the church, especially as it grew in the Third World countries of Africa and elsewhere, to discourage condom use, and to block HIV prevention programs that dared to differ. The human cost of those choices will be tallied for generations, but it's already clear the body count for which John Paul bears responsibility is far larg· er than the several million who have flocked to Rome to pay him last respects. IN THE LATTER YEARS OF HIS papac); John Paul II aggressively breached the wall between church and state and lob· bied Western governments against treat· ing gays equally under civil law. This campaign came even as a shock· mg scandal of sexual abuse by priests, facilitated by the active neglect of the Vatican, was proving once more that the Roman Catholic leadership lacked basic understanding of adult sexual behavior. Any non-religious institution facing such clear evidence of misguided thinking, neg· ligent oversight and active cover-up would have been so thoroughly discredited that il~ views on anything related to human sexuality would be rejected out of hand. But Pope John Paul II, after only addressing the ~-ue directly a handful of times and acting in baby steps only after the outcry was impo~ible to ignore, was undaunted. Rather than retreat to reconsid· er whether centuries-old thinking about sexuality and celibacy caused or con· tributed to the crisis, the pope's spokesman joined a chorus of cardinals and bishops blaming the inexcusable sexual abuse of boys and te<>nage males on - you guC'SSetl it gay priests and homosexualit): If the pope were Jewish, such SC'.tpe­goating might quality as chutzpah of epic proportions. As he was not, the more Catholic description of "intrinsically dis- HOUSTON VOICE APRIL 8. 2005 PAGE 10 ordered" or "evil" seems more apt. Whether as a distraction or because the arrogance of papal "infallibility" knows no bounds, Pope John Paul contin· ued until his dying months to attack any effort to lend civil legal recognition to gay couples, even though doing so would expand health insurance coverage and · ensure a more stable home and protected future for children raised in gay families. THE PRESS EVENTUALLY GOT AROUND to filling in the dark side of Ronald Reagan's legacy, and there's every reason to believe they'll do so with this pope as well, especially as the cardinals meet to choose his successor. Hopefully the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and our other advocacy groups won't lose their voices for fear of offending "people of faith," every. one's favorite post-election focus group. Don't expect the next Roman Catholic pontiff to hand down or even allow a more tolerant posture on gays or condoms, much less apologize for John Paul's shameful record. The Vatican waited until 1992 to finally apologize for forcing Galileo to recant his view that the earth revolved around the sun, and it was eight years later before John Paul apologized for two millennia of Catholic Church actions that mocked the teachings of Jesus Christ. If we are to challenge religious tenets like those of the Roman Catholic Church, we should be direct and straightforward. So far, gay rights groups have joined Democrats in ceaseless talk about "hav· ing conversations" with people of faith, which comes off sounding like an espe­cially meaningless episode of "Oprah." Catholic and non-Catholic heterosexu· als need to understand that the church's teaching on homosexual sex is essentially the same as their own sexual behavior; Every act is sinful unless specifically intended to pro-create; that means no marital sex for pleasure and no condoms or birth control. Because our homosexual behavior can never have that aim, and our "homosexual attraction" is recog­nized to be "innate," gays are to be entire· ly chaste: no love, no sex, no nothing. Even Catholic priests, who at least can marry the church, have proven incapable of living up to that restriction. The Catholic doctrine on homosexuali­ty is indefensible, and when it is fully explained, is completely out of step with accepted modern ideas about human sex· uality. Sometimes it takes a few good funerals for real progress. but don't expect the burial of Pope John Paul II help the blind men in charge at the Vatican to finally see. I Clvis Crain is @ executive editor -of the Houston Voice and can be reached at ~ / HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com o int RICHARD J. ROSENDALL John Paul II was an eloquent defender of human rights, yet objected bitterly to inclusion of gays and women. A pope of contradictions LIKE MANY FORMER Catholics, I have never Jost my fascination for Holy Mother Church. When she gets you early, she never quite Jets go. I thought of this while the news sta· tions were in deathwatch mode for Pope John Paul II, and as his death was report· ed I recalled his first visit to America. I stood atop the steps of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception in Washington, D.C., on October 7, 1979, listen· mg via loudspeaker as Sister Theresa Kane, welcomed His Holiness on behalf of women clergy by urging him to accept women into all the ministries of the church. As the polyglot pontiff understood, she meant women priests. It was an exhilarat· ing moment, witnessing the speaking of truth to power. Many of the women inside the shrine wore armbands, blue for the Blessed Virgin Mary, as an expression of solidarity with Kane's message: "It is appropriate that a woman's voice be heard in this shrine." There was hesitation in the pope's voice as he responded, obviously appalled. He awk· wardly urglXl the nuns to return to wearing traditional habits. A week later (speaking of troublesome modern developments), the first national gay march came to Washington, and I remember the street vendors along the march route still hawking papal memorabilia. JOHN PAUL II WAS A POPE OF contradictions. He played a significant role in bringing down the Iron Curtain, yet he was one of the last authoritarian rulers in Europe. He was the first pope to recognize Israel, and initiated unprecedented ecu­menical outreach to leaders of other churches. yet he aggressively suppressed heterodoxy within his own church. He was an outspoken advocate for the poor, yet he opposed the Marxist-inspired liberation theologians of South America, even though the leading oppressors on that continent were the oligarchs whom the leftist theologians were resisting. He was an eloquent defender of human rights, yet he objected bitterly to civil authorities granting a permit for a gay rights march in Rome. Three years before John Paul's ascen· sion to the Chair of Saint Peter, the Vatican's Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith had declared that "homosex· ual acts are intrinsically disordered." Deciding this was insufficient, the new pope's chief doctrinal enforcer, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, issued a pastoral Jetter in 1986 stating that "the inclination itself must be seen as an objective disorder." Ironically for an organization that pur­ported to defend families against a demo­nized minority, John Paul's church was g business:.