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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
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Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 001. 2002-08-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3868.

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(2002-08-02). Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3868

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002 - File 001, 2002-08-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3893/show/3868.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1136, August 2, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date August 2, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript I 01ce Celebrate with Melissa Lesbian rocker Melissa Etheridge brings her celebratory summer tour to Houston next week. Page 13 ISSUE 1136 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. AUGUST 2, 2002 INSIDE Judge David Patronella will speak this week as a guest of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political caucus. Page 3 Lorri L. Jean, executive director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force, leads the group in lobbying for an international women's rights treaty. Page 4 Comedic actor Rob Nash offers his own 'Romeo and Juliet' tale at Theatre New West. with mostly hilarious results. Page 15 After-hours club struggles to stay open Club Nsomnia, AIDS Housing Coalition Houston leaders look for other sources of funds as club's donations dry up By PENNY WEAVER Leaders of AIDS Housing Coalition Houston - and at least one politician - are searching for alternative funding sources after a police raid on the after­hours club that funds AHCH eliminated most donations used for the group. In the meantime, Club Nsomnia remains open without its tradition of Bring Your Own Beer (BYOB). "The doors are open. A lot of people are under the misinformation that we're closed," said Nsomnia CEO Matt Locklin, who also is executive director and co­founder of AHCH, a nonprofit group that assists persons with HIV I AIDS. But few people have come to the club - which has a number of gay patrons - and few have made donations since a July 19 operation led by agents for the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, with assistance from officers with the Houston Police Department. The TABC alleges that club operators were selling alcohol without a license to do so. In addition, it is illegal in Texas to con­sume alcohol in a public establishment after 2: 15 a.m. With the club practically empty, and donations at almost nothing, the coali­tion will be unable to operate without alternative funding, according to Locklin. The organization provides emer­gency and temporary housing assistants for persons with AIDS. in addition to assisting those clients with food and household goods. Already, most of the residents in AHCH·assisted housing have moved. Locklin said. "We're down to one client," he said. "The other clients were all relocated to other situations." Please see CWB STRUGGl..ES. on Page 6 Ga}'1lopular Club Nsormia. headed by CEO Mitt l..ocld'11 IS still open as organizers look for other WJJS to fund the nonprofit AIDS Hoosing c:oatition Houston. The maiority of funding to support the group last year came from donations made via the dub. known fur its BYOB lr.klition, which IS OON ooder fire by law enforcement offici.-lls. (froto by Dalton Dehart) RAVE Act moves to slower beat Sen. Joe Biden. (D-DE) meets with opponents of the RAVE bill. which he introduced. to consider amend· ments that may provide more safeguards for legiti· mate rave and gay circuit party promoters. Sponsor predicts eventual passage but meets with critics By KilTH TAYLOR The pace of the once fast-moving RAVE Act has slowed as opponents of the bill lobby lawmakers to amend the proposal. Opponents of the Reducing Americans' Vulnerability to Ecstasy Act would prefer to see the bill scuttled, but at the very least they are seeking changes that would afford more protections to rave party organizers and owners of establishments where gay rave and circuit parties take place. "There is no impending movement that we know of on the bill," said Chip Unruh. a spokesman for Sen. Joseph Biden (D-Del.). the bill's primary sponsor. Republicans placed a hold on all legislation coming out of the Judiciary Committee, but that hold has since been lifted, Unruh said. But he still predicted passage for the legislation. ··rt has bipartisan support and doesn't have any real strong opposition that I can think of here in Congress." Unruh said. Unruh did not rule out action on the bill before adjournment, but he said, "I don't have any strong mdication telling me that that is defmitely going to be the case." He referred questions about scheduling of the bill to Sen. Tom Daschle (D-S.D.), whose press office did not return phone calls by press time. Representatives of the Drug Policy Alliance and the American Civil L1bert1es Union planned to meet Thursday on Capitol Hill with Biden and bill co-spon.<.ors Patrick Leahy <D-\ 't.) and Dick Durbin <DID.). The groups want to talk with lawmakers "about ways [the RAVE bill] can be fixed," said Bill Piper, associate director of the DPA. "We've managed to slow the bill dov.n," Piper said. He said action on the bill is not likely before the Senate recesses this week. Piper said co-sponsors seem receptive to possible amendments. Please see RA VE ACT, on Page 7 2 AUGUST 2. 2002 STANDARD CAPAllLITY l'cnnancn< .n wh<d ~ fWT chanod all-IO'r.Dn "'1tl-lod brakes H I lh:cnt ( .ontrol l~valvc V-6 CJIG'OC I NC·'P'.'cd a""""10C """"""'1<>11 iGuun='l! ( ommandShilt Moin"'Jlir body w.th ~ urucrural '=>< .-..k four whcd l:Ja:trum<. Tra<.1>00 Contn~ k.xm 1...- hvc ,.,th fl. '40'!'11-rold1ngrnr""1t STANDARD LUXURY Light~ on-doJ> co aidio H..·akd tmnt WlndJiicld Power ru.J hrottd m1nn Powcrwtn&,.. .. l\>W<r ch.- b.h .. ith remote kcylc.'" mtty Power rc1racr.bk- rear U1J10 window Alloy "Ink 1nchl1ng tull...::r alloy <p.>rc Pcnmctc.;r \a...l.n1y \)"tern .. 1th mtnnc unmobthZc.T I-our )'Cal'> of rno®dc &1"'111<.C ·Relationships ·Love • ·Happiness ·Sex Life ·Inner Peace • Career Call for"" "ppoi111me11t 713-527-0000 TONY CARROLL, LMSW-ACP Co11nt~l111g, Pnrlmth'raPJ Hnr.hh"P' /11t' /ndJvUlualf and r·1mpln .\~rrinJC """''"" •, c •• _, und l.L>bi•n ""'-' ~ <Dm (Ofnnumily \.,.,..,. 1911.! .. ,. . .,.·.lfom/onTlltrapijUOm www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE Tlte Rdornt C'1Mrc'1 of Galv~ton, Tex~ We would like to extend an invitation for all to come worship with us at 11am Sunday. Father Tom Martin, pastor 3712 Broadway Galv£Aton, TexOA 77550 409.765.8500 Recent discoveries of sexual abuse by Catholic priests and the years of cover-up involved, have left many parishioners wondering who they can trust. While most of the clergy are honorable and trustworthy, some are not and they continue to violate the trust of the innocent and vulnerable. Churches have failed in their duty to protect some of its children from abuse, and have instead been protecting themselves. If you or a family member were a victim of clergy abuse, call attorney Rand Mintzer today. We will hold accountable those who violated your trust. RAND MINTZER Attorney At Law HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com Judge Patronella to speak on renters' rights issues David Patronella, presidingjudge of Hams County Justice of the Peace Court (Precinct l, Place 2), will lecture and answer questions on renters' rights topics for gay Houstonians this week. One of the best known judges in Texas, he y,1]1 speak as a guest of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus. HGLPC Board of Trustees member Clair Koepsel described the event as a "not­to- be-missed chance for parties on both sides to learn from an acknowledged authority who deals with renter-landlord disputes on a regular basis." The only Democratic judicial incumbent in Harris Count)( Patronella has held his present pa;ition since 1009 and is running for ~ec- A For info tion this yeru: "The focus of his talk will be • • eviction legalities, and that's a hugely impor. tant topic," said Koepsel, "But I hope he has time to say something about the different courts we have as well. We have Justice Courts, County Courts, Municipal Courts, and State District Courts. The county courts are divided into three kinds. and there are four kinds of state courts. We have to elect judges for all these benches. and how many voters really know the difference? We may have to ask Judge Patronella to come back again." -Gary CalTett Houston Black Tie Dinner officials choose 2002 theme "ReflP.Ctions" has been selected as the theme for the 2002 Houston Black Tie Dinner, according to organizers. Now in its 11th year, the dinner is held each fall. Proceeds from the dinner go toward helping local nonprofit organil.ations continue the worl< that they do In S<'rvice to gay Houstonians. This year's beneficiaries are: Bering-Omega Services, 11.A.T.C.H., Lesbian Health luitiative, .Montrose CollllSeling Center, Montrose Clinic, PWA Coa11tion. and Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. Black Tie Board President Chris Lewis said "Reflections" as this year's theme" ... remmds us of the opportunity we have not only to cel­ebrate and reflect upon our lives after the tragedies of last year, but also to come toge th· er as a community yet again, recommitting o~ve:; to living life to the fullest and pur­suing dreams for ow· communicy" Board entertairunf:'nt chair David Greiss said, '"The BL1ck Tie Dinner is a wonderful opportunity for both the communit); as well as our friends I obituary Houston Gay & Lesbian Political caucus meeting 7 pm. Wednesday, Aug. 7 Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center 803 Hawthorne • 713-524-3818 The Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus hosts Hams County Judge David Patronella next week for a lecture at the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. and supporters. to join together for a night of fun and socializing, all the while knowing that just by their being at the event. much­necded funds are being raised for the local beneficiaries." Tickets and tables can now be purchased online for the event. ft INFO Houston Black Tie Dinner· Ocl 12. 2002 Intercontinental Hotel • 610 West Loop South wwwhoustonblacktiedinner.org Gone but not forgotten TI1e popukv yellow tabby cat of Mary's .. Naturally - dubbed ''Mr. Balls" - died recently and will be remem­bered with a balloon release and memorial service Saturday Everyone is invited to celebrate the life of this memorable cat who tooched the fNeS and laps of many people- as ID,) as you had a treat and would pet him. imlltfmg to Mary's regul.Ys. The event starts at 3 p.m. Satunlay at Mary's._ Naturally, 1022 Westheimer. David Palmer Swem, 44, Avondale resident David Palmer Swem. 44. of Houston died on Friday, July 26. 2002. at Park Plaza Hospital in Houston after an extensive battle with HIV I AIDS. Born on April 30, 1958, Swem came to Houston from upstatl' N w Yorl< in 1979. He was a long.tune clie>nt of organizations such as AIDS Foundation Houston, Bering Support Services and Thomas Street Clinic. Despite physical lim· itations, he managed to continue his favorite activities playing bered for having the "gift of gab," as well as a heart of gold, accordmg to friends and relatives. He is sun•JVed by his par­ents, Charles and Ethel Swem; sister, Ethel Soukey and her husband Nelson and their children, Troy and Damian, all of New York; brother Charlie and his wife Beverly and their children, Tyler. Christa.Jo, Chas and Drew, all of Florida. bingo at the Sons of Herman on L..:....__,.L...Jll~..__--' Swen will be cremated, and his ashes will be interred In Harrisville, N.Y .. bestclc his deceased sister and brother. Friday nights, growing African violets and taking care of his pets and his friends, accordmg to his family. In recent years, Swen had become a fix tlln' m thl' Avondale neighborhood when:• he lived and walked his beloved dogs several tunes a day, friends sa I H will remcm A mrmorial S<'rvice will be held at 1 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 3, at Bmng Memorial l'n1ted \irthoclist Church. Casual attire IS requested -From staff reports AUGUST 2. 2002 3 August 4 • "The Head Bone Connected Connected to the ... " + J ...i ~'fY' to the Neck Bone, The Neck Bone ~~ // Rev. Janet Parker ~~~ \\ Maranatha ~~ '' Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion• Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group· services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That 1\1.aranatha Fellowship A1CC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713·528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1..net www.maranathamcc.com 4 AUGUST 2, 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I al news Gay group pushes for ratification of women's rights treaty BY RHONDA SMITH Leaders at the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force urged the organization's mem­bers last week to lobby for a 22-year-old international treaty created to promote equality for women. "Basic equality for women should be a no-brainer," said Lorri L. Jean, executive director of NGLTF. "yet the anti-gay right wing in America has blocked this treaty for nearly a quarter century." Sean Cahill, director of NGLTF's Policy Institute, said the gay political organization is lobbying for U.S. Senate ratification of the treaty, known as the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), because of its direct impact on women, including lesbians. ''Half of gay people are women so it will haveadirectimpactonlesbians,"hesaid "But also, it's about equality. As a gay man, I should be concerned about this passing as well." The Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted 12-7 on Tuesday, July 30, in favor of ratifying the treaty, which urges nations to remove barriers to equality for women in education, employment, marriage and divorce, health care, and other areas. Under pressure from conservative oppo­nents to the treaty, the Bush administration recently asked the Senate to postpone a vote on it until the U.S. Department of Justice reviews it. Democrats rejected the request. Bush officials and Republicans have said the treaty's text is vague and that they are troubled by related U.N. panel reports. They cited one report calling on China to decriminalize prostitution and another chiding Belarus for using Mother's Day to encourage women's traditional roles. Secretary of State Colin Powell said in a letter to Sen. Joseph Eiden, D-Del., who chairs the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, that while the Bush administration supports the treaty's goals, it wants time to examine the treaty and the ''basis, practical effect and any possible implications of the reports." "It's not a long or complicated treaty," Cahill said. "For the Bush administration to say the Justice Department needs to review it is disingenuous. If he's opposed to it, he should come out and say that." Scott McClellan, a spokesperson for the White House, told the New York Times that the administration "strongly supports the goals" of the treaty but has concerns about whether it might infringe on U.S. laws. The ranking Republican on the Senate Foreign Relations committee's, Sen. Jesse Helms of North Carolina, said in a letter that the U.N. panel's findings "are simply out of step with generally held values of