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Montrose Voice, No. 290, May 16, 1986
File 020
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Montrose Voice, No. 290, May 16, 1986 - File 020. 1986-05-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/405/show/399.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-05-16). Montrose Voice, No. 290, May 16, 1986 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/405/show/399

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 290, May 16, 1986 - File 020, 1986-05-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/405/show/399.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 290, May 16, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Claude, Ken
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 16, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript Second Serve MAY 16, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 By Steve Warren Montrose Voice film critic Transsexualism is television's new frontier for this spring. It was played for laughs on The Last Precinct and now seriously in Second Serve. Like most Vanessa Redgrave vehicles, this true story of Richard Radley's transition to Dr. Renee Richards was of more interest for her performance than anything else. And like most groundbreaking telefilms, it was burdened with exposition, having to answer the most basic questions for the least informed viewer. Redgrave was sensational in handling the physical and emotional demands of the role of a person who felt more than he/she showed. As a man for more than half of the film she looked rather like John Hurt, with her own hair cut short in 50's style. Fresh out of Yale, Dick was dating— and having intercourse with—Alice Krige, who got pregnant to try to force him into marriage. He held back because of his compulsion to dress in women's clothes. The first person he confided in was his mother, Louise Fletcher. Although she's a professional psychiatrist, her first response was "Maybe it's my fault." She sent him to a colleague, Martin Balsam, who tried to talk him out of it: "You've got to fight it." Dick listened to this incompentent—who probably "cures" homosexuals too—for years. His suggestion that Dick grow a beard was temporarily effective in curbing his female feelings until, ironically, the Navy made him shave it off. At first, Dick's "problem" made him sound more like a transvestite than a tran- sexual, perhaps to ease the audience along one step at a time. The viewer was represented by Dick's best friend Josh (William Russ), to whom he stupidly came out by showing up at his door in full drag. Eventually realizing that he was a woman and wanting to make the physical change, Dick found a sympathetic psychiatrist who told him, "When the spirit refuses to fit the body, why not make the body fit the spirit?" Locating a surgeon was more difficult. They don't mind operating on people in other fields, but he told Dick, "No transsexual has ever been a practicing physician." He headed for Casablanca to have surgery and was beaten by two Spanish soldiers for dancing (in women's clothes) with a man who was trying to pick "her" up. This was one ofthe scenes (including unpleasant childhood experiences in his sister's clothes—how he came to like it was never explained) that flashed through his mind and made him decide against surgery. Things happened rapidly after that. A few slides covered his marriage and child; the breakup took only a moment. Next thing we knew Dick went into surgery and Renee came out. She told her young son, "I love you very much. That's one thing that will never change." Renee moved to California and had an affair with a pool cleaner who got her back into playing tennis. Her "killer instinct" attracted a tournament organizer and her success inspired a bitchy TV reporter to investigate and expose her past. The court battle to be allowed to play women's tennis passed as quickly as the rest of the post-op segments, giving us credit forhav- ing followed it in the media at the time. A final title brought us up to date, including the fact that Richards coached Martina Navratilova. As persuasive as Redgrave's perfor mance was, her voice was a problem. The pitch was perfect, apprising us at all times where he/she is on the gender scale, but her accent was spotty—never English but never quite American either. The film moved slowly for the first hour or so, and Redgrave's low-key approach generally avoided dramatic fireworks. She was worth watching, but it wasn't a great movie. K. J.'s CLUB PREVIOUSLY JACKS ARE BETTER 11830 AIRLINE 2 blocks South of Aldine-Bender 445-5849 HOURS: NOON-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm, Double Drinks, 750 Beer FRIDAY: t.g.i.f. 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