-:"* may be prop I think it ts a great idea. Many of our community have moved out of Montrose. A GLBT business district with a good business We have reached an era of GLBT buying power. If we work together. we can make changes in the GLBT community. "Knowledge is power." at the upcoming conference on the Mure. What are your thoughts? mix targeted to our market could be an attraction lo bnng people back into Montrose. RICK TAYLOR. 51 Houston Business owner JOE REYES, 42 Houston Sole proprietor, 10 Inches To Go APRIL 8, 2005 11 Pope John Paul II is seen at the center of the judges of the Roman Rota the Vatican tribunal that can grant marriage annulments, at the Vatican Thursday Feb. 1. 2001. The pontiff said there was no possibility for marriage to be re-defined according to different cultural models. stressing again the Vatican's opposition to gay unions. Marriage is not just any old union between human persons. susceptible to bemg configured according to a plurality of cultural models. the pontiff said. (AP PhotolArturo Mari) excruciatingly slow to respond to revela­tions that it had acted in effect as an organized crime network facilitating the sexual abuse of children by priests. Indeed, its first instinct was to stonewall and hire aggressive attorneys. In this scandal the church's insular and unaccountable men's club demon­strated in the clearest manner its feet of clay. Boston's Bernard Cardinal Law was rewarded with the highly prized post in Rome. Thus the idea that the church's ruler is divinely ordained and answerable only to God. long outdated in the secular realm, is extended by the Vatican even to crimi­nal matters. ULTIMATELY, HOWEVER. IT IS NOT John Paul Il's shortcomings or blind spots, but his many good works that point to the greater tragedy of this man and the world· wide church he led so firmly for so long. Anyone who claims special access to divine wisdom, and leads a large organi­zation dedicated to promulgating it, is bound to find himself, however good his intentions, at odds with what Thomas Jefferson called "the illimitable freedom of the human mind." Each of us is born with a priceless gift, a brain. Surely that gift should not be dis· honored by refusing to think for ourselves. As the world mourns this contradictory man, this authoritarian freedom fighter whose pastoral journeys took him from Auschv.itz to Jerusalem. my heretical brain cries out amidst the h~mns and eulogies: No one has a monopoly on the truth. ~ Richard J. RosendaD is a Washington· ~ based writer and actiVtst and can be reached at rrosendall@starpower.net I think we should not segregate GLBT businesses into one dis· Irie!. but integrate all GLBT busi· nesses into the Houston business community. I think 11 will be a wonderful idea to ere.lie this busmess dis· trict in Houston. It'll show the rest of the nat1011 and the GLBT commumltes how strong our community really is. It's t1111e for the commuruty to band together and show a urut­ed front S1IPHEN DU BAY, 48 Houston JO CASADY, 40 Sales Rep.. Frst American Trtle Houston Managemeni ABEL ROORIGUEZ. 46 Houston Flllel'al chctor/entalmer Sound off about what's happening in your world at www.houstonvoice.com/soundoff. Interviews and photos by Dalton DeHart GAY HOUSTON NIGHTLIFE, ARTS & CULTURE www.houstonvoice.com Anwar Robinson next? Those damned bloggers seem determined to have a gay contestant on 'American Idol.' Page 19 ---- APRIL 8, 2005 ----------------~ pivotal protest APRIL 17 MARKS THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF HISTORIC, PRE -STONEWALL DEMONSTRATION By BRIAN MOYLAN ORTY YEARS AGO, JACK NICHOLS and his partner, Elijah Clarke, sat on the floor of their home in D.C. making signs for a gay civil rights prote;;t. Nichols' friend and gay roommate said, "You guys are crazy. People are going to attack you." MNo they aren't," Nichols replied. "They're just going to stand there and ooh and ah, just like you are now" Nichols was right. On April 17, 1965, he and nine other protesters - including gay civil rights pioneers FrankKameny and Lilli Vincenz held a gay civil rights protest in front of the \\ltite House for two hours, and no one was attacked. To honor the anniversary of this pivotal protest, the Rainbow History Project, a i::roup dedicated to preserving Washington. D.C.'s gay histol'}: has po. ted information about these early gay civil rights advocates on the group's Web site at wwv.:rainbowhistory.org, pickets.him. "With the {X>S.~ible exception of a picket in New Yorlt, this was the first public demonstration by gay men and !es· bians," says David K. Johnson, author of "The Lavender Scare: The Cold War Pe.r;ecution of Gays and Lesbians in the Federal Government" and a history professor at the University of South F1orida in Tampa ''Thts was the begnuung of a whole series of organl1.ed demonstrations." The previous protest in New York was a spontaneous event led by six civil rights activists in :-:cw York City who publicly voiced their objection, in front of the \\ltitehall Induction Center, to the military's anti.gay policies. That first demonstration In D.C was arranged overnight, but it was a long time coming. It all began m 1961, when Kameny founded a D.C. chapter of the ~lattachine Society, a social and political group for gays that started in Los Angeles in 1950. In April 1965, Nichols and Clarke heard reports that Fidel Castro was putting gay people Into work camps in Cuba, and tht'y decided this would be the perfect reason for a picket. They called Kamen}: \~ho eventually agreed that the time was right for a demonstrauon. "I always felt that we would [picket) some clay and soon," Nichols. 27 at the time, says. "But nothing ever seemed to be so significant that It required that we do it. But putting~ pie away [in camps) filled the bill.