democratic nations." Helms is recovering from heart surgery and voted by proxy against the treaty. He also has expressed opposition to the treaty and accused supporters of it of having a "radical abortion agenda." Two Republican senators, Gordon THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! Smith of Oregon and Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island, joined the Senate Foreign Relations Committee's 10 Democrats in voting in favor of the treaty. Republicans predict uphill battle Before the president can consider the treaty for ratification, two-thirds of the Senate, or f)T members, would have to vote in favor of granting advice and consent for ratification. Lester Munson, a spokesperson for the Senate committee's Republicans, predicted the recent vote would only increase objec­tions to the treaty. "I think we're going to see a lot of peo­ple raise their voice with objections and concerns and actual passage on the floor is going to face a stiff challenge," he said. The treaty's supporters hope to sched­ule a floor vote on it in the full Senate in September, before the midterm elections. The hope is that pressure from women who support the treaty would push moderate Republicans to vote for it. Congress is scheduled to adjourn for summer recess from Aug. 5 to Sept. 3. "The reality is that the right-wing fears that these treaties will undermine their own rigid concepts of the family and reli­gion," she said. "The right wing has used this same anti-woman, anti-gay rhetoric to oppose reproductive freedom and equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people, both here in the U.S. and abroad." Lynne Weil, press secretary for the Foreign Relations Committee, said the full Senate could possibly vote on the treaty in September, if Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-S.D.) places it on the executive calendar for consideration by the full Senate. Weil also said, however, that placing the treaty on the calendar does not guarantee a full vote will take place. The Foreign Relations Committee approved the treaty for a vote in 1994 but there were "anony­mous holds" placed on it by unidentified senators who did not want a floor vote on it. The treaty has garnered little attention since 1980 because Presidents Reagan and George H.W Bush gave it a low priority. The Clinton administration pushed to have the committee consider it in 1994. When Eiden became chair of the Foreign Relations Committee last year, Weil said the supporters of the treaty began examining the option of considering it again. "To our mild surprise and pleasure," Weil said, "the State Department under the current Bush administration gave this treaty a more favorable ranking than had been expected." As many as 170 countries have ratified the treaty, which President Carter signed as he was leaving office in 1980 . The U.S. is the only industrialized nation, among 21 countries, that has not ratified the treaty. Other countries that have not ratified it include Iran, Sudan, Syria, Somalia, Monaco, and the United Arab Emirates. The Associated Press contributed to this report W@rr~ 1)1~ ~®'IWD~®~~ Sundays at 9am & 11 am Wednesdays at 7pm Noche Espiritual (Spanish service) Saturdays at 6pm 2025 W. 1 l+h St @TC Jester • 713-861 9149 • www resurrectionmcc org HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com I around the nation Scouts can be barred from Conn. charity list, judge says HARTFORD. Conn. (AP) Connecticut did not violate the rights of the Boy Scouts when 1t removed the group from a list of charities that state employees contribute to via a payroll deduction plan, a U.S. District Court judge ruled July 22. The Connecticut State Employee Campaign Committee removed the Boy Scouts from its list in 2000 after the state's Commission on Human Rights & Opportunities found that including the Boy Scouts on the list violated the state's anti-discrimination laws. The Irving, Texas-based Boy Scouts, which has a right to ban gay leaders based on a US. Supreme Court ruling, and one Connecticut scouting council filed a fed· era! discrimination lawsuit against the state, argumg that exclusion from the hst was a First Amendment vio· lat ion. State Comptroller Nancy Wyman, a named def en· dant in the lawsuit, lauded the decision. "It just basical· ly states that the state of Connecticut does not, and can· not by law, do business with organizations that discrim· inate," Wyman said. The Boy Scouts and the group's Connecticut State Comptroller Nil1Cy Wyman. a defendant in a federal law· suit filed by the Boy Scouts. lauded a ruling that said the state can boot the organization from its charity list (Photo by Steve Miller/AP) attorney in Connecticut could not be reached by press time. In San Francisco, judges there have become the first in the state to cut ties with the Boy Scouts over its anti-gay policies, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. San Francisco Superior Court judges and commissioners adopted a policy July 11 saying they would not take part in any organiza· tion that "discriminates on the basis of sexual orientation." Conn. appeals court says it can't dissolve civil union HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) - A gay couple's attempt to have their civil union dissol\'ed was rejected by a Connecticut appeals court last week in what is one of the first such test of the law outside Vermont. Glen Rosengarten and Peter Downes were mar· ried in Vermont in 2000, six months after that state enacted the first law in the nation allowing gay couples to enter into a union with some of the same rights as marriage. The Connecticut appeals court ruled that it cannot dissolve their union because Connecticut law does not recog­nize such relationships. "This is not a test case," said Gary Cohen, Rosengarten's attorney. "These are two very pnvate peo­ple who want to have this resolved with dignity and discretion." Cohen said he would encourage Rosengarten to appeal to the Connecticut ~upreme Court. Lower court judges had ruled that they did not have jurisdiction. Lesbian construction worker files bias lawsuit in Ill. CHICAGO A woman who worked on the city's Deep Tunnel project ,,led a civil suit last week against a construe· tion company and her former supervisor, alleging sex discrimination, sexual harassment, assault and battery, and hate crime, according to the Chicago Tribune. Djuna R. Diabor filed suit in U.S District Court against Kenny· Kiewit-Shea Joint Venture and Robert Dodds, a construction superviso1~ said her lawyer, William Ryan. "The construe· tion industry has an obligation to protect employees from this kind of harass· ment," Ryan said. A Kenny-Kiewit-Shea spokesperson said he had not seen the lawsuit. Several times Daibor's supervi· sor tried to pull her hands toward his crotch, kissed her, forced his hands inside her clothing and. on one occasion, tried to rape her, the lawsuit alleges, after she told him she is a lesbian. AIDS ride organizers in Ill. dump Pallotta CHICAGO (AP) In seven years, the Heartland AIDS Ride raised more than $15 million for AIDS-related causes. But shrinking profits and an overall lack of participation have prompted organizers to announce the event has run its last race. The agency is also breaking with Los Angeles-based Pallotta Teamworks. the event's creator and promoter. Pallotta has faced strong criticism recently over its poor returns on AIDS vaccine rides, which the company dis· banded last month after low returns for a European event. Last year the Heartland event raised $5.7 million, but the charities only saw about 35.3 per· cent of that, officials said. "We have an obligation to our clients, our donors and even our states' attorneys general to have a solid return on every fund· raising dollar we spend," said Courtney Reid, president of AIDS Cycle, one of three participating agencies. A scaled down version of the event is planned for next year. 'No' not final answer to HIV-positive 'Sesame Street' character in U.S. PASADENA, Calif. (AP) PBS won't flatly rule out the addition of an HIV· positive character to "Sesame Street." PBS President Pat Mitchell said July 26. Queried earlier this month by federal lawmakers about an HIV-positive Muppet joining South Africa's "Sesame Street," Mitchell told them no such character was planned for the show's U.S. version. But if the AIDS virus became a more serious problem for U.S. children, "Sesame Street" would be as responsive as it has been to other topics, Mitchell said. The new Muppet charac­ter will join South Africa's "Takalani Sesame" in September to help educate children about AIDS at the urging of the South African government. From staff and wire reports AUGUST 2. 2002 S Optional Equi~ment: Sunglasses & Sunscreen Other Z3's Available Starting at $29,500 .A""pVANTA.GlE BMW DOWNTOWN 2101 San Jacinto @ Gray (713) 289-1200 www.advantagecars.com Mon - Fn 9am -7pm Sat 9am-6pm The Ultimate Driving Machine $3,499 cash down plus 1st month's payment, security deposit andTT&L. $449 per month for 42 months (lease). Optional residual value of $17,660. 20c/m1. over 10.000 m1.lyr. W.A.C. Oispos1t1on fee $350. Stock #25221. Offer expires 7/31/02. 6 AUGUST 2. 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I iocal n s Coalition clients displaced from homes With the threatened closing of Club Nsomnia, HIV/AIDS patients served by AHCH face a housing crisis By ERIC ERVIH The apartment in Montrose where Patrick has lived for the last three months 1s nothing fancy, but it's clean, comfortable and, most impartantly, eco­nomical compared to other places in this neighborhood. He has a living room, a large kitchen, eating area, and a place to sleep at night for only $300 a month in rent. That covers all utilities and even his phone bill. Patrick, who doesn't want his last name revealed, has been HIV pasitive since 1993. His current home has been provided by the AIDS Housing Coalition Houston, a nonprofit organization that has arranged emergency shelter and food for people living with HIV and AIDS for about 10 years. But others llke Patrick may not be able to take advantage of this service because of the nonprofit organization's recent financial strains. The after-hours Club Nsomnia, which funds AHCH, may be forced to close its doors soon after allegations by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission. Agents with the TABC raided the club the night of July 19 and, since then. all pouring of alco­hol has stopped at Nsomnia. Now, attendance is down. donations are all but dried up and the club's future is in danger Funding for the coalition is drastically low, according to Nsomnia CEO ~latt Locklin, who is also executive director and co-founder of AHCH. and those who were housed m the shelter could end up homeless. All of the shelter's residents had to vacate as soon as possible. as per a letter sent out last week by the coalition. According to the letter, a previous notifi· cation stating that tenants had until Aug. 3 to move out has been changed to "immediately." The other tenants had already moved out of the apartments this week. leaving only Patrick behind. Patrick said he feels lucky because he has somewhere else to stay. but he feels sad for others who are not as fortu· nate as he. The apartment came at a perfect time in his life, Patrick said. He said he used to live at a friend's house on the other side of town, but the friend sold the home and Apartments provided by AIDS Housing Coalition Houston - such as those in this building in Montrose - have made temporary homes for a number of HIV/AIDS patients who otherwise may have been on the streets. The drastically reduced business at Club Nsomnia which largely funds AHCH. may threaten the existence of such emer­gency shelter. (Photo by Penny Weaver) moved to another residence. The apartment gave him a sense of independence and is close to his doctor's office in Montrose, he said. In order to live in the apartments, occupants must fill out an application, verify their HIV status. and show proof of income. Once the information is veri· fied, clients can move in as quickly as within a day. They're allowed to stay for a maximum of 90 days. "This was so easy to move into." he said. "I called Matt up and came by and filled out an application and within the next couple of days I was able to move in." No security deposit or connection fee was required, Patrick said. Residents at the shelter are also provid· ed with food every week. The coalition operates two units, which can house two people each. Patrick said he's thankful for the help that the coalition has offered him, and is sad to see Its programs in danger. "I wasn't sure where I would have gone," he said. "It's just a good thing for people who need it. It's a shame if it's not going to be here anymore. "I don't know how many people he [Locklin] has helped, but it's a good oppar· tunity for people," Patrick added. Locklin said he was prompted to start the coalition after a friend's death from AIDS. The friend had to live on the streets becausP a local service organization could not find him a place to live. The coalition's shelter is the only one of its kind serving people living with HIV and AIDS in Harris County. The organiza· tion also has offered on-site counseling and distributed information on HIV and AIDS from the club headquarters. Locklin: Coalition may turn to offering emergency shelter CLUB STRUGGLES continued from Page 1 U.S. Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, whose dLS­trtct includes the Montrose area, said this week that she will try to secure money to keep the program running. Locklin said club organizers will meet with Lee m the coming days. "We are going to see what options we have to keep the doors opened," Lee said. The congresswom· an said she plans to sohrlt local govern­ment, religious groups, and private donors for U.S. Rep. Sheila funds. She said she was Ja:lcsoo Leesa d !hrs upset v. hen she heard week she wdl try to of th news about the fllld financial support AHCH shelters closmg. for the program. I was a little angry, then d1Sturbed," Lee said. "It provides a vital service for the commun1~:" Lee called upon residents to offer support. "This is not something to overlook," she said. "Everyone should be concerned with this." She beheves seemg the coalition go under is a loss to not only the ~tontrose community, but to the city of Houston as a whole "Our success in health in helping peo­ple 11ving with HIV and AIDS depends on programs like this," Lee said. Locklin said the funding emergency also may lead the coalition to change some of its focus. "We're lookmg at trying to open anoth· er emergency shelter." rather than fund transitional housing, he said. In 2001, the coalition raised $292,000 and spent nearly all of it on its programs, according to Locklin. The group placed 45 people in housing last year, and also offers counseling, food, assistance in pay­ing utilities, and buymg clothing and household goods. "I get at least 10 calls a day for advice, counseling and referrals," Locklin said. AHCH's routine expenses include the community center lease, apartment leas­es, Janitorial supplies and services, and club expenses such as a DJ, bookkeeper and cleanup. The community center building houses Club Nsomma in addi­tion to serving as a site for storage, a food bank and fund-raisers. Most of the $292,000 the group gar­nered last year 290,000 of which was spent on its programs, Locklin said was raised through Club Nsomma. which requests a donation at the door to those who enter the club. Charges being filed TABC Lt. Tracy Hudgins said this week that the commission has asked the Harris County District Attorney's office to pursue charges in relation to the July 19 raid at Nsomnia. A charge of selling alcohol without a license would be filed against an indi­vidual, Hudgins said, presumably Locklin A spokesperson for the district attorney's intake division said Thursday that no charge has yet been filed. The paperwork hkely is still being processed, according to Hudgins, since the TABC report on the operation was just finished Wednesday. Locklin disputes the TABC's version of events at the club. He denies that Club Nsomnia sells alcohol He also alleges that TABC agents and HPD officers at the club on July 19 made anti-gay comments and targeted gay clients. "(HPDJ Internal Affairs has accepted our complaint and TABC has accepted our complaint," Locklin said. "We've got a lot of different people breathing down every­body's neck about this situation." According to Hudgins, however. such a complaint was not made about state agents. "We have not been accused of making homophobic remarks," he said. HPD officials could not be reached for comment by press time. Houston City Council member Annise Parker, the only openly gay person on the council, said her office has looked into whether or not gays were targeted in the raid on the club. "We have, at this point, concluded our investigation," Parker said Thursday. "We've visited with TABC and with Matt and the Houston Police Department. We asked for anyone who might have been present during the raid to visit with us, and we haven't heard from anybody. "'We get completely different stories from the two parties," she added. "We've been unable to verify whether there was anything inappropriate going on when TABC came to the club. but all of our evidence shows that Matt was operating illegally." Parker said that no matter what the cause may be for Club Nsomnia's fund· raising, it must operate in accordance with the law. "The closure may have a real negative Impact on the AHCH, but the rules, partic ularly alcohol rules, apply to everybody," shesa1d Alternative and possibly more tradi· tional funding sources for the group would also require more structure for the coah­tion, Park1>r noted. "! think it would cause an overhaul of the organization, which is not necessarily a bad thing," she said. Locklin is determined to continue work on behalf of HIV I AIDS patients in what· ever way he can. "AHCH deals with AIDS on a personal level. We try to inspire hope in the person again," he said. "I have a burning desire to help people with HIV and AIDS stay off the streets, and whatever way I can, I will." -Eric Ervin contributed to this story HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com In na news Biden open to amending RAVE ACT. continued from Pagel "I suspect they'll bend, and we'll get a better bill in the Senate," Piper said. Biden might also be receptive. but because it's his bill, Piper said. "He takes the issue personally, really," he said. The bill caught rave and gay circuit party organizers and clubs by surprise, prompting an outcry from opponents who said that the act would unfairly hold busi· ness operators responsible for the actions of some patrons. The bill, which Biden introduced June 18, would amend the federal anti-drug statute known as the Crack House Act. That law allows prosecutors to file crimi· nal and civil charges against owners of buildings that can be show to "knowingly" allow drug use and sales on their premises. The RAVE Act would "prohibit an indi· vidual from knowingly opening, main· taining. managing, controlling, renting, leasing, making available for use, or prof· iting from any place for the purpose of manufacturing, distributing or using any controlled substance." The bill is "too broadly written," Piper said, and by targeting rave events, the matter becomes a free speech issue. Even by calling it the RAVE Act, the bill singles out a partic· ular form of self-expression, Piper said. Depending on how the bill is enforced, he said, business owners and promoters could face jail time and fines for the actions of people who attend rave parties. The bill could lead club owners to take steps from eliminating so-called "chill rooms" or stop­ping techno music, "anything that they think prosecutors aren't going to like.'' Piper described the DPA as the nation's largest drug policy organization. It aims to seek "alternatives to the war on drugs" by emphasizing treatment and harm reduc· tion programs. He acknowledged but did not defend the use of drugs by some who attend rave parties. "People definitely use drugs at raves," Piper said. "But they use drugs at all sorts of events." He said he did not believe drugs are any more prevalent at raves than at other large dance parties. C) FORINFO Drug Policy Alliance 925 15th Sl NW. 2nd Floor Washington DC 20005 202-2l(r()035 www.drugpolicy.org U.S. Sen. Joseph Biden 221 Russell Senate Office Building Washington. DC 20510 202-224-5042 senator@biden.senate.gov 4th 1\nnual Oa•v ribhean ~~S;s~r~fruise Sail from (;1hr11to11 ahoud lhc• 111ali,11ilirc·nl /lhap.~"'~' o( lhc• .C.eas to lhr lirn11lif11l 110rls or to111mrl. 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KIMBERLY THOMPSON AdwrtisP,i Sales BRITT CULWM-Account Exl!aJtive ~hwstonvoice.com PETE MORRIS-Account ExecutNe pmom5i$houstonYoice.co National Adver1isir1g Represenbti'le Rivendefl MJrXeting Coolpany. Inc. 212-242-6863 lication Pl.tlisher- WINDOW MEDIA UC Pmident-WIWAM WAYBOURN Elitori3I OirectDr- CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Conlroler· PATRICK SUMMERS Art OirectDr- ROB BOEGER Mneting OirectDr- ERIC MAY General Manaljer- MICHAEL KITCHENS CllAIITTR MEMBER Established 1974 as the Mcntrose SLr 500 I.Mt! Blvd.. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (7U) 529-8490 Fax (7U) 529-9531 WWW hoostonwice.ccm Cootents cnpyright 2000 Offi:e Inn: 9 a.m. lo 5:30 pm~ To Slbtit a letter letlers should be ~ than 400 words. We rtSeM the right to edit for content am Ierr,ith. Wt wi'll wtumld names upon request but you must include yax name and phone runber for \'et'lfica­tion. Please sem mail 1o Houston Voice. 500 LMtt Blvd. Suite 200. Hooston. Tex.is 77006; fax (7U) S2't.lJ53l or e-mail to editor'.'<ihoustoovoicuo Opinions~ therm do oot reflect those of the Houston Vorre Issue 1136 v wpoint Stepping in when straight dads fail If those who breed would take responsibility for their progeny, there wouldn't be any need for gays to be Big Brothers in the first place. By STEVE FRI£SS WALKED INTO KELLY Stidham's office for the first time in 1996 and came right out with it. "I'm gay," I told the case­worker from Big Brothers Big Sisters. "If that's going to be a problem, let me know now and we can save everybody a lot of wasted time." Kelly blinked twice, laughed once, told me to have a seat "It's not a problem for us if it's not a problem for you," she shot back. That acceptance ended up costing me and my Little Brother a lot of time. Wonderful time. Time swimming. And riding rollercoasters. And eating salty french fries. And watching movies. And telling stupid jokes. And playing catch. And talking on the phone. And washing cars. And celebrating birthdays. Insidious, evil stuff, all of it. Or, that's what a group of gay-baiting bigots want you to believe. Focus on the Family, appar­ently not content with the number of homophobia-induced suicides they likely have already prompted, has launched an all-0ut attack on local chapters of Big Brothers Big Sisters of America for allow­ing homosexuals to serve as mentors to fatherless boys and motherless girls. Mind you, most BBBS chapters have been doing this for a quarter-century. This is not news, no matter how breath­lessly the.~e alleged Christians insist that Rome just started to burn. But the national organization reafllrmed its policy recently, giving the religious right its big opportunity to butt in. In doing so. they've trotted out the old canards about gay men having a propen­sity toward recruitment and child molestation, pointing to the Catholic priest pedophile scandal as proof. Funny hov.~ with little-girl kidnappings now all the rage in the news these days, these same people haven't thrashed all straight men for their obviously uncontrollable compulsion to snatch children off their front lawns and mutilate them. BBBS HAS ALWAYS BEEN HYPER­aware of the potential for a molestation case that would devastate a child and humiliate the organization. They're matching strange adults with someone else's children: caution is key. That's why they run their mentors through a battery that includes an exhaustive personal background check. You must sit for a lengthy and probing psychological examination, permit a caseworker to determine whether your home is a suitable environment for chil­dren and put up with an intense inter­view in which they quiz you about every­thing from your sexual experience to your views on parenting and discipline. The Vatican should be taking notes. In the end, my partner Jim and I were matched with 6-year-0ld boys who are now almost 12. Their mothers were told in advance that we are gay and given the option of rejecting us as matches if they wish. Considering there were 200 boys waiting for men­tors, these lucky mothers were simply grateful for the offer of our time. My Little Brother's biological father lives nearby but sees him once or twice a year. He flits in and out of this child's life capriciously, routinely disappoint­ing him and constantly giving rise to torturous self-doubt in a boy who must wonder what he did wrong. From me, this child sees an adult male who consistently and unfailingly loves him, is in constant contact and attends his school plays. He sees that responsible men honor their commitments. work hard to pay the bills, keep clean homes, run HOUSTON VOICE AUGUST 2. 2002 PAGE 8 When straight men abandoned their parental respon­sibility, .in Ri:hter and his partner steve Friess stepped in as Big Brothers and filled the void. errands and know right from wrong with a certainty that provides him both structure and comfort Dare I say it. too, that as a child of divorce it has even been good for him to observe my healthy adlllt marriage. I'VE NEVER HAD A CONVERSATION about being gay with my Little Brother. His mother and grandmother must have explained it to him, or perhaps he came to understand it because he spent lots of time with Jim and Jim's Little Brother. I do remember my Little Brother once remarking that he's lucky because he got two Big Brothers. But the Focus on the Family folks aren't really scared that I'll molest my Little Brother. They don't even know us. and they'd likely refuse to spend an afternoon with us even if we offered them the chance. No. what they fear is that we'll show, by example, that gays are normal, car­ing, contributing members of the com­munity who live in stable relationships and fulfill their civic and personal duties. They're afraid these children will grow up tolerant or, in the sneering parlance of bigotry, that they will "come to believe that homosexuality is an acceptable lifestyle." What they miss is that Jim and I don't need to "advocate" for acceptance; our behavior earns it. They also miss the glaring truth that straight men, not gays, cause far more destruction and instability in our cul­ture. If those who breed would take responsibility for their progeny, there wouldn't be any need for Big Brothers in the first place. "fi:} Nevada-based free­~ lancer Steve Friess 1s a frequent contributor to USA Today, the Christian Science Monitor and Wired. He can be reached through WWW .Steveftiess.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com po1• n PAULA MARTINAC Now that it turns out women have been put at risk with hormone therapy, maybe the medical establishment will pay attention to us Maybe now they'll listen to lesbians wrm THE ALARMlNG REVELATION that hormone replacement therapy actual­ly increases women's risk for heart disease, stroke and breast cancer, the co1.mtry may frnally be waking up to something lesbian and feminist health activists first talked about 30 years ago - that menopause, like pregnancy, isn't a disease to be "treated." The danger of HRT is as big a scan­dal as Enron or pedophile priests, repre­senting a massive breach of public trust. Millions of women have taken synthetic estrogen to relieve the annoy­ing indications of menopause, like hot flashes, loss of sex drive, mood swings, and insomnia, and also to guard against heart disease and osteoporosis. Doctors have even prescribed hormones to peri­menopausal women those in their 40s, just prior to menopause - to deal with pesky problems like irregular periods. Without a doubt, straight women have been the primary market for this therapy, which amounts to yet another sexist ploy - like Botox or cosmetic surgery - to convince women that they must halt the aging process. Now many of the women who used HRT face life-threaten· ing health issues that could make feeling sweaty, cranky, tired, and not in the mood look pretty good by comparison. On the hopeful side, the HRT crisis may help bring the terrible era of overmedicat · ing women to a well-deserved close. In just a few weeks, there's been an explosion of media focus on alternative ways to navi­gate the trying time that my mother's gen­eration referred to - in hushed voices, of course - as "The Change." And when Katie Courie starts weighing the merits of herbs like black cohosh and valerian for coping with menopause, a lot of women will be listening. WHAT'S NOT BEING SAID IN THE media, though, is that much of the information about alternative therapies isn't new. During the heyday of the women's health movement in the late 1960s and early '70s, feminists critical of the male-dominated medical establish· ment began learning about their bodies and sharing this knowledge with other women through clinics, workshops, and books like "Our Bodies, Ourselves." In particular, they sought out natural ther· apies and preventative medicines from Asian and Native American cultures. Not surprisingly, a lot of the health­care activists who spearheaded this AUGUST 2. 2002 9 TROOSLf IN JESSE J.IELMS-f.AND .. . movement were lesbians. Among them was Joan Waitkevicz, an M.D. in New York who often had two choices of remedies to prescribe: a conventional pharmaceutical one and an herbal one. If you chose the herbs, there was a well­stocked, lesbian-run apothecary shop in the neighborhood. Many of these les· bian health-care workers brought their valuable knowledge of self-help and nat­ural remedies with them when they vol· unteered during the AIDS epidemic. Although it's not what it once was, the feminist health movement is still going strong in some areas, including cyberspace. The pioneering Feminist Women's Health Center in Washington state now has branch clinics as far away as New Hamp­shire and Georgia Its Web site (WW\'.:fwhc.org) correctly addresses menopause as a wellness issue, not an illness. THAT MAY BE BECAUSE OUR community, just like mainstream America, often glosses over the health concerns of women over 40, until they become manifested in a disease like breast cancer. When was the last tune. for example. that you read about women's bone health in the lesbian and gay press? The concerns of yo1U1ger lesbians, like pregnancy issues and safer sex, make better copy that is, when they're dealt with at all. \"ie \ -e also virtually erased the enormous contributions lesbians made to managing our community"s wellness. Nowadays it's more popular to diss '70s les­bians for going off the politically correct deep end than it is to praise their ground­breaking work in the area of self-help. What the HRT crisis clearly demon· strates is that health care for middle-aged women is in a sorry state. Ideal!); our community would use this information to set up workshops specifically for 4()­plus lesbians, implementing the lessons of the feminist health movement. That, of course, means acknowledging that maybe all those granola- and tofu-loving lesbians weren't so crazy after all. ~ Paula Martiiac 1s an author and V syndicated writer and can be reached at l.ncoUnr@aolcom. 