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Montrose Voice, No. 352, July 24, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 352, July 24, 1987 - File 001. 1987-07-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/361/show/332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-07-24). Montrose Voice, No. 352, July 24, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/361/show/332

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 352, July 24, 1987 - File 001, 1987-07-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/361/show/332.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 352, July 24, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 24, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call (713) 529-8490 montrose VOICE Late News on the Health Crisis Cells in Blood Kill AIDS Virus Naturally eagan's Commission Begins Its Work Officials Say Education Should be Top PriorHy for Mi orities Worley Runs Away with 'Gypsy' Bill O'Rourke, inside HOUSTON WEEKEND WEATHER Fair and hot, 20% chance of afternoon showers Day highs 96. night lows 76 FOR ALL THE BAR ADS, SEE []JtJl:iJ E3tJtJl:iJ IN THE BACK OF THE MONTROSE VOICE 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24. 1987 Where Over 5,000 Couples Have Met in 9 Years! Mornings 7am featuring Prycene and her New Orleans style Bloody Mary's $1 25~ Draft All the Time Legal Liquor Notice New! Daytime Umbrella Clause When it Rains We Pour $1 Well Drinks Out Patio Cotona Cabana Bat Now OP.en Dailg at 4pm leatutina Buol< Twentg Five Cotona1 220 A~ondale 529-1525 -·---- JULY 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Health Officials: AIDS Education Should be Top Priority for Minorities By Jeri Clausing FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE HOUSTON (UPl)-The spread of the AIDS virus is unproportionately high among blacks and is spreading more quickly to heterosexuals in minority comm uni ties, experts told urban leaders this past week. Blacks, who represent 12 percent of the American population, account for 25 percent of the nation's AIDS cases, the doctors told a forum of the National Urban League Conference Tuesday. Eleven percent of AIDS cases among blacks have been attributed to hetero­sexual transmission, compared to 1 per­cent among whites, said Dr. Beny Primm, president of the Urban Resource Institute of Brooklyn, N.Y. "If that number were (the same for whites}. we would see a blitz in the media," Primm said. "I suggest that every state do something quickly to pub­licize the facts." Dr. Rudolph Jackson, an Atlanta pediatrician who works with the Cen­ters for Disease Control and the Public Health Service, said themostimportant target groups for AIDS education todayO are heterosexuals and teenag­ers. "When you look at heterosexual cases, you will now see in the case of females that you have a very large number of cases occurring in the teen­age to 30 years of age .... This means that we've got to get our message to tee­nagers and younger people." Jackson c1aimed that homosexuality and bisexuality is less common among blacks than whites, but intravenous drug use is more widespread among blacks, and people infected through con· taminated needles are more likelv to Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. Gay Awareness Service The Gay Group and Friends of First Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin at Southmore. will present the Worship Service on Sunday, July 26. at 11:15 a.m Order of Service will include a mixture of information under the general theme of gay awareness-what it was or 1s like to. be gay or lesbian. The .program w1U include readings and talk. songs and other music, d1scuss1on of historical figures and issues of today. The general public is invited to attend Letters to the Voice From the Readers of the Mon t rose Voice ~ We Should Never Forget From David Reid With the passing of Dr Thomas Waddell we have lost a true leader and positive spirit m the struggle for gay rights and recognition Without a doubt, his lengthy legal battle with the U.S. Olympic committee all the way to the ultimate re1ection by the Supreme Court took its toll as much as his battle with AIDS. So the US. Olympic Committee doesn't like the use of the word "Gay" with Olympic They shouldn't mind then if we drop "that" word but still use theirs The Tom Waddell Olympics At least the Tom Waddell Gaymes. We should never forget ~ Write the Voice Items in the "Letters" column are opinions of readers. Publication of such opinions does not.infer a concurring view by the Voice. R~aders are encouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest . Please keep letters bnef and mail to "Letters to the Editor," Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006. All letters must be signed and include address and phone number to verify authenticity Address and phone will not be printed. Namew11I be withheld on request <fl Q. ,. :::> IN w ~ z 0 INTERNATIONAL :::> 0 MILITARY .... z () 0 FASHIONS z =t FRENCH* GERMAN• ITALIAN 0 Celebrating this 0 ... wwn VINTAGE * .a..:. Month z COME Jj'@:(]~ THE () Our 5th Year z .w... G) in Montrose FASHION ARMY AT ..... w with ~\ Kl~~· A/C, Oil & Lube and Cooling System Service INTERNATIONAL MILITARY Specials SURPLUS HDu RS. I' ~,;;:.~ 522-2190 MON .. SAT 1609 Westhelmer 1411 Tait 11·6 528-2818 TRANSMISSIONS spread the virus through heterosexual contact. "That seems to be how the disease is moving now, that seems to be the factor that is moving it into the general popu· lation," Jackson said. The most recent CDC statistics indi­cate there are more than 38,000 diag­nos4! d cases of AIDS in the country, 60 percent among whites, 25 percent in blacks and 15 percent among Hispan­ics. "At the CDC, at first we all thought that AIDS was a problem of gay white Police Nab 'Bicycle Robber' A man suspected of robbing at least six Montrose businesses and fleeing on a bicycle was arrested Tuesday, July 14, and charged with aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon. Willard Dorazio, 25, of the 2300 block of Waugh Drive, was being held in Har· ris County Jail in lieu of $240,000 bail. Dorazio has been "positively identi­fied" in the robberies of six adult book· stores or convenience stores and HPD Robbery Division officers believe he may be responsible for 20 other robber­ies, all in the past two months. Dorazio, on parole for a previous forgery conviction when he was arrested, used a silver or chrome-plated derringer during the robberies and used the bike to get away, police said. An old friend . . . Al_l_l .. tr .... 14-y ... is just around the comer World Travel International has been servtng the Montrose Area with expert travel service since 1947. Conveniently bcated at 1915 Sooth Shepherd since 1974, \.Ue've become a landmark in the community. Cruises, tours, Wteation plans and other travel arrangements are right here at our :~~fshe~ ~I ~~:~tll or drop in for ~World Trawl International 8;30-5:.JOMon .• Fn I0:00-2'<Xl5aturda111 1915South~ Hou.ton. Te:x.u 77'019 (713)526-5151 males," Jackson said. " ... Statistics, however, today indicate minorities are very much involved in this problem, blacks particularly." Since there is no cure or vaccine for the virus at the present time, "all we have is education. We've got to get the message across." Dr. James G. Haughton, director of the Houston Department of Health and Human Services, called for a blitz of public service announcements like those that flooded the media in the recent national battle against drunk drivers. But while people must be scared into practicing safe sex and quitting intrav­enous drug use, he said they must not be scared too much. "We have to not scare people too much where they urge their leaders and elected officials in things that are abso­lutely stupid like having health cards across communities, mass screenings that result in spending precious money on witch hunts," Haughton said. montrose VOICE HOUSTON TEXAS ISSUE 352 FRIDAY. JULY 24. 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Con1ents copyright 1987 Office hours: Bam-6pm Henry McClurg publ•'"er·9d•t0f Linda Wyche managing .O•tOT Donald Upchurch olllc• m11,.ger Jame1 Lewis product>Ofl David Szynal produ<:t>Olt Bill O'Rourke ,..,_ SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-3490 Jerry Mulholland adll.,-t.S•l'f9 dfrector Ken Boge accou,,r etecut- POSTMASTER 5-'ld lddr .. COffediorlS 10 'OB Avon- 0.le Houston. TX 77006-3028 Sut.criptlon ,.,. "'LIS (Oy l/QH;9 C.rT.., "' us Mail):. s1 2Sper'#Mk(upto2-ft) S66pery•r1S2wee1<t1 or $32 S0 pef'alX mot11hl f2'5 WMlt!l.j Nat Oflaf .CV.'1•ng ,.,,,_,.,uar"'a R•vende'I Mar1<.et•roo P 0 Boit 126(1. F'tlillll•ekl. NJ 07061 {2011 75'·'348 Flnal .OVerf•.,"f dHdlfM AO d•~ -'S Spm 2 ct.ys pnOf 10 p1,1bl1u1oon dlte Anc1...,1oec19ds2pm 1 d1y pnor 1opubl•c•toon date NOl•U 10 ~111.,.S Adv9'11$•flQ r•I• schedule Eoghl-A wuett.c11..-A.pnl 11.1996 RHpOflS•btMy W•do not uat.rme hri•ne>•I retl)O"S•bd•ty for cl•LtTIS tlY 8Clv911<M!'I but rNOers are Mked to advrM the MWspaper ol 1ny -piclOri ol lradulefll Of deceptive adverhl•!'lg 1nd SUSPICIOnt w•I be 1!'1Y9lt•g1ted N-i Hl\llC8 Un•ted PreN 1n1ernallO!'l8i ~· It's Summer again and time to do those projects you've been putting off. Call .! I If HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor /; : ~=r:::t.Ja; T wesJ • Tra & Trosh Removal • Insulation • Sheetroc.k/ Painting • Tile, Masonry ~ • Plumbing/ Electrical • Cabinets • Foundations Repaired • Decks · Hot Tubs No Job Too Big or Too Stnan 520-9064 ~:. 4 MONTROSE VOICE JULY 24. 1987 c1fn Eenwriam RICHE MULLIN Riche Mullin. 29. of Houston. passed away Saturday afternoon. July 11 at Memorral Southwest Hospital with his parents and several close frrends at his side He is survived by his mother and father Bruce and Catherme of Indiana. a sister Helene of Kentucky. and a brother, Chris­topher of Ohio Family v1ewmg was held Monday. July 13. at Waltrop Funeral Home. Memorial servi­ces for the public were held Saturday. July 18. at D1gn1ty Center with celebrant Dennis Barca. 0 FM officiating Riche was born 1n Cleveland. Ohio on July 27. 1957: attended high school in Chi­cago; and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree from Augustana College m Moline. lhnois After l1v1ng a short while in New York City, he moved 1n the early 80s to Houston where he quickly became a very popular man. w1n­n1ng several titles Mr Southwest Drummer and Mr Hams County He was a figure skater. avid 1ogger and a gym instructor. and he was vice chairman of the A I DS Foun d a tions PlaySa fe Committee Riche was a vocal proponent of a healthy li festyle He wanted to help educate his fnends about safe sex and ra tse money for his friends with AIDS He always wanted to help those who net?l1ed help His father described him as a lover of hfe who cared for others Riche loved uncondi­tionally and was unconditionally loved by all who touched him He leaves behind a legacy of warmth. humor and smcenty In lieu o f flowers. donations may be made m Aiche's name to Aid for AIDS OURPOUCY TtieMon1rou\10009ishQnor9dlo~letl'>e r- Of our,_.,, .r>et 1..ndll;"' ,...~of ourr..:ien ""·'".,. ~ W.Mllthallr...UOf-.....CWO'ndeUSW•lhlf>lor .,..1.ononperton(notby.....iOf-l't-.~I T,_eisMChefge lof1,,......,oce FLOWERS &GIFTS Direct Burial or Cremation Police Seek Suspect in Murder of Montrose Decorator European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit & Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys Available. '" $395 I As of Thursday, Houston Police Depart· ment Homicide investigators were con­ti nuing a search for a suspect in the murder of a Montrose interior decorator whose body was found in his home Mon­1811 Indiana day, July 20. at Dunlavy 523-3791 Voice/ TTY Machine Major Credit Cards Accepted (ef-~ According to Sgt. David Ferguson, the body of Bert Hollister, 59, was found on the kitchen floor of his home at 1714 McDuffie about 10:00 a.m. Monday. He had suffered multiple stab wounds to his upper body. Lubraseptic, as previously adver­tised in this publication, does not prevent AIDS, herpes, gonorrhea or syphilis. Police were called to the home after friends, who became concerned at not seeing the victim over the weekend, pried open a window and found the body. It is believed that Hollister, who was last seen a live Friday afternoon, was killed Friday night. Because there were no signs of forced entry, Ferguson believes that Hollister knew his assailant. Hol1ister's car, a 1986 white Nissan Maxima, remains missing and poJice believe the suspect has fled the area in the vehicle. Harriman Laboratories, Inc., 230 Marcus Blvd. P.O. Box 14248, Hauppauge, NY 11788 Ferguson would not release informa­tion about items found missing from the victim's house but did say that some were of large monetary value. Hollister's murder is the second fatal attack of a Montrose resident in the home in less than two weeks. On July 8, Charles Hebert was found dead in his townhouse in the 2700 block of Mason. A suspect is being held in that case . EAT HEALTHf. .. , BE HEALTHr! we now know you can cook up you own defense ... According to the American cancer society, there Is evidence that diet and cancer are related. The food you choose to eat may help reduce your risk of cancer. Foods related to lowering the risk of cancer Of the larynx and esophagus all have high amounts of carotene, a form of vitamin A which can be found In apricots, cantaloupe, carrots dark green leafy vegetables, spinach, winter squash, and sweet potatoes. Foods high In vitamin c are related to lowering the risk of cancers of the stomach and esophagus. Cood sources of vitamin c In· elude broccoli, cabbage, cantaloupe, caullflower, grapefruit, kiwifruit, papaya, bell peppers, potatoes, oranges and strawberries. Foods that may help reduce the risk of gastrointestinal and respiratory tract cancer are cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, cauliflower. Fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain cereals such as oatmeal, bran and wheat may help rower the risk of colorectal cancer. Now, more than ever we know you can cook up your own defense against cancer. So eat healthy and be healthy/ ""more +AMERICAN ~ CANCER SOCIETY' Liberace's Sister Calls Late Entertainer's Home a 'Shrine' JULY 24, 1987 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 Sy Robina Luther FOR TH£ MONTRO~~ VOICE LOS ANGELES (UP!)