• The two men started calling up friends and fellow activists to try to round up a group for the next day; Nichols made the signs. "Except for Lilli Vincenz's," he says. "She made her own She wa~ al\\ays very independt'nt. · Vincenz, 27, says that she got a call from Nichols and agreed to attend, even though she was to take the two­part test for Mensa (the "high IQ'' club) th" next day "1 was [at the test] with my shopping bag and my A group of protesters picketing for gay civtl rights in 1965 in front of the Pentagon. This was part of a series of actlOllS that year after the initial demonstration m front of the White House on April lZ (Photo by Kay Tobin Lahusen) sign," she recalls. "But the picket was at a certain time, so I didn't have time to take the second test." Twenty-two then, Paul Kuntzler, a :\lattachine mem­ber says he got a call from Kameny and agreed to attend. Nichols also recruited Gail Grnen, who also was 22 at the time and married to her first husband. The other five protesters who attended that day were Gene Klecberg. bisexual Judith "J.D." Kuch, Perrin Shaffer, Jon Swanson. and Otto Ulrich. Shaffer and Ulrich are now deceased. GREEN. WHO RECALLS THE EVENT AS "EXCITING," said sht' was a bit afraid. "We were more or lt'ss afraid we would lose our jobs," she says. Nichols says he \\ouldn't let Clarke attend the protest because he worked m the Office of the Joint Chief.~ of Staff and would likely lose hts Job. Vincenz. who was t'Xpciled from the mihtalj' in 1963 for bemg a lesbian, was working as a waitress at the time "I was between careers, and I could aflbnl to do it," she says. "We all could afford to do it or could take the risk." Vincenz eventually became a psychoanalyst. The news media were not notified before the event so that no one could prevent the demonstration or investi· gate the people who were there. The picket was covered briefly in the Washington Afro-American. The protest took place without a hitch and bolstered everyone's spirits. Shaffer and Ulrich wore sunglasses during the event to partially hide their identities. •·on a drep level. I had the feeling that we were doing something important by ht'lping our society," Green says. Vincenz echoed Green. "Next to my wedding ... that was the most important day of my life," she says. Both Vincenz, 67, and Kameny say that the direct action their group took put them at odds with many gay people at the hmt', who would have preferred to stay in the closet. "There wrre people who disapproved on a variety of levels, saying that this was undignified," Kameny says. ~ichols had other feelings about the protest. "I was certainly glad that we had the gumption to do what we did, but I wasn't patting myself on the back," he says. There were more protests to rome. FIRST, IT WAS BACK AT the White House on May 29, then in front of the U.S. Civil Service Commission on June 2G, next at the Pentagon on July 31, on to the U.S State Department on Aug. 28, and finally back at the White House on Oct 23. The final White House pick· et had a contingent from the newly formed Chicago :\fattachine Society, bolstering the numbers to 65. By then. the l\lattachine Society had a system for notifying the media b<"forc and after each protest to gain attention and coverage. News organizations like Reuters, magazines like Confidential, and even CBS News covered the protests, organizers said. Certain guidlines were established for protests that included men wearing suits and ties and women wear ing dresses. The idea was to give homosexuality the best image possible for the public. organizers said. Also that year, l\lattachine joined the Philadelphia chaptr.r of the Daughters of Bil it is, a lesbian group. and began holding an annual protest on July 4 in front of Philadelphia's historic Independence Hall. It took place every year through 1969. but was callt'd off in 1970 in observance of Christopher Street I.1beration Dm; one of the nation's first Gay Pride events nation. · THIS YEAR, ON t.IAY I PENNSYLVANIA Gov. Edward Rendell, a J>emocrat, is srheduled to unveil n plaque In front of Independence Hall commemoratmg the protests. "We were the fringe of the fringe of the outer fringe," Kameny says. "We\e gone from the fringe to being remPmh red personages." MOVIN' IN: A gay former Houstonian is back with the tour­ing cast of the hit Broadway show, 'Movin' Out.' Page 15 I MARTHA DOESN'T KNOW: Don't get your Houston gardening advice from Martha Stewart. Page 16 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com APRIL 8. 2005 13 14 APRIL 8. 2005 Register for your Sport or Cultural activity or for the International Conference now. Come to compete hard and furious and enjoy everything there is to enjoy. World dass facilities, a great friendly city and much, much more. The one international Rendez-vous you don't want to miss! • Quebec:: ••• www.houstonwice.com HOUSTON VOICE IN 2006 MONT 0 1 1worldOutgames Ren L-Vou;, Montre I 2006 26 July - S August 2006 AIR CANADA@ aircanada.com/gay HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JOHNNY HOOl<S Former Houstonian and gay dancer Sean Kelly is back with the moves of Twyla Tharp and the music of Billy Joel Swingin' to Billy Joel MANY PERFORMERS IN MUSICAL theater are required to learn one or two parts at best. However gay dancer and former Houstonian Sean Kelly must learn all the male parts as the dance cap· tain/swing on the first national tour of the Billy Joel and Twyla Tharp Broadway musical 'Movin'Out'. "It's funny, we have what we call 'swing moments' in rehearsal, where suddenly you find yourself on the wrong side of the stage, going into a different role than what you're rehearsing," he says. Sean Kelly was born in San Raphael, in Marin County, California. There he trained at the Marin Ballet, under the direction of Maria Vegh. Though he refuses to give his age, "Are you kid· ding?" he laughs, he will admit to being in his late 30's. Isn't that a bit old to be performing in a show that is nearly all dance? "Well, if I was still in performing classical ballet, then I would say yes." he says. "But this show is contemporary in every way." Sean Kelly lived in Houston from 1985 through 2000. "It was nice to have a steady paycheck, and I loved living in Houston." he recalls. "The city really supports its arts community, and that is so refreshing." Kelly was a member of the Houston Ballet and danced here for many seasons as a Principal Dancer, eventually becom· ing Ballet Master. He danced all of the company's full-length classics and many contemporary works by such choreogra· phers as Ben Stevenson, George Balanchine, Glen Tetley, Christopher Bruce, Paul Taylor, Jiri Kylian and Stanton Welch, among others. Kelly has been on the road for many years now. He is single and doesn't even have time for a pet. "I am just never home." Previously he toured the US and Japan as Dance Supervisor with the musical 'Swing' and