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Houston Voice, June 24, 2005
File 032
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Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 032. 2005-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3801.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-06-24). Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 032. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3801

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 032, 2005-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3801.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, June 24, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 24, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 032
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JUNE 24, 2005 3 pride Festival entertainers wax philosophical on Pride By JOHNNY HOOKS The Houston Pride Parade garnered national attention several years ago when it became the first nighttime gay pride parade in the United States. In keeping with the searing political climate in Texas, the 2005 Pride Festival is making a bold statement by bringing in headliners Sophie B. Hawkins, queer punk pioneers Pansy Division, Latin pop star Jade Esteban Estrada and cupie doll crooner Rachael Sage among others. "We searched the GLBT music universe for artists who are known for their energetic live performances," Festival Co- Chair Matthew Stone said. The Houston Voice spoke with the head- liners about what pride means to them and what to expect from their shows. Sophie B. Hawkins Sophie B. Hawkins is a familiar name to gay and straight music fans. In 1992, she burst onto the scene with her mega-hit, "Damn! I Wish I Was Your Lover," a song where she openly sang, "I lay by the ocean making love to her with visions clear." Interestingly, nothing was made of the line and Hawkins went on to have several top-five singles on the Billboard charts. After a falling out with Sony, her record label, Hawkins founded her own record company. Trumpet Swan, so named because "I was on a photo shoot at a lake and heard this incredible sound. It was a trumpet swan singing, and I knew I had my label name right there." Her latest CD "Wilderness" is out now Recently Hawkins appeared on the hit NBC summer series "Hit Me Baby One More Time" singing "Damn" and glam- ming it up for the her second song, a re- imagination of the song "100 Days" by Shades Apart. Hawkins describes herself as part of If MORE INFO Bud Light Stage Pride Day Lineup 2:15 Gurlfriendz presented by Montrose Diner 3:10 Rachael Sage 4:05 Jade Esteban Estrada presented by Twisted Mister 4:55 Sarah Pinsker & The Stalking Horses 5:55 Pansy Division 7:00 Sophie B. Hawkins, introduced by special guests, Roula St Ryan of Mix 96.5 Tickets $10 online at www.pridehouston.org mmW -ma - 1 Sophie B. Hawkins the gay and lesbian family, but uses the word "omnisexual." Asked to define it, Hawkins said, "I was the first person to use that phrase, I invented it for lack of a better word. It just means that when I am attracted to someone it is more about them as a person, about their soul and their inner beauty, not what physical equipment they have." Hawkins, still the pioneer, loves playing Pride festivals across the country and is excited about Houston. "The Houston market really broke the single "Damn," so I will always have a special place in my heart for Houston." She's philosophical about Pride. "So many people sacrificed so much so that we can go out and have Pride fests and parades, and I love honoring those people. And when someone comes up to me and says 'Thank you Sophie, because of your song, or because of you I was able to be the person I am today,' I consider that the ultimate compliment." our last studio album." The group will decide whether or not to do occasional live performances here and there, "Depending on who asks, but as all of our lives have changed, like the world, we think now is the time to let others carry on what we started." Ginoli said Pansy Division has always enjoyed playing in Houston, usually to packed houses in the Heights at Fitzgeralds. "We love Houston," he said. "Your city has always been there for us, and with the way your Governor Perry has been acting, not to mention that fine former Governor Bush you sent the country, its important we come and take a stand with you at your Pride Festival." Pansy Divison Pansy Division released the group's first two singles, "Bill & Ted's Homosexual Adventure," in 1993 and "Fern In A Black Leather Jacket/Homo Christmas/Smells Like Queer Spirit," in 1992. The band has always been out and proud. Founding member Jon Ginoli recalled, "You sing about what you know, about the experiences that happen day to day. If you attempt to write a song that you think is going to be a hit, that's when you lose perspective." Asked if he is disappointed that Pansy Division never achieved the kind of runaway success that other bands from the 1990's "grunge scene" had, he laughed and said, "Well, we're still waiting. No, actually the band and I couldn't be happier with the success we have achieved." Ginoli said success is measured in many ways. "We have done it our way and have a tremendously loyal fan base to stow for it," he said. "We've talked about it and really think that our last album "Total Entertainment" will probably be Jade Esteban Estrada Jade Esteban Estrada Jade Esteban Estrada is a true renaissance performer. In his one-man show, "ICONS: The Lesbian and Gay History of the World, Vol. 1," he performs as the characters of Sappho, Michelangelo, Oscar Wilde, Gertrude Stein, Sylvia Rivera and . Ellen DeGeneres among others. £\ He is also a talented singer l\ and comedian. "Well back in HP\ the day, a performer had to be i^-g, able to act, sing dance and tell a few jokes between sets." A.sked what he'd pick if he had to choose only one medium for his artistic talents he purses his lips together and thinks aloud, "Hmmm. I hate this question. People that are creative have no choice. It's like breathing to us. I guess I would say I would choose singing, as I can't imagine not being able to tell my stories through song. But if you had asked me a few years ago I would have said dance, so if you ask me again at another time, expect another answer maybe!" The Estrella award-winning singer was born and raised in San Antonio. The son of a U.S. Army officer and a stage actress, Estrada won a scholarship to the American Musical and Dramatic Academy in New York. Estrada studied dance (alongside Jennifer Lopez) with Slam, the lead dancer from Madonna's Blonde Ambition Tour among other notable teachers. Genre Magazine calls him "the most exciting Latin pop artist ever to emerge onto the music scene." He has performed in seven languages and in 33 countries, and his music can be heard on the Golden Globe and Emmy award-winning police drama "The Shield" on FX. He has also been seen on the "Graham Norton Effect" on Comedy Central. Estrada is currently working on the third and final installment of his "Icons" trilogy that will premiere at the Columbus National Gay and Lesbian Theatre Festival in 2006. Estrada said, "Many people think gays and lesbians only came about in the 1960s or '70s and that is so not true. It's important to know where we came from so we can see where we are going." Rachel Sage Rachael Sage may not be a household name yet, but with six albums under her belt, she is certainly working on it. While growing up, the former Lilith Fair Talent Search winner attended The School of American Ballet performing in such classics as "The Nutcracker" and "Coppelia." But it was the music she heard in class that held her attention more than the steps, and by the age of five she had taught herself to play piano. She remembered pounding out the times of a renegade accompanist who played Beatles songs with classical arrangements, "Until they kicked me out of the building." Her early admiration for classical composers shifted toward confessional lyricists with her discovery of Laura Nyro, Elvis Costello and Patti Smith. Sage has a wonderful memory of meeting artist and activist Keith Haring when she was about 13. "Keith came backstage after and brought posters of his version of the American flag, and signed them for us," she said. "We didn't really know who he was then. And it just struck me that he was starting with these Rachel Sage kids, a new generation that was trying to come into their own, and make their own opinions and not just what the parents had instilled in them." It was an early lesson in what Pride really means. "It means celebrating freedom, the existing ones we have and the projected future ones we are going to achieve."
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