111 Eric lrner 10 AUGUST 2. 2002 practically anything! Your Digital Image L y J I Your Commw1ity Insu ranee Agency! 713.661. 7700 J'or .1uto, Home. Rtntl'n. life, ll•alth.Rusm•.s ITL\llrtln<'' a11.1/ 1naclr more. 657311: loop.Sout/1, St•. 185 &llairr, TX n401 wuw.Sc hmcrl•r 1i:r11<}ccom www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on the record "It sure doesn't sound like he's growing old all that gracefully." A spokesperson for Madonna, responding to a published quote by Boy George criticizing her for allegedly taking Botox injections and insisting that he prefers to "grow old gracefully" (Salon.com) "The prettier-than-ever cast revealed nothing but skin, coming off more calculated and remote than any cast in memory. Seven strangers in the beginning, seven strangers in the end." TV Guide, panning the final episode of "The Real World: Chicago," which featured two gay cast members and was the highest rated episode of the highest rated season yet for the MTV reality show (TV Guide, July 27) "Other research confirms what therapists have known for decades: Homosexuals are made, not born. And they are frequently 'made' by older men who molest them as youngsters." Rev. Louis P. Sheldon, chair of the Traditional Values Coalition, on a new Web site designed to debunk "Homosexual Urban Legends, "including that gays are "born not made" "I'm now the representative who just happens to be gay, not just the gay representative." Ga. State Rep. Karla Drenner, the first openly gay elected official in a Southern state legislature (CNN. July 24) "I've really noticed a resurgence of 'gay' by skateboardy kids. Not gay like homosexual. It meant kind of farty, kind of odd." Gay gossip columnist Michelangelo Signorile, on the changing mean· ing of the word "gay" (New York Magazine, July 22) "These people in the Castro want me and my kind exterminated like roaches. Because that's what we are to them - ugly, soulless creatures that make a mess of their little gay utopia." Cowan Conaghan, 25, a gay homeless man criticizing hostility toward the homeless in San Francisco's gay Castro district (San Francisco Examiner. July 24) "They pulled the Olympics out and it turned out to be the best thing in the world for Cobb County. ... People still stayed in all of our hotels, still ate in all of our restaurants, still played in all of our recreational facilities. They didn't give a rat's ass whether the Olympic torch came through Cobb County or not." Cobb County, Ga., Commission Chair Bill Byrne, now a candidate for governor. on the anti-gay resolu­tion that resulted in the relocation of the Atlanta Olympic volleyball venue and torch relay in 1996; Byrne's daughter Sharon came out during the ensu­ing protests (Associated Press, July 24) "I had sex with men in the past. I was tested and am clean. I gave blood." An anonymous e-mail sent to a number of Canadian blood donor agencies, who have been unable to trace the sender or confirm its legiti­macy (Canadian Press, July 29) HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com KALETRA 1s indicated for the treatment of HIV infection 1n combination with other ant1retrov1ral agents 1n patients 6 months of age or older KALETRA does not cure HIV infection or AIDS and does not reduce the nsk of passing of HIV to others. Safety Information KALETRA should not be taken 11 you have had an allergic reaction to KALETRA or any of its ingredients. KALETRA must not be taken with certain drugs due to the potential for serious and/or life·threaternng side effects Discuss all medicines. 1nclud1ng those without a prescription and herbal preparations. you are taking or plan to take with your doctor or pharmacist Pancreat1t1s and liver problems, which may cause death, have been www.kaletra.com Abbott Laboratones Abbott Park, IL 90084 reported m patients rece1vmg KALETRA. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease such as hepatitis. Your doctor may want to monitor your liver function. In patients taking protease inhibitors, increased bleeding (in patients with hemophilia) and d1abeteslt11gh blood sugar have occurred. Changes in body fat have been seen m some patients rece1v1ng antiretroviral therapy. Some patients receiving KALETRA have had large increases 1n tnglycendes and cholesterol. The most commonly reported side effects of moderate or severe intensity are: abnormal bowel movements. diarrhea, leering weak or tired, headache, and nausea, Children most often reported diarrhea, rash. taste aversion, and vomiting. KALETRA oral solution contains alcohol. Please see adjacent page for Patient Information. May2002 Printed "' USA AUGUST 2, 2002 11 12 AUGUST 2, 2002 KALETRA"' (lopinavir/ritonavir) capsules (lopinavir/ritonavir) oral solution ALERT: Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with KALETRA. Please atso read the section ·MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA. Patient Information KALETRA"' (kuh-LEE-tra) Generic Name: lopinavir/ntonavir (lop-IN-uh-veer/ rit-ON-uh-veer) RIWI lllis leaflet carefully before you start taking KAlETRA. Also. read It each bme you get ~our l<ALETRA prescrlpbon rafrlled. 111 case something has changed. This Information does not take the place of talkJJlo wtth your dOctor when you start Uus medtcme and at ched< ups. Ask your doctor~ you haw any questions about l<ALETRA. Wbat ls IW.ETRA 1nd how does H wort? KAlfTRA IS a COOlbinatJcn Of two rnedlcines They are lopinavlr and rilooaw. KAl.ETRA IS a iype Of medldne called an HIV (human lmmunodelidency virus) protease (PRO-teHSe) lnlllbila<. KAlETRA IS always used 111 combinaliOn with Oll1ef anti-HIV medicines to Ilea! peol)le willt human lmmunodeflcltnc Virus (HIV) lnlectlon KAlETRA Is tor adl:lls and tor cNldran age 6 monttls and cfdef HIV infection destroy$ C04 (T) cells. wtrich are irnpOl!anl to Ille mmune systmn Aller a large number Of T cells are deslroyed. acquired mmune defidel1cy syndrome (AIDS) ~ KALETRA blocks HIV protease. a chemlCll wtrich IS needed for HIV to mu!tJply KA!.ETRA reduces tile amount Of HIV 111 your blood and =:sn=:J~ea':o':°-'~an:1~~ your Immune system •s weak (opportunistic lnfectJOOS). Does KALETRA cure HIV or AIDS? IW.ETRA does not cure HIV Infection or AIDS The fong·term effects of KALETRA 111 not known 11 th11 Umt. People taking IW.ETRA may still get opportunistic Infections or other conditions !flat happen witb HIV Infection. Some of these conditions are ~;~pTe~n/~A~i'fn~:crl~~ Infections, and Mycob1tf1rtum ,.;um Does KALETRA reduce the risk of passing HIV to othe11? KAl.ETRA doeS not reduce the nsk of passing HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contamination Conbnue to prac!JCe safe sex ar.d do not llSe or Share d rty needfeS. How should llake KALETRA? • You sflould stay under a doctor's tall when taking KALETRA. Do not cflan;e your treatment or stop trutment wlthOllt ~rst 'afl<inO with yow dOc!OI' • You <nus! take KAlETRA every day exactlY as your doctor p,.. Willed rt The dose ot KALETRA may be d1ffertnt for you than for other palJentS Follow tilt lllrectlons from your dOClol exactl'i as wnt:an on Ille label • ::.>smg In adults ftndud ng c1111dren f2 years of~ and older) The usual dose for aduns Is 3 cap$Ufes (400/100 TIO) or 5 D ml or the on solution twice a day (morning and night In combination wttn olller anb-HIV medtetnes • ~In chi dren from 6 months lo 12 years Of aoe Cl!ildren from 6 months to 12 years of age can also take KAL.ETRA. The child's doctor will decide the nght dosa based on tile chilil s wttghl • Take KALETRA with food to help tt wot1< better •Do not change your dose or stop tak ~ KA!.ETRA without ~rst talk· Ing with your doctor • When your KALETRA supply starts to run low get more from your doctor or pharmacy This is wry Important because the amount of virus In your blood may lnerease If the medtcine II stopped for rven a short bme The virus may develop resiStallCe to KAlETRA and become han!er to treat • Be sure to set llll a sehedule and follow It careMfy • Only take medicine Illa! has been preserlbed spedlalfy for you Do not gtVe KAlETRA to otllers or take medlcine prescribed for somecne else Wllal slloufd I •o H I mils 1 dost of IW.ETRA? tt IS imllOrlan! lllal you do not llllSS 111'1 doses. H you moss I dose Of KAlfTRA. laf<a ~ as soon as posslble and then take your next schedlJled dose al As regular tnne. H 4 IS almost time for your next dole. do not lake lhe mossed dose. W'¥1. and take the next dose 11 lhe regular time. Do nol - lhe next dose WUt llappens HI takt too much KALETRA? H you suspect Illa! you took more tnan the preserlbed dose of this mediclne ccntact your tocat potSon control center or emergency room unmedtatefy As with all prescnption med cmes. KA!.ETRA should be kept out of th• reach of young chlklren KALETRA Uquld cootalns a large amount of alcohol. If a toddler or young child accidentally dnnks more than the recommended dose of KALETRA. it could make him/her sick from too much alcohol. Contact your local poiSOn control center or emergency room unmediately 1f this happens. Who should not takt KALETRA? Together with your doctor you need lo deClde wtlelher l<ALETRA 1s nghlfor you • Do not take KAlETRA H you are taking cellain medlClneS. These could cause senous side effects that CCIJtd cause death. Be!ore you talo! KAl.ETRA. you must tell your doctor about all the medicines you are takJJ1(I or are planning to take. These tnctude OCher prescr1p1Jon and 11CX11>rescnption medicines and herbal supplements. ~.~~~i:""sec:==-~D~E~~~~o~ NOT TAKE Willi KALETRA.• • Do not take KALETRA H you have an allergy to KAl.ETllA or any of Its ngredtents. including rltor1avlt or lopmaw Can I take KALETRA with othtr medications?· KALETRA may Interact with other medicines, indudmg lhOSe you take wlthOllt a presci:iption. You must tell your doctor about an the med~ ones you are takino or planning to lake before you take KALfTRA. MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA: • Do not take the following medtemes with l<ALETRA because they can cause serious problems or death If taken with l<ALETRA. -D1hydroergotamme. ergonovlne, ergotamme and methyler­gonovine such as Cafergot", M1granaf9. D HE 45 Ergotrate Maleate. Metllerg1ne, and ot11ers - Halel0n9 ttnazolam) - Hismanal" (astemtZOle) - OraP" (pimolide) - PrOl)ufsld9 ( ctsapnde) - Ryllunol' (propafoocne) - Seldane" (te11enadine) - Tambocor"' (flecaintde) -Versed" (mldazolam) • Do not take KALETRA with rttamotn. also known as R1mactane9, R1fad1n8 Ri!ate,., or Rilamate9. llifampm may lower the amount of KAlETRA m your blood and make d las eftectNe • Do nol take KALETRA with St John's wort (hypencum perforatum). an herbal product sold as a dietary supplement, or products containtl10 St John's wort. Talk With your doctor I you are taking or plamlnQ to take St Jolln's wort Taking St John's wort may decrease KALETRA lewis and lead to lncrea$ed Viral load and possible resistance lo KAlfTRA or cross·reslstance to other antH<IV mediones. • Do not take KALETRA with the ChOlesleroHowering medtCmeS Mevaco,. (lovastabn) or zoc..- (simvasta1ln) because of possillJe senous reactJons. 'here IS also an Increased riSlc of drug interactJonS be!Ween KAl.ETRA and l.ipito.e (atorvastattn), talk to your doctor ~~ take any Of these cholesterol-reducing medtCines with Medicines that require dougt 1djustm101J. h IS possible that your doctor may need to Increase or decrease Ille dose Of other medtCines when you are also taidnp l<ALETRA Remem­ber to ten your doctor a 'lledicmes you are taking or plan to take Befo11 yo1 take V1ag111 (slfdenaflf) wltb KALETRA. tallt to your doctor 1bout problems tltese two medicines can cause when takH together. Y°" may get Increased sldt enects of VIAGRA. such as low blood preu ure. vision changes, and penis trtclion lasting more than 4 bou11 tt 1n erection lasts loogtr !flan 4 llou11, get medical help rlglll away to avoid permanent damage lo your penis. Your doctor can u plain Hine symptoms to you • H you are taking oral contracepttves ("the pill') to prevent pregnancy. mrr~n::::':lr:=r.:==sJnce • Et.Mrenz (Susttva"'l or nevu;pme (Viramune81 may iower the amount of KAlETRA m your blood Your dOctor may lnereaso your dose Of l<ALETRA H you are also taklng efawenz or newap ne • ff you are taking Mycobubn8 (rlfabutin) your doctor w1 I lower the dose Of Mycobubn •A change In therapy should be considered If you 111 taking KALETRA Wtlh: Pttenobarllltaf Phenytoin (Oifant1n9 and others) Carllamazepine (Tegretol' and olllers) "Iese medidnes may lower the amount Of KAL.ETRA In your blood and make It fess effective • Oilier Special Considerations: KALETRA oral solution contams alcohol. Taflt wttn your dOttor ~ you are taking or Ptannill(j to !aka metronidazole or dJSUfhram Severe nausea and vornltJl1g can OCCllC • tt you 111 taking bolll dldanostnt (Vide.-i 1nd KALETRA: Oloanosme IV'lde.-i ShOUkl be taken one llOur before or two hours after KAlETAA Wllat are tlle possible side tfttcb of IW.ETRA? • ThtS list of side effects Is not complete If you haw questtons about side effects. ask your doctor. nurse, or pharmacist You ShOUld report any new or conbnulnll symptoms to your dOttor nght away Your doctor may be able to help you manage llteSe side effects • The most commonly reported side effects of moderate severity !Ital www.houston voice.com are thought to be drug related are abnormal stools (bowel move­ments). diarrhea. feeltng weak/tired, headache. and nausea Children taking KALETRA may somel1mes get a skm rash • Blood tests 1n pabenls taJung KAl.ETRA may show jlOSSlble IM!r prob­lems. People with fiver disease such as Hepallbs B and Hepat1bs C who taka KAlETRA may have worsening fiVl!r disease. liver problems lncludmg death have ocamed In pa!len!S taking KAl.ETRA. In studies, rt is undear d KAlETRA caused fllese fiver problems becallSe some pa!len!S had Olhet Illnesses or were tak!ng other 'lledicmes • Some patJe1lfS taking KALETRA can develop senous problems With their pancreas (pancreat1bs). whieh may cause death. You haw a higher chance Of having pancreali!Js If you haw had n before Ten your doctor U you haw nausea. vornltmo or abdommal pam. These may be signs of pancreabbs • Some patients haw large Increases m trlgfycertdes and cholesterol. 'he long-term chance of aetttna complications such as heari attackS or stroke due lo Increases In tngfycertdes and cholesterol caused by protease lnhlbltors Is not known at this bme • Diabetes and high blood sugar (ltypergtycemia) occur In patients taking protease lnh bltors such as KALETRA Some patients had diabetes before starting protease inhtllltors. others did not Some :;:be":,:: m the• diabetes medicine. Others needed • Changes m body fat haw been seen In some patients taking anti· retrowal therapy These changes may include Increased amount of fat In the urper back and neck ('buffalo hump'), breast, and around ~~·'!'i:'ek ca~ a~J~0~:~~ :;,::~~t~:a ~xd~:I~~~:~; not known at thlS lime. • Some pabents with hemophUta haw Increased bleeding with pro­tease Inhibitors • There haw been other side effects In patients laking KALETRA However. these side effects may have been due to other medicmes that patients were taking or to the Illness ltsett Some of these side effects can be serious Wllat should I ltlf my doctor before taking KALETRA? · mu~~=r~~~.