has been a guest artist with a variety of companies throughout the U.S. as well as abroad. Recently he staged Ben Stevenson's 'Cleopatra' for both the Boston Ballet and Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. Kelly is also a choreographer having creatrd numerous works with the @MORE INFO 'Movin' Out' April 12·24 Broadway in Houston Hobby Center 800 Bagby 713-629-3700 www.BroadwayAcrossAmenca.com Former Houstonian Sean Kelly is the dance cap­tain/ swing for the first national tour of 'Movin' Out.' (Photo by Joan Marcus) Houston Ballet as well as Diablo Ballet, Lexington Ballet and Ballet Spartanburg. He has been invited to teach at the Houston Ballet Academy, the Beijing Dance Academy, the High School for Performing and Visual Artists and Tulsa Ballet Theatre's summer program. Not happy to rest on his laurels, Kelly has participated in three international ballet competitions and was a member of the original Broadway cast of 'Movin' Out,' which v.'On Tony awards in 2003 for Best Choreography and Best Orchestrations. THE SHOW'S STORY FOLLOWS FIVE friends from their 1960's high school graduation to their reunion some years later. In between, everyone finds or loses love, the men go to Vietnam (where one perishes on the battlefield), and everyone must readjust to life after the war. With no traditional dialogue, the story is told through more than two dozen or so well-known Joel songs like "New York State of Mind," "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me," "Angry Young Men," and "Uptown Girl," among others. Tharp 's delicious choreography tells the rest of the stor}: An exhilarating band is led by Darren Holden, who sings lead and plays piano. AskE'd what he mL~ses most abouf Houston, he says, "The people and mv friends. Even though the early '80s w~re a tough timr in Houston, I really liked it." The last time Kelly was in town was a sad occasion, thr funeral of his friend and local ballet star Mark Arvin. This time. in addition to chowing down on Texas barbeque, he says, "I also can't wait to go to JR's and the Brazos River Bottom! There is nothing like line dancing with a cute cowbo}:" APRIL 8. 2005 15 HoustonGrandOpera ~ www.HoustonGrandOpera.org Don't miss two grand productions based on immortal works of Shakespeare. Romeo and Ju/tel stars Ram6n Vargas and Ana Maria Martinez as the famous lovers m a story of mnocence and heartbreak. l!ltemat1onal superstar Bryn Terfel portrays another side of love as the .. fat kmght" Falstaff, whose unrequited lowe for Ahce ~ord -soprano Patricia Racette -will have you laughing out loud. ~c ,, ROMEO AND JULIET April 22, 24, 27. • 2" May 6,* 8 Corporate G1c, · ..:! , wantor· ® SHELL Oil COlll'MT FOUNDATION l{ul FALSTAFF Aprti 28, May 1, 4,* 7, 13,* 15 Corporate Guarartor and Med a Partner nme Wamef Cable Corporate Guarantor Anadarko Petroleum Grand Guarantor. Albert and Margaret Alkek FoundatlOll • Special discounted performances. Call for details. RE-BUILD YOUR CREDIT with easy payment arrangements upon approval. • LOW INCOME • BANKRUPTCY • RE-FINANCING • msT l'.ONSOUOAnnN Call 1.866.837.3840 l6 APRIL 8, 2005 ~ c ingular BROAOWAY •• HousTON GET TICKETS TODAY! • APRIL 12-24 Hobby Center for the Performing Arts BroadwayAcrossAmerlca.com or call 713-629-3700 :ii!:\; llii:z:l!ll':: Groups of 20 or more: 713-693-2692 -~icu ~ --- --.. ....... ., .......... ..,.!!:_= •19o •.v .. &MN .t .,-'~~~IOM..D ,.._lllllU•~ .... Tht• Saned llrart So(·irty of Little l ork Presents ta Festa Siciliana A Trip To the Old World An Italian Experience APRIL 16th & 17th S\T. 10 il\I - 10 Pi\I I srN. 1 Ll\1 - 6 P.\I 816 E \\'hitn(~~· St., Houston •Trip to Italy for 2 Raffle! • \uthentic Italian Foods & Desserts •Live Bands & Daneing •Pasta Eating Contest •Children's Ac·tivities •Door Prizes • Bocce Ball Tournament & Lessons Buy 1, Get 1 Free Admission with ad www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE ho111e ELLA TYLER Get your Houston gardening information from the gay garden club, Urban Harvest, the Texas Extension Service, from anybody but Martha Don't listen to Martha MARTHA STEWART MAY BE OUT OF prison and back to advising America about its recipes, crafts and gardens. but that doesn't mean that we Houstonians should listen. at least to her gardening pronouncements. Her gardening advice is wrong, wrong, wrong for Houston. So, although her decla· ration that she would be out of prison in time to plant her spring garden showed me that she is a real gar­dener and doesn't just play one on TY, it is too late for us to PLANT a spring garden. That does not mean that we cannot BUY a flower­filled, absolutely gorgeous spring garden. Nurseries all across the area have a mix of cool-weather and hot-weather bloomers now. The cool-weather bloomers - spring garden to Martha -are in full bloom. Annuals such as petu­nias, snapdragons, stock, alyssum and primroses will probably not thrive past the beginning of June. Some refer­ences, even local ones, list marigolds as hot· weather plants. but they really are happier in cooler weather. Annuals complete their life cycle from seed to bloom to seed - in one grow­ing season. Unless they reseed, they will not be back next year. Since there's not a lot of time for these plants to grow. buy big ones. Look for ones that have open flowers and lots of buds. Perennials bloom for a short time once a year. then. with the right conditions, good care and luck. they bloom again in the following years. The conditions that cause problems for perennials are our summer heat and/or our lack of cold. Some plants just need cold dormancy to bloom. Fuchsia~. for example, don't make it through the summer; no matter how hard you tr): Enjoy one, then send it to a friend who lives in a cool. moist climate. Geraniums will stop blooming in the sununer. but if you keep them in the shade and move them back to the sun when it cools down, they might bloom again. It does not get cold enough here for ft MORE INFO Garden and Yard Club 713-661-6378 or 713-863-1066 Urban Harvest www.urbanharvest.org Texas Extension Service texasexteflSJOfl.lamu.edu/ag nr.html tulips to bloom again, but amaryllis and some kinds of daffodils and lilies will come back. MOST BUSHES THAT ARE FLOWERING now will not flower again this year. To avoid transplant shock, which causes the flowers to fall off, dig a hole and put the pot in the hole. As soon as the flowers fade, take the plant out of the pot and plant it properly: Some gardeners I know recommend cutting off the bottom of the pot, slitting the side half-way-up, then putting the pot in the hole. After filling the hole half way