-Liberace's sis­ter has announced plans to raise $5 mil­lion to buy and convert her brother's palatial home in Las Vegas into a shrine in honor of the flamboyantenter­tainer who died with AIDS in February: Angie Liberace said ear1ier thi.Ji month the mansion "is just as much a shrine" as Elvis Presley's Graceland Museum in Memphis and should be pre­served. But because Liberace's multimil1ion· dollar estate was placed in the control of his lawyer and accountant, who intend to sell the mansion, $5 mi1lion wi11 have to be raised to buy the home, she told a news conference. Las Vegas already is home to one Liberace museum, administered by Dora Liberace, the widow of the pian­ist's brother, George. Liberace, who died Feb. 4 at the age of 67, spent most of his time in the house just off Tropicana Road, about 4 miles east of the Las Vegas Strip. The mansion, a reflection of the pian· ist's luxurious lifestyle, includes a rendi­tion of Michelangelo's ''The Creation of Adam"-the original is in the Vatican's Sistine Chapel-on the ceiling of Libe­race's bedroom. "The home should always belong to the public," his sister said. "I know from many conversations with Lee (Libera ce's nickname) that this was his wish. We can save my brother's home with support from his friends, fans and his colleagues." Landis Identified as Mystery Buyer of Hudson Hacienda LOS ANGELES (UPI)--Director John Landis is the mystery buyer who paid $2.89 million for the hacienda where Rock Hudson died 10 months ago, the Los Angeles Times reported. Landis, recently acquitted in the deaths of three people on the "Twilight Zone" movie set and the director of such comedy hits as "Animal House" and "Trading Places," bought the late actor's home in the name of Beverly Crest Trust, the newspaper said last Sunday. Although listing agents refused to reveal the name behind the trust, sour­ces told the paper that Landis was the buyer. At a probate hearing in June, Lan­dis's representatives made a successful overbid at $2.89 million, $60,000 more than the listing price and $140,000 more than a Japanese bidder. The paper said escrow closed Wednesday. Landis, who was already living in the area, reportedly plans to spend about $.500,000 refurbishing the home where Hudson died Oct. I, 1986, with AIDS. Jeff Hyland, president of the Beverly Hills real-estate firm of Alvarez, Hyland & Young, described the 5,000· square-foot home as the "quintessential hacienda, what everybody thinks of as a California house." The two-story Spanish·style home overlooking Beverly Hills has a cou.rt· yard, swimming pool, spa, theater, six· car garage and two servants' rooms. Its hilltop view extends from downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Ocean. About $11,000 has been raised in the effort to preserve the house, she said. Gladys Luckie, Liberace's house­keeper for nearly four decades, said the house "is a reflection of (Liberace's) lifestyle and personality." "For his fans, we want (to preserve) the bedroom ceiling, the marble-pillared bathroom and the Moroccan atrium," she said. The house is "a place for his fans to visit and get some pictures of his real life." Peggy Antrobus, a neighbor of Libe­race's who recently founded the Save Liberace's Las Vegas Home Fund, said hundreds of curious fans stop by to pay their respects to Liberace. "I don't think (Liberace) would under· stand that they would place his home . . . on the auction block in such an imper· sonal way," Antrobus said. Late last month, Joel Strole, the enter· tainer's lawyer, said millions of dollars in glittering antiques and classic cars owned by Liberace will be sold to benefit an arts foundation created by Liberace. Strole has said the estate also plans to seB Liberace's homes in Los Angeles, Malibu and Lake Tahoe, Calif., and an apartment in New York City. Another home in Palm Springs has not been offered for sale because the estate is neg­otiating with thecitY to open it, too, as fl museum. •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSEIJ IH;~;KENDS "'CONTINENTAL n,...,,..,._._ dtlwHonla.S~re>n-hnlra Houston Symphoi:v Orchestra &r9iu Comissiona, Music Director 81ngle tickets $5-$20-call 227-ARTS Save 20% (3 concerts or more)-ca.11 224-0327 VIVALDI'S FOUB SUSOR Joseph Silverstein, Conductor and Violinist Schubert: Overture to Boaamlllld.e Mozart: Symphony No. 38, Linz Vivaldi: The Four Seasons Mr. Silverstein's performance underwritten by Bonner and Moore Associates Friday, J'uly 84, 8 p.m., Jones Hall .July 29-The Untiniahed and the Emperor .July 30-Mozart and Beethoven .July 31-Comiaaiona and Luca .AlJgu.st 1-!'estival !'inale: Beethoven'• Ninth , TllE 8FST urru: Gl'IST HOl E l'JTQ'l"l1 LOC.An:D 0\ l'JtSl.'IJ'liES AT RA."'4PUT•ltUElltE fltENCH Ql.ARTU 8EGl'<S RFA"-0\ABU: RATES CO'm\E.,7AL 8REAKFASr ROO\IS ViTTll "01\.llllW. CU'Mn: C0"1ll:Ol Al'iD PRl\'Alt BAllt.'ii FREE PAJIKl'liG FOR RNRVATIO\'S CAU (5().1) 566-1177 Something Different: Superior Service RE5ULT5 Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas 6 'JONTAOSE VOICE / JULY 24, 1987 The Montrose Voice If Montrose is part of your world too, you should be part of the Montrose Voice. TO SUBSCRIBE, OR TO ADVERTISE, CALL 529-8490 --·---'·-- "-------,/~ L Falwell Supports Bork By Margaret Lillard " 11-1£ M! )NTP< >t: VOICE PIGEON FORGE, Tenn. CUPll­Liberal opposition to Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork is bigoted and should be fought with prayer, claims the Rev. Jerry Falwell. Speaking Monday to about two dozen preachers and journalists before con­ducting a rally, Falwell urged ministers to work and pray for Senate confirma­tion of Bork's nomination because he may support the "pro-life" movement. "But we have a job thereto work very hard for his (Bork's) nomination," because he may be pro-life, Falwell said. The Baptist minister also said minis­ters should pray the views of current Su-preme Court justices change to sup­port the pro-life movement. Christians not only have the respon­sibility to preach the gospel, but to be politic..llly active, whether directly or th rough prayer, he said. The Reagan nominee has been critic­ized by liberal groups fo r his stands on civil rights issues and his firing of Watergate Special Prosecutor Archi­bald Cox while Bork was a J ustice Department official. Mexican Poll: It's OK to Rob Government MEXICO CITY (UP!)-Although abuse of public office is considered a grave breach of morality in Mexico, tax eva­sion is a virtue-a "national pastime," according to a poll released Tuesday. The poll, conducted by the Mexican During Falwell's sermon. four Knox­viJle teenagers brought into the hall where Falwell was speaking a sign reading, "Ban the Moral Majority. God loves Jews, Hindus, Buddhists, Mos­lems and Christians all the same." Security guards ordered the teenagers to remove the sign, saying protesting is not allowed in the hotel. At a news conference earlier Monday, Falwell said broadcast evangelists are contemplating policing themselves to avoid government regulation. Falwell said he had just come from a Washington, D.C. meeting with other broadcast ministers and Rep. J.J. Pickle, D-Texas. He said the group talked about inves­tigating tax-exempt groups without ref­erring to specific organizations. But Falwell said, "All of this is a rebound from PTL." National Religious Broadcasters members are discussing the creation of what he called a financial integrity commission, which he compared to "a Better Business Bureau for television ministries." Falwell said this group would be an alternative to government regulation of television religious ministries "I think government intervention in churches and religious organizations, especially religious organizations, is something we need to be very, very cau tious with," he said. He said he believes Pickle has "no sin­ister or clandestine motives" in his desire to keep an eye on broadcast min­istries. At the meeting in Washington with Pickle were evangelists Jimmy Swag­gart, Paul Crouch and John Ankerberg and a representative for Pat Robertson. JULY 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 §AME DAY TYPE~ §ETTER§ A N J•;W J> I VI RION OJ<' THE MONTROSE V O ICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Nol'(,!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by 5pm (stze of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If yoUt tipesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) 81 TYPESTYLES TO CHOOS E :FROM Pick Up and Delivery Ava1/able ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 Institute of Public Opinion, revealed r------------------------------, ~~i~~~::~~~~~~~::x:i:i~t~~~~etoiomno~; L~~"' Int'l. Pet Groom1"ng ~-$--1--Q--0--0-1~ consider civil mat ters- like not ;::: voting-to be very serious. '"'' Of the 20 questions asked in the poll, Academy Mexicans consider failing to vote and ff I evading taxes to be the least serious 0 I infractions. Tax evasion is a crime • ..-i:\i 1 1 I under the 1aw, but those polled consider 'fhl1 v A career working it a "sport" practiced on a national 1 i t It .. ' w1"th a n1"mals I I level. b vv CUP THIS AD and attach it to Abuse of public office was considered /\ 0 k h I ? I your next order for s 10.00 off J "serious" as were issues of having sex- f'}. • Tired of wor ing wit peop e. I ual relations with chi ldren a nd con- ~ .~· ii ~·' -- .-- -~-. Love animals? any of the following items: demning an innocent man to prison. ~ .. .. I (Minimum Order $50) More than 70percentoftherespondents I• Letterheads• Postcards cons idered these three activities to be serious breaches of morality. 1' , 1', 1 =. A grooming career can give you . . . •Brochures • Multipart Forms, According to the poll, the majority of ~ J _ ... J _ • Rewarding work in pleasant surroundings • 2-Color Printing • Flyers those s urveyed believe It is more • Flexible hours and a chance to b• your • Contracts • Menus immoral to watch a pornographic movie •Resumes • Emelopes than to evade paying taxes, to ride the own boss with a small initial investment I . . subway without paying or to abstain • The skills to provide a service that is in • Amouncements • rNltatlons from voting. great demand • Business Cards • Door According to official election figures "'-10 \,1.) • Assistance in initial job placement Hangers • Report or Booklet drawn from gubernatorial races in three 11 .}.. 'I Copying • Invoices of the 31 states, barely 46 percent of the CG Spend a day and exper ience MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD eligible voters showed up at the ballot th · - MEMBERS may substitute box. A high percentage of Mexican citi- e exciting world ~ 100. Dlscounl zens attempt tax evasion, the poll said. of professional pet care Thepollalsoindicatedthat85percent at no cost or obligation. .. SPEEDY of the sample-the group polled 600 - - PAINTING SERVICE adults living in Mexico City-believes We Also Provide: CJ' r r " 49 that while the country's economic s lide •Grooming •Boarding Fast R'ha~ SC'Mc,, continues moral values will decrease. • Kennel Manager on Duty 24 Hours 1 Day ... .... f1eel!!l!Mt Ou.a!1()', LON Cost While the poll confirmed that Mexi- e Pets lndlvldually Exercised I~ • ~;, . j)_ 5400 BEUAJRE can society is fundamentally "macho," YOU MUST SEE TO BELIEVE! BLVD. 5..1 percent do not consider homosexual- All New Faclllty Converumt Southwest locabon I ity to be immoral. Come By tor Visit Today · Dlock ('...,, oJCfwrnty 1toci.- • u~ A few of the responses did not reflect CALL 667-7417 I religiousprecepts,despiteMexico'spre- Int'l. Pet Grooming Academy PICK UP ...... D DELIVERY I dominantly Catholic population. Half ,....,. oftherespondentsdonotconsidermari· 8475 Highway 6 North, Bldg. C-1 "'J~~,~~:f'~~~~~~~ I tal infidelity a "serious moral problem," and5.1percentdidnotobjecttolegalized Houston, Texas 77095 ~~~~='~""'~==I abortion. Currently, abortion is illegal 71 3/859-3433 ..J. in Mexico. ----------- 8 MONTROSE VOICE JULY 24 1987 Australians Stage AIDS Conference SYDNEY. Australia (UP!f-Governor­General Sir Ninian Stephen opened a three-day regional conference on AIDS Tuesday with a warning that a global effort is needed to stop the spread of the illness. "It is imperative people understand the disease and its implications," Ste­phen said. "As this ... infection spreads, many of us will have friends and many of us will have relatives who will die of AIDS." Stephen said the World Health Organization, sponsor of the confer· ence, estimated between 500,000 and 3 million additional sufferers of AIDS would emerge in the next five years worldwide. Repret;entatives from more than 30 countries in the Western Pacific and South East Asian regions are attending the conference. Spokesman Robert Pounds said the meeting comes from recognition that acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome is a global problem. "Countries in the Pacific region and Southeast Asia appear to be still rela­tively unaffected by the virus and through planning and collaboration, its spread may be limited," Pounds said. Monday. the director of the special AIDS program of WHO. Dr Jonathan Mann, said compulsory antibody screening and exclusion of AIDS suffer· ers from society would create great dangers to the community because peo­ple with the disease would "go under· ground and avoid testing." Parties Pick Candidates to Replace McKinney By Mark A. Dupuis BRIDGEPORT Conn. (UPl)­Democrat Christine Niedermeier and Republican Christopher Shays won party nominations Tuesday to the seat left vacant by the AIDS-related death of Rep. Stewart B. McKinney, R-Conn. Niedermeier, 36, of Fairfield, served four terms in the Connecticut House, leaving in 1986 to challenge McKinney last November. She lost to the popular congressman by about 10,000 votes, his closest race in years. McKinney was serving his ninth con· secutive term when he died in May from an AIDS-related infection. He was the first member of Congress to die from ailments related to acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Niedermeier said she planned to "take a page out of Stewart McKinney's notebook and pretty much ignore my opponent," devoting her time to explaining what she would do in Con· gress. The 4th District includes nine towns in lower Fairfield County and includes affluent New York City suburbs and the citiea of Bridgeport, Stamford and Nor­walk In addition to the major party con· tenders, the special election will include Stamford plumber Nicholas Tarzia, who petitioned himself onto the ballot aa candidate of the "War Against AIDS Party" Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose SUPPORT A ''NEW MANHATIAN PROJECT ON AIDS" The "New Manhattan Project on AIDS" will harness the full commit­ment of the government and private sector-bringing top scientists and researchers together and providing the resources they need-to stop AIDS. The Pro1ect's primary goals are: (1) to accelerate research, increase drug availability and provide the best care possible for persons with AIDS­cutting the murderous red tape, (2) to insure an effective national AIDS education program, and (3) the enactment of laws protecting confiden­tiality and prohibiting discrimination against persons who are infected with the HIV virus. Our community's lobbyists are hard at work on Capitol Hill. But they need our help! We must not only overcome government inertia but the pressure of Right-wing opponents, who seek to exploit the health crisis for pohtical gain. CONGRESS MUST HEAR FROM EACH OF US! Call 1-800-325-6000 and ask for operator 9184. Tell the operator you want to send the Pubhc Opinion Mailgram (POM) listed above. Other POMs are available. The cost is just $4.50 per Mailgram, which will be charged to your telephone bill. You don't even have to know who your legislator 1s, they11 take care of it for you. Won't you take just a minute, right now, to make a difference? THE NATIONAL MAILGRAM CAMPAIGN Sponsored by The fairness Fund, lll rooperabon with the Humrin Rights Dmp.Ugn Fund and many other national gay and lesbian organizations For further information on grassroots mob1lizat1on, call or write •Th~ Faimus fund, P.O. 1723, Wa .. tungton, O.C 20013 (202) 347-0826 What if the President of the United States had a son who was gay? What if the President's most powerful advisors were willing to go to any length necessary to keep that fact a secret? THE PRESIDENT'S SON a novel of political intrigue by Krandall Kraus $7 Q' in book toreJ, or dip chi., ad to order b-v mail [. Endo,eJ is $8. 50 (postpaid) for The President's Son. name address_ l.llV $tale zip Alyson Publicanons, Dept. p.5 40 Plympton St. Bos10n, !'