~her:= • If you are breast·lnlfllJll Do not breast-feed ~ you are taking l<ALETRA You sflould not breast-feed H you have HIV If you are a woman Wllo has or wilt haVI! a ~· talk with your doctor about tile :1.:r!=i= ::v:~~~~::::~J~~~~= mt!ted tllrough breasMeedlng • If you haw liver problems ff you haw ltver problems or are Infected with HepatttJs B or ~epat1bS C. you should tell your doctor before takmg l<ALETRA • If you row db/Jttes: Some people taking protease 01hlbltors develop new or more senous diabetes or hlQh blood sugar Tell your doctor if you haVI! diabetes or an Increase m lhitSt or frequent unnahon. • If you haw hemop/11/Ja: Patients taking KALETRA 'TI.1y haw rncreased bleed no How do f store KALETRA? • Keep KALETRA and all other medtClne$ out of the reach of children . :\':3~=1r~:O =~~ .. ·: g:I s:r:;:;i::,, ':,~ perature up to n•F (25-C) KALETRA capsules and oral solution sflould be used within 2 months • AVOid exposure to excessive heat Do not keep medicine that IS out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure tlBI' you lllrow fl'f medlclle Wit It II out of the 'each of cllildren. Gene11l 1dvlce about prescrtplion medicines Tall< lo your doctc or other health care prOVlder t you haw any quesllOI\$ about llltS medicine or your cond lion Medtttnes are somettmes prescribed for purposes other !flan those ltsted In a Patient fnformabon Leaf et If you haw any concerns about th s medtcme ask your doctor Your doctor or pharmaclsl can give you informahon about th s med ctne that was wrrtten for health care pro­fessionals Do not use this medicine for a cond1bon for which rt was not prescribed Do not share this medtClne with other people • The brands fisted are trademarks of their rtspecllVll owners and are not trademarks of Abbott Laborafones The makers of these brands are not affiliated with and do 'lOI endorse AbboH Laboratories or its products. Ref OJ.5 t77 ·R6 Revised. January, 2002 028-03&2825-t MASTER 02~3555-t PRNTED IN U.SA HOUSTON VOICE SPORTS: Members of the Montrose Softball League head for the Gay Softball World Series. Page 16 I THEATER: Comedic talent Rob Nash offers his own twist on 'Romeo and Juliet' Page 15 Out on Lesbian rocker Melissa Etheridge puts emphasis on the hopeful flip side of her 'Skin' album in this year's tour By PENNY WEAVER THIS YEAR'S SUMMER CONCERT TOUR IS ALL ABOUT celebrating for lesbian rock'n'roll star Melissa Etheridge, who brings her musical party to Texas next week. "It is so wonderful. I think it's the most fun I've had on tour - ever," says Etheridge, taking time for an interview with the Houston Voice via cell phone while driving en route to her Los Angeles home. "It's so easy. It's such a celebration. The band is phenomenal The crowds have been that's probably the best part- I didn't know what the crowds would be like this sum­mer, and they have been insane and really wonderful." Surely Etheridge's legions of fans would describe her as "wonderful" too, as they eagerly await the eighth album from this Grammy award-winning singer/songwriter known for hits such as "Bring Me Some Water," "I'm the Only One" and "Come to My Window." Etheridge's walk on the road of fame began with her self· titled- and Grammy nominated-1988 debut and has since been punctuated with events including her 1993 coming out, launch into parenthood five years ago, widely publicized break-up with ex·partner Julie Cypher, and recent hook-up with actress Tammy Lynn Michaels. Oh, and she's produced six more CDs, a best-selling autobiography and crisscrossed the nation on fan-pleasing concert tours in the meantime. The current tour reunites Etheridge with her band after last year's acoustic "Live and Alone" venture. "It was very introspective; it was very intimate with the audience and there was something to be said about that," she says. "I would love to do that again some time because it was really a very special thing. It was kind of healing and a growing and a journey, that whole thing, and this [year's tour) is just a big party. "It's a big celebration; it':; a lot of fun," Etheridge adds. "Skin" is divided almost in half, with the first five songs focusing largely on heartbreak and despair, and the second half more hopeful, including her release, "I Want To Be In Love." "It's funny because ... the last tour, 'Live and Alone,' it's like I did the first half of the album, and this tour I'm doing the second part of the album," Etheridge explains. "It's the healing. It's cool." In an interview a year ago, the singer prepared to go on the road just after her autobiography, "The Truth Is ... ", was published. The book included stories behind many of her songs, and she was anxious to see what it would be like to perform the tunes knowing that her fans were "clued in" to their origins. "The audience was very supportive, very much so,'' she recalls. "It turned out to be a lot less painful than I thought it would be. They turned it into a healing experi­ence, getting all that out." New hope, new music NOW, ETHERIDGE CELEBRATES HOPE AND HAPPINESS while on tour. That is a hint at the feel of her next album so far ·which she expects to have out as early as next spring. She's debuting some of the tunes in concert over the summer. "On tour I've been doing at least one a night and sometimes two," Etheridge relates. The new album is still in its early stages. 'Tm writing," she says. "It's a lot different material HOUSTON VOICE AUGUST 2, 2002 PAGE 13 Lesbian rock star Melissa Etheridge makes three concert stops in Texas beginning Aug. 9, with an Aug.10 show m The Woodlands on the north side of Houston. [than 'Skin'). Actually, the music is more rocking than I've done in a long time. "It's not that depressed, sad person - it's a very happy person who's having sex and really enjoying herself," she adds with a laugh. Last year, Etheridge described "Skin" as "like throwing up." Her upcoming album - like her per­sonal life - is headed in a different direction. "This one feels like after you've been sick and then you get well and you look back and you say, 'Wow I'm going to really appreciate well, 'cause I never want to be sick again,'" she explains. "And now I'm well and well is great and I'm celebrating well. "It's a real celebration, like this tour is," says Etheridge, but that's as specific as she can get so far about the new work. "I haven't put enough of it together yet to say exactly what it is." She notes she'll have a new DVD coming out in a couple of months with material from her last tour. "We recorded and filmed the last couple of shows on the 'Live and Alone' show. There's a lot of new and yummy stuff on that," she hints. Happiness at home ETHERIDGE, 41, CONTINUES TO FIND JOY IN raising her children - Bailey, 5, and Beckett, 3. She shares custody with Cypher. "They are wonderful. They make life worth living. They're insanely great," Etheridge says of her children. Gay parenthood has been increasingly a political topic in recent years, particularly with Rosie O'Donnell coming out and supporting the fight to repeal Florida's ban on gay parents. But even though Etheridge is several Please see MB.lSSA. on Page 14 14 AUGUST 2. 2002 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE I on a you New Etheridge album due out next year MEl..ISSA. from Page 13 years into the parenting experience, she says tt's difficult for her to gauge the progress gay moms and dads are making. "It's hard to say because, yes, I'm a gay parent, but I'm also a famous gay parent, and famous just outdoes evecything,'' Etheridge explains. "I'm really not the one to talk about like the real issue; of gay parenting because I get the first table or whatever ... [because I'm famous), I'm always the first 111 llne." She does recogruze the influence she can have as a famous lesbian, and that's fme by her "It's a responsibility, and I'll take it," she says. As a parent - as m seemingly all aspects of her life Etheridge focuses on being open "The best thing I can ever do for the kids is be completely 100 percent honest with them and explain everything to them," she adds "m e."tP!ain that, yes it 1S unusual to have two moms .. .it's special, but they know others that do. You just are honest with them about the world. "You just gwe them the information so that they're never surpnsed by anythmg." Sure to be reflected in the next album IS the singer's happiness as inspired by the love in her life. Michaels, 21, who played character Nicole Julian on televi· sion's WB series, "Popular." The pair met early last year, and Etheridge ' ·' >I e.1~ .. .J~. SKIN says Michaels still can be surprised by the singer's characteristic franknes.5. In an inter· view for August's Out magazine, Etheridge revealed that she and Michaels had a platonic first date. but soon got physical. "Yeah, Tammy came home a couple days ago and went, 'You told everyone we slept together on the second date!"' Etheridge says. "I went, 'I did? (gasp] Oh I did. Oops.' "She's holding it over my head for a long time," she says with a laugh. "She's gonna get a Jot out of that one. That's all right." Out and open SINCE COMING our NEARLY A DECADE ago and later confronting persistent specu-lation about the biological father of her chil· dren. and intense scrutiny over the breakup with Cypher Etheridge draws almost no lines between her public and personal lives. "Nothing's off limits." she says. "I do limit what I will offer up about the children. I will talk about my experiences with them. but they live their own life and rm trying to keep as much of that in private as I can. That's probably where I'm most guarded." Open. honest and raw in the emotions she expresses via her music, Etheridge is similarly forthcoming about her own life "It seems crazy, but there's only so much that the public really does want to knOY.'. and if you giVe them the basics they'll leave you alone," she explains. 'Tm from the Midwest That sort of sensibility was in me. I've found that when I was up.front and honest that was when I was the most successful. and I was rewarded, and it wa.~ easie1: "It's a lot less energy to be up· front. I've been rewarded for It," she acids. Laughing, Etheridge notes, "I have been asked everything- everything." Not surprisingly, the most·asked ques­tion of Etheridge is. "How do you write a song?" She says if there was a sure-fire formula for the art, she'd pass it along. "How do you Y.Tite a song" Everyone wants to know,'' she says. "It starts with inspiration. That's what's always differ· ent. It can be some words, it can be a musical phrase, it can be an inspiration of a subject, of a person. of anything. "You have to start with that and then you go, what's next? Lyrics? Music? It's always different." Beyond this fall's new DVD and next year's new set of tunes. Ethendge has no concrete plans, but would like to branch out as an artist. "I would like to [do) some other things, outside of music." she mu5es. "I would like to try other mediwns. I would like to be able to still be making my mu~ic and making songs that people want tu hear and make their own. "I think that's the most important I want to keep doing that." ft For info Melissa Etheridge in concert 7:30 p.m. Fnday. Aug. 9 • Tickets. $83 Smirnoff Music Center • 1818 First Ave Dallas. Texas 75210 • 214-421-llll 730 p.m. Saturday. Aug. 10 • Tickets: $41 and up Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion 2005 Lake Robbins Drive The Woodlands. Texas 77380 • 281·363-3300 7 p.m. Sunday. Aug 11 • Tickets: $59 and up The Backyard • 13101 W Hwy 71 Austin, Texas 78738 • 512-263-4146 www.melissaetheridge.com • One Performance Only! FIRST HOUSTON APPEARANCE WITH KEITH LOCKHART CONDUCTOR FIDELITY INVESTMENTS 2002 Boston Pops RICHARD RODGERS CELEBRATION TOUR Sponson:d bv s Pre-paid preferred parking in the Gold Lot Garage is available at The Pavilion Ticket Office. Here's your chance to join Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops Esplanade Orchestra as they celebrate the IOOth anniversary of the birth of Richard Rodgm {of Rodgers and Hammerstein), one of America's most treasured songwriters. Reserved: 50/$40/'~25 Lawn: s15 Tickets are avaiL . T PaVlhon on-site Ticket Office Monda'j- Friday, 10am - 6pm ,Saturday, 10a.m. 4 p.m. and day of show through mtermlSSlon. Ticke1S are also available at all tkl<~ locations. Pnces do not 111clude servicelhandhng fees. 1'1ot 2002 PrefornunoM S. tr1JmJUs/yund<n.n11n1hy - -@·- -.B MW•H.OU STON. ~h.un ~--- http://pavillon.woodlandacenter.org 281 ·363·3300 HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com RICH ARENSCHIELDT Rob Nash's 'Romeo and Juliet' showcases the actor's genius, but has some room for improvement Funny by half NO, TIDS ISN'T A REVIEW OF OUR annual outdoor theatrical sweat·a·thon, The Houston Shakespeare Festival, but rather, commentary about an entirely dif· ferent kind of animal - comedic actor/ writer Rob Nash. Fortunately, the same impresario/ rocket scientist that planned the Miller Outdoor Theater series that takes place each August is nowhere near Nash's current offering, "Romeo and Juliet Sex &Love at Holy Cross High," now showing at Theatre New West on Missouri Street. This show is presented in air-eonditioned comfort, not in the terrar· ium known as Miller Outdoor Theater. Outdoor theater in Houston does seem a bit odd - cultural mavens in our city seem to have made three egregious assumptions. First, that Houstonians actually want to see Shakespeare, a dubious assumption under the best climactic circumstances. Second, that the most famous of the Bard's lines isn't "Wherefore art thou Romeo?" but rather, "Julio, where's the hell's the mosquito repel· lent?" And third, that two plays within a week's times constitutes a "festival." Fortunately, the "other" "Romeo and Juliet" provides a cooler and much less tragic alternative. Since he is a frequent performer in Houston, Nash's quirky brand of comedy has acquired a definite following of Texas devotees. He has appeared under the aus· pices of just about every theatrical group in the city and audiences have come to regard him as the kind of actor you might invite to one of your parties to liven things up a bit. Many know him as the result of his "Dysfunctional Family" saga which includes the now decade old "12 Steps To a More Dysfunctional You" and "12 Steps To a More Dysfunctional Family." The most telling part of the trilogy, "12 Steps to a More Dysfunctional Christmas," packs a humorous holiday punch. These works and a series of one-man comedies detailing ado· lescence through rosary-colored parochial school gla<;ses have established Nash as an extremely talented writer/ actor. Through these various pieces, Nash has found a for· mula that works well as a means to offer his highly origrnal material. His uRomeo and Juliet" differs from this formula, especially since it relies heavily on one of the most famous pieces of English drama ever created. In this case. the choice is a good one. While audi· ences may not be familiar with every poetic line of the work, most know the sequence of events, if only from