with dirt, cut the rest of the way up the side and remove the pot. I am certain I would hurt myself, so I have never tried it and do not know if it works. It is not too late to plant seeds for sununer-llowering annuals. Cosmos, zinnias, celosia and sunflowers are really easy to grow from seed. Others, such as periwinkles and begonias are tricky, but are available now in small pots. The plants will get big soon enough if you feed and water them regularly: You may plant gladiola, dahlia, gin­ger and caladium bulbs (or tubers) now. Gingers and caladiums pre­fer shade. Many vegetables and herbs are decorative and edible. Lettuces do not like hot weather, so buy plants. Tomat()('s set fruit when nighttime temperatures are below 70 degrees, so grab some of the already pot­ted plants of many varieties are available now. I bought one that has flowers alread}: Peppers and okra are easy to grow from seed, as are melons, cucumbers and summer squash. They are so easy to grow. be prepared to deal with lots of whatever it is you are growing. There are varieties of watermelon that produce small fruit. but the plant is still big. Vegetables and herbs require a lot of sun. The first rule of successful gardening is "chose the right plant for the right place." Add, "plant it at the right time" and most of the battle is won. There is plenty of help for novices. Any good gardener in your neighborhood will be glad to give you advice, and the lesbian and gay gardening club (Garden and Yard Society) meets the second Friday of each month. Urban Harvest hosts classes and gives great advice about gardening here. Books are full of gardening inform· tion, but use a local one. When Martha starts her .show up again, turn the TV off when she talks about gardening. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com J.A. CHAPMAN The ambience leaves something to be desired, but exceptional cuisine with a South American flair makes Meson del Sol an extraordinary find in Houston South American flair "I FEEL LIKE I'M AT A BANQUET hall," my dining companion remarked as we took our seats in the spacious dining room at Meson de! Sol Simple white walls with innocuous decorations, a dance floor in the center of the room, industrial carpet, and ivy· topped Roman columns definitely leave the impression it's a reception hall. Which in fact, it is. The owners rent out the space under the moniker of Hacienda del Sol for par· ties and corporate gatherings. And with a stunning v1eY. of the downtown skyline, and an outdoor deck. it's a great setting. But the rest of the time it's a rcstau· rant And that's why we were here Meson del Sol specializes in South AmeriCTm cuisine. with nods to other gas· tronomic influences. Italian pastas make an appearance. as do Caribbean, Tex·Mex. Creole and Hawaiian dishes. There's something for everyone. They start you off with chips and salsa. The chips are homemade from tortillas. and the salsa is chunky and full of flavor. The appetizer menu is not your typical collection of starters. The patacones with cheese ($2.99) are worth a try. Mashed green plantains are flattened into patties and then deep-fried and topped with shredded cheese. The patacones are thin. crispy and tasty, but the cheese adds little. I preferred mine plain with a little salsa for spice. Be sure not to miss the excellent Peruvian ceviche ($ 7.99) - tilapia lightly mar~ted in lime, red onion and cilantro. The fish is ten· der and perfectly done. It's served with avo­cado slices, mango salsa, and crackers. There's plenty to share with friends. The tilapia in chipoUe sauce ($15.99) is one of the house specialties. The fish is lightly breaded, pan seared until just flaky, and served on a creamy, spicy chipo· tie sauce. It's simple, but well executed. The polio de la casa ($12.99) is also worth a try. Grilled chicken brca~t is topped with a creamy spinach and mushroom sauce that's full of flavor. The chicken is fork-tendei~ and the sauce is packed with spinal'h no skimping here. The Caribbean shrimp ($15.99). done in a creamy tomato based Creole sauce, were a touch overcooked. but still tasty. And the Serrano's rib eye steak ($16.99), a gen· erous cut of black-angus beef, was cookPd exactly to order. MAIN DJSIIES COME WITH STIR·FRIED vegetables. which were spicy on one visit, bland on another, but always tender crisp. Also on the side, the fried sweet plantains arc not to be missed. Tender, very sweet and crispy on the edges, they are quite simply some of the best I've ever had. Because of its proximity to a school, Meson del Sol is BYOB. If you bring your own wine, they'll open it for you and pro­vide glasses. They' ll even keep your bottle of white cool and top off your glass. Just because alcohol isn't S('rved does not mean drinks aren't available. The homemade fruit juices are among the hid· den gems at Meson del Sol. A wide variety of fruits is used, from the familiar straw· berry to the more tropical passion fruit. Made ('ither with water ($2.49) or milk ($2.99). they're cool, refreshing and filled with flavor. The milk version is almost like a dessert smoothie, and indeed is a perfect way to round off your meal. The service at Meson de! Sol is efficient, but the wait staff isn't always well informed on the menu. They are friendly and helpful, however. and will do their best to find an answer if they don't know it offhand. The food at Meson del Sol is excellent. Fresh ingredients expertly prepared make it worth a visit. But the ambience leaves something to be desired. The room seems quite empty when only a few tables are filled, and the linens. silverware, and china seem more typical of a catered event than a fine restaurant. It's an odd juxtaposition. Even with the banquet hall feel, Meson de! Sol is worth a visit. A restaurant of this quality where you can bring your own alcohol is an unusual find. (o~ Meson del Sol 1220 Taft St 713·529·6255 www.mesondelsol.com Food •••• Service: • *,.. Value: 19'!9!'91 Scene: * '911/2 .. = Stay home and eat cereal 191 ,. = Well, if you really must rel 191 le!= Fine for all but the finicky !el,.• • =Worth more than a 20-minute dnve !e! le! ,. • • =As good as you'll find in this city APR! L 8. 2005 17 stay &~~Additional Parking Available emNERdl ::i~~E,l!! 1111 WESTHEIMER OPEN for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner with a full bar 7 DAYS a week Early Morning and Late Night 1220 Taft Street Houston Texas 77019 713-529-6255 info@MyCateringCompany.com Full Service Catering Corporate Events Carry Outs & Delivery From Breakfast to Late Dinners 18 APRIL 8. 