.1A 02118 JULY 24, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference call our exciting phone service has become the rage In California, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It avallable to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you Will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, like yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. TOP or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're all here! It's only $2*-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are required. Your anonymity Is guaranteed. Call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • Houst~~: 713-976-9696 'This call ls only S2 In most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller and vet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tional toll charges may apply in some areas. 10 MONTROSE VOICE JULY 24 1987 Reagan's Commission Begins Its Work By Norman D. Sandler F fl ?'ME~ <) 11j T WASHINGTON (UPI>-President Rea· gan Thursday named four women and eight men, including a gay geneticist and a Roman Catholic cardinal, to round out a l:l-membercommission that will help map a national strategy against AIDS. Frank Lilly, a former board member of the Gav Men's Health Crisis organi· zation. afid Cardinal John O'Connor were among the final 12 appointee~ to the panel headed by Mayo Clinic endo­cronologjst W. Eugene Mayberry After the announcement. the comm is sion was to join Reagan at the National Institutes of Health in suburban Mary­land for a briefing on research of acquired immune deficiency syndrome and a formal charge from the president. White House spokesman Marlin Fitz· water said the appointees-drawn from the fields of health care, business, pub· lie service and religion bring "a wide range of backgrounds and experience" to the fight against a deadly epidemic. "The president believes that the spread of AIDS is a cause of deep con· cern , but not panic," Fitzwater said. "If Americans work together with common sen~ and common purpose, the presi· dent believes we will, in the end, defeat this common threat." In New York. Joseph Zwilling, spo­kesman for O'Connor, released a state­ment by the cardinal: "In serving on this commission, it is my hope that I will be able to find ways to help alleviate the suffering of those persons who already have this terrible disease as well as to contribute toward the prevention of its :• - •••• • •••••••• •••••••• •••••••• ..••..••..••..••..•• .................., ·,. .·..· .,.. ......... , ............ , .·.·.·.·.· ·.· ....•....•....•....•....•....•... t ..................... further spread " Lilly said at the NIH he believed he was the first openly gay person appointed to a significant position in any administration. "This recognition ofthegaycommun· ity is richly deserved, since unfortu­nately we have several years of advance on any other governmental or private group in attempting to cope with the horrors of the AIDS crisis and have developed an extensive base of expe· rience in social services and public edu· cation concerning AIDS." he said. In addition to Lilly and O'Connor. whose New York ministry includes a hospital for AIDS patients and a refuge for AIDS victims, the new memben; of the Presidential Commission on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Ept· demic are: -Colleen Conway-Welch, dean of nursing at Vanderbilt University. -John J . Creedon, president and chief executive officer of the Metropoli· tan Life Insurance Co. of New York. -Theresa L. Crenshaw, director of The Crenshaw Clinic, which specializes m the evaluation and treatment of sex ual dysfunction and relationships. -Richard M. De Vos, co-founder and president of Amway Corp. -Burton James Lee III , a practicing physician at the Memorial Sloan· Kettering Cancer Center. -Woodrow A_ Myers Jr., health com· missioner for the state of Indiana. -Penny Pullen, an Illinois state leg· islator. -Cory Servaas, editor and publisher of The Saturday Evening Posl - William B. Walsh, founder of Pro- I ject HOPE. -Retired Adm. James D. Watkins, a former chief of naval operations. For weeks, the White House screened candidates for the commission, which was increased in size last week from 11 to 13 members. I ts composition has been the subject of some controversy since plans for the panel first surfaced in May Key among the questions asked out· side the White House was whether the gay community, hit hardest by the deadly virus, would be given a voice in recommending how the government deal with the AlDS epidemic. The selection of Lilly, head of the Genetics Department at Albert Einstem College of Medicine and an acknowl· edged homosexual, may do just that, although White House officials said he was chosen only for professional ere· dentials. Those explanations notwithstand­ing, gay rights activists and AIDS spe­cialists said the appointment of a gay person would enhance the credibility of the commission and avert a furor that could undermine its mission. However, Sen. Gordon Humphrey, R­N. H., said he was "very disappointed and upset" that Reagan named a homo­sexual to the panel, insisting it may con· vey the message "that homosexuality is simply an alternative lifestyle." "The practice of homosexuality is immoral," Humphrey said. "The conse­quences of that immoral behavior is AIDS, and not only AIDS for homosexu· ale, but AIDS for many innocent vic­tims, including children." In a June 24 executive order, Reagan gave the commission a broad charter to assess AIDS research, education and prevention efforts, to examine long­range impact on the nation's health care system, to examine the spread of the virus through the population, to study legal and ethical issues and to recommend steps that federal, state and local officials can take to protect the public, to help find a cure and to care for those suffering from the disease. As of June 19, the Centers for Disease Control said 37,:JR6 cases had been reported in the United States, resulting in 21 ,621 deaths. The commission has been directed to submit a preliminary report within 90 days. Its final deadline is one year from Thursday. Qiunnin_s4am ~nt.erpris.es Service Plus A Quality Cleaning Service Resldentlal­Commercial Hauling Etc. Pick Up-Delivery Hauling Bonded Jeff Cunningham (713) 522-3451 Good Time Call ... 916-G~~l\ ~ "d 'talk 'to 'f\le M~ Of ru1 UR Dreams. ~ 0 ·u be connected 6 GABB* you W\ ca\\ with When you dial 97. -h"bited conference ngoing un\n ' Ml over 'Texas . to an o . b\e men from man)' des\ra i,.: .:.=.. .:.:. \ ................ •••• •••••••••••• •,.• .•.••.•.•.• . 1 ••••••• .•.• •. •.•.•.• . •••• •••••••••• •,• ••••• ..... . ..•...•. •.. . •...•...• ... ,...... ..... ............. ... ....... .... ...... .. . .. . LIVE\ ording\ Not A. Rec oung or o\d, Short or ta\\, Y. . m1aranteed . bottom, nvm\t)' \S b- 'fo\) or ' '{our ano i "' w ·• ,, 're al\ here. ~ ... ,,.. .. ., the)' "I had them all removed last week and boy, do I feel great." JULY 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Voice Comics ~ , E.D /AA'KES A REALLY LOUS'/ J >f • t:lE/\L \ollil\ TllE. DE.'v'IL... -,_ c Arnie has yet to come to terms with his refrigerator rn; lHE~UPWARi:;t_Y M061 ~E LOOK. IT 1ELL5 FWPI.£ 1\\AT IM A 611{ OIJ "THE 60. A SHAKE:R . A MOVER. ~551R , IM RfAUY GOIN ' P!ACfS. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24, 1987 Cells in Blood Kill AIDS Virus Naturally By Gayle Young UPI Science Writer BOSTON-Researchers have disco­vered cells in the blood that seek out the AIDS virus and destroy it, a finding that may help scientists working to develop a vaccine for the disease. According to a study published in the Judge Could Order AIDS Test for Sex Offenders Under Senate Bill AUSTIN (UPl>--A bill adopted by the state Senate would allow Texas Judges to order t'l"ts for AIDS and other sexu­ally transmitted diseases on people indicted on sexual assault charges. The bill, sponsored by Sen. Bob McFarland, R-Arlington, would allow rape victims to find out if they have been exposed to a sexually transmitted disease. The law would bar any other use of the test results. McFarland said July 17 the bill was" introduced following complaints from the family of a rape victim that slate law does not provide for the testing of defendants for venereal diseases. "There is currently no procedure available whereby a court can order blood tests for this purpose," he said. The bill, if passed by the House and signed into Jaw, wi11 a11ow judges to order blood tests for AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases for people who have been indicted for rape or sod· omy The original bill made such testing mandatory hut McFarland amended it to give judges discretion in ordering the test~. Sen. Ray Farabee, D-Wichita Fall•. sponsored an amendment that would plare such «·sting under the existing Communicable Disease Act and provide confidentiality to those tested. Gara LaMarche, director of the Texas Civil Liberties Union, said Thursday the bill "poses serious constitutional issues involving self-incrimination and presumption of innocence." McFarland said, however, that a vic­tim of a rape or sexual assault has a right to know whether their assailant was a carrier of acquired immune defi­cienC'y syndrome or other infectious venereal disea!lle8. •·The trauma a victim obviously goes through following ~uch a horrible crime is obviously aggravated by a total lack o( knowledge in that area," he said. McFarland said TexaH law already provides that rriminal defendants can be forced under court order to submit to blood and hair tests for evidentiary pur· pcses. "But that does not extend to a deter­mination of whether or a person who has been convicted or accused of that crime is a carrier of an infectious vene­real disease." he said. "I see no intru· sion here into any protective rights." But LaMarche said no other state has such a law, adding, "Texas should not be firsL" "Forced testing for a suspect does nothing to help victims," he said. "A better approach would be to offer coun­seling and periodic, voluntary testing to all sexual assault victims." British science Journal Nature, the killer cells are manufactured in the blood after the body is exposed to the HIV virus that causes AIDS. "We know they can identify and kill cells expressing the AIDS virus," Dr Bruce 0. Walker of the Massachusetts General Hospital said Wednesday at a news conference. Researchers at the hospital, who dis· covered the killer cells in collaboration with ~dentists from the National lnsti· lutes of HPalth, said the presence of the cells also may help explain why !'ome people develop the disease after being ;nfected wlth the virus while others do not The researchers said it appears all people infected with the AIDS virus develop the killer cells. but some may have more cells than do others. "There is more (killer cell) activity in people who are healthier, but we don't know which came first," better health or more cells, said Dr. Robert T. Schooley, another of the researchers. According to Nature, the cells, called cytotoxic T lymphocytes, were found in eight patients known to have been infected with the AIDS virus. No evi­dence of the cells was found in the blood of five uninfected people in a control group. The body normally produces both antibodies and killer cells to fight viral infections, doctors said. With AIDS, researchers quickly identified the antib· ody to the virus but the killer cells were not found until now. Schooley said the discovery will help scientists trying to develop an AIDS vaccine because they will now be able to test whether a potential vaccine has the abnity to create killer cells, as well as antibodies. "The vast majority of vaccine work has been in antibodies because that's what could be measured," he said. "Now we have the ability to measure both." Human trial:; on potential vaccines are expected to begin as early as the end of the year, the researchers said. Walker said it is too early to determine what role, if any, the cells may play in the development of a treatment or cure for acquired immune deficiency syn· drome. He said it is apparent the killer cells can not eradicate the AIDS virus entirely since it continues to replicate in people who get the disease. Schooley said the doctors will follow the eight study subjects, measuring the amount of killer cells they have and watching to see who develops the dis· ease. BETTER LAIDilS & QARDEilS Totcll lclwn mclintenclnce Commerctcll-Restdenticll • Lindscdpe • Tr<lsh RcmmMI • Ch1mnc4 Sweep • T rec Scnnce • Stump!> Removeu • C1 )mplcte Spnnkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Neighborhood Sports Spor ts News from Mo ntrose & Community Groups ••Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladders There are now 39 players participating in the Houston Tennis Club challenge ladders Although Andrew Wade is still No. 1. No 2 has really switched around. Mark Pack left for summer school and Ron Landrum stepped in to the slot 6-2, 6-2 over Rick Hadnot last month and then defended against Jim Bloome 6-2. 6-1. Last Sunday, July 19, Bart Hounsel took over No_ 2 7-5. 6-4 over Landrum. Ron Bell holds onto No. 4 with a challenge in progress and Rick Hadnot rounds out the top five In other action Rich Corder held onto No. 7 against the challenge of Mike Dowell. Mike Shelton held onto No. 10 by the score of 6-1. 6-2 against Bruce Willis Randy Lunsford held off new member Jesse Armenta 6-1, 6-2. Returning to the ladders.JV Klinger outlasted Jeff Barkman 6-4. 6-7, 7-6 for No. 3 on the B ladder Houston Tennis Club plays Sundays 9:00 am-noon. Wednesday nights 7:30-9:30 p_m end is now adding play on Friday nights 7:30-9 00 p.m. Cost is $4 for Sunday and $2 each Wednesday and Friday. Rich Corder. 