the Broadway musical equiv~lent, "West Side Story." Boy meets girl, boy wants girl, girl's family forbids it, boy and girl arrange to secretly marry, then boy and girl die as the result of some inept monk who thinks he's a pharmacist. In Nash's work, bits of The Bard are interspersed with bits of drama surrounding the production of the production. Nash not only plays all of the Shakespeare characters but also all of the high school char· acters portraying those characters. This cast of dozens necessi· tales quick move-me? t and mental Rob Nash, popular comedic action !h>m Nash. actor and writer, brings to He easily manages life his own version of 'Romeo staccato style and Juliet' now playing at transformations Theatre New Wesl of gender, accent, demeanor. age, and sexuality A one-man recitation of the Shakespeare text alone would be daunting; to couple that with an additional cast of separate charac· ters seems a bit impossible, but is entirely within the range of Nash's capabilities. The difficulty in this production isn't in presenting the two sides of the coin, but in articulating how they relate to each other comedically. The Holy Cross High characters are. in typical Nash style, a hilarious high-school microcosm. Not only does the playwright create these individu· als, but he then uses his unique acting abilities to bring them to life onstage. The potential for humor is endless as these socially flawed teenagers attempt to portray serious Shakespearean roles. As expected, under the magnifying glass of traged~ the personality disorders of the Holy Cross High School drama group are intensified, a conven· tion wisely utilized by Nash. However. there are many more opportunities in this work for hmnor than the writer takes advantage of. This is especially true in that most high school kids are oblivious to the true depth of the world's most profoundly romantic traged~ While this version of "Romeo and Juliet" has some amusing moments, this writer/actor has in a way shortchanged himself by giving us characters that are not as fully developed as audiences might expect. A fair amom1t of the original "Romeo and Juliet" tex"t is included m this work and Nash's portrayal of his "south of the border" Juliet is really worth seeing. That said, I was hoping for more "backstage" interaction from this wacky "cast" of one. Audiences are familiar with the work upon which this show is based. What we'd like to see more of are the characters that the talented Nash brings to life and how they relate to each other. "Romeo and Juliet" a la Nash is a work that has a few holes. Its inventive creator can aptly fill them with humor. ft 'Romeo & Juliet: Sex & Love at Holy Cross High' 8 p.m. Through Aug. 17. Thurs. Fri & Saturday Tickets: $18-20 • Theatre New West 1415 California Sl • 713-394-0464 AUGUST 2, 2002 15 ~ I Tlclleb alM> a111aH•bl9 at .. t.a.,.•hf'9!!.•t-' oulleQ, tndudl"'tl FOley'a •ad Whereholae '11 T1tUts II Mus.k 01 ct1•re• br phone at 7U U~700 or at TO.tmni.r.com All eta..., acts •nd bQet pnc.e$ Mlb»..:t to change without notke A Mnte• cti• .... la edded to each IJC:k91 "---~tc,_ ___ ..,._. The prke of .. <ft tadlet will be Increased bf $2 on th4' day of tt't9 91\0W •t al k>catk>lt9 - -- Alf a.hoW9 are rain ot ahln• A 0••• Chaflr\91 Ev•nt. ~C'h • t:y, ~ ns s fl' ~ Donu"ts 'You ~ri lnvitid To &ii Mr~. etain~ Psychic Advisor 713-972-0251 Tarot $15 Reg. $35.00 .., Pa..l.,m.. Crystal $25 Reg. $55.00 ..A..u.r.a.. 16 A9$T 2. 2002 •Job Fair • Health Fair • ports & outdoors Home & (forden • Chltdr n's area oth -mrnw wmm •roths at Empower are in high 1ty/high traffic areas. Most prime locations are given on a fl st-come, first-served basis. Reserve your booth today! er • 3-523-1516 halcc.org 11cc.1ru www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE sports LEE DAVIS Montrose Softball League sends players to the Gay Softball World Series this month Teams head to Portland Scratched it! My thanks to Mr. Vargas of the Independent Billiards League (IBL), who corrected my error in the posting of the group's Web site. For information on IBL, surf http:/ /www.iblhouston.com. The Houston area has great opportunities for those who like to play pool The IBL can be contacted at their site listed above, the Greater Houston Pocket Billiards League at 71~. and the Houston Metropolitan Billiards League at 713-m.8969. The main differences between the various leagues are rules, regulations and days/nights of pla)l Join the fun. C.Ontact one or all of the leagues for membership information. Spikes The Lone Star Volleyball Association (LSVA) announced its new season beginning Aug. 18 at 43> p.m. at the Jerabeck Center on the campus of the University of St. Thomas. Games for the Women's Division & Intermediate Division are played from 4:3(). 7 p.m. The C.Ompetitive and Power Division play from 7-93> p.m. For more information, contact the LSVA at 713-717-LSVA (5782) or visit the Web site http:/ /www.lsva.org. Series play Four Houston teams will be representing our great city in the Gay Softball World Series to be held in Portland, Ore., from Aug. lS-2.5. In the ''/iJ.' Division, we send our peren· nial powers Houston Force. The "B" Division will be represented by Rich's. Chaos carries our hopes for the "C" Division and "D" Division Bering will definitely hustle in trying to bring the trophy back to Houston. MSL announces two upcoming events for your pleasure. The bus departs JR's this Saturday at 12:30 p.m. and returns to JR's at 11:30 p.m. - for an excit­ing gambling/casino trip. Gamble your cares away from 3:30 until 8:30 p.m. The cost is a nominal $20 with beverages served on the bus. Additionally, participants will receive a $10 food coupon or a $5 gambling voucher. Sorry kids - you must be 21 years of age to attend. RSVP's were due Monday, July 29. but if you want to see if there's still a seat left, call 713-867-3913. The MSL donates proceeds from fund-raising events such ns this to local charities. The 23rd annual MSL Appreciation & Awards Ceremony is scheduled for this Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Crystal Ballroom at the Rice Hotel. 909 Texas Ave. RSVP's were due July 25, but to see if any seats are still available, call 713-867-3913. The groups also is planning its annual Fall Fun League. This year the fun league begins Sunday, Sept. 22, and con· tlnues through Sunday, Nov. 3. Games will span a period of six Sundays, with one weekend allowed for rainouts. Participants will play at Tim Hearn field, located near Memorial and Waugh drives. Teams are typically co-ed, open to all skill levels, are chosen by random draw, and designed to be a lot of fun. Not only do those interested get to play six weeks of scheduled games. but they also can get additional playing time by filling in for absent players on other teams. Cost is $30. For more information, check out the league on the Web at www.montrosesoft· ballleague.com. Kicker\ The Montrose Soccer Club of Houston is open to men and women who have experi· ence playing soccer. For more information, send an e-mail to MontroseSC(p soccer.com or go to http://www.geocities.com/ MontroseSoccer. Row, row, row your boat Call the Rainbow Fishing Club at 713-523- 8381. Excursions on charter boats with every· thing provided, good fellowship, great fun and perhaps the catch of the day await you! Wimbledon Dreamsicles The Houston Tennis Club meets on Wednesday and Friday evenings from 7:30 to 9 p.m., and also on Sundays from 9 a.m. until noon. For more information, contact the Houston Tennis Club at 713-692-2701 or log on to houstontennisclbra aol.com. Rodeo Roadies? For all of you dudes and dudettes out there, don't forget the great State of Texas is home to one of the nation's greatest rep. resentatives in the International Gay Rodeo Association. If you ertjoy bare back, western sad· dies, cattle rustling, bull riding or any other type of rodeo event, contact the Texas Gay Rodeo As.<;0eiation at 281-873-0641, or write them at P. 0. Box 1308.55, Houston, TX 77219-058.5 Boring bol\'ling? Not in Houston' Don't forget there are many opportunitiP.s out there for all levels of play. C.Ontact Tom O'Dell at 7~1-1187 or 713- ZID-SiOO, ext. 331, for information on the Inner Loop Alternatives (four-person mixed teams) at Palace Lanes on Sundays at 7 p.m. Tom's also in the know for the 9 p.m. Mondaio: 6=ro p.m. Wednesday and 9 p.m. Thursday leagues. He's just a Roman fountain of information' QIU Pat at 281437-6218 for information on the Monday Night Women's League. Bowhng begms at 6:45 p.m. at the Dynamic L.·mes, 6121 Tarneff. Go roll a few. Fir\t and 10 The Houston Women's Flag Football League begins a new season. For more information, call 713-981-6753. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston VOlce.com dinin KATHREEN LEE Cherryhurst Grill provides pleasant atmosphere, tasty dishes with only a little room for improvement Subtle restaurant pleases ENSCONCED IN THE OAK-LINED residential Cherryhurst community in the center of Montrose, the small new neigh­borhood restaurant, the Cherryhurst Grill, can easily be missed by the casual passer­by. Its modest black awning and large win­dow storefront does not snare one's imme­diate attention like the more colorful and familiar Domino's Pizza nearby. But upon just brief inspection, the small, intimate and cozy atmosphere of the Cherryhurst Grill calmly beckons those in the mood for a warm savory meal. Formerly Cole's Restaurant, the Cherryhurst Grill is still managed by one of its previous owners and maintains the same service staff and chef. Known as "Mama," the chef has had extensive previ­ous experience and was part of the origi­nal kitchen staff at La Strada's. The menu is varied without particular emphasis on any type of cuisine, and although the entree list is a bit meat-heavy, vegetarians still have a few salad and pasta options. For example, fresh squash, zucchini, asparagus, portabella musluooms. and rioot­ta and mozzarella cheeses are baked togeth­er within the pliant folds of pasta ribbons and topped with a flavorful tomato basil sauce to create a sumptuous Vegetarian Lasagna ($10). The portions are huge, with the oorners of one large cubic serving bank· ing the sides of the substantial serving bowl. The only complaint was that the toma­to basil sauce, while flavorful, was a bit thin and easily ran off the lasagna - an easily remediable factor. The dish would have been perfect if a thicker tomato based sauce richly coated each bite of fresh vegetables and piquant cheese. Fresh squash, zucchini, asparagus, portabello mushrooms, and ricotta and mozzarella cheeses are baked together within the pliant folds of pasta ribbons and topped with a flavorful tomato basil sauce to create a sumptuous Vegetarian Lasagna. CHERRYHURST GRILL OFFERS A Create-Your-Own-Pasta where you can choose your own adventure by matching various basic step ingredients. To start, you choose your pasta - linguini or penne. Then you select from four different sauce options: marinara, meat, vodka cream, or basil pesto. From there, your choice of pasta fixings include: stu1 dried tomatoes, pine nuts, black olives, basil, tomatoes, spinach, musluooms, carrots, chicken, tuna. shrimp, or crab fingers ($8.2.>$18.75). Although the vodka cream sauce sounded decadently rich, I decided to thwart the impending coronary and ht. A.-r of Food .rnd lrill uq Tlic CHERRYHLJRST CRill opted for the healthier marinara. Once again, while all the ingredients were incredibly fresh and complemented each other perfectly, the marinara sauce was a bit runny and pooled at the trough of the bowl. However, the pine nuts were roast­ed perfectly for a combination of its natu­ral tastes with the musky burnt flavor. While not on the menu, the ceviche is a common specials item. A fresh cilantro­guacamole blend topped a zesty mix of diced shrimp, scallops, whitefish and chopped onions swimming in a sharp vinegar bath. The ceviche lacked the tangy lime or lemon citrus flavor crucial to eliminating fish oil, and therefore had a lingering fishy taste, which unfortunately slightly marred the otherwise tasty dish. ONE DISH I WOULD PARTICULARLY reoommend is the Cooonut Shrimp ($14.50). Large shelled shrinlp are swathed in egg, batter and shredded oooonut and lightly fried. The preparation does not remove any of the coconut's natural flavors, and the fried batter provides a rough texture to complement the smooth succulent shrimp. The dish is served with a pineapple mango salsa for dipping, but the overly sweet sauce jarred with the oooonut flavor, and I would advise you to just ignore its presence. Most of the desserts are imported from DaCapo's or Amy's Ice Cream in Austin. However, the Cherryhurst Grill prepares its own homemade blueberry sauce to pour over Amy's vanilla malt ice cream. I was excited to try a homemade specialty, but unfortunately, the blueberry sauce was barely noticeable and I found myself trying to scoop larger and larger quanti­ties of it to just get a sense of its flavor. With its prime location in the heart of Montrose, this neighborhood restaurant offers its patrons a wonderful cozy atmo­sphere to enjoy a delightful meal (with a few minor tweaks needed here and there) and pleasant company. "CJ Cherryhurst Grill ~ 2100 Waugh Dnve 713-942-2100 Food. 'el !el le! le! Service: 191•191 • Value: le! le! le! t.i Scene: 191 • '91 le! " Stay home and eat cereal • ,. = Well. if you really must le! 191 '91 = Fine for all but the finnicky '91 '91 le! 191 =Worth more than a 20-minute drive • • • !el• =As good as you'll find in this city AUGUST 2, 2002 17 STEAKS CHOPS CHICKEN FISH SHRIMP PASTA SALAD THE CHERRyHuRsT GRill vV HAPPY'HouR ~' ~~~\_\\lt't.)~ a Emy Wednesday from 4-12 ) /l,~ ~) ~\.(.\~\_) Every other night from 10-12 ~ • - ·slrr Hap/'Y 11111.1se. /11Jusrrr \ishr n'ttl lun.IJ1 2100 Waugh Drive Houston, TX 77006 (lt'~4 J i1. -... l.:1 713.942-2100 Lunch Mon-Fri 1 la-2:30p Dinner Mon-Thu 5:30p-10:30p Fri & Sat 5:30p-la Sun 5:30p-10p 18 AUGUST 2, 2002 I appts a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL SUNDAY, AUG. 4 "The 20th AmNersary Whorehouse Show" IS planned at Sonoma Restaurant. A group of friends has offered up this show for 20 ye.n It began as a benefit in response to the AIDS epidemic. This year, the fund­rJrser benefits the National Leather Association's Camp Hope charity fund, wllich assists HIV-positive childrm Tables 1113'/ be purchased at $100 and include four seats. Fer table sales. ca S mon at 713-840- im a p.m :ioor- charge: $5. There will be a cash bar Sonoma Restaurant. 1415 Califoma. 713-522 7066. SUNDAY, AUG. 4 "The Ama NiaJle smth Show" ~on E! taevisior\ and the Houston l..e5lx.1n & G.1y Conmmy Ce!iter plans a VleYl1rg party $5 reco11111e11ded donation. 8 p.m at the Ce!iter 803 Hawthorne 713-524-3818. wwwJugcc..org. ART CONTEST The Houston Council of Ctibs is solitlting entries for pm and poster desigris for "LUEY 30." let Us Entertain You (LUEYl weekend Wiii be celebrating Its 30th year in 2003. Those ITTterested m subrmtting artwork for consideration should know this informa· The pm must contain masks of comedy and tragedy and the phrase "let Us EntertaITT Yod' or "LUEY." with ·2003· and "Houston. Texas: The design for the pm should be such that 1t can be made to reflect the three colors of Mardi Gras: purple. green and gold. The poster must contain the phrase "let Us Entertain You Weekend.· "Houston Council of Clubs." "Houston, Texas" and "March b-9. 