2005 ADVENTURE HAS A NEW DESTINATION. AMC MEYH PAI« 11 S. Poll Oal!ll S LOO\) 211-31MAMC Ql<fMAAX IHLlll!ES 111S810W11 'llS1CllASI 3!00••-PD!1 713-9'2-l lll LOEWS THEATRES W ION COMMONS RI. 6.S.al290 1-800fANDNIGO AMC AMC Dl!lllOOlllolil24 FllST COLONY 24 U.S. 59H 6 1960 !ml lal!IOIFllOU.11111 21l-311-4AMC 211-31MAMC AMC OHEllARK lHE.lll!ES ONEllARK IHLITRES D.'i!'MAAX IHEAll!ES OTY MIUS 20 HOUYWOOD · USA !llllllOll!IJAClllllCll'f TlllSalOWll - Al Kar. II Mall 20 I 0 E 8'llway 8 Eas!FwyO- 1600Laktl!olJOlns 211-31MAMC 713-475-0081 713-330-3951 211-- QNEllAR!(JHE.llRfS ONEMAAX IHE.lll!ES aHEMAl!K THEAIRfS LOEWS nEAIRfS TINSElTOWN290 WEISTl• 11 OTY FOUNTAINS lt#V 290 0 NW I 00 1-45 0 NASA RO 1 W 6lond Pkwy. N SWfwf -GlllOA 713-32t-H75 211-332-1-400 211 ·371-tooO l llOOFANOANGO LOfWS !HfATRES lf.ISIC.lfflSONlllLl!lEl AWIO DW1 HOUSI EDWARDS CINEMAS SPRING NOITHUNI MALL WEST Oill IWL HOUSTON llAWl 23 1-45 & Holzwofth 1-456~51. 1000 Wesl!)Ol<S lldl l.d!.1yfTt •Sb~ HIOOFANOANGO 1 ·800fANOANGO 211 -551·5200 81)().f!HllAHGO (371) Just because the state does not recognize it. ;d;~ Does not mean you can't. TuE GALAXIE JEWELERS we Create the Unusual 2511 Sunset Blvd. (near Kirby) 713.521.2511 - AMC WlUOWllOO« 24 Hwy 249 • 1 ll60 211·31MAMC AMC SlUDIO 30 2949 DllMM 211·31MAMC AMC GUlf l'OINTI 30 m~3~.~8 EDWARDS Cl~EMAS '81!1!Wll$1.lilOPWC! I dSWFwy CllWlsic!<ll 800-flHllANCO (370) ~' 2001 MCAF Diamond Star Award ,_,_00.-..c. Houston \'c c R1 ~ CL.,-c - Bcs1 Jcwdcr < ( r 1004 The(;alaxieJe'lVelers.cont JOHNNY HOOKS Two new restaurants are opening, there's a new wrinkle at the Community Center, and The Art of Living Together' Opening in Montrose IT'S TIME TO GET OUT AND ON THE Go-Go with your only weekly column on all things queer in the Bayou City FlRSTTHOUGH A BIG CONGRATUIATIONS to Amanda Carmichael who was the lucky winner at Club Eve of two killer seats to last weeks Margaret Cho perform­ance! You go girl! WELL IN LIGHT OF ALL THE CLOSINGS in the hood, it's nice to be able to talk about some openings. The space that once housed Cafe Noche at 2409 Montrose is being retooled as Senior Rita' 'Already the building has "I fresh coat of saffron·colored paint and four very "Christo-esque" triangular sails have been installed on the patio. Back in the day, the Senior Rita's in the Village was the place to be apres brunch. Patios packed, disco blaring, boys and girls everywhere. ALSO NEW AND OF NOTE IN THE Montrose is Aladdin, a new restaurant at Montrose and Westheimer. Word is that the new owners have invested big money on the decor inside; the transfor­mation on the outside is obvious for all to see. HotGG's only question is this. Where are all the patrons going to park? Even with running valets, the streets in the area are filled with Pacific Strt·•t revelers every night. Will be interesting to see how this shakes out. WHILE OUT AND ABOUT THIS weekend, take time to see "Coexistence­The Art of Living Together"' on view at Hermann Square, 901 Smith. in front of City Hall. This traveling exhibit 1s brought to you by the Holocaust :\luseum of Houston and the City of Houston. Free and open to the public daily, this exhibit teaches tolerance and diversity through art, film and dance. Something we could all use more of in this day and age ... Ciao Karol! 713-942· 8800 for more info or visit www.hmh.org. GET YOUR DIRTY CAR WASHED AND help the Lambda Center this weekend. The Lambda Center is holding a fundraiser Car Wash , Saturday from 8 a.m. to l p.m. at 1201 W. Clay, between Montrose and Waugh. It's for a good cause so please stop by. With all the pollen on cars, HotGG can't see your rainbow flags! THE HOUSTON GLBT COMMUNITY Center debuts a new performance night, called "Featured at the Center" this Friday. Poet and singer Aaron Coleman Aaron Coleman hosts ''Featured at the Center" this weekend at the Houston GLBT Community Center. hosts " Featured" where talented commu­nity members can present music, dance. poetry and other spoken-word perform· ance, stand up comedy, film or display works of art. "Featured" takes place on the second Friday of every month at the Community Center. 3400 Montrose, suite 207. There is no admission charge, however donations to the Community Center are welcome always! Performers and artists interested in participating in any "Featured" program should contact Coleman in advance at 713-522-0712 or aaronssongslO yahoo.com. MR. OOti GILL HAS TURNED THE reigns of the Mr. Prime Choice event this year, over to Mr. Robert Harwood of Key's West. Mr. Prime Choice weekend still remains at The Ripcord, and this year we have two handsome men compet ing for the title: :\1r. Laurence Van Valkenburg, from Galveston and Mr. Greg Misak yan. While there is no talent portion per se. the filmed fantasies are not to be missed. Mr. Prime Choice is crowned this Saturday night at the Ripcord, 715 Fairview. FINALLY DARLINGS. KEY'S WEST WILL be the sight of memorial show for Russell Box, called "Ima Cummin'Home" Presented by Miss Ima's Friends. the evening benefits People with AIDS Holiday Charities and gets under­way at 7 p.m. at Key's West, 817 West Dallas. 713-571-7870 for more information. "1l If you have any club announcements or ~ events. email them to jhooks@houstoovoice.com or call 713-529.-8490. See you on the Go-Go' HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvo1ce.com dish There's a Fine Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash 'Idol' gossip Anwar Robinson gets gayed, Oscar winners get defensive and Michael Musto gets cryptic on us Those damn bloggers are just bound and determined to have a gay contestant on this year's "American Idol," the super popular glorified karaoke contest on Fox. The latest target of Internet rumors is ANWAR ROBINSON. The 25·year-old New Jersey singer. who auditioned in D.C .. has been pseudo outed on gay entertainment information Web site \1rww.afterelton.com, the brother to lesbian site www.afterellen.com. The site has posted a personals profile found in the men-seeking-men section of ww\\:BlackPlanet.com. Of course, it could be a fake. "BlackPlanet.com indicates that Robinson's last login was Jan. I, :m5, before the contestants for the fourth season of ['Idol') were made public," afterelton.com reads. "No one knew at the time that [Robinson] would become one of the finalists ... which makes it unlikely to be a fake profile ... It also rai<;es questions around why Robinson did not remove his profile once he was S<'lectcd to be on the show." John Chiklis, the \\-Titer of the stol): concludes that Fox doesn't want the contestants to be out while on the show and claims to have •·,ource<" who say that Robinson has been out