524·2151. has more information about the group that mP.ets at Memorial Park Tennis Center .. Galleon Captures Regular Season Softball Title It was tough, but the Galleon won its first Montrose Softball League title in over five years last Sunday. July 19 Earlier in the day the Mining Company defeated Fitness 6-1 and Michael's 7-1 to put pressure on manager Gene Russo's club. After the Voice beat Michael's 10-7, the Galleon had their first test and almost lost the title The M1mng Company was one loss back, but had beaten the Gal leon twooutofthreetimes which meant that one loss m two rematn1ng games would move the Galleon to second place They edged by the Voice 7-6 in extra mnmgs The MSL playoffs will be held the next two weeks The winner of the playoffs will represent Houston in the Gay World Series in San Francisco next month. The Galleon goes m as a favorite, but upsets can happen The games have moved to Tim Hearn Field (Waugh and Memorial on Jackson Hill by the H.C.C. Building). They begmSundayat 4:00 p.m. with Michael's taking on the Voice. At 5:00 Fitness plays Mecca At 6:00 the Galleon plays the winner of Game 1andat7:00the Mining Company plays the winner of Game 2. Two games will follow at 6:00 and 9:00with earlier games determining the playing teams To help offset expenses to the men·s and women's teams representing Houston in the world series, a fundraiser will be held at Kindred Spirits on July 31 ••• DEAR MEMBERS: Because of recent illegal actions perpetrated by Houston Police officers, the Organization of J.0.E. will not be meeting for a short time. Continue to "Play Safe" JULY 24, 1987 'MONTROSE VOICE 13 NOW President-Elect Comes Out Swinging By Joe B. Warrick FOR THE MONTROSE YOIC£ PHILADELPHIA (UPl)-Molly Yard's e]ection as president of the National Organization for Women is an indica­tion the group will keep its focus on fighting Reagan administration poJi­cies and pushing for the Equal Rights Amendment. Yard, who was elected last weekend to replace Eleanor Smeal, said the first item on her agenda is to oppose the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork, the federal appeals judge who she called a "neanderthal" on women's issues, particularly abortion and birth control. At a news conference Sunday con­cluding NOW's convention, Yard also pledged to put ell the organization's force behind the potential presidential candidacy of Rep. Patricia Schroeder, D·Colo. Yard, who was opposed by NOW members who favor working at lower levels for their goals, said NOW's 150,000 members will be "out in the streets and also in the courts" to work against Reagan administration policies in general and the Bork nomination in particular. "We are fighting mad on this issue and we are not going to al1ow it to con­tinue," said Yard, a diminutive, tough­talking grandmother raised in Ligonier, Pa., who is described as being in her mid-70s. 0 Bork is a neanderthal," she said. "We aren't going to stand for having someone on the Supreme Court who wants to reverse Roe vs. Wade," the high court decision in 1973 that legal­ized abortion. Another priority for NOW members would be to support Schroeder, who is considering a bid to become the nation's first woman president, Yard said. Schroeder was given a thunderous ovation when she addressed NOW con­vention delegates Saturday. The group immediately raised more than $351,000 in pledges for her candidacy, enough for her to become eligible for federal match· ing funds. "We are going to keep saying to Rep. Schroeder, 'Run, Pat, run,"' until she decides to formally enter the race, Yard said. Remarking on the obvious absence of other presidential candidates at the con· ference, Yard said, "We didn't invite any other candidates. We didn't see them as addressing any of our concerns. "We never came anywhere near rais­ing as much money for anyone as we did for Pat Schroeder," Yard said. "It says volumes about where NOW's hearts and minds are." The election of Yard, NOW's former political director and Smeal's person­ally chosen successor, was not without controversy. Her opponent, Noreen Connell, a labor organizer and presi­dent of the New York NOW chapter, had many supporters including NOW's first president, Betty Friedan. Conne1t's camp has differed with Smeal and Yard on tactics and strate­gies for achieving goals thev hnth share. Connell's supporters have criticized Smeal for devoting most of NOW's resources to the ERA fight and for focus­ing on anti-feminist symbols such as the Rev. Jerry Falwell and the pope, while ignoring issues like affordable child care, pay equity and what Connell sees as the real culprits-the courts, local and state governments and corpo­rat~ ons. Y ard'e 2-1 ratio in the vote was des­cribed as a resounding endorsement of Smeal's efforts to thrust abortion rights and an equal rights amendment to the U.S. Constitution into the forefront of national debate. "It was a vote of confidence in the direction we all set out in four years Women's Groups Call for Demonstrations Against Pope By David E. Anderson UPI Religion Writer F• THEMONTR< \'l WASHINGTON (UP!)-A coalition of two dozen women's issues groups ca11ed Thursday for a series of demonstra tions, possibly including civil disobe­dience, at the Vatican embassy before the September U.S. visit of Pope John Paul II Five organized demonstrations are to begin Aug. 26, Women's Equality Day, and to continue at the embassy in Washington until Sept. 9, the eve of John Paul's arrival in Miami for a JO. day nationwide visit. "No group of U.S. citizens has more reason for concern about Vatican poli­cies than women," declared the ad hoc Papnl Visit Coalition, theprotestorgan· izer "Both Catholic and non·Catholic women have been and continue to be seriously and negatively affected by Vatican positions and efforts to influ­ence U.S. public policy," the coalition of two dozen groups said in prepared remarks According to protest leaders, the dem­onstrations will call attention "to spe­cific Vatican violations of women's rights, particularly opposition to the ordination of women, to the Equal Rights Aml'ndment, to choice in child­bearing and childrearing and to gay and lesbian rights." "In nil these instances," the coalition declared, "the rights of women to be treated ns full persons under both church and secular laws have been vio­lated repeatedly by the institutional church." Organizers said the protests, modeled on non-violent demonstrations at the South African embassy, will include efforts to deliver "tangible messages'' to the doori,; of the Vatican facility-which could lead to arrests, depending on the response of Vatican Ambassador Pio Laghi. Frances Kissling, director of Cathol­ics for a Free Choice, another principal organizer of the demonstrations, said the pope's visit "has had at least one positive outcome" in that it has "mobil· ized women to join together ... against Vatican attempts to oppress all women." In stark contrast to John Paul's warm reception in 1979, when he visited the Northeast and the Midwest, the Sep­tember trip olready is marked by con­troversy such as a threat by Jewish organizations to cnncel a meeting in Miami between the pontiff and top Jew­ish leaders. Demonstrations at the Vatican embassy, which the pope will not visit during hi!'! SepL 10-19 voyage, are expected to set the stage for other pro­tests by a variety of groups, including gay organizations, in the nine citie~ ago," said Smeal. who served as presi­dent of NOW for seven of the past 10 years and decided not to run for re­election. Yard promised to continue the ERA fight when she officially assumes the presidency on Aug. 18. She said she also planned to organize demonstrations outside the Vatican's embassy in Washington because NOW "doesn't want to be told by the pope about birth control and abortion." Yard, a national NOW officer since 1978, was the third daughter of Metho­dist missionaries to China, a country, she said, where "having three daugh­ters and no sons was almost a fate worst than death . Women had no value." that will welcome John Paul. The International Federation of Flight Attendants, meanwhile, locked in a bitter dispute with Trans World Air­lines, also has vowed demonstrations to protest the Roman Catholic Church's decision to charter TWA for the visit. On the con~ervative side, some anti­abortion activists have pledged efforts to make the papal event "abortion free," suggesting they will try to shut down clinics and other facilities that perform abortions in the cities he visits. Among the groups included in the coalition are Catholics for a Free Cho­ice; Catholics for the ERA; Chicago Catholic Women: the National Organi­zation for Women; National Abortion Rights Action League; National Abor· hon Federation; National Assembly of Women Religious; National Coalition of American Nuns; Religious Coalition for Abortion Rights and the Women's Ordi· nation Conference. 14 MONTROSE VOICE JULY 24. 1987 Life Goes On for Bobbie Montgomery By Steven Watsky f OR T'1E MON Al r VOICE SLlllELL. La. IUPl>-Bobbie Lea Montgomery, a private investigator and handicapped transsexual mother who once ran for mayor, says the annul· ment of her marriage from the man she met by CB radio will be just another chapter in her hook. "Wanting 1t All." ''I'm going to finish the book. "Want­ing it All,'• said Montgomery. "I'm going to put in a chapter on him Cher husband ''See, the book started with me coming out of the hospital "1th my baby and ii went hack to where my mother was com· inl{ out of the hospital Y.'ith me. But now I want to put m the part about my hut;· band" ~ontl{omery, confined to a wheel­chair bv a brittle bone disease, said she found ·out her husband had never divorced hi8 first wife. "For the last several years I have been a private investigator. I was in Houston doing research on another case when I found the papers" showing he had never filed for divorce, she said. 1.Joyd Walters. Montgomery's attor· ney_ confirmed he had filed annulment papers in a state d;strict court the first week of July Montgomery said most of her investi· gation work involves researching docu· ments in courthouses and very little surveillance. She met her husband about a year after having the sex change operation at the Univeri;ity of Texas in 1978. ·we originally met on the CB radio. My handle was the Bionic Woman can you tell mt' a better handle? I was driv· mg on the loop in Houston and he came on the radio and tried to talk to me," Montgomery said. "He followed me around the loop and we ended up getting married ~even days later." Montgomery said she told her hus­band the night they met she was a tran&exual, and "it didn't bother him." She tried to tell her future in-laws, but they did not want to hear about it. ''They told me my mother-in-law fainted when she read about me and my baby in the (National) Enquirer," she said. A year after the marriage, the couple decided they wanted a child, so they approached Dottie Powers-Bobbie Montgomery's sister-to act as a sum> gate mother. Stuart "Scooter" Montgomery was born in 1981 and was given to the Mont· gomerys while surrogate mother and child were still in the hospital, she says. The birth of Scooter was believed to be the first time a transsexual had partici­pated in a surrogate arrangement. Before the sex change, Montgomery was married twice as a male. In 1963, then Robert Bennett married a woman who died of a brain clot three years later. Bennett married again two years later. but "it only lasted three days." Bobbie Lea said she realized in 1968 she had a sexual identity problem and started the long process of hormone treatments-made more complicated by the fact she suffers from osteoporosis imperfects. a condition that causes bonei; to easily break She has been con· The Montrose Voice It's The Place to Advertise fined to a wheelchair for years "To me, I've lived two lives already­my ·other life' was normal (as a man1. Now this life is quite normal, too. T don't com hinP the two . ., mayor of Slidell in 1986. She dropped out of the race after learning her non­profit organization could not sponsor a political candidate. She said she moved Scooter and her two chihuahuas hack home to Slidell, where she moved into her sister's trailer behind a dii.;count store Her scrapbc1ok is filled with pictun·s and awards she has received as an acti· vist for the handicapped. Those activities led her to run for After the ahorted run at the mayor's job, tht· family moved to Houston. It was there she learned of her husband's alleged failure to legally divorce his first wife. rr the annulment is granted, she says i;he will finish her book, consider an offer to have a film made of her life and continue her work as a private investi­gator. We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice We're the people you reach when you ndverti!ie in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of tht• Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on th(' things we buy-clothes, partying at night, apartments, curs nnd repair. hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's S6 million weekly.) ~t something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe ull you have to do is usk-by advertising lo us through our newspaper The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 lor ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY He-res N>W "'' 1~, red lh< loqurn Bau d•Strlb.1!•CW1 10000 te>P•tt f11dlJ" ~50CICI tOP.H Tu.sdaJ" 1.....-oor1.,1y suspended I Assumed PIH Oil Ill• f1.-1or '11 Thus Hlor!'ll!l'O S~fs":::..,a~o;..:~:"~:Z: •.::--~•:,.:;•:;!!;,',~:,~ •:=• ;;~;•003-:=~ L>I •P9ft0• TH(Sf. FIGURES ~VE BEE~ ADJUSTED FROM EA Al of A PV9LoSHlO ft0UAfSWHICl1 HAO ALSO AffLECTEO THE TU(SOAY E01TION THESE flCUflES AUUCT Of'll Y THE ,AIOA'f' (01fl0N PTL Sacks Bakkers' Maid JULY 24, 1987 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 million and income was $4.2 million, including unpredictable donations from viewers. By Doug Mauldin F~TH MIJNTPI'. COLUMBIA, S.C (UPl)-PTL's chief operating officer told creditors Wednes­day the bankrupt ministry is slowly climhing out of its financial hole through severC' cutbacks-such as the dismissal this week of Jim and Tammy Faye Bakker's housemaid. Harry Hargrave, appearing before a gathering of about 100 creditors and contributors in a movie theater, said the ministry was losing $3 million a month when the Rev. Jerry Falwell put him in charge in March and it is at the break­even point now "We think in a few months we will have a positive cash flow to stop that drain," he said. Hargrave said there are plans afoot for incremiing revenue at PTL's lavish Heritage USA resort, including estab­lishment of a tum-of-the-century farm­Farmland USA-to which there will be an admission fee, charges for tent revi · vals and gospel sings and $5 per car for tourists who come to see the dazzling display of lights at the Christmastime. Hargrave, a Dal1as businessman, said he had cut expenses by $1.5 million a month, largely through the dismissal of 230 employees. Among them, he revealed, was an unidentified house­maid assigned to the Bakkers, the dis­graced founders of the ministry. The maid, he said, had been retained at Falwel1's instruction until this week. It was not immediately clear where the maid waHorwhy Falwell kept heron the payroll so long, Hargrave outlined the ministry's financial woes without launching any vE>rhal assault on the Bakkers. There was no immediate comment on the financial report mentioned in Wednes­day 's Washington Post, which said the Bakkers had drawn $792,000 in total compensation from the ministry in the two and a half months before they left. Among those at the meeting were attorneyR and representatives of the PTL Partners Association, a group of dissident "partners" who claim that they bought into the ministry with con­tributions of $1,000 and more in return for guarantees of three free nights a year at the ministry's hotel. They are seeking a say in the running of the ministry. Hargrave said PTL will present the bankruptcy court within the next few weeks a plan to deal with these lifetime partners "with integrity and equity and acceptable to everybody. The partners have been our main support-the life.