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Houston Voice, June 24, 2005
File 009
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Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 009. 2005-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 16, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2005-06-24). Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3778

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, June 24, 2005 - File 009, 2005-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 16, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3815/show/3778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, June 24, 2005
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date June 24, 2005
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ! ^B P ^^ HOUSTON VOICE Local Life =- When June rolls around, it's all about Pat The central figure in the logo of Pride Houston is described as definitely omnipresent and omni-sexual and so 'Pat' By BINNIE FISHER Ask anyone who's associated with Pride Houston to talk about Pat, and they suddenly become animated as they gush with glowing adjectives that paint a radiant portrait of the city's most visible symbol of Pride. A single human could scarcely possess all the luminous qualities attributed to Pat, but the androgynous figure that is the centerpiece for the city's Pride logo handles the compliments in stride. "It's all about Pat right now," says Pride Parade Chair Lynn Sixkiller "Pat loves the limelight." The figure that is neither distinctly male nor female reaches to the stars with one hand, symbolizing Houston's nighttime Pride Parade, and to squiggly lines with the other hand that represent the Texas heat in late June. In the middle of Pat's chest beats a big. red heart. "I see Pat as just a fun-loving gal," says Yvonne Feece, who with her partner, Rebecca Mahaffey, and a committee of volunteers created the 2005 Pride logo incorporating two figures of Pat. "Everyone loves Pat." Although Pat is definitely androgynous, most of those who know her say that the pronoun, "her," is the one to use. Among gays and lesbians, "her" and "she" are used to describe just about everyone. The figure that has come to symbolize Pride Houston was created in 1997 by Leana Columenares to capture that year's theme of "Glowing with Pride." It was the first year of Houston's now famous nighttime Pride Parade. Columenares said at the time that she created the figure in memory of her father, Bill Whiting, who died of AIDS in 1996. "Pride is a strong emotion that each of us can find within our hearts, and I wanted to emphasize this in the •f) MORE INFO Pride Houston Pride Festival 2-8 p.m Yoakum and Westheimer Pride Parade 8:45 p.m. Westheimer between Woodhead and Whitney 713-529-6979 www.pridehouston.org logo," she said. Joel Lutringer later incorporated the figure into what has become the official corporate logo of Pride Houston. The figure stands in a circle reaching toward the night sky and the Texas heat. As for the name Pat, that's strictly unofficial. For the first few years of the figure's existence, it was referred to as, "Pride person." Pride committee members wanted to personalize Opat Bora: 1997 Birthplace: Houston Residence Montrose Sex: Omni-sexual Occupation: Symbol of Pride Houston Relationship status: Free to be Kids: Adoption is an option Pets: Maybe next year iNuuouy nau ever mou£. before," says Sixkiller. "It was perfect." approval was unanimous. "Nobody had ever thought about naming her .ore," says Sixkil,rt So, Pat it was. their mascot, so the call went out among them for a name. Committee member and Houston Voice Sales Manager Jason Wilson uttered the name that stuck, "Pat." When he began searching for a name, he says, he thought of the androgynous character created on "Saturday Night Live" and later in a movie by actress Julia Sweeney. The jingle that accompanied Pat went like: A lot of people say. "What's that?" It's Pat! A lot of people ask, "Who's he? Or she?" A ma 'am or a sir, accept him or her or whatever it might be. It's time for androgyny. Here comes Pat! He said it in a Pride meeting, "Pat," and the Montrose is home Where Julia Sweeney's character moved to L.A., took a bungalow and lived among straight people who are probably still trying to pinpoint Pat's sexuality, Pride Executive Director Jack Valinski says, Houston doesn't have to worry about that. Houston's Pat calls Montrose home. "Pat is just a person who looks like either a he or a she and is all about having a good time," he says. Pride Houston President Nick Brines says now that Pat is in her eighth year in Houston, she has effectively branded the city's Pride celebration. "Whether she's standing 10 feet tall on a float or on a one-inch-wide lapel pin, she's everywhere," he says. "Pat's omnipresent, omni-sexual, onini-every- thing." Whenever Houstonians see Pat, Brines says, "People know it's an official Pride event." Feece says when she and the committee were creating the logo that would highlight the 2005 Pride slogan, "Equal rights! No more! No less!" Pat had to be there in a big way. The two Pats depicted on the logo are definitely celebrating. "We put two together," she says, "it could be two guys or two girls." Sixkiller says the thing that makes Pat such a perfect representation of Pride is, "Pat's very diverse. She's been in many colors. She just kind of covers it all." Feece says Pat epitomizes what Pride is all about. "She eats, sleeps and breathes Pride. She's all-inclusive. She's always trying to outreach to other groups and to everybody" Brines says in addition to Pat's big heart, he likes the fact that, "Pat's crazy."
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