2003." A mentlOll of the 30th anruversary of LUEY weekend would be appropriate also. The pm should be simple in design, as it is usually less than two square inches in sae. The poster does not have to match the pm, but should have space ava fable for the design of the pm to be added. SubrmsSIOllS for the pm and poster contest should be de vered to a board member of the Houston Council of Clubs no later than 8 p.m. Aug. 21. All artwork subrmtted wm be cfisplayed and the wm· ning deslgris will be announced at a special party in September. For more information. contact Loyd Powell at realloyd a.'prodigynet or 2Bl-397-6297, or Daddy Rose at po oo.com. UPCOMING · SUNDAY, AUG.18 'UVE 2002," the aiser hosted by Don Gill Productions.. this summer wm benefit the Gulf Coast Ardives & Museum to support the nonprofit group's effort to preser;e history for gilY Houstonians. A oom­ber of local entertainers will offer thew talents to con­tribute to the show. At the event. MISS Camp Amenca. Bouton. Soiree Aubergrne and the late Carolyn Roberts will be inducted into the arthives. All dorotiOns of any Sile are wefccme to benefit GCAM, and 1113'/ also be sent to Gill at 911 Welch St. Houston. TX 77006. &:30 p.m. Sunclay Aug. la Keys West. 817 W Dallas St Don Gill Productions: 713-521-0911 FILM THIS WEEKEND "PlaUun Blonde.. directed by Frank Capra, features Jean HarlOW Robert Wilfiams and l.Jntta Young. 7 pm Satllrday. Tdets: $&. MuselJll1 of Fine Arts Houston. <:aniline Wiess Law Buiking, comer of Main Street and Bissonnet/Binz. nJ.639.7515. www.mfah.org. GALLERIES ONGOING Wf Coast ArdWe and ~ af GU!T llstory Sal!llil2 Ex1tiin The first exhibition from the GCAM coltection presented at the Houston Lesbian & G.1y Corrmt:nity Cer.tcr honors the NAMES Project Houston. Community ~ 803 Hawthorne 713-524·3818. Positive Art Woricshop Photography Exhibition. Artists living with HIV/AIDS created these pictures w th aa:ompanymg text Houston lesbian & Gay Community Center, 803 Hawthorne. nJ.524·38la Athena Art Project 11Mtes women artists to submit works of art. Ii m and Video to ts annual 1uned art show Selected wor1c W1 I be cfisplayed at the eighth annual Houston Women's Festival on Sept 2a The de.1cllrne for entry has been extended to Aug. 17. For more mformatiOn. caU 713-995-5251 or e-mail artshow'.'a.hwfestival.org. Web site: wwwhwfestival.org. community cale ar SATURDAY, AUGUST3 Men's Gathering of Houston. Dialogi. IT t111g, 6:30·9:30 p.nL Monogamy vs. Open Relationships. Can One Man Satisfy Your Sexual Needs?" Community Gospel Church, 4305 Lnlian. Church phone: 713-880-9235. Men's Gathering of Houston· m-528-44&1. Rummage-A-Rama. Sale hosted mt Saturday of each month to benefit AIDS Housing Coafition Houston. 202 Tuam Ave. 713-521·1613. EVERY SATURDAY All-Spanish Wcnhip Service/Noche Espirtual b p.m ResurrectlOll Metropol tan Community Church, 2026 W. 11th. llJ.303-3409 or 713-8&1-9149. After Hours. l(J>FT 901 FM. l-4 am. Dignity mass 7 30 p.m for gilY Catholics. n.3-880-2872 Free HIV T estinQ. Montrose Chnic. ll pm ·2 am. at Viviana s. 71J.830-3000. Gay & lesbian Bre.akfast Club. 9-:30 am. 2Bl-437-0&36. Houston Wrestling Club. Practice.1:30 p.m. 713-453-7406. ~ Volunteer; wa k the streets to help prevent hate crimes. 9:30 p.m. Convene at community center. lli·52B·SAFE. E-m.: qpat"Olmc a;aolcom St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary B am. 1B05 W Alab.1ma 71J.52B·6&&5. Houston G.1y & Lesbian Convrunity Center. Drop-Kl, noon- 4 p m. • Bi-Net Houston party and 1110V1e. no p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 71J.524-38la www.hlga:.org. SUNDAY, AUGUST 4 PFlAG-Houston. General meet1119 with panel discussion, 'WtPf Do You Keep Coming Back?" 2 pm. Christ Church Cathedral lll7 Texas. 713-4&1'-FLAG. EVERY SUNDAY Bering Memorial United Methocfist Church. Semces at BJO & 10-50 am. Sunday school 9:45 am. 713-526-1017. Comnuity Gospel Service at 11 am. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children 10 am. m-880-9235 or www.commumtygospel.org. Covenant Cluth. EcumenicaJ, Liberal Baptist Sel'VICe 19':30 am. & education 'iour 11 am 713-6&8·8830. Emerson Unitarian Church. Adult education, 10 am. Service. 11 am. Lunch at noon. www.emersonhou.org Flrst Congregational Church (Memorial). Sen11ce at 10 a.m. Christian Education. 11:30 a.m. 713·46B·9543 or fcc-houston.org. Frst lkitarian lkivelsalist Cluth. Senlices at 9-.30 & 11:30 am. 8nn:h at 10-.30 am. 713-526-5200. c:lantl-.:fi;f~ Free HIV TestinQ. Montrose Chmc. 9 p.m.·rnidrnght at Club Inergy 71J.830-3000. Gay Catholics of St Anne'Hlouston. 5 pm worship service. Dinner and SOCial. alexcam a.wt.net JU.&23-0930. GLOBAL G.1y lesbian Or Bisexual Amance. University of Houston GLST student group meeting. 2 p.m. at the Houston Lesbian & G.1y Community Center, 803 Hawthorne. JU.524·38la www.uh.edu/"91obal E-mail: global a.bayoo.uh.edu. Grace Lutheran Clvth. Sunday school for all ages 9 am. Semce 10-.30 am. 713-528-32&9. Houston Tennis Club. 9 am-noon. Memonal Parle at the Tennis Center. houstontenmsclb iilaolcom Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. 10 a.m. serv· ice. 3333 Fannin. Suite 10&. 713·528-&75&. Resurrection MCC. Services, 9 and 11 a.m. Children and YOUth Sunday School, 10 am. Children's sen1ice. 11 am. 713-8&1-9149. St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Euchar1Sl Rite I. (NS a.m.. Holy Eucharist Rite II, B:55 a.m.; EducatlOll hour, 10 am.; Choral Euchatist. 11 a.m. 713-528-b&&S. Slnlay 8nn:h. For HIV-positive men 11 am. Riva\ ll17 MISSOUri Sl Paul.~ e-mail: PoznBuff o:)aolcom. The Worrefs Group. Meeting and dlSCllSSIOll 10:45 am. 71J.529·B57l Thoreau~ UriYersaist ~Milt discus- 51Cl1\ 9:45 am SeMce. 11am.2Bl·277-8882 www.twc.org. Un tartan ~e owship of Galveston County 502 Cllirch Sl Service. 10-30 am. 409·7&5-B330. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum. 10 a.m Service 11 a.m. 713-686-587&. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. DrO!Hfl, 2·5 p.m • Viewing party for the premier of "The Anna Nicole Smith Show" on E! SS recommended donation. B p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 71J.524·381B. www.hlgcc.orv. MONDAY, AUGUST 5 American Vetern for ~ R1rJrts. Houston Chaptl!r. Monthly ~ mt Monday of each month 7 p.m. Houston l.2Slliiwl & Gay Conmmy Center. 803 HawtOOme. E-rn.1il: BK Silva. AVERHoustonfu'ah or call 281-415-6876. EVERY MONDAY Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. B p.m.-rnidnight Keys We$l 71J.B30-3000. Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV m-B30·3000. Gay Fathers/Fathers Flrsl Support group. B·930 p.m. Grace Llitheran Church. TOii\ lli·72&-B736 www.geocities.com/gaydadshouston/ Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Benng. 713-526-1017. ext 208 Kolbe Project Euchanst 7.30 p.m 71J.8&1 1800. ~Voices Rad'IO Show. B·lO p.m KPFT 90.1. Houston Lesbian & Gay ConmJnity Center. Drop-in b-9 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. nJ.S24-38la www.hfgcc.org. TUESDAY, AUGUST 6 Houston Area Bears. Dineout at the 59 Omer 7 pm 713-8&7·9U3. www.houstonareabears.com. Lesbian Health Initiative of Houston. Inc. NOf1Pnlfil organ" zatJ011 worfcmg for lesbian health meets the first Tuesday of each month. 7 p.m., 404 Westhe1mer. 713-603-0023. LHihoustonOO a.aol.com EVERY TUESDAY Bering Support Ne!wol't Lunch Bunch Gang, 11 a.m. 713-526-1017. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Chmc. 8 p.m.·m1dmght Club Houston. 713-830-3000. G.1y youth. New program for young gay males. ages 18·29. 7 p.m &14 Avondale. lli-533-978&. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous. Support group. 7 pm. Houston Women's Rugby Team. No expenence necessary. Practice. &:30-830. Westland YMCA Kay, 713-208·1529 Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. No partner needed. Beg nner 2 Step, WJltz. Shuffle & SWU1Q. BJO pm JU.52B·9192. Houston Lesbian & Gay ConmJnity Center. Drop-tn &-9 p.m • Lesbian Corning Out Group, 7 p.m • BM f' NI" ~J.3.524·381B. www.hlocc.org WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 7 Classic Chassis Car Club. Monthly 11' ·t1 1g. TI1e Cafe Exprm, 1422 West Gray. 713·797·B615 wwwclassicchassiscarclub.org. EVERY WEDNESDAY Bering MernorfaJ United Methodist CIM'ch. Support N.rtworli: Pot Luck Dinner, 6:30 p.m. Vanous support gl'llllps, 7 p.m. 713-526-1017. Bible Study. Noon & &:30 p.m. St Stephen's Episcopal. 713-52&-66&5. Free HN Testing. Thomas Street Clime. 9 arn.·l p.m. 2015 Thomas St OraSure method. Ca I for appomtment Sharon. 713-B73-4157 Free HIV Testing. Montrose Cltnic. 4-8 pm. at Mary's; 9 p m.-rnidrught at Ripcord; 10 p.m-1 am. at EJ's; 10 p.m· lam. at Mldtowne Spa. 71J.830.3000. Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal 1307 Yale m-52B-4379 Houston Tennis Club. 7:00-9 p.m Memorial Parle at the Tenms Center. hou5tontenniscfb!itaol.com Lesbian Literature Discussion Group. 7 p.m Meets every other Wednesday. nJ.383-6738. Spiritual Uplift setVice. 7 p.m Resurrection MCC, 713·8&1-9149. Houston lesbian & G.1y Cormu1ity Center. Orop-tn b-9 p.m. • Houston Black Lesbian. G.1y, Transgender Coal tion office hours 10 am-noon• Free HTV testing, couriseling. b-C/ D.nt • 803 tiJwthor1e. 713-524-3818. WWW hlgcc.org. THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 lesbian & Gay Immigration Rqrts Task Force-Houston. B p.m meeting. Chns. 7J.3.42&-312a E-rnait lgirtf-houston<..1i:egroups.oom. EVERY THURSDAY BiNet Houston. Group for bisexuals; everyone welcome. 7· 30 p.m. Hobbit Catt!, 2240 Portsmouth. WWW.flash. 'V!V ·blhouse. 7J.3.4&7-4380. Community Gospel SetVICe. 7:30 p.m. m-880·9235. www commurutygospel.org. Free HIV Testing. Montrcise Clinic. 4·B p.m. at The Outpost; 8 p.m.· midnight at Brazos River Bottom and Cousins; 10 p.m.·l a.m. at Toyz Oisco. nJ.830·3000. Free Art Classes. By Kenmt E'isenhut for HIV+ individuals. 1-4 pm Lunch provided. 713-523-9530 FrontR!mers. RuMing club. 6:30 p.m. lli-522-8021 Web site: http:/ /home.swbetlnet/larathonlhoufr .htm. E-mail: larathon@:swbell.net www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE GLOBAL Gay, lesbi,1n or Bisexual Alliance at the University of Houston-Central Campus. Weekly meeting, b p.m. e-mail: nguyen0023 Q hotmail.com. Hep C Reoovery. Support group. &:30 p.m. Bering. m-52&· 1017. Ext. 211 Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience necessary. Practice 6:30·8:30. Westland YMCA. K.1y, 713·20B· 1529. Lambda Skating Club. B p.m. Tradewinds. Skating Rink. www.lambdaroll.org. 713·410·7215. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessoris. No partner required. Braios River Bottom. B:30 p.m. nJ.52B·9192. Recovery From Food Add'ICtion (RFA). Meeting for 12·step program open to all. Noon·l p.m. Sl Stephen's Episcopal Church. 1805 W AlJbama St RFA: 71J.&73·284B. www.geocities.com/rfa77235/. E-mail rfaworldservJCe a;aol.oom. Spanish Char1a Conversation Group. Cate Agora. 1 p.'n. E·mail charlahou5t~o.msn.com. 713-416-7203. Women's Clinic. Montrcise Cfimc. n 3·830-3000. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop m &-9 pm. • Houston Black lesbian, Gay. T ransgcndcr Coahtion office hours 10 am.·noon • BOJ Hawthorne. m-5?' 0010 www.hlgcc.org. FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 Houston Area Bears. Movie Night "Signs," tune to he a. ""' ....... , .3·8&7·9123. www.houstonareabear.;.com. Jump Start Group by Bering Support Networle for GLBT people living with disabling conditions sucn as Multiple SclerOSIS, Cerebral Palsy, amputatioris and head trauma. Meets the second and fourth Friday of the month. 11 a.m Faclhtator. Ken Mcleod. nl-52&·1017. ext 208. EVERY FRIDAY Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 10 p.m.·2 am. at The Meatrack; 10 pm·l a.m. at EJ's and at Midtowne Spa. 713-830-3000. Free HN Testing. Thomas Street Clime. 9 am.·l p.m. 2015 Thomas St OraSure method Call for appomtn1C11t Sharon. 71}.B73-4157 Freelance Art Classes. By Kerrrnt Eisenhut for HIV+ 1ndi· v1dU.lls. 9:30 a.m.·12:30 p.m. Light breakfast provided. 713.523.9530 Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV 713·B30· 3000. Govinda Yoga Club. Free yoga classes at 3115 We$! Loop South, No. 21 713-439·0455. Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (HA T.C.H.) Meeting. m.942.1002. Houston Tennis Club. 7:00·9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. Houstontennisclub.org Kolbe Project Morning prayer, 10 am. nJ.B61·1BOO Mishpachat Aliziln. GLBT ~ish congregatlOll Sabbath selVJCes at 8 p.m. on the second Friday of each month at Baby Samabys, 602 Fain1iew. Monthly study groups with CongreQJtlOll Beth Israel. 5600 North Brae$wood Mishpachat Alizim. PO. Box 980136, Houston. TX 7709B. 8&&-841-9139. ext 1B34 Q-Patrol Volunteers walk the streets to help prevent hate crimes. 9:30 p.m. Convene at C011U11W1ity center. 713-528-SAFE. E·mail: qpatrolill<:;!l aol.com Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Oroμ-ln 6·9 pm • B03 Hawthorne. 713·524·3BlB. www.hlgcc.org. VOLUNTEER/SELF-HELP Gay & Lesbian Help Line. For gay, le!>bian, bisexua~ trans­Y , 01.J questiornng youth. Staffed by volunteers of all ages. &-11 pm. Monday-Friday. 5·10 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 888·340·GL8T Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Houston. Volunteers offer a friendly ear to callers m need of information non1udgmen­tal support. crisis intervention and referral se'Vices. cmer· gency shelter and advocacy semces to cnme sun1ivors who may need someone to accompany them to a hospital for medical attentJ011 or assistance in fifing a pohce report 713-529·3211. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center Volunteers perform a variety of critical tasks which include staffing the Information desk during drop-111 hours, helping with Center programmmQ and events, working on community outreach efforts. fund-raising and pubhc· ity Card players. writers and artists 111 particular are needed 713·524·3BlB. Peer Listening Line. Youth only. Staffed by GLBT youth for gJy. lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth. 5-10 p.m. MondJy·Friday. B00·399·PEER. HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com • Lounge wear " • Thoru;a • ..... tll .-1 0 Ne\T DVDs Buy l get l freer g ~ () " -.dult Videos 2 for U9.90 ; 11 3 11 1 " ~ ;';;i•)•.1m11". §•1•1."•t""'••r ~ C"l) .-1 ~ ..... .C.l.) 0 :z: 2!9~1 713.944.6010 fu l~C7 Spencer fl','1 II Allen Genoa 15 •1nute1 1outh of downto1111 Take I-4~ South, exit College/ Airport. go eut 3 •1le1 ., ct P" (I) '1 •Club wear • ~\Ti wear Ho-usto~I wPhotog=~I lwrogra;xry « GlBT Hwston • Full f'rlV8CY • Events PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Call KEN! for a Better Body! •Massage/In o· 01Jt •Personal Tra inong- •Many Locanons including behind Gallena inside loop •RMT & Fitness Cut1fiw: 'TR 31797 (832) 563-3962 OVER 10 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE • Windows & Mac Compi..tcr Support • Home & Office Networks W11ed & Wireless • DSL & Cable MOdem Setup H • Computer Clean Up • Reasonable Pt1ces • Call For Free On Site Assess; t Darryl Harris• 713·529·5564 I ff fu~11 N~i s s>. ~P~L 1 Als<iu~J'd llVUofl"DJJi.J Lllr.;) ~1JJ- t>s::nn 11 Ullil pllnlt> UJD u.wpwi/ "'="' 2 •t -110l!R SERVICE 6, 8 &: 10 l'.astmgcr El<gio111 Simch Limousines • r:-'-"6 86-3337 20% off When You Mention Thia Adi AUGUST 2. 2002 19 Amcr1u..;.' ~..w.1 n~ U.\olJUaOOn Cauftcd ~.ulin"g L=oru on ( lar Lik< and G>h«ton Ba) We oho offer pm21< u tlmg uuuucuon. in: appoimmcnt. ,.,.h A-\ i\. ccmficd instnKton. ~~""' call 713-644-0606 if your hair isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY Al'l'OIHTMOIT OID ••a. -·· 11 • Single Cooples & Fam ~ Pies ' I Photo Se • • F blDs $11000 Tell them you found them· in the directory! THI 11al PlACI 713.240.6508 llo11sfo11 • friminal Drfro\r • foil l.ilifalion • GI.HT l\ms • falalr Planninf • Domrslir 1•artom~ips call 713·227·1717 law.Simoneaux.