since high school First season finalist JIM VERRAROS is the only openly gay contestant in the show's histor); and he came out after the series ended. For those of you who forgot about Verraros, his second album of pop tunes. "Rollercoaster" is set to hit stores April 26. He also stars in "Eating Out," a gay comedy that screened in D.C. last June and Jim Verraros is being released in select cities April 8. While the bloggers obsess over rumors about the next gay idol, it looks like Verraros has been busy getting to work. Get shorty It looks like the winner of this year's Oscar for best short subject documentary may also have a short fuse. Last week, Steve Kalafer, the producer of nominated short "Sister Rose's Passion," sent a letter to the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts & Sciences claiming that life partners ROBERT HUDSON and BOBBY HOUSTON unfairly used reenactments m their award-winning 'American Idol' finalist Anwar Robinson is the latest of the show's smgers to encounter gay rumors. movie "Mighty Times: The Children's March," the Associated Press reports. In his letter. Kalafer says the film fails to disclose which scenes are reenactments of events from the black civil rights movement, Hudson & Houston's subject. Dale Olson. a publicist for "Passion" told AP that "Mighty Times" is "an Bobby Houston intentional deception to the Academ}:" Hudson had a bitchy retort for the Los Angeles Times, saying, ''The pain you feel inside after losing can make anyone spin out of control." Ouch Musto be true Village Voice gossip columnist (and Dish's arch nemesis) MICHAEL :\1USTO purged himself of a whole lot of gay gossip in his column on March 29. Unluckily for his humble readers, he took all of the names out. so we have to guess for ourselves. "Which swiveling pop star has been known to pick up guys in the steam room at a Miami hotel gym- a lot?" Musto queer-ies. "What handsome ex-series star (a Golden Globe winner) once flirted with a guy across the aisle on a plane and even tried to follow him into the bathroom, to the consternation of the actor's young male 'assistant'?" "What marriage between a gay and a gal was partly done for the gay to get press and the gal to get a green card?" "What two young hunks (one a faded star of an Oscar.winning flick and the other a broken-up boyfriend) may well have commingled several years ago when they were both more famous?" These are a couple Dish figured out, let's see if you're as good. llf'ti Send comments. suggestions to ~ Dish@houstonvoi APRIL 8. 2005 19 20 APRIL 8, 2005 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOIC CLASSIFIEDS Visit houstonvoice.com to place your ad. Up to 25 words only $12.50 per week. 504 eac additional word. Fax toll-free 1.888.409.6768, or call toll-free 1.877.863.1885. Deadline fc online ads: 8am Wednesday. For other submissions: 5:30pm Tuesday. REAL ESTATE SERVICES STAND OUT FROM TIIE CltOWD ~your home speoal7 Tell cu re~ at.out 11. Guarantee they will 1ee ~ with cu new feanm. lold or box 'fOJI ad for added attrac1JOn Con!dCI cu CllSlCmef S<MCe reps for more di!lai!s. (SJn 863-1885 SALE I HOUSTON THE TIME IS RIGHT ... ADVERTISE NOW!! Adve<'l2 with the HOUSTON VOICE CLASSIFIEDS I call to place your ad! 1 (877} 863-188S. HEIGHTS TOWNHOUSE 105 sqft 2 SR, I 5 BA 2 car gar age. Marble tr wood brs. New a e V. whirlpool tub Downtown """' S 158 5C MOV1119 · bring •easonab!e of f• wwwbuyowr r prope:tyasp'code:HC'U4C56 SALE I ELSEWHERE FABULOUS! RENT I HOUSTON 3 MONTROSE APTS FOR RENTI Take your poa 1 BR, ' BA l BR BA Both rn qu et bort'ood l!wd llooo. a,.¥ WO l BR, 2 BA oear 1"e dubs with 'abutous Gourmet Kr.:!len r New carpe• C AH wo ca Jawn 832 541 qeo• tedlBR 5BA.2' ;qfl.' er < dose' .= & sep Voolwr. .R krt. summer '0001 & courtyard MONTROSE 111 l.ar'J", renovated, small quiet project. All BILLS PAIO! Spe· dal S61 Simo for 1 year lease, S6351mo for 6 moS- No deposit 1f qualified (713) 213-0000 RENT IT FAST with OUf r.ew features. Draw attention to ywi ad by usrng our bold or box feature. Contact our cus­tomef service reps for more details. <sm 863-1885. WANTED TO RENT INTERNATIONAL POSTDOC RESEARCHER at Medical Center lookmg tor affordable housing ( th to ~ th or S month max 1ease) around MortroselMuseumll<eights. Contac1 anurosenmann@hcmnai corn RENT FURNISHED HOUSING GLBT COMMUNITY HOUSE S '00/wtc fulrnshed private 'ledr BIL ~ PAID Cable, ,)S._ yardl West Herght5tNc:11 SheP£rd/61 o ~011.• No alcohoVdrugs. rl' ll 906 4119 ROOMMATE SERVICES NW 610 & 290 Shafe 2 BR, l BA •own :ow WO, Pool, Sat Iv. Quiet BR .mfumished w Side patro S395 00 SS deposit References Howard 713 681 3114 SHARE I HOUSTON SE 610 LOOP AREA Jg l BR house to share Lrg swrmmmg ~ S400imo. 713 941 4646 COMMITMENT CEREMONIES brady's corner ANNOUNCEMENTS HEY HOUSTON! A new gaynesbian Crossover Country/ l'l>p Group IS fomung 1 We nftd: Acoustic & Electnc Instrument Playen. Mandofin. iSts, lead Gwta1 Bass. Hand & Drum P.fCIJSSIOOISIS, fiddleN• olrn. Keyboard. Lyncmi. Melod)oWnters and Harmony Singers. tt you c.an act. sing. dance or ate otherwise creatrve. we want you• Must be goal oriented. no pt"ofessional exp necessary Call (713) 493-9646. "Dreams are earned '10I grven· EMPLOYMENT ~----------------------------, I Adecca HOSPITALITY ADlCCO HOSPIT ALITV 1'5 hlrinq part time lo<•I ~lclons •nd ,,_rm•Mnt jobs with NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINES POSITIONS AVAILA&U INCLUOt waiters bartenct•rs. room att•ndants. laundry <h•fs. cOOks and surv•lllance per.onnel C•ll (713) 627•0471 tor •pporntmont lmmHlllt• opentnqs nperlen<• • plus bul •II •vels considered L---------------------------- EARN UP TO S4,000IMO pan trme Bwld a S l:xJK residual orne with 2 yea~ fu I tllne Ca S: Ta ey 2S 1 448 5991 866 204 1347 EXPERIENCED WAITSTAFF! We are wrrently see< :iq expenenced waitstall Qua! fied <i!ndidates must be avai able to work Monday thru Friday S 30 11 3Cam, Sat day & s..nday 6am llocn. f you have a pos. :e anrtude. a ea team player & ran PJOYide exceflen• guest se:vtce thr we are IL f )'OU' PLEASE APPLY IN PEllSON TO Y< Hendnx or M Martin The Courtyard at Md! n Brcokhollow. 2504 North Loop Wse• atTC Jester 1713)688-7711 FREELANCE REPORTERS NEEDED "" hard news. Send res..:ne and three dips to Editor Houston VOtCe 500 lOYett #200 t<ouston Texas 77006 Part Time Bookkeeper Resurrection M.C.C. is seeking a bookkeeper. 1S - 20 hours a week. Knowledge of Windows, Excel & church related databases a must. can (713) 861 -9149 OR email resume to: vmgibbsOResurrectionMCC.org TEXAS SHIRT CO. IS hmng at OUf Heights •ocahon. LISI of opportunities & appfrcauon at hnpJ/www.txsh1rts.com/ employment.asp WAITSTAFFI BEST LITTLE NOODLE HOUSE 1eekrng c Jte. experienced GAY ( kay Stratglll too) wartstaff. Come on ovei to Jenni's Noodle House. 