­line of PTL. However, we can't continue the negative cash flow we have today." Falwell has said that if the court for· ces PTL to recognize the partners as creditors and to honor the promises of lifetime timesharing at the hotel, it will quadruple the ministry's debt and force it to shut down. Bakker resigned from the ministry and the Assemblies of God church in March, when he was confronted with evidence the PTL had been paying one­time church secretary Jessica Hahn to remain silent about a sexual encounter with Bakker seven years ago. Bakker handed the ministry over to Falwell, who has since refused to give it back. It went into fi1ed for protection on Chapter 11 last month. Attorney Ryan Hovis, hired by the Bakkers to try to get them established as creditors of PTL, attempted Wednes­day to link Hargrave's PTL operations WE'RE ON THE CURVE. and Falwell's "Old Time Gospel Hour." Followers of the Bakkers have charged that Falwell is usingPTLto build up his own operations. Hovis asked Hargrave about use of a PTL mailing list by Falwell's Lynch· burg, Va., operation. Hargrave replied that PTL was too broke in May to finance a direct mail campaign, so "The Old Time Gospel Hour" handled it. "I assure you that Jerry Falwell did a mailing for us and we've repaid him for the exact cost of the mailing," Hargrave said "These ministries are soliciting by mail, and doesn't that make them com­peting businesses, competing for the same source of funds?" Hovis asked? "No, that is not the case," Hargrave said. "To my knowledge there is no com­petition ." But Hovis said, "I don't think the stockholders of Chrysler would want Lee Ioccoca running General Motors also." Hargrave said when he took over PTL for Falwell the ministry had only $88,000 in cash-in almost 50 checking accounts. "We found $8 million in debt to televi­sion stations," he said. "Most accounts were in arrears. There was very little cash, and we were overdrawn at banks. We were in a total state of disarray. Financial demands were being made that we didn't have the cash assets to meet. "We had $88,000 in the bank when I arrived," Hargrave said. "We had $8 million in debt to pay and we couldn 'tdo it. We were forced into the situation of filing for Chapter 11." He said when Falwell brought him in the PTL's monthly expenses were $6.7 "There was a negative cash flow when I walked in thedoorof$3million a month," he said. But now "our monthly expenses are at 4.5 million. We are at a break-even point n(1w in operations." German Court Finds Man Guilty of Attempted Manslaughter MUNICH West Germany UPl)-A German court ruled Mondav that a man who has i:;exual relation with a woman although he knows he has AIDS is guilty of attempted manslaughter. The court convicted a 26-year-old Tun­isian sufferinfr from acquired immune deficiency syndrome of raping a 23- year-old Moroccan woman, but sent him to a psychiatric hospital instead of pri­son because a medical report said he had a schizoprenic psychosis. According to evidence given at the nine-day trial, the man, identified as Mohsen Ch, not only raped the Moroc­can woman, but had sexual relations without using a condom with five other women and had infected a 20-year-old girlfriend with AIDS. The court ruled that a man who knows he has AIDS and does not inform a partner of it is guilty of attempted manslaughter. Prosecutor Albert Dumler said the defendant had been informed in 1985 that he had AIDS and in more than a dozen visits to the Munich Polyclinic he had been warned ofthedangerofinfect­ing his partners. SALES RENTAL 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24, 1987 Columbia Has a Hit with 'La Bamba' Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice o La Bamba Columbia Pictures' La Bamba is, both historically and artisitically, a very interesting show. This is the story of Ritchie V alens. Not everyone realized when he was alive that this teenage rock singer was Hispanic. His manager changed the lad's name from Valenzuela just so that would happen. He needed to be a popu­lar crossover singer in a time that knew even more racial prejudice than we, unfortunately, still have with us today. That iH shown in the film when his Anglo girlfriend's father forbids him to see her. So he writes her a song, "Donna," that becomes his second hit, and sings it mournfully to her over a pay phone. Though we are both fiercely proud of our heritage, Ritchie was no more Mexi· can than I am Irish. Neither of us can speak the language of our ancestors. When he had a hit with La Bamba, somebody had to teach him the words phonetically. He was purely American and the son of a veteran. Esai Morales stars as Bob (right), who has a hard time dealing with the success of his half-brother, Ritchie Valens (Lou Diamond Phillips) in "La Bamba" about big band musicians, i.e., The Five Pennies, The Glen Miller Story and even A Star is &rn (the Garland remake). teeters on the brink of out and out alcoh­olism. Understandably, he really res­ents all of the attention given his brother. Underneath, though, he loves Ritchie. One night, spurned by his wife (Eliza­beth Pena), he even proposes a sexual union with his brother. But he has really hurt Ritchie by that time and there's no way the boy can respond favorably. The major focus of the film is on their close relationship. There's litte surprise, though, when they do finally reconcile. Sadly, that happens just before Ritchie goes on that fatal plane trip with Buddy Holly and the Big Bopper. Anticipation of that ride is used we11 throughout the film to color all of the proceedings. Although the script seems at times to be moving slowly, it is always bounding ahead with slashing speed towards that moment. Although, not arising from an inherent character flaw, I cannot label it a tragedy in the dramatic sense of the word, it is a great and sorrowful pity. Lou Diamond Phillips, in the title role. gives a performance that should be remembered at Oscar time. Using very subtle details he delineates several changes in Ritchie's character without the script having to hit us over the head with them. This one easily merits three, maybe three and a half, stars. o Nadine Nadine has got to be one of the worst films out this year. I really have a lot of respect for the stars, Jeff Bridges and Kim Basinger. And the supporting cast is headed by Gwen Verdon and Rip Torn. Enough said. Quality, right? They all do a great job, accomplishing what they were asked to do. The movie is as interesting as they could make it. In this case, though, that only means that I did not run screaming from the theater. Someone tried to combine two genres here that just do not mix. One is the gritty realism of a small Texas town ala The Last Picture Show. The other is a caper comedy, sort of like a "Dukes of Hazard" episode. It would do much better with a laugh track. Then you could at least feel like someone was enjoying it even if you weren't. Only one out of four stars for this one. o Incoming Attractions La Bamba and Dead End Kids open. Deutl in the Flesh is an Italian philoso­phical romance that contains one scene that I'm sure will be talked about, in which there is an obviously unfaked bit of felatio. In Superman IV; Quest for Peace, Lex Luthor and 1..Dis Lane are back. Guess which one is threatening to trigger a nuclear war. And on the limited run scene: Huang Tu Di (Yellow Earth) (M.F.A., 24 & 25)-a soldier collecting folk songs tries to prevent a 14-year-old girl's arranged marriage I Was a Male War Bride; My Favorite Wife (Rice Media Center, 24)-featuring a long sequence with Cary Grant in drag. Hail Mary (Rice M.C., 25)-This film was denounced by the Pope and has attracted picketing protest.ors wherever it goes. But it was also the winner of the International Catholic Cinema Award and has prompted one critic, David Denby, to call it "oneofthemostradiant and tenderly religious movies ever made." Director Jean-Luc Godard has examined the Virgin Birth in contem· porary terms with the BVM a basketball-playing gas station attend­ant. Ma and Pa Kettle Go to Town (The Orange Show, 25)-Bring a covered side dish and you'll get in free for the movie, live C&W music and a wonderful Spam en tree Kim Basinger and Jeff Bridges star in Nadine This is the first major release by an American film company in a long time that's been aimed at American­Hispanics. You can bet your bottom dol­lar that it's hardly the last. There are surely many counties in the border states where these people are a "minor­ity" only in name. It's very important not only that there should be entertain­ment manufactured for them but also that the rest of us should enjoy it as we11. These films will not always be as good as this first one, of course. But, when they are, they can help us understand new friends and allies in the struggle for rights for all. The 50's rock is still very, very dance­able! But the visuals that go with it here, though great. are not contemporary. This does not feel, as some films have, like a serieo of MTV videos loosely con nected by a thin thread of plot. Instead, it will remind you of those old bio pies The gritty realism of the opening seg­ment. a taste of Valenzuela's famiJy's life as migrant pickers, is very reminis­cent of The Grapes of Wrath. But unlike the Jodes. the Valenzuelas do not stay downtrodden. First. son Bob (Esai Morales) returns from jail and is able to move the family into the slums of a small town. Then Ritchie is able to hit it big with his music and move them to a nice house in a better part of the sub· urbs. In the light of Ritchie's larger and more legal success, Bob's accomplish· ments get fairly ignored. He is a much rougher, chauvinistic man with adrink­mg problem. At one point he tries to tum over a new leaf and become an artist-a cartoonist. But by then it is too late. The mother (Rm:1ana De Soto) has her hands full trying to push Ritchie's career. Bob Lois Lane (Margot Kidder. rrght) lntroduus her hero Superman 1s not goal-oriented enough to keep him- (Christopher Reeve) to lacy Warfield (Mariel Hemingway) the daughter of 8elf on track without firm guidance and the new ou·ner of The Daily Planet in "Superman JV; The Quest for Peace" JULY 24, 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 HELL TEXA CALL NOW AND TALK TO OTHER HOT DUDES-LIVE! DALLAS (214) 976 3833 HOUSTON (713) • Dial Dude is here. Connect with other guys for hot times. Here's how it works: Call (214/713) 976-3833 and hook up with as many as eight hunky Texas guys. You can talk or just listen and stay on the line up to three minutes. Whether you want to meet new guys, explore your fantasies or just listen ... Dial Dude is for you. Dial (214/713) 976-DUDE A service charge of $2.00 + toll It any. No credit cards ire necessary. You must IJe 18 ye1rs of 1ge lo call. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24, 1987 Worley Runs Away with 'Gypsy' jold, Peter Jennings, Sigmund Rom­berg. 30-Arnold Schwartzenegger, Emily Bronte, Kate Bush. Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Vo;ce You have only two more chances­tonight (Friday) and tomorrow-to see Theater Under the Stars' production of Gypsy. Curtain is at 8:30. Go to Miller Theater immediately! You can read the rest of the review in the car on the way there. the show will doubt that the overall effect is worth a Jittle waiting towards the beginning of the show, but, back on the hillside, the first act energy comes through rather faintly. Boy, can Michael Tapley tap! That young man is phenomenal as Tulsa. Diane Denson Tobola, Marijo Pound and Christine Miller do "You Gotta Burlesque queens Mazeppa (Marijo Pound). Electra (Christine Miller) and Tessie Tura (Djane Tobola) strut their stuff in "You Gotta Have a Gimmick" in Theatre Under the Stars production of "Gypsy" at Miller Outdoor Theatre But don't expect to get home before midnight. Although director Frank M. Young has cut at least one interesting but not crucial scene, the show is long by today's standards. It certainly doesn't feel that way while you're watching it. The show zaps from one dynamite musical number to another even better one all evening with very :ittle let-up for dialogue in between. The lyrics are by Stephen Sondheim; the music by Jule Styne. If you don't know at least four of these songs well enough to sing along, you really need to see this show If you do sing along softly, chances are your neighbors won't bop you . After all, the tickets are free and nearly everyone's brought along some wine or a ~x pack anyway. If you've never been to Miller Theater some suggestions are in order. First, tickets to the covered seating are avails· ble free at the theater in Hermann Park or the downtown Showtix booth from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. the day of the per­formance only. But if you don't mind daring the rain. it's more fun to sit on the hillside to watch. Lawn chairs on the left side only, please. Bring a picnic and come at least an hour early for the best seats. Binoculars are handy for see­ing facial expressions. Wherever you sit, don't forget your insect repeHent! Jo Anne Worley won an important award for her performance of Mama Rose out in California. I'll lay even odds it was in a much smaller, indoor theater. She is super-fantastic in the second act. Several factors keep her scaled down a little too small in the first act. First, this role is very demanding. She sings prac· tically every number. If she sang every number all out as many nights in a row as they're doing this show, she'd never sing again. Unletis her name really was Merman. Secondly, Worley is an "actress," not a "~tar-" By which I mean that she sub­ordinates herself to the role, making Mama Rose really come to life, rather than subordinating the role to her own talents. making Marna Rose a vehicle for showing herself off. No one who has seen Worley do Roties' Turn at the end of Have a Gimmick." Those are the same three who did it the last time TUTS staged it in 1981. They are nothing short of magnificent. And the rest of the sup- Barbara Sims (Roberta) and Richard Johnson (Danny) portray one of the powerful moments in Stages Repertory Theatre's production of "Danny and the Deep Blue Sea" porting cast much more than holds its own! Please don't blame me if you miss this show. Short notice reviews like this are a necetoisity when the show of'lly runs two weeks. o Notes Producer/ director Paul Randolph· Johnson hopes the crowds at Rocke­fellers for "The Rocky Horror Show" don't get too rowdy. "Remember our actors are live and well-and we want to keep them that way!" Gulp (the gay beach musical) is doing so well that it will be held over for another week, til August 4. You can catch this really silly show Mondays and Tuesdays at Kindred Spirits, and I suggest that you do! Norma's 5611 now has piano bar entertainment on Wednesday night for the ladies. Norma tells me if enough men start showing up on Thursday nights, we'll get to sing along, too! A new archives has been opened at the downtown library dedicated to the historical preHervation of Texas Jazz! Writers and artists: Evergreen Chron· icles is a· quarterly magazine that pub­lishes prose, poetry and black and white graphics by gays and lesbians. For further info, send tham a SASE to P.O. Box 6260, Minnehaha Station, Minnea polis. MN 55406-6260. "When you prevent me from doing anything I want to do, that is persecu­tion; but when I prevent you from doing anything you want to do that is law, order and morals." -George Bernard Shaw (born July 26) o Openings Hay Feuer (Actors Workshop, 24)-Noel Coward's comedy about sexual flirta­tions at a family's country home Laini Kuumba Ngoma Dance Troupe (Our Park, 24, 2:00 p.m.)-Freebies. ONQI Love Rides the Rail (Theater Subur­bia, 24)-Mellerdrammer' Cheer the hero. Hiss the villain . Popcorn throwing optional Lust Under Magnolias, or, They Were Married by Candlelight But It Only Lasted a Wick (Theater Southwest, 24)-This summer mellerdrammer is a full-blown musical comedy by Joe McHale. Madonna! (Astrodome, 24)-with Level 42 and a massive set. ONO! Raul Martinez, Chuck Montgomery, Jeff Sweeney (Comix Annex, 24 & 25)­stand- ups Spyro Gyra °(Tower, 24)-Breakout. The original stage production of "The Rocky Horror Show" is at Rockefeller's July 23-August 2 o Celebrate! July 24, 1984-Yanessa Williams is forced to abdicate her Miss America crown after posed photographs were printed showing her enjoying a lesbian interlude. Sometimes, as at an Irish wake, we celebrate things to help us remember not to let them happen again. B'days: 24-Ruth Buzzi, Amelia Ear hart, Alexandre Dumas. 25--Al Car· mines, Walter Brennan, Donna Theodore. 26-Jafo;on Robards, Gracie Allen , Blake Edward•. 27-Rev. Troy Perry. Peggy Fleming, Bobbie Gentry. 28-John Ashberry, Sally Struthers, Georgia Engel. 29-Dag Hammarsk· ONO! Vivaldi's The Four Season (Jones, 24)-HSO ONO! Quest for Entemity Family Day (MFA, 25, 9-5)-inrluding The Golden Jade Dancers, Cookie Joe's Asian American Dane<> Company and clay art workshops. ONO! Amadeus answ£'r8 Salieri (Jones, 2.5, part one at6, part 2 at 8)-H .S.O. special event! ONO! Al Jarreau (Music Hall, 2.'i)-L is for Lover. ONO! Stop Along the Way (Munchies Coffe­shop, 26)-stagOO reading of a new work by Houstonian David Campbell. Panda Monium Players. Freebies. ONO! David Cult (standing) and Jerry Harmon in "Lust Under the Magnolias" at Theater Southwest Saturday Night Live! (Music Hall, 29)-with Dana Carvey, Dennis Miller and Kevin Nealon. ONO! Schubert's Unfi nished and Beethov· en's Emperor (Jones, 29)-H.S.0. ONO! Ann Holmes (University of St. Tho· mas Bookstore, 30)-0NO! Mozart and Beethoven with Jeremy Menuhin and Sergiu Luca (Wortham, 20}-H.S.0. ONO! True Wit (1600 Smith lobby galler, 30)-visual puns, incongruities and whimsical motifs by contemporary Texas artists. Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek a date, an adventure, an encounter Send o message for all to see to someone you love Advertise your secret fantasy TO PLACE A 'PERSONAL' IN THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE, JUST CALL 529-8490 People By William C. Trott United Press International !<OR THE MONTR< 'f V• :E QUESTIONS ABOUT MAILER: Writer Norman Mailer says authorities are try­ing to drag him into a drug smuggling case. Mailer is in seclusion in Cape Cod, Mass., but said through attorney Ivan Fisher that unduly harsh sentences were given to his friends Richard Strat· ton, an author, and Bernard Farber, an editor, becauise of their association with him. They were convicted in 1984 of smuggling 7 1htons of hashish and sour· ces told the New York Daily News there is still a question of whether Mailer helped finance the deal and whether he perjured himself during the trial. Far· bar faces six years in prison and Strat­ton faces a 10-year term. Farber supports Mailer's contention that he wasn't in on the deal but the trial record says a government informer taped a conversation in which Farbar says Mailer was repaid his investment but made no profit. BOYS NOT SO BEASTLY: The Beastie Boys made it out of Memphis, Tenn., without getting arrested. The audience at the rap group's show last Sunday night included City Councilman Jimmy Moore, who was waiting for a chance to have the Beasties arrested for violating obscenity laws. The boys played Mem­phis four months ago and, as usual, created a stir but they toned down the act this time, leaving the nearly naked dancers and 20-foot sex organ at home. Moore said he still thought the Boys were crude and profane but not legally obscene. Some of the fans were disap­pointed. "I expected a little more vulgar­ity," said Steven Ward, 17. "I'm disappointed. It's the only reason I came, because I heard how wild the last concert was." STONE ROLLS AWAY BUT THEY MAY GATHER: The future of the Rolling Stones doesn't seem as shaky as it did a few months ago-even though Keith Richards has signed a deal that will make him a Stone alone. Richards, who has never been happy about Mick Jagger's solo projects, signed a long­term, multi-album deal with Virgin Records that some sources say is worth millions. Richards and fellow Stone Ron Wood went to the Lone Star Cafe in New York last week to celebrate Keith's record deal and catch country rocker Joe Ely. Richards heads for the studio in the fall but a new conciliatory attitude recently developed among the band. Jagger reportedly plans to rejoin the group after finishing a tour to promote his second solo album, "Primitive Cool," which is being pointed for a Sep­tember release. The Jagger tour starts in Hamburg, West Germany, in late August, and will feature guitarists Jeff Beck and G.E. Smith, head of the "Sat­urday Night Live" band. 'FAWN' FAIRCHILD SEEING HEARING: Morgan Fairchild, who would be a good candidate to play Fawn Hall when someone makes the lrangate movie, dropped in on Tuesday's session of the Iran-Contra inquisition, taking a prime front-row seat with another actress, Shelly Duvall, and Kim Cranston, son of Sen. Alan Cranston, D·Calif. Fair­child looked a bit bored as former national security adviser John Poindex­ter droned on but said she had been "enjoying the hearings very much" and "been watching them every day in L.A." The hearings also have attracted Kirk Douglas and Ellen Burstyn. Fairchild and Duvall are in Washington to testify on the California Desert Protection Act, a bill sponsored by Sen. Cranston to create 7.5 million acres of new wilder­ness and parks in the California desert. JULY 24. '987 /MONTROSE VOICE 19 BROADWAY BOUND: Singer Julie Wil· son, opening a month-long run in Dal­las, says she recently spent six weeks in New York participating in workshop rehearsals for a new Peter Allen musi­cal, "Legs Diamond." The book for the musical, which hopes to make it to Broadway, is being "doctored" by Har· vey Fierstein of "Torch Song Trilogy" and "La Cage Aux Folles" fame. Wilson plays the part of Flo, who runs a spea­keasy. "She's the old broad who's been around the block several times. I have a good, gutsy torch song," she says." There's no word yet on when the musi­cal might open. HUSTONS MASSING FOR MOVIE: The movie "Mr. North" ·will have nothing to do with Oliver but a lot to do with the Huston family. John Huston and daughter Anjelica will appear in the film, an adaption of the Thornton Wilder novel "Theophilus North," and his son, Daniel, will direct. "John directed his father, Walter, in 'The Trea­sure of the Sierra Madre' and both received Oscars," said co-producer Steven Haft. "We look on this as carry­ing on a tradition of filmmaking in the family." Anthony Edwards from "Top Gun" will star and Lauren Bacall and Harry Dean Stanton are in the support­ing cast. Filming begins in Newport, R.L, on July 27 and the movie is expected to be released next spring. RETURN TO SCENE OF THE CRIME: David Crosby was arrested the last time he played Dallas and he wasn't giving interviews as he prepared for his profes­sional return to the city last Saturday night with Crosby, Stills and Nash. "He's working on a book and I guess he wants to save it a11 for that," said a publicist. Crosby hit bottom four years ago when he was arrested in his dress­ing room at a Dallas nightclub on charges of possessing cocaine and an illegal weapon. He ended up spending several months in the Huntsville prison and now says he is drug-free. WHITE HOUSE COOKING: A Dallas chef says he put the White House on the back burner. Dean Fearing, executive chef at The Mansion on Turtle Creek, says he turned down an offer to inter­view with first lady Nancy Reagan for the job of White House executive chef. "It was a great situation but I just had to tell 'em I'd catch 'em next time," Fear­ing said. "I had to bow out gracefully because I've just got something I want to do and finish at The Mansion and I just didn't feel it was my time to go." Henry Haller, the current White House chef, will retire in October. Fearing is one of the country's foremost practition­ers of American and Southwestern cui­sine and his first book, "The Mansion on Turtle Creek Cookbook with Dean Fearing," is coming out in September. 99 FAWN AND GAMES: There was a Fawn Hall alert in San Diego during the wee­kend but the world may never know if she was really there. Word started fly­ing among the media that Hall, who made history by helping boss Oliver North shred papers in the Iran-Contra scandal, would attend the change-of­command ceremony aboard the cruiser USS Leahy at San Diego's 32nd Street Naval Station. The public affairs office at the Navy's Pacific Fleet Surface For­ces headquarters was bombarded with requests for passes to attend what nor­mally is a routine ceremony. As the number of reporters grew, the officers in charge of the ceremony decided to close the whole thing off. Was Fawn there on the rain·slickened deck of the Leahy? "I don't know," said a spokesman. "I didn't ask." BOWIE, TINA IN PEPSI GENERATION: David Bowie and Tina Turner are shil-ling for soda pop now and their Pepsi commercial will have its debut showing Saturday on MTV, The spot, which was filmed in Amsrerdam, will hit the net­works two days later. It's set to the tune of Bowie's song "Modern Love" and is described by Pepsi as ua tale of computer-age love." Bowie and Turner also will begin separate, Pepsi­sponsored tours in the next month. JOAN RIVERS SQUARED: It's not as prestigious as having your own late­night talk show. butJoan Rivers is mov­ing into the hallowed center square on the "Hollywood Squares" game show. The center square is the traditional comedy hot seat from where Paul Lynde held court until his death in 1982. "It requires an exceptional personality,'' said Scott Towle, president of Orion Tel· evision Syndication, which distributes the game show. "Joan Rivers is perfect for the job." Rivers, who was canned by the Fox Broadcasting Co. as hostess of the "Late Show" in May, will make her debut as a regular cast member on Sept. 14. AMY OUT AT BROWN?: Amy Carter may have been a little too busy with protests and sit-ins last semester. The Providence Journal quotes sources as saying that Amy, 19, the daughter of former President Jimmy Carter, has been dismissed from Brown University for academic reasons. A spokesman for the school refused to comment on the report out of respect for Amy's privacy but a classmate says she finds ithard to believe that Amy would have flunked out. "She's very perceptive," says Ali­son Buckser. "I've taken three or four classes with her and I find it very diffi­cult to believe that she would be dis­missed for academic reasons." Carter was ta.king classes in Native American literature, feminist frameworks, plant biology and linguistics but she was tied up much of the semester with a legal wra nglings. She was arrested in anti­ClA protest at the University of Massa­chusetts in Amherst with longtime radical Abbie Hoffman but they were acquitted of trespass charges. THE PEOPLE SPEAK: Elizabeth Taylor and Tom Selleck are the sexiest people around and fallen angel Jim Bakker is the least trusted. according to a survey of 1.000 People readers The magazine·s nmth annual poll shows that 41 percent of its respondents said they didn't trust Bakker and another evangelist. Jimmy Swaggart. was rated the second least trustworthy person along with Lt. Col. Oliver North. However, the poll was taken before North's captivating testimony on Capitol Hill. Taylor won the sexiest woman honor with strong support from female voters. finishing ahead of Linda Evans, Raquel Welch and Joan Collins, while Selleck outdistanced Paul New­man. Robert Redford and Don Johnson The survey also asked readers which American politician they would least likely to see in the nude. The winner; Ronald Reagan wit,h 37 percent BETTER THAN AN ALARM CLOCK: Israelis had the pleasure Tuesday of waking up to the sweet soulful sound of Tina Turner cooing "Boker tov, Israel"-Hebrew for "Good morning, Israel." "I'm Tina Turner," she said, "and I hope to see you Tuesday and on Wednesday." Turner is in the Holy Land to put on two shows in Tel Aviv and gladly helped out Israel's army radio, which tries to get a celebrity to give its wake-up call each day at 8 a.m. She arrived in Israel earlier this week and apparently still discombobulated by jet lag-woke up about 2 a.m. Tues­day and then rousted her bodyguards and agent to keep her company. After recording her good·moming greeting, Tina did a television interview and then went back to bed. 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24. 1987 So Many Parties, So Little Time "Soap" by the Staff of the Montrose Voice ls there any more room left in the date book? This is shaping up to be one of the biggest party weekends of the year. Things get underway Saturday night with the Gray Party and Bondage Dem­onstration at Chutes beginning at 9:00 p.m. What many consider the grand dame of them all, the Garden Party, gets underway at 3:00 p.m. Sunday at Mecca. Some will drop their dresses and don their denim for the annual Denim Party at the Brazos River Bottom, begin· ning at 7:00 p.m. For those who just want everyone to see that frock. an After the Garden Party Drag Show will be held at Chutes. A $100 first prize for the best number highlights this event which begins at 8:00 p.m. Sunday.. .... Happy belated birthday to Ron Sioux, Mark McClure, Walter Carter, David Abear and Jody Turner. Congratulations to T.G.R.A. winners of the Mock Rodeo Playday held last Sunday at Kindred Spirits. All around Cowgirl was Lisa M. and All Around Cowboy, Todd V. John Barton has returned from his trip to San Francisco with several new ideas for hairstyles from the Sassoon Academy. Terry Clark of The Barn received a Service Award from the International Gay Rodeo Association for his service as a T.G.RA. trustee from January 1984 until November 1986. Gary of The Pet Shop and Bird Clin ic has donated a $300 aquarium to The Outlaws to be given away during the drawing for the Acapulco trip on August 15. We understand that Walter and Till <BRB) have a new addition to the fam­ily. lt'a a new baby doll in its christen· ing dress given to Walter on his birthday from Vera. It's rumored that Miss Hardtung has made several recent trips to St. Ann's to , Fanny, of Mary's, and others at The Ripcord's "Blessing ?f the Bikes" pray for rain so he could get out of work once again. Some people will try any· thing. Garden Party "87 is Sunday at Mecca Sally's Liquor Bust begins at 4:00 p.m. Saturday and Sunday and Mary's is again having a Beer Bust this wee­kend. Mii;is A's Talent Search continues Sunday at 8:00 p.m. at Outlaws where last week's contest was a lot of fun. The August meeting of T.G.R.A. will be Au1n1st 2 at 3:00 p.m. at The Barn. Jessica Renee, Miss T.G.R.A. candi­date, will hold a Casino Night at Kindred Spirits on Thursday, July 30, benefitting the Montrose Counseling Cen ter . The tollowmg mght; July 31, the Montro•e Softball League along with the Hollywood Bears of the Women's Softball League converge on Spirits for the Second Annual Jocks in Dresses. A $5 cover will help send the Houston representatives to the 1987 Gay World Series of Softball in San Francisco. Rev. Gracie Lee announces that A Place in the Sun B-Zzarrio !Wsale Shop has re-opened at the corner of Grant and Fairview. Tax-Oeductibledonations will be sold to benefit the Place in the Sun Shelter. "Bring something and buy something," says Lee. The Original 611 Breakfast Club is having their First Annual Christmas in July Party Saturday, 10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. A toy for a tot benefits the Pediat­rics Unit at M.D. Anderson Hospital. Don Dowdon, bartender at 611, enjoys a drink at The Ranch ~Pl~y ~safe! Fortunes Capricorn Gets the Prize By Merk Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fflday erenmg. July 24. through Friday morning, July 31, 1987 ARIES-While it may seem as if your financial problems are over, this is not the time for any big purchases. You may be tempted to lavish gifts on that special someone you've been after Don't be fool­ish. Give what money can't buy instead TAURUS -How can you be dissatisfied when everything 1s going your way? Your mind and your body are both finding their needs met. but something hard to des­cribe keeps getting in the way. Sit down with a friend and figure this one out GEMINI -Someone as strong and determined as you are may force you to change your ways. The power of love and desire may overwhelm you and leave you wondering where you've been and where you're going. This is a powerful time; just try to keep part of you down to earth CANCER· -Somebody with a whole lot of fantasies may want you to fulfill a few of them. If you're up to 11, go ahead. but don't take any of it too seriously. This is strictly fun and games_ Be unbelievably absurd, but don't start believing it your­self LEO ·You have something important to say to someone in your life. but have no patience at all for a certain someone else But what 1f you all got together? It couldn't hurt. could it? As in-three heads and hearts are far better than one VIRGO -Advice and words of warning are hardly what you're after. But-if you don't control that sense of urgency that's flowing through you, you could fall off the deep end and land on your bottom Take it one fantasy and one excitement at a time. LIBRA ·Summer heat 1s bust1n' out all over. and you are right at the head of all the action. The leader takes his proper place and revels in the rightness of his pos1t1on. This 1s no act. This is you as you want to be, where you function best SCORPIO The excitement con­tinues You're blossoming. and you may be just too much for the shy and gentle ones Stick with those who have as much intensity and drive as you do' The heat of summer feels right. and hot is the word for your life SAGITTARIUS We don't mean to confuse you, but some of that control that you needed should now be toned down. Loosen up_ Bend with the wind a bit. Let your 1ntu1llon have a chance. Day by day, night by night, you'll get 11right1f you take some thoughtful chances CAPRICORN You get the prize, and you get the surprise. It was you who fig­ured 1t out. and you who worked it out You did 1t. Take some credit. Enjoy this time of reward and accomplishment, and don't confuse yourself any further. This 1s 11 AQUARIUS ·If you're one of those who have a hard time saying "I love you," this 1s the time to change your ways The ablltty to verbalize your warm and tender feelings is strong . Strong body. strong feelings, and words of love combine for a fine period for you and yours PISCES ·Anticipation can certainly lead to frustration unless you understand the value of wa1t1ng. Take this time to be good to yourself, to be with yourself Being your own best friend ts a cliche. but 1t works right now-·at least untll your best friend comes back •'917 MQNTAOS£ VO E We do our best to make this list as accurate as possible but there may be some errors. Call the bar or restaurant to confirm an event Always •The 611 75¢ draft beer premium liquor well .. .Pot Pie· Open •Charlte's Restaurant: Open •Sally's 25¢ draft •Mary's Pourmg doubles & 75C draft Delly •Spanish Flower Restaurant Lun­cheon special 11am-2pm •Chutes Frozen marganttas $1 noon-6pm thru July 31 •Bflar Parch. Happy hour noon­Bpm •Camp Closet Happy hour noon- 8pm •Galleon. Happy hour 2-Bpm •Venture-N Beer bust 4-10pm •Montrose Mining Co. : 3-in-1 happy hour 4-9pm •Mother's: Munchies 4-8pm •Club Romeo. Happy hour 5-9pm •Hun! Room: Happy hour 5-7pm live entertainment 6-8pm •JR. 