<-001 "'artfool lo tic I""""' ti 1..,1 s,n;.lil.tm Customers are out there! Help them find you by advertising here Call 713-529-8490 Support our Advertisers! SALE! Sp£ciol PwrdoGAC: Lo ... pA For o Ll'"itcd Ti'"c wp to off ALCON UGtfTCRAFT CO. 1424 W. Aloba ... a HoWAto", Tc:xOA 77006 713/526-0680 HowrA 10-4 TwCA-Sot I ' Deaning with a gendemanly Hair! Please call Edwii at 713-498-2359 or 713-868-1148 Carpentry • Repairs • Remodeling • 936.563.5180 / 936.760.5531 Lawrence Gilstrap MASSAGE RJLlBODY RELAXATION ti!"'"'lla-nmassage ret 713.942.2399 • Mon:"ose Locat on • 7 da>• evenings • Visa Mastercan1 • Outcalls welcome Get results! Call now at 713.529.8490 to place your ad in the directory! •Alignment •Brakes 1307 Fairview Inc. (3 blocks west of Montrose) 713-529-1414 20 AUGUST 2. 2002 houston classifieds Houston Classifieds deadline is Monday at 11 a.m. -------- HOUSTON WOMEN'S FESTIVAL Satu day, September 28. at Garde'l in the Heights! Great MUSIC • Beautiful Art • Fun Market Place • www.hwfestival.org DONATIONS NEEDED PWA Coalition 1s holding a yard sale on 8/17 & 8118. benefiting ~.1 of our programs. All items are needed. To arrange for drop-off, call Brian Jones at 713-520-9248. RFA •Recovery from Food Addiction• A Twelve Step Progran Open to ALL Thursdays, 12-noon to 1-pm St Stephen's Eprscopal Church '805 W. Alabama (Woodhead 0 W. Alabama) RFA 713-673-2848 www.geocities.com/rfa 77235/ E-mail: rfaworldservtceOaol.com FOOD EMERGENCY HOU. HUMANE SOCIETY Tre cupboards are bare at HHS. They need puppy and kitten food • Any kind • Any quantity • Drop donations at 14700 Almeda Rd. or send monetary donations to: 11ouston Humane Sooety • PO SOX 450428 • Houston, Texas 77245-0528 • For information, call 713-434-5555. DAY SHELTER Needs new or used clothing and shoes in good condition • Contact Etalia or Ruth at 713- 528-5667 • 402 PaCJfic MR. PRIME CHOICE We are looking for Prime ChoKe" vest of our former and deceased winners. Vests are to be placed in the archives. If you have one or know where any of the vests are, please call Don Gill at 713-521-0911 AUDITIO~S davidlewisIMAGES Houston area GLBT Photographer IS OON seeking models. CompensatlOfl IS rmitecf but the experience IS fun! Send sample photos to: GREAT JOB! Persoral Assistant needed. Flexible hours. Perfect for stu­dent. Must be creative and out­going Organizational & Plarning Skills Required. Contact Jonr. 713- 562-2474 Texas Shirt Company 1s seeking self-motivated & responsible individuals for part-time Pr;nting Assistant. Pay is S7.00/hr to star Visit: www.txshirts.con or 7P 802-0369. Guaranteed Money • We are looking for young (18-25 pre· ferred male/sheMale) attractive upbeat escorts • All-American, Latin and Asian a plus • Must be reliable and ready to make money m a safe professional environment • No experience necessary • If you are ready for financial security call us today and start today. 11 am to 9pm 7 days a week• 713-526-1531. FREE EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE Offer; 1g tre• mployment assis tance to HIV+ individuals Including JOb preparedness, training. resume development, and job searching a1S1stance For more info call 713-981·1543 FOR RENT ----- HEIGHTS AREA 1600 Sqft two stroy. spiral stair· case, 2BR/1.58A & study, garage apartment. Ceiling fans. new car­pet & flooring, & washer/dryer connections. Central A/C. Deposrt required. SSSO/mo. No pets. Available now. Call for appoint­ment. 713-864-1681. HUGE BEAUTY! 6-bedroom, 3.5- bath with Sparkling Pool, New Ceramic Tile, Carpets. Paint. Fixtures, Custom Entry. S 1700/mo. Cal Sheila 281-931-6848 GALLERIA AREA 1250 sq.ft. Downstairs Unit of Fourplex - 2BR/18A, Kitchen, Dining Room, Living Room, Covered parking space. S 1200/mo. One or Two year lease available. Darrell 713-205-2211 or 713-529-4161. davidlew1SIMAGESOaol.com or check our Web site at Garage Apartment near www.davidlewislMAGES.com. University of Houston. Great for EMPLOYMENT MIDTOWNE SPA Desk & Floor he p v ar ed • ..pply in Person only' Houston 3100 Fannin/ Dallas 2509 Pacific/ Austin 5815 Airport. No phone calls please 1 Gay Students. S325/mo. + S 150 de pc it. 713-926 1777. --- HEIGHTS DUPLEX 1/1 • Har' we"' • Carports • Central AC/H • Water paid • S650/mo. + deposit • Small pet OK • 713-686-2075. Montrose Cottages 111 Gard C • e • S300 and up • Reserved for People Livmg with AIDS • 90 day MAX • Phone, furnished, AC • Maid paid • No deposit • Sliding scare fee • No drugs or Alcohol on property • AIDS Housing Coalitron AHCH • 713-521-1613 PRIDEREALTY.COM SALES. 'RELOCATION FOR SALE Beautifully Re-modeled Heights Home. 1744 sq.ft. 2BR/2BA, for­mals, den, new kitchen/baths, granite, hardwoods. 706 Usener St. S309,000. 713-426-6620. TRIPLEX 1920's Prairie Style Triplex • 1 5 miles from Astro Field! S 1200/mo. Rental Income. S135,000. 713- 928-5211 or 713-926· 1777. PRIDEREALTY.COM SALES 'RELOCATION MASSAGE THERAPY MASSAGE Therapeutic • Swedish • Sports • Deep tissue • Myotherapy • Relaxation therapy • Jason • College guy • Memoriai Park and Montrose Studios • www.siz· zlingmassage.com • Cell: 713· 819-7368 or 713-524-5400. All Knotted Up Massage • lncalls • Outcalls • 8 a m. 'till 10 p.m. • 7 days/week • Excellent Rates• Call Bill 713-283-8378 or pager 713-326-3279 MASSAGE BY KEN Experience stress relief • Convenient Montrose location • By appointment only • 11 am to 8 pm • RMT#028519 • KEN CLAUDE • 713-240-9598. Across I Coocem of Todd Ofdhan 6. Single drag queen? 10. ~medalist lougaras 14. Bottom t.Jnper of boots 15. P'mce IOI Yooog men? 16. 'Jone_" !Moorehead Hid of 1944) 17 Member of The Goy and lesbioo Arabic Sooely, perhaps 18. Oidinson's 1here _frigate fike a book" 19 Modonoo soog of 1993 20. Her name is Rich 23. Phallic fish 2 4. lie Eng. at most schools 25. Some wutch foces 28 PeMU! friend ol Mi1(u ~? 31. LOO athletic~ 35. flieel's 'We_ tie~· 36. Showing a liny opening 37 Vooillo, to oo S/M ~e 39. Her nome IS Anthony 4 2 . Give ip semc e? 43. Supportei ol bedroom octivity 44 A pOlll s1tr may hove a big ooe 45. l.dv of 1he Wizard of Oz" 46. Each 4 7 Killed, to King Jomes 48. Once 1he lcrgest co. with domestic partner beoelin so. Reed. who ded oo the wid s.ie www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE 52 Her 'Xll11e IS Horry 60. Lie dirty J<*es, often 61. _:fjgls (drag queeirs IJJsiervJ 62 ._Paris' 64. Sings fike Eozy E song 65. "Exit to_ • (Rosie flick) 66. "God loves ll'lerybody." to MydU Judge 67. Queenie portrayer m "Bell, Book and Condie" 68. Come quickly 6 9. Gawk ike a chicken hawk Down 1. Sooke's wurning 2. WOITTI to persistent comJHJOS 3. Cole Porter's "Brush Up_ Shokespecxe • 4. lJongonen wumen 5. Top 6. Charles Nehon Reilly's "The Ghost and MIS. 7 CIA!ure ilil's • = Mllode" 8. ·coocer in Twu Voi<es" cCHlU!hor Burlei 9 Oindi of a gott classic 10. R"xlod ol "kc! hi Ben! l'aylld ()( 11 l'hll'wl. ooce ol "!Kre Life to I.Ne" 12. Emmo Oonoghue'scounlry 13. Orog quee11 _Pool 21 Omtion name of Choshty's holf-illother Answers on Pa e 21 22. "Am I OueEll?" exam? 25. Bome's Wendy, e.g 26. 'Fritz the Cot" creotOI Robert 27 He wrote about two !l\JV> iving together Oil Oil island 29 Albert to Annand, in 1he Budcoge" 30. 1he Hoked Civi Serront" author Ouentill 32. College web address suffix 33. Stond next to Casso! 34. Place where men weor makeup 36. Like the top of the world 37. lube OI vibrator, to a sex shop 38. Plenly, to Shokespeore 40. Out_ Kicks (gay soccer dub) 41. _-mo replay 46. Berne ol 'ffaried. With 0-.1dren" 4 7 Rent what you rent 4 9 Took port in on AIDS ride 51 Final notices m th! "8oy Areo Reporter• • 0 52. ModOIVlO soog in 'Dick Trixy" 53. Russian over 54 Suck~ 55. Rick's old flame 56. Not one single time, to Lord Byron 57. Former Boseboll heartthrob Bucky, who ploys Oil the other team 58. Scottish isle 59 Im leslm 00. do rron) 63. Hot time IOI Colette HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com • Montrose LocatlOl'I • 7 days/ eveNngs • Visa/ Mastercsc • OutcaH1 welcome SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK Relaxation • Myotherapy • Deep tissue (RMT#024589) 713-807-7109 • 713-501-9852 • 1 1/2 hours for S60 1 Hr. S50. PRODUCTS & SERVICES WWW.RAJNBOWl'ROD.COM, BILBO PROFESSIONAL SERVICES M2M BODY GROOMING Body Waxing • Clippings • Coloring • Personal grooming by Dale. Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist. Private location in Montrose. Call 713- 529-59S2 for appointment. ROOMMATES Two Rooms Available' • S300 & $600 • All Bills • Big Metal Mansion in Montrose • Need: Cute, handyhlouseboy • 713-529- 7200, hotmasseur@hotmail.com PETS Answtrs toQ puzzle on page 20 N.d~1.il l)1rC'd 'J of GI Bl f iert::!Y w~ ' ,,, I, ~•on~h ----- -- ---- R.~i~1~owweddingnetwork.com 1!61>2SI ISM y To adopt a homeless animal, con­tact the Houston Humane Society at 713-434-SSSS. VOLUNTEERS STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregivers for transition­al housing program for HIV+ adults • Must have high school diploma and experience as a caregiver • Contact Ms. Straham O 713-S22-S7S7 or fax resume to 713-522-1910. CLASSIFIED ADS WORK! Get results! Call toll-free 1 ·877· 966-3342 ext. 15 to place your classified ad on these pages. Deadline is Monday at 11 a.m. AUGUST 2, 2D02 21 parent company to: Houston Voice -Texas Southern Voice - Southeast Washington Blade - Washington D.C. New York Blade News - New York Eclipse Magazine - South is seeking dynamic Sales Leaders to join our growing company. If you have a proven track record, and are results driven, we can give you the biggest sales area in the country. We offer competitive salaries as well as benefits. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send all resumes E-mail: employment@windowmedia.com Fax: 202-478-1663 - ON YOUR NEX I VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-G/'4Y B&B we•re right I N the neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars. 408 AVONDALE ~ . 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com 22 AUGUST 2. 2002 • DJ Kenney + Larry Patio Bar COming Soon! i~~ "?; Easy Access off of 1-45 Me\issa Etheridge .Atter-Partv Aug. 10 6-8pm Happy Hour Daily No Cover with Ticket Stub ~ $1. 75 longnecks Sun-Thur Cher look-A-like Contest Au~. ~ $2 well Sun-Thur all nite Sponsored bV \04 KRB£ ~~~~Tdcets 18 + Up Welcome Males & ~-VJek;nme • 13331 dahl Rd • H n. Texas 77090 P n 1 davs 281.875 30 • Close to I tercontinental Ai a week www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE • • All the latest New Releases e on DVD & VHS! e • DVDs as low as $1 O! • • Check out our private viewing rooms! • • Buy any 2 $16.95 or $26.95 •• • VHS tapes & get l FREE! • Hundreds of novelties, magazines & lubricants • Gay-friendly staff! •• •• •• •• • • FREE :MEMBERSHIP! •• •• • 14002 Northwest F""'Y •Off Hwy. 290 atW. Tidwell! e • 7 3.462.5100. 713.462.5152 • HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.corn as rolog JILL DEARMAN My Stars! August 2 - 8 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) Venus moves into your house of love on Aug. 7. During this cycle you may feel a little more vulnerable than usual. but trust me. darling, that's a good thing. An Aquarius helps you to understand yourself on a deeper level. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) The Sun conjunct Mars in your house of home and family this week could bring a domestic situation to a head. Try to be an inspiration to your loved ones. darling, not an embarrassment. An Aries can't understand your mixed signals. Clarify! GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) Your social life may be a bit of a whirlwind during early August. sweetie. Even you may get exhausted by all the hubbub. A fellow Gemini may push you to focus your attention on the most important people in your life. Out with the riffrafT! CANCER (June 22 to July 22) Life is unduly confusing right now, except where money is concerned. Jupiter is shining on this part of your chart. You can make hay while the sun shines and land new gigs while others are complaining about being downsized. A Capricorn offers you a connection and then toys with the idea of a (mutual) seduction. LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) With Jupiter. the sun, Mars. and the new moon all transiting your sign in early August, you'd better embrace your power, sweetie. You can't help but push the envelope in love. and why shouldn't you? You can gamble and win. A Scorpio is your prize. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) This is a good time for you to really bury old ghosts and break outmoded ways of dealing in relationships. Your time in the sun is coming soon. But first you must clear away the shadows. Welcome a Sag into your life. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) Venus moves into your sign on Aug. 7 and brings you much joy and inspi· ration. especially when it comes to love. Your ruling planet validates the evolved part of your romantic nature. I.ive up to your higher self, dear. A Leo wants to put you on a pedestal. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Uranus and Neptune retrograde in your house of home and family could make this confusing time in your life even more perplexing. It's the dark before the dawn, dear heart. You are close to the kind of true epiphany you've been praying fo1: A Taurus comes through for you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) This is your time to pursue the adventure of your choice. An international trip or a tempestuous affair with a lover from a completely different background may be called for immediately! A Capricorn e..xpands your way of thinking. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) The Sun conjunct Mars in your house of serious relationships all week Jong - ~hould push you to stand up for what you believe in when It .c~mcs to love. A little righteousness and a lot of passion take you far A Gemm1 wants to go even farther with you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) It's a tawdry and passionate time in your love life. sweetie. Just when you thought you could handle several lovers at once (or romantic obsessions), Jupiter throws you a few more. Catch a Taurus before she falls too hard. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) Venus goes into your house of collaboration on Aug. 7. Think about hooking up with a like-minded creative spirit. And then stop thinking about creating, and just start doing it, doll. A Cancer will help. Jill Dearman 1s the author of the best-selling "Queer Astrology for Men· and "Queer Astrology for Women' (both from St Martin's Griffin). For information on charts and consulta­tions. call 212·841·0177 or e-mail QScopes@aol.com AUGUST 2. 2002 23 ::.: PRECOR • LIFE RTNESS • CYBEX • NAUTIWS • HAMMERSTRENGlll • EXTENSIVE FREE u ~ g m u Vi Ci a: 0 z ~ z ~ ~ GET YOUR ABS IN HERE! 0 4040 Milam Mon-Fri 5am-10pm ~ 713.524.9932 Sat-Sun 8am-8pm CJ ~ 33!!:1 3AISN11X3 . HWN3lliSH3WWVH . smunvN • X300 • SS3N.lli 3:1n ~~~-~--- !l003!ld . Local Phone Chat 1iFREE! 1-900-440-1212 ($1.99/min.l 18+ interactive male Fort Worth 817-289-1234 Dallas 972-993-1000 Austin 5 12 -735-5002 San Antonio 210-933-1234 Corpus Christi 361-561-5000 Other local TX #'s f-BBB-212-1211 Houston 713-595-9952 Use FREE code 7013 Browse at www.interactlvemale.com
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