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Houston Voice, May 26, 2006
File 009
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Houston Voice, May 26, 2006 - File 009. 2006-05-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3769/show/3756.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2006-05-26). Houston Voice, May 26, 2006 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3769/show/3756

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, May 26, 2006 - File 009, 2006-05-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3769/show/3756.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, May 26, 2006
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Ford, Nancy
Publisher Window Media
Date May 26, 2006
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript Local Life HOUSTON VOICE MAY 26, 2006 PAGE 8 Picture of success Dr. Dalton DeHart honored with Minnie Stevens Piper education award By NANCY FORD SAY YOU'RE OUT SOME SATURDAY night at one of the myriad social functions offered to Houston's gay community. Or perhaps you're attending a Wednesday afternoon political luncheon. Or a Thursday happy hour birthday celebration. Or a wee-hours-of-Sunday-morn- ing after-hours bash. Chances are better than good that you'll spot the familiar face of Dalton DeHart He's highly recognizable, a taU, lanky blonde, gentleman who works the room gracefully and easily He knows everyone and everyone knows him, it appears, from the smiles and hugs he elicits from the crowd. Another easy way to recognize DeHart is by his equipment. He's the man with at least one professional-grade camera slung around his neck, which he aims and shoots with effortless accuracy If ever there were a chronicler of Houston's gay history it is DeHart His work has been in the Houston Voice and other gay publications since he began snapping images more than 20 years ago, making him an irreplaceable part of Houston's gay community "Very seldom a week passes that I don't do eight or 10 events, generally," he says. "I tell people that I don't take pictures of just certain kinds of people — I love all of it. It doesn't matter if it's an after-hours party or the transgender Unity Banquet or Human Rights Campaign function or Black Tie Dinner. Just whatever — I'm an equal opportunity photographer!" WHAT MANY OF HIS PHOTOGRAPHIC subjects may not know is that DeHart has a whole other career. After graduating from Buna High School in east Texas, DeHart entered San Houston State University in Huntsville. His camera accompanied him through a hitch in the U.S. Army and as he entered ft MORE INFO Dalton DeHart Photography 713-622-2202 www.daltondehart.com his teaching career. In the fall of 1983, DeHart began teaching at San Jacinto College's central campus in Pasadena, Texas. In 1986, he became a permanent professor of English at San Jacinto College, and in 1989 he became chairman of the Language Skills Department. "The teaching and the photography go so well together," Dehart says. "They compliment each other." Later this summer DeHart says he will retire from teaching. But as a perfect example of "going out with a bang," DeHart was recently chosen to receive the highest honor Texas' educational system has to bestow on one of its own, the Minnie Stevens Piper Award. The award represents "sort of the zenith of all of the educational endeavors that we undertake," DeHart says. "It represents the highest honor that a person in a college or a university can achieve. It's kind of the Oscar of the education business." Each year, San Jacinto College Central and other Texas college faculty nominate a faculty member as the outstanding educator on that campus, voted on by faculty itself. The winner of that honor is then eligible to be one of 15 statewide recipients of the Minnie Stevens Piper professorship, DeHart explains. "We always think that we try to do the very best job that we can, but it's wonderful to be validated," DeHart says. "I believe that the teachers in the Language Skills Department have contributed much to my success," DeHart continues. "In addition, my close friends in the English Department with whom I have taught for so many years are certainly responsible in part for my being selected for the award." Another of the reasons Dehart is considered a model educator is reflected in how he views his relationship to his students. "I really believe that much of the job that we do in the developmental course is to encourage them, sort of nurture them, tell them that, yes, they can do it," DeHart says. "Some of them sort of consider themselves as failures, and part of our job is to assure them that they can do it if they just put forth the effort." THOUGH HE IS LEAVING TEACHING. DeHart has no intention of retiring from his photographic career. He will continue to be seen behind the lens as he has every week since he started focusing on Houston's gay community in the late '80s. Among the first events DeHart attended was Executive Professionals of Houston, a social group made up of predominantly Dalton DeHart, longtime Houston Voice photographer and San Jacinto College Central's 2006 Teacher of the Year and recipient of the Minnie Stevens Piper Professorship award. (Photo by Alfred Padroni gay and lesbian business people. "I ended up joining and after being a member for six months. I was asked to be the chair of the directory committee because I did photos. Then I started doing other events and various fundraisers and that sort of thing. I did all sorts of events." The greatest difference between then and now, DeHart says, is the visibility the gay community has come to know. Seldom did a gay or lesbian-specific event carry the words "gay" or "lesbian." Specifically, DeHart marvels at the evolution of the city's Pride Parade. "That's one of the most amazing things I've seen," he says. "It's just mind- boggling now." "When I first started doing this, the meetings I attended were not public events," Dehart says. "Over the years, almost all of the events have become pub lic and people know about them. Now we have so many GLBTs and so many straight people who are also so supportive of events because of the worthwhile causes the community is involved in." With a catalogue of more than 450,000 photos chronicling so many of those worthwhile causes, as well as the people who make them possible, DeHart shows no signs of slowing down. "People ask me all the time where I get my energy — 'What are you on?'" DeHart says, laughing. "I say 'OK, look in the mirror.' I am high on life and on... the people that I photograph. That's what motivates me. I get incredible joy out of taking pictures of these people because I feel like it makes them feel good, and it certainly does make me feel like my life is worthwhile. "The people and the joy I hope I bring to them is what motivates me."
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