's · 3-m-1 Happy Houropenmg- 10pm •The Outlaws: Happy hour 7am- 8pm •The 611 3-m-1 happy hour openmg-1 Opm. beer bust 4pm- 2am •Sally's $1 well when it rams •Sally's· Prycene·s $1 bloody marys lam Nightly •Norma's 5611 Club. Piano bar •Monfrose Mining Co -Beer busr 4- 10pm •Charlie's Restaurant. Dinner and m1dmte specials •Chutes: Frozen margaflttas $1.25 6pm-2am lhru July 31 •The 611: 30 minutes of lree well drinks & long necks •Mary's: Happy hour 11.30pm 12:30am. af,er-hours 2am-till •Rendezvous (Charlie's Club) After-hours 2am-hll Friday •Better Days Female dance review •EIJ's Beer bust 4pm-midnite and hot dogs 7-10pm •Club Romeo. TGfF party 5-9pm •Sally's Hank's TGIF party. buffet. happy hour •Chutes "Cruze Night'', Cuervo madness 6pm-2am. midnight buffet •J A 's: Pacific Coast Dancers 6- 9pm •Cousins Wm cash contest 6-'30pm •K.J.'s Liquor bust 7-11pm, $5 •The Barn: Steak night 7-9pm •Camp Closet Steak night 7pm •Heaven: 50¢ well, after-hours, cover •Mecca 50¢ well drinks. after­hours, cover •Bacchus- Omega House benefit 9pm, raffle for Spuds McKenzie suffed ammafs •Galleon: Crazy hour 9-10pm, $1 well, beer, shots •Hunt Room Gail Gerard 10. 11pm. m1dmte •Hunt Room: 99¢ shots •Cousins Pool tourney 10pm •Michaels· Men of Montrose with Maude, 10pm. m1dnite •Club Romeo· Tom Rae & Co. AIDS benefit show 10_-3opm Frl.·S•t. *The Outlaws Miss Alabama's Fol­hes 10pm with Robbie Roberts •Brazos River Bottom Brazos River Band •Norma's 5611 Club: Lee Aldridge 830pm·1 :30am •French Quarter Theater Videos on the big screen to 3am •Chutes: After-hours 2am-lill Frl.-Sun. •Better Days Open 10pm Saturday •EIJ's Beer bust noon-m1dn1te. liquor bust 4·7pm. volleyball •Venture-N "Pig Party" and pool tournament 4pm •Michaels: Beer bust 4-7pm •Club Romeo- $1.75 Coronas. 75e schnapps •Brazos River Bottom Guest bar­tenders lrom Montrose Counsel­ing Center •Heaven. soe well 9-11pm. afler­hours. cover •Rock 'N' Horse: Live band 'Cho­ice" 9pm-1am •Chutes- Grey party & Bondage Demo •Lazy J· Show night 10pm •Michaels Muscles m Action with Maude, 10pm. m1dmte •J R.'s- Pacific Coast Dancers 10:30pm •K.J. ·s· Amateur male stnp 10:30pm •Mecca After·hours, cover •Cousins Open 7am Sat.-Sun. •Chapultepec Mexican Restaurant Brunch special 11am-2pm •Club Body Center: BBQ and refreshments 1-3pm •Mary's $2 beer bust 2-8pm •Sally's Liquor bust 4-lpm •Mother's 50¢ well drinks 4-9pm Sunday •Hunt Room_· Brunch 11am-3pm •The 611 Brunch 12 noon with mimosas •J.R. 's. 75¢ bloodys, screws. cods. shots •Michaels $1 white well liquor 12- 8pm. beer bust 4-7pm •E1J's- Beer bust noon-m1dmte, burgers 7-10pm, volleyball •Chutes Beer bust 1-7pm. food. live band '"Choice" 4-8pm •Mecca- Garden Parry benef1tting AIDS Foundation •Briar Patch "Suck ·em Up Sun­days" 2-Bpm, 25¢ draft, 75¢ bloodys, screws, cods •Montrose Mining Co. Biggest Sunday crowd m Houston •Mother's· T-dance 4pm •Rock 'N' Horse- Live band jamses· s1on. all musicians welcome. 4.30pm •Club Romeo: Hangover Blues beer bust 5-9pm •Sally's · Mears on Wheels. BBQ Joe. Spm •Brazos River Bottom: Steak night 6pm. Brazos River Band 8-12pm •Camp Closet Poof tournament 5pm •Heaven: Free well 7-9pm, free draft all night. cover. after-hours •Brazos River Bottom 4th Annual Denim Party 7pm-m1dnite •Galleon: $1 25 margantas & chips, steak night 8pm *The Outlaws Talent Search Bpm, Miss Alabama MC •Chutes: "After the Garden Party Drag Show" 8pm •Mother's_. Fantasy in Motion male dancers 1 Opm •Michaels Sunday Show & the "Search for Mr Michael's". 10pm •Mecca Donna Day, Hot Choco­late, Kandi Delight, Tiffany Anea­gus, 10_-3opm •Better Days: Male dance review Mond•Y •Rock 'N' Horse· cfosed •Club Body Center· Locker special noon-m1dnite •Cousins Happy hour all day. all night •Chutes Free pool, beer bust 4- 10pm, happy hour to 10pm •Club Romeo_. $1 margantas. $1.50 bloody marys •Mother's: 5C beer 6pm-1am •Hunt Room: 99¢ margaritas •Sally's- Beer bust 6pm-tit •Camp Closet Buffet 7pm •Mary's Plckles' slop shot pool tournament •Kindred Spmts· The Group's "Gulp"Bpm •K.J.'s "Airline" night •Ripcord. $1 marganttas 8pm-2am •Michaels Liquor bust 8-11pm •EIJ's $1 margaflttas & bloody marys night •Galleon Male stnp contest 10pm. biggest Monday crowd m Houston •Norma's 5611 Club_ Cfosed Mon.-Tue. •Better Days Closed •Michaels. Happy hour all day, all night Mon.-Frl. *Hunann Inn Chinese Restaurant Chinese lunch buffet 1 lam- 2:30pm •K.J. ·s· Happy hour 12·7pm •Hunt Room Happy hour buffet 6- 9pm •Mother's- Happy hour 7am-8pm Mon.-Sat. •Chutes Beer bust 3-9pm •Mary's Happy hour 7am-noon, 6- Bpm (ex. weekends) •The Barn: 75e bloody marys & screwdrivers 7am-noon •Mary's Open 7am with $1 screws & bloody marys to noon •The 611 Open 7am Tuesday •Chutes_ Beer bust 4-10pm •Sally's Sl well 4pm-til. oldies OJ Dennis McGinnis 9pm-2am •Club Romeo: $1 beer •Hunt Room: 99C draft •Cousins. Pot luck buffet •The Barn: Steak night 7-9pm •Venture-N· Pool tourney 7_-3opm •Mother's .. Prom Night," disco oldies. $1 well. 8pm-midnite •K.J. ·s_- Bar & restaurant employee night •The Ranch: Beer bust & dance lessons •Ripcord $1 canned beer Bpm·2am •Rock 'N' Horse: $2 pitcher beer •Michaels · Beer bust 8pm-t1I •Brazos River Bottom: C&W dance lessons. biggest Tues crowd in Houston •EiJ's Stuffed ·tator and salad night. pool tourney Bpm •Galleon: Twisted Wheel of Fun 9, 10& 1lpm Tue.-Frl. •Bacchus. Happy hour opening- 9pm (cfosed July 27-29) •Club Flamingo: Happy hour 5-9pm Tue.-Sat. •Club Flamingo_. Commercial Art live entertainment 9-3opm-1 _-3oam Wednesday •Sally's Wednesday Afternoon Drinking Society, liquor bust 9pm­midnite •Club Romeo_. Vodka specials •Hunt Room: 99e well drmks •Camp Closet: Pot luck supper 7pm •K.J.'s $5 liquor bust 7-11pm •Norma's 5611 Club. Ladies happy hour all night •Rock 'N' Horse MSA Pool Night I c ..... . -"- ·r <- lli-H$plr!Oo JULY 24, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 21 •Bacchus MSA Pool Night. happy hour sf/ night (closed July 29 J •Venture-N Open pool •The 611 MSA Poof Night •Cousins MSA Pool Night •Mary's MSA Pool Night •EIJ's Liquor bust 9-12pm •Heaven: 1oe well 9pm-2am. cover. after-hours. biggest Wednesday crowd m Houston *Brazos River Bottom: Amateur Night with Brazos River Band 9pm- 12:30am •Michaels- Amateur male strip 10pm Wed.-Thu. •Better Days Open 1 Opm Thunday •Brazos River Bottom 'Dollar Day. $1 beer, well. shots. noon- 2am •Club Body Center: Half price day noon-midnrte •Club Romeo· $1.50 well •The 611 BBQ from 6pm •Hunt Room_. 99C bloody marys •Bacchus Steak night 7pm •Venture-N · Pool tourney 7:30pm *The Ranch Beer bust & dance lessons •Galleon. Buffet Bpm. ~Brothers 9pm •Norma's 5611 Club: Gentlemen's happy hour all night •Cousins_ Games tourney •Mother's_ Fantasy m Motion 10pm •Sally's. Male dance night. 10pm •Chutes: Male stnp contest 10pm. MC Bruce Herling •Michaels · Talent night. 10pm, with Cassandra Landa •K.J 's: Nexus Naughties 10:30pm •EIJ's Dance contest 70_-30pm, cash pnzes Thu.·Frt. *The Outlaws Keok1 Kon a 5pm-? July 31 •Kindred Splflts_ 2nd annual ·Jocks m Dresses· benefiting 1987 Gay World Senes. 9:30pm Hera's the BAR-ZAAR list: places youmightcons1derfordrmkmg. din­ing and sensual pleasures The 611 611 Hyde Park, 528-9079 Bacchus. 523 Lovett. 523-3396 The Barn 710 Pacific. 528-9427 Better D•y• 4705 Mam, 527-8765. 529-8756 Brnos River Boltom. 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Briar Patch 2294 Holcombe. 665- 9678 C•fe Edi W Alabama at Shepherd. 520-5221 Camp Closet 109 Tuam. 528-9814 Club Body Center 2205 Fanmn. 65!)-4998 Chapultepee Mexle11n Rest•urant 813 Richmond. 522-2365 Charlie's Restaurant 1102 Westhei­mer. 520-5221 Chutes 1732 Westhe1mer. 523-2213 Cousins 817 Fairview. 528-9204 E/J's 2517 Ralph, 527-9071 Club Flamingo_ 907 Westhe1mer. 527-8830 French Quarter ThHter, 3201 Loui­siana. 527-0782 G•lleon 2303 Richmond. 522-7616 HHven Pac1f1c at Grant. 521-9123 Hunann Inn Chinese Restaurant 800 Elgin. 522-6650 Hunt Room 3404 Kirby, 521-9838 J.R.'1 808 Pac1f1c. 521-2519 Kindred Spirits 4902 Richmond. 623~135 K.J."1 11830 A1rhne Ad 445-5849 Knew Mood Nu-B•r 1336 Westhe1- mer. 529-3332 Lazy J 312 Tuam. 528-9343 Los Jorges 5605 Washmgton. 869- 5599 Mary's 1022 Westhe1mer 528-8851 Mece11 2401 San Jacinto, 655-0769 Michaels 428 Westheimer. 529-2506 Mldtowne Spa 3100 Fannin, 522- 2379 Montrose Mining Co. 805 Pac1f1c, 529-7488 Mother's 402 Lovett. 520-7935 Norma·1 5611 Club 5611 Val Verde The Outlaws 1419 Richmond. 528- 8903 Pot Pie 1525 Westhe1mer, 528-4350 O.T.'1 608 Westhe1mer (opening soon) The R•nch 9150 S Mam. 666-3464 Rendezvous (Ch•rlle'1 Club). 1100 Westhe1mer 527-8619 Ripcord 715 Fairview. 521-2792 Rock 'N' Horse 5731 Kirby Dr 520- 9910 Club Romeo 903 Richmond. 528- 9110 Sally's 220 Avondale. 529-7525 Spanish flower Restaurant. 4701 N Main. 869-1706 Studio 13 1J1e Westhe1mer. 521- 9030 Ventur•N 2923 S Main. 522-0000 Viet Nam Rett.ur•nt. 3215 S Mam. 526-o917 22 MONTROSE VOICE / JULY 24. 1987 You Too Can Be A Drag Queen! After the Garden Party Drag Show $100 Cash Prize for the Best Number on Stage! Not a Benefit! The audience will be the judges so bring your friends! and your music! Sunday the 26th 8pm- ,~"'.: ·~).1 Sh a r p ! ·)! , : Home of Eagle Leathers & 't· Texas Riders 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 Thursday Night Male Strip 10pm Sharp $100 Cash Prize to winner $25 Cash Prize to 1st Runner-up MC Bruce Herling ... •~ • . . ~·· c 1732 Westheimer 523- 2213 INVITATION REQUIRED SUNDAY EVENING HOT DOGS HAMBURGERS .................................................................. ····· ........... . ;···-... ::::·····.. .. ... ······· ···········: ····· ... ······· ... JULY 26, 1987 FREE DRAFT BEER JUL v 24. 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 23 ~ ·-~ ~j ADMITS TWO 7:00 til MIDNIGHT CASH BAR Saturday Night Guest Patio Bartenders: Montrose Counseling Center BRAZOS RIVER BAND DJ-DAVID ROYALTY 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24. 1987 p111 K .J . ' s Ill • - =-= -:== 11830 Airline __________ 445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldlne Bender) Friday-$5 Liquor Bust, 7·11pm Saturday: Amateur Male Strip Night-Cash Prize Wednesday-$5 Liquor Bust, 7·11pm ------ Thursday-Nexus Naughties- Showtime 10:30 pm _ No Cover _ ::: ---- '== ~Happy Hour 12·7pm Daily ~ ~, 1111111 lllllld Where Everyone Is Welcome ---- Friday 24th: Omega House Benefit 9pm with Guest Bartenders and Raffle for Spuds McKenzie Stuffed Animals. Closed Mon.-Wed., July 27-29 for Facelift! Reopen Thursday, July 30 for: Steak Night 7pm Bring Your Own Steak We Supply the Rest 523 Lovett 523-3396 ~ Miss Aiab<iilia's Follies ~ ~ Every Friday & Saturday ~ lOpm ROBBIE ROBERTS· Show Director with: Friday- Jerry Vanover, Gina Malone and Ciji. sat.- outrageous Arl:ly, Black Velvet and Lady Crystal. 0~~~~· Now With New t."i~ -t~0"'.- }fLow Prices on All Drinks~ '}0:W. :\}'\$t\ .'1 e1 • ~ 0: ~ ~ Acapulco Splash ~ '1\C Beginning 7-15-&7 through 8-15-&7 Receive a chance with each drink purchase Emp1o'f'HS. O!irntors and [n!•rto1ners ol 0Jllaw1 cue nol eUqll)Le lo win. s~,., You must be present to win Al;'"~ !st prize Trip tor two (2) to . 1'Cll~""Ss <t, S Acapulco Mexico (includes r t ~ J'.lJt s...: S airfare & hotel) elite orh.,"'tl.l'C'Ji 2nd prize $100 bar tab 'l'fcti;:!S Of Plus: numerous other prizes to a 8J:>~ ~<lllell be given away ,., C012 , Q.sb ,;:_, tJJ t ~&rw_ <&st ~·.Q: Also A Special Show Fealunng (!':"',,;fer Qllts Els Miss Alabama Open Sunday 12noon-2am IOpm August 15 Open Monday thru Saturday 7am-2am 1419 Richmond The Outlaws lliQJs i i12 '4ct 411ist 12 6 ,,.ll'Qll ... &airs~& Happy Hour until 8pm Friday CRUZE NIGHT Featuring Cuervo Madnessl 6pm till Closing Cuervo 1800-$2 a Shot Gold Frozen Margaritas -$2 Midnight Buffet Jose Cuervo T-Shirt Give-A-Way c 523-2213 1732 Westheimer Home of Eagle Leather s JULY 24, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Gray Party and Bondage Demonstration l'C"'(·:....._ r 1· ,.· <' Saturday July 25 9pm $125 Frozen Margaritas All Night Drink Specials throughout the Evening c s .~.~~·#:) ·: Home of Eagle Leathers & Texas Riders . 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 24, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 11 listed here m the Voice where I 1ter­ally thousands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter. promotion can l"lelp our business target your goals and reach your market Galt 524-0409 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your proless1ona1 service through a Voice Ctass1f1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 11 on your Ameri­can Express. Diner's Club. MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanche AIR CONDITIONING 1F YOllAE HOT DIAL M·I·().. T ·0-W·N (643-8696) ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news· pap&r ha.,,1ng published continuously lor over 5 years is qualified to accept legal no ices ANSWERING SERVICES PAGE MEi coMMuN1CAT10NSS:vS. TEMS. 622·4240 SEE-· -·~ CAYAJ BEEPERS for Sale only $29 each Answering Service only $12 monthly Electronic Message Center only $12 monthly Call today ~~!~.~~'622-424C M;)Hage Center ANTIQUES To odvert1se, coll 529-8490 during business hours OOEON GALLERY. 2117 Dunlavy. 521-1111 iff OUR DISPLAY AO FiND1NGs.- 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR OtS/>tAY AO ATTORNEY McBRIDE & ASSOCiA.TES~ 6430 Richmond #300. 266-1744 SEE OUR DISPlA r AD JAMES.$ WALKER. 