2130 Jefferson St Stop by betwttn the '1outs of 2·6pm. Monday 5a11Jfday Use your noodle r OBITUARIES BERTRAM W. CLAPP, 66, of Houston passed away peacefully at Park Plaza Hospital March 31 at 1:15pm from complic.ations c.ausod by diabetes. He was bom in Cape Cod, Mass. on December 30, 1931. He was precoded in death by his parents, Bertram W. aapp & Jane B. aapp; his grandpar­ents. Richard A. Jennings & Marion E. Jennings. & Edith B. Oapp. He is survived by his sisters, Mar­ion E. Coleman of Houston & Amy F. Rose of Har­wich (Cape Cod}. Mass.; nephews Larry Greeley & Stephen Rose; niece Rebocc.a McMahon, several great nieces & nephews, & many loving & loved fTiends & his two beloved c.ats, Missy Moo & Missy Girl. He was employed for the past 35 years by House of Coleman, where he served as Bindery Foreman. He enjoyed photography, was known for his talent for holiday decorations & pen & ink drawings, & was a Civil War buff. He also was a member of the 'Nite Caps'. His family would like to thank his primary physician, Dr. Gary W. Brewton, & Dr. Edward W. Stool, Dr. Jo· seph Gathe, Jr., Dr. Gary L. Hagstrom, Dr. Victor Cumagun, & the staff & nurses at Park Plaza Hos· pita! for their wonderful care & support. For those desiring, memorial contributions may be made to SNAP, P.O. Box 702S6, Houston, Texas 77270. or Kindred Spirits Celebration, 901 W. Al· abama, Houston, Texas 77006 per Bert's wishes. A celebration of life is being planned. Call (713} S23·2521 for details, location & time. HOME IMPROVEMENT L00K! HOMEWORK A+ QUALITY HO"vlE REPAIR! 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BODYWORK: COME AND SEEi Huge I.lien~ take t ~Ii relax stress ~ay. ease llllJScle soreness. Private & prof~ ~.al Nice young guy. (832) 978 7661 SEDUCTIVE FUlL BODY REl.AXATION W/BRONZE 34, 5'8" P&.y ... icolly Fit & Bc:owtiJ..lly Hw"~ IH/ 0Mt Colt... Private: Vc:ry Di.<.crc:c:t TOBY (713)520-5477 BODYWORKS 101 Masculine, Professional & Discreet. Deep Pressure Body Rubs. Classically Handsome. 6'2 20S lbs. llondlllue/DDFI (713) 303 .. 941 HOUSTON'S FINEST! l'otl Hungl Young' Massage & Escort ava able 24 hours on call In/Out (281) 989·8948. Located"' the Montrose ADULTS ONLY WWW.HOTSTUDS.COM New hot ong nal Bare8act Vld eos. Hot Slud\ Sexy !winks & laM Boys doing 1t all raw View on: ne or purchase discreetly. DEADLINES Barn Wednesday for online submissions only. 5:30pm Tuesday for all other submissions. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonYOice.com HOW IS IT THAT THE SAME ESCORTS have been advertising in the local gay rags since the early '90s and yet the age listed in their ads never changes? TO THE GUY WHO QUESTIONED HIV­positive men in adult bookstores having sex with others all day and not telling them: If you're in adult bookstores having unprotected sex, you're a moron. TO THE GUY WHO WANTS THOSE HE tells his problems to to "stop laughing": You get what you pay for; I'm not your damn shrink! WORKING IN A GAY BAR DOESN'T make you gay. Reading a gay magazine and being bitter enough to submit a post to it, well that's pretty suspect. IF WE WANT "NORMAL" AMERICA TO ..,.,,, ''" love us, we have to stop making fools of ourselves and practicing lewd and crude behavior like dancing naked and grop­ing each other - in the streets at Pride events and other gay venues. THE GUY ONLINE ASKED TO BUY tina from you not because you are black, but because so many guys online do crys­tal meth. Everything is not about being black or white. IT'S LAUGHABLE TO HEAR YOU so-called bears ranting at each other over how you must behave in order to be one. It just goes to prove the folly of succumbing to labels to define who you are in the first place! SPEAKING OF THE SEARS CATALOG, I can remember one time years ago it was recalled because it was thought that a model's 8= THE YEL OW PAGES OF GAY PORN 36 easy·t~surf categories Cruising • Voyeurs Bodybuilders· Erotic Art Bears & Cubs Twinks Celebrities • Solo Adult Stars • Athletes Amateurs • Galleries Escorts· Exhibitionists Tht Frtt Gay Dirtctery 28,000 Websites Listed 1,000s of Free Se11 Pies 13,000+ flff Stories All men are gay, but most are still in the closet. penis was sticking through his pajamas! GAYS ARE "IN YOUR FACE" AND "shoving gay rights down everyone's throats"? Nothing is worse than the inces­sant bullshit from anti-gay activists who make up lies about us to deny us our rights. If they got anymore "in your face" with their self.righteous "Bible-based" persecution we'd be having intercourse! TO THE OLDER GUY WITH THE HOT Latino boyfriend: Enjoy him now because soon enough "ugly" won't be in style, and I'll be able to get on that! TO THE BLACK MEN WHO GO TO primarily white gay bars and roll your eyes at the sight of another black man: What's that about? THE INTERNET HAS SPOILED THE gay world for me. I used to like the sur­prise that came with meeting someone in the real world, rather than recognizing them from their online ad. What's the point if I already know who they are? MATURE MEN WITH NO HAIR ARE much hotter than young men with atti­tude. And no, bitch, I'm neither . APRIL B. 2005 23 WHY DOES MY BOYFRIEND INSIST on watching me take a dump? He even likes to look over the bathroom stalls in public places while I do it. It's embarrass­ing and weird. I LOVE ':AMAZING RACE" AND AM happy to see a gay couple on it again. I hope they win. My only gripe is that Lynn and Alex are such nelly queens. Why do some gay people have to make such a stereotypi­cal spectacle of themselves on TV? YEAH, I HAVE BACK HAIR. I HATE IT, too, but do you know how hard it is to shave it by yourself? Cut me some slack; we all have imperfections. I'M A STRIPPER, AND I'M SINGLE BUT dating right now, and I have a message for you bastards who want a relationship with me: Don't ever fucking try to get me to stop. If you met me while I was strip­ping, then you shouldn't ask me to stop. BITCH BOY RESPONDS: If they met you with attitude, they shouldn't ask you out! THERE ARE TRUE GENETIC heterosexuals, but the vast majority are JUSt too brainwashed and conformist to consider any alternative. E1itm' m These are real btches. sent 11 tr,< real ~ mrt Qa'i life's little armyarx:es. aro the big ones. too. Got a bitch? Call l-8Q0.858.8088 or e-mail bitch@expressga eotunng DJ oc y pmmng the Best m Hip Hop/Rop/Lotm/Dance Mu 1c 1 S I Dom tic ho ter 7 Dorn fl N COVER V RY ATURDAY IN APRIL I ... CHOOSE
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