4515 Yoakum. 526-4300 SEE OtJR or.'Pt.AY AD JAMes D HESS. 3401 Monlrose •205. 521-9216 Thrl.awot!oto/ Dr-IW U.... PC Avclit"""t--*t-' ~"""'1 ...: We • . James S. Walker A ttorney at Law 4515 Yoakum Boulevard Houston 526-4300 Statewide 1800-833-0250 Se Hab/a Espanol Located in the Ross Sterbng ManSIOrl. in the H15toric MontrCJM!, Museum Distnct Net 8d C..t Tu Bd Us~ McBRIDE & ASSOCIATES, P .C. James C. McBride Attorney at Law Maggie McBride, C.P.A 6430 Richmond Avenue Suite 300 Houston, TX 77057 (713) 266-1744 AUTO REPAIR ti wa ;1 M1wa P".iial aud Dody Cealen 1107-D Upland Dr. 932-9401 MONTROSE AlJTO-AEPAiA. 2516 ~~!5!8 (1~~:~·hc) 526-3723 MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 A/C Speclallst Electrical Repairs All Brake Work Free Puppies STEALING PAINT & BODY CENTERS. ~~~5'R ~I~~ ~b 932-9401 TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Tall. 522-2190 SEE Ol.IR OISPLAY AD BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS THE ROMAN. 522·8576 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD HAIRCUTS BYMIKE. 522-3003 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD {~2~~::TON 1515~ Dunta.,,y SEE ()41R DISPLAY All Haircuts, etc. by Mike Men's Shampoo Cut a Blow Dry $14 by Mike SNOW WHITE could be tanned f ree Tanning Session with Cut bi,' Pork• Ff!if~ ~(J,;,~':J" 522-8576 WAUC -INS W'HCOME ~~ SAlOH 1515 ~ Dunlavy 522-7866 BARS BAR LISTINGS? Our bar listings ha.,,e mo'l9d to the BAA ZAAA pages rnn~ 2517 Rolph St. 527-9071 Beer Bust Fri. &: Sun. BOOTS Oh Boy• Ouahty-Boots.-912 we5the1mer 524-7859 CARS AND BIKES Is It True You Can Buy Jeeps lor $44 through the U S go.,,ernment? Gel the !acts today• Call 1·312·742·1142 Ext 8389-A SELL YOUR CAA through a Montrose Voice ctass1fted ad Car 529-8490 CHURCHES K1NGDOM-COMMUNffY-CHuA-CH 614 E 19th, 880--3527. 351·4217 SEE Ol.IR 0/';Pt.AY AO Kingd om Community Church ro 1rF1m11v 111 1<1Rl 614 E 19th urday• lam 862-7533 CLEANING SERVICES DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HOUSES/ APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE Lafge -2-bedroom. CA C- deck. fuu kit· chen. breakfast room. no deposit $350 523-7133 RoOmmate wanted lo share 8pt ne8r Memorial and Shepherd 862-2221 ·- - One bedroom. large rooms. 4--plex, park· 1ng. all appliances. S29Slmo, water paid 409 west Polk 862-6958 M0ntros8duplex, 2 bedfOOm. close to downtown. hardwood. newly redeco-­rated $37Slmo 529--1341 ~~nt~1~~ ~l:~:.o~~g:ip:r~::~~~~i~ne~ tans. new appliances. sun room. ceniral air/ heat. fenced yard Must see $79.000 Owner 526-7276 Aoomate Wanted A8spons1ble GWM 10 share 3 bedroom house in Galleria area 871-1214 Male or female roommate wanted for stu­dent ol 1 bedroom Montrose area apart· ment Drug free en.,,ironment only· -non-smoker preferred $132 25 plus elect 522-7514 ONLY $2351 NO DEPOSIT! Small. all adult complex with pool. court­yard and excellent security. has one bed­room apts to lease' Ceiling tans, mmi-bhnds. large kitchens & bathrooms separate d1mng and lr'1mg area. carpet and more' Also. tree cable. laundry room. and on-site ma nag err Come by and see us at 2509 Dunlavy near Westhe1mer or cell at 521-1123 lor more details ALL ADULT & PWAs WELCOME 1- bedroom lower apt $200. Museum area. 528-3482 alter 2pm. all day Sunday & Monday Montrose/ Whitney St Cute and spacious ~::::::t:~~~:S~~~,~-gli:;n& ~r~~g$e2~~~~ $365 plus deposit Gas and water pa•d 524-6553 Montrose one bedroom apt insmallqwet _omplex with pool. security gates. laundry lac1htun. cable available Adutts No pets $100 dep $265 plus electric. 713- 529-8178 Sunshine C1eanmg Services- -Day OR EXCEL APARTMENT LOCATORS-. 524- NtGHT. Home or Office. insured. 529- 7800 99901 726-4926 Mr Rtchard!lnn SEE OUR 01' I LAY Al SERVICE PLUS. 522·3451 .----------- • EOURDI .oc..AYAO CONSIGNMENTS FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION. 827·1422 or 497-5228 SEE OUR OISl'UiY AO HsK coN-iAACTING. 520-9064 SEE Ol.IR DISPLAY AO COUNSELING DA NICHOLA~f EDD. 2128 w~ch. 527-8680 SEE OUR OISPt.AY AO DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. D D s 427 Westhe1mer. 524--0538 SEE OUR Ol>"t..AY AO Ronald M, Butler 0 ,0 ,S, 427 Wes1he1mer Hou~ton. TX 77\X.~<i Moncily 1hru S"urrhy H<11.1r~ by Al)f'0111,n.eri1 713) 524 0538 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent !hat house or apartment through a Voice Classified Call 529-8490 And ~~:r8~u·~~C!~r:i:n8:~~~E:ii~r~1~~ Visa FREE APT, 8: HOME Locating Service Move In Special $99- $1~ Call Mike 713-524 - 7800 Excef Apartment Locators EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED ~~t:~e~nl~n~·~~~tors needed SBIG TIPS Call Eastern Onion now• Smgers and dancers needed Fun 1ob. lull or part hme, 680-1975 JOB OPPORTUNITIES AT THE MONTROSE VOICE ~~~:t~~~:Ye~°ci~;~~~~n~~~=~:ss~~~r' We are now accepting applications tor these positions FULL-TIME EDITOR: This is a working ~~~: 1u~~~u~~;~1~ ~~~I~~ c~~:~~s stories yourself -and supervising a smaft troupe ol freelancers You must ha.,,e solid 1oumal1sm experience FREE-LANCE JOURNALISTS: You'll JUSt write a story or two a week tor a few dollars a week and tots of e11posure. Pro-- ~~r~~~\ ~~rn:'6~'~ ~~:~ i ~~ r~~·~~s: we·.,,a been holding at 2 tull-ttme sales persons and are now ready to expand to a :~: R=~=n~~t-g~~~91fe~o7g:;~w~~~ leads but also domg ··cold calhng " You must have rehable vehicle PART-TIME BOOKKEEPER: Be knowl· edgeab1e ol taxes and forms Work one day a w99k SUBMIT RESUMES by mail or drop oft in person to Henry McClurg. Montrose Vok:e. 408 A'1ondale. Houston. TX 77<X>6 PLEASE No phone calls or m1erv1ews at this hme ESTA TE SALES FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk. 522·3662 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO FLOWERS CLASSIC DESIGNS OF H6uST6N 1811 Indiana. 523-3791 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO IMISC,I FDR SALE FOR YARD SALES See ads under 'Yard Sales .. at the end of the Voice Class1f1eds FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 W8'ch. 526-3851 ~EE OUR OtSPlAY AO CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL 692·555~ J63-9999 Sff ~ P't:AY Ai FURNITURE GALLERY 0DEON GALLERY 2117 Dunlavy 521-1111 SEE OUR )f-"PtAY A._ HAULING HAULING, ETC. Pick up and delivery. hauling bonded Jell Cunningham. 522-3451 HEALTH CENTERS. GYMS CLUB BODY CENTER. 2205 F8nnin, 659-4998 SH 0,' ~ HOUSTON [(.~CLUB BODY ~ CENUR 2205 FANNI/\" 71002 1713) 659-4998 INSTRUCTION CAREER-INSTITUTE. 3015-Richmond 529-2778 Sff OUR DISPLAY AD PARALEGAL CLASSES e TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Placement Assistance CAREER INSTITUTE 529- 2778 3015 Richmond Ave. INSURANCE GUARANTEE ISSUE HEAL TH INSURANCE including AK plan No one turned down Call Bill 469-7793 CYNTHIA H MANSKER INSURANCE, 3311 W AIAbama #100. 522-2792 SEE OUR OISPtAY AO Ar• your tired ol struggling with the high cost of lnsur•nce? Call today lor a tree competitive quote. Cynthia H. Mansker Insurance Agency 522-2792 Auto e H-.......·,... e -,...,._ e LM9 LAWN CARE BETTER LAWNS & GARDEN$. 523-LAWN Sff C"IR DI' PtAY Al MEDICAL SERVICES SUMMIT AREA CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC. 3222 Marquart. 963-9143 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD _ BLOoo-SCREENING SERv1CES. 11115 Red Oak Dr #207. 444-1875 SEE OUR OISPLAY AD __ _ CASA HOSPITAL. 1803 Old SpAnish Tt11I, 796-CASA SEE OUR OISPt.AY AQ_ __ _ -~ _ - SfEVE 0 MARTINEZ. MD. 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621-7771 BLOOD SCREENINi:i SERVICES INC. • Tol•llY Anonyrnou• N•• AIDS Anll9• n THI co.1oc10V•"'"O•r••n .. 1a,._ .... 1 • OIMr S•,..,lc•• lncklcM All TypH ol Blood Work •nd Drug ScrHnLng 444-1875 SUMMIT AREA CHIROPRACTIC CLINIC Open 7 Days Mulllpl• Doctor1 .rid TechnlquH 963-9143 3222 Marquart, Houston MILITARY CLOTHES Kil.ROYS. ; sc)9Westhe1mer. 528-2818 SlE OUlll t>tSol't.AY AD MOOELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS PLAY IT SAFE with black or white 1ock escorts and get the best lull body rubdowns by one of our hot. younger men Call •nd ask tor Ste­ph1an. We aim to please (713) 660-6847 - SMOOTH RUB BY HARO BODY. 24 HRS. 526-3711 . Rx: RELAX II you've never had A professional mas· sage. you can barely 1magme what you're missing Bill O'Aourke. MST 669+2298 THOM OF HOUSTON 523-6577 ~ull body mHHge, 24 hours, 529-3970. Soft. sensual bodyrub Weekday even­ings weekends Marc 523-8938 WARNING TO OUR MASSEUR I MODEL ADVERTISERS Houston Pohce vice ol!tcers have 1hls past week called some of our masseur and model advertisers. and mv1ted them to hotel and motel rooms where they had a hidden camera In TeKas 1t tS illegal to eKchange money tor 5eK, although this has been gomg on smce money was mvented Please be careful and obey the law Handsome. hunky hairy. muscular. mas­cuhne body rubs (713) 278-7360. Any­time SMOOTH RUB BY HARD BODY. 24 HRS. 526- 3711. Body rubs by handsome well-endowed G/WiM 24 hrs Early evenmg specials 529-3970 MUSCLE MASSAGE, SENSUOUS FULL BODY EXHILERATION, 24 HRS. 529- 3970. MOVERS MOVEMASTERS BoKes. too• Visa. MC. AmeK welcome 1925 Westhe1mer 630-6555 PAPER HANGING ALL AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION- 827-1422 or 497-5226 .;;uovRDSP"..AYAO Poper Hanging and Vinyl Res1denllol ond Commercial A.II Types Refnodeling Al l AMERICAN CONSHWCTJON 497-5228 PERSONALS Your attitude is discreet. your color is red your waist 1s 29" or less. your special tat· ent allows my hands to gently eKplorethat magical place where pleAsure dwells 529-3983 PLAY IT SAFE With us CAii And we w1llshowyouagood time. 660-6847 24 hrs. a dAy Ask for Ste­ph1an West Houston. GwM 5-11" 160 lbs. 34 years old Lookmg tor mean1nglull rela· l!onshtp I am a honest. sincere profes­sional. I en1oy movies. tennis and traveling Senous replies respond to Blmd BOK 352-F C/O Voice HORNY GUYS WAITING! ~:~ 1::e~· ~~1 t1~~';:;rYv~t~.0~~~1~g6~~~~~ Link. 24 Hours. Na11onw1de For Free Info Cati 4151 346-8747 SAFE SEX 6 J/O Healthy. Horny MEN m Houston and nAt1onwide for SAFE 1-1. Group & phOne action Wnte· CKC, POB 330484. Mia· mi.FL 33233 SEEKING PAFITNEFI FOR RURAL LIFE Ready to move from Houston to country living Seek mg compatable pArtner com­fonable with country hv1ng. interested in self-suf11c1ency Not hm1ted to TeKH At 36. I am seekmg another man who wants a quahty hie EKperiences without games. alcohol and msecunty II you are l1vmg 1n the country and desmng a partner who Pr~:'t~P~ ~:;etr~~t.·s ,:V~rr1 ~~3 :~v~0~~ make this ~appen with the right mAn If this doesn t interest you don't call No J!O Call John (713) 526-9557 EXPECTING Too MUCH? Attractive GWM seekmg mature (35-45). proless1onally emoloyed. relationship oriented. sate seK top Like me. only rm not top. What I Am is a combination of a cocker spaniel and Edith Bunker in male ~rr~~ ~~tn&~~?B~: g~1~r~eJ0oV:i~: so Seeking masters who WAnt to borrow ' share my slave. Also seekmg master1 slave combination who want to share or trade. Other poss1b1!111es also considered ~~~ 9~~r~5a11~~n ~6dv~~~!uggest1ons to 37. GWM. 5'7'°. 145. atrOng. handsome, masculine. non-smo ker. non-drtnker seeking same who 11 sell honest. self respectmg. natural. creative. playful. alfecuonata for lnendsh1p possible mon- ~~~odo r,:~~:nshlp Reply Bhnd BOK PLAY IT SAFE With us. Cal and we w1•1 show you a good time. 660-6847 24 nrs a dAy. Ask tor Ste­ph1an H6T1 wET1 WILD• 976-2636 <;ff OOR DISPLAY AO 91--S:GABB. 976-4222 Sff OUR D/Spt..AY AD 0-IAi DUDE. 976-3833 ~£ f"Jl!.PIS~Y AD THE RIGHT CONNECTION 976-9696 )ff OUR DISPLAY AD LivE ACTION NETWORK-. -97s-es0c) Sff OllR DISPLAY AO LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES ** SHE WILL WHISPER * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * \'OUR EAR * ** g~Rttcr ;:~~~:~;~:~~gg ** ·* NOW! 1-900-410-3800 * ** NO M~:e~~s~'.: N~-~~.~SARY ** * JS• ••C~ •O=•h0"1 .... .,.,, . * * * * * * * * * * RULES F6A THE PERSONALS- Person­als (and other advertising). should not descrtbe or imply a description of seKual organs or acts No Personals should be directed to minors Advert1smg must be ·positive." not ""negative., (If you have certain preferences m other people. list the quahhes you desire: Please don't be negative by l1st1ng the ki_nds ol people or quatilles you don't desire.) Thank you and happy hunting ATTENTION J .o .E. MEMBERS Meeungs will resume shortly under judi­cial and adm1nstrat111e protechon agamst illegal police actions In lhe meantime. pleASe continue to Play Sale And cele­brate Gay Prtdet CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING Henry's One-Hour Photo has moved to 408 Avondale. 1n the ume building as the Montrose Voice Open Monday-FridAy 9am·6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health. havese11: For your rshy!1~::e~~~rem~~= 1t;~•e=1t~A~~u~~: eKchanged The v1ru~ which leads to an AIDS cond1t1on is believed usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen Those who Are '"recep­t111e .. are especially at rii;k Do condoms protect? They cartamly help. But con· doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant. Petroleum or vegetable-based lubricants will actually d1$So1ve the con· ~()m and eliminate the protecl!On A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? John Preston and Fredenclt Brandl can show you how to have active lun or play passive games with the personal ads. In their book. ··c1ass1f1ed Affairs." they'll tell you how to write an ad that really stands out. what to eKpect when you place or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny little abbreviations mean. Send $8 to "Classified Affairs:· Alyson Pub, Dept P-5. 40 Plympton. St • Boston. MA 02118.(Also included will be a coupon for $5 oll on your next Personals m your choice ol 25 pubhcaltons. 1rn lud1ng the VOice.) PEST CONTROL RESULTS HOME- CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL. 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PETS TOM'S PRETTY FISH. 224 Westhe1mer 520-6443 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT ALU Printing and developing. enlargements. 1umbo prmts. film. Kodak paper. 2615 WAugh Dr 520-1010. HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO. 408 AvOn­dale. 529-8490 Sff OUR DISPLAY AD PLUMBING BiLL :SPiUM81NG. 1819 Commonwealth. 528-2151 SEE ()IJR DISPLAY A.C 1 BILL'S PLUMBING SERVICE 1a19 Commonweallh Houston. Te11:as 77006 528-2151 1 JULY 24 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 27 PRINTING SPEEDY PRINTING. 5400 BeUa1re Blvd 667-7417 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD PSYCHICS SISTER SUE 1516 W Alabama 523-5823 ~-r O•JR D PLAY A1 SISTER SUE: Palm & Tarot Card Readings Bring your problems to me. I will help you solve them. 1516 W Alabama For appt 523- 5823 IPEN )AY' A WEEK PSYCHOLOGISTS GLENN STERNES. 3233 Wesl !}'an #205, 622-7806 SEE OUR DISPl.AY AD DR NICHOLAS-EDD.-2128 Wekh. 527-8680 SC - ,q- Dr. Nicholas Edd, Psy.D PSYCHOLOGIST rm ;e Accepfed· 24 H Phone Serv• Memort•I C11y Prol Btdg 902 Frott,..ood ~ - Houlton 7702<1 <1fi! Montrose 2128 Welch. 527-8680 GLENN f·. STERN ES. Ph .D. Chnic•I P1)1Chol09l1t 622- 7806 Specl.t111r1; In • A11er1•wer1eu-ConhcMric• e Siren ReducUori e Se1u .. Ptoblem1 3233 WHle)l•ri (• I R•chmOl'ld) s 11;1e 2tl"' RECORDS & TAPES MANHATTAN SOUND. 1412 Westhe1mer. 522·2822 SEE QUA OISPt.AY Al RESTAURANTS CHARLIE'S. 1102 Westhe1mer 522-3.'1'12 SEEOUADISPC.A1AD __ _ POT PIE. 1525 W9sthe1mer. 528--i350 SEE OUR msPLA' AD v1ET-NAM RESTAuRANT~ 3215 Main at ~:~1gi1~2~! AD ~ C•tl'u S._ 1102 Westheimer Dailv Sp<>< ials 522-3332 'tHE l>O't VIE Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 Westheimer 528-4350 THE VIET NAM RESTAURANT 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 SUPERMARKETS KROGER, 3300 Montrose Sff OUR DISPLAY AD TIR
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