Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houston Voice, No. 1208, December 19, 2003
File 001
File size: 11.73 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1208, December 19, 2003 - File 001. 2003-12-19. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3539/show/3510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-12-19). Houston Voice, No. 1208, December 19, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3539/show/3510

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1208, December 19, 2003 - File 001, 2003-12-19, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3539/show/3510.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1208, December 19, 2003
Contributor
  • Crain, Chris
  • Fisher, Binnie
Publisher Window Media
Date December 19, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Gay Holidays Gay men and lesbians stay close rather than go home for the holidays. Page 15 ISSUE 1208 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 19, 2003 Police patrols beefed up in Montrose Police pledge increased attention in Montrose area to stem assaults on gay men By JOSEF MOLNAR Houston police will increase patrols in the Montrose area in response a rash of recent reports of assaults on gay men. At a Dec. 17 meeting that included rep· resentatives of the Houston Police Department and city and state officials, gays and lesbians also in attendance walked away with some assurances that police are responding to their concerns. HPD Capt. Glenn Yorek, who heads up the central patrol division, said he has assigned the 20-member Tactical Unit to the area to boost the police presence there. Since the Central Division has only one tac· tical unit. however, it will be moved to other areas when its presence is needed else· where, leaving the usual officers assigned weekend for a performance prompt­ed John Szewczeyk to organize the meeting. Eight Houston Police Department representatives attended the meeting with gay and lesbian community member including Chris Arasin, who heads up the Q Patrol, and Randall Ellis. the executive dire<:­tor of the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobb}: which is based in Austin. Police Capt. Glenn Yorek (standing) urges victims of asS<lult file police reports, while (from left) meeting organizer John Szewczyk, Officer James Sobota. and Capt. Dave Cutler listen. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) Elected officials at the meeting included District D City Council Member Ada Edwards, Texas House Rep. Garnet Coleman and newly elected At-large Position 4 City Council Member Ronald Green. to the area to continue their duties. "We can't stay in the Montrose area indef· initely," Yorek said. "But I think that, getting past the immediate problem, we could per­haps work on some long-term solutions." Reports of a vicious assault on a New York dancer in Houston over the Thanksgiving Councilwoman Edwards said the Thanksgiving attack on Allan Koren Tibbetts, who was chased down. beaten repeatedly with a metal pipe and robbed. was not the only assault that weekend. However, Sandra Aponte, a public infor­mation officer with HPD. said the Tibbetts case is the only one officially filed with the police at this time. Yorek said HPD has been hesitant to officially label the attack on Tibbetts as a hate crime because of the common nature of the attack. and also because that report and other unofficial reports don't include homophobic slurs. "I wish that we could have had reports on those crimes, but they weren't reported officially to the police department," he said. "If they were reported, then that would have been a red flag immediately to me that next morning that we did have four or five of those instances that hap­pened m one night, and we would have been alerted a little faster." Edwards, whose office has been taking unofficial reports from victims who don't want to go to the police, said continued reporting by victims and their friends will help police to remain aware of the situation Long-time political activist Ray Hill told members of the gay and lesbian com· munity that although pollce have their jobs to do, so does the co= unit}: Please see ASSA UL TS on Page 9 Bush to back marriage amendment 'if necessary' President criticizes 'activist' Mass. court, but leaves room for states to act By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON - President Bush took another step closer to endorsing a constitu· tional amendment banning gay marriage on Tuesday when he said a Massachusetts court •overreached its bounds" by ruling in favor of same-sex marriage. "If necessary, I will support a constitu tional amendment which would honor marriage between a man and a woman codify that," Bush said in a Dec. 16 White House interview with ABC News corre· spondent Diane Sawyer. "The position of this administration is that whatever legal arrangements people want to make, they're allowed to make. so long as it's embraced by the state," Bush said. But he added, "Except and unless judi· cial rulings undermine the sanctity of marriage, in which case we may need a constitutional amendment." In remarks over the past year. the pres­ident has said marriage should be defined as a union only between a man and a woman and that he and his legal advisers were studying whether a constitutional amendment is needed to "codify" that defi· nition. In the ABC News interview this week, Bush criticized the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court for ruling that denying marriage rights to gays violates that state's constitution. Some gay rights advocates said the president's criticism of the court suggests he may be siding with social conservatives and anti-gay groups, which have denounced the Massachusetts high court for essentially legalizing same-sex mar­riage. The court ordered the state legisla· ture to re'\\Tlte the state's marriage law to bring it into compliance with what the court says is a provision in the Massachusetts Constitution that grants gay couples equal access to the institution of marriage and marriage benefits. "The court has said that same-sex cou· pies in Massachusetts should have the same right to marry," said Matt Foreman. executive director of the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. "And now the presi· Please see BUSH on Page 8 'The position of this administration is that what­ever legal arrangements people want to make. they're allowed to make, so long as it's embraced by the state.' said President Bush MARRIAGE DEBATE: Local gay men and lesbians weigh in on gay marriage. Page 3 I GINGERBREAD & MUSIC: Community events are chronicled in photos. Page 4 .. 2 DECEMBER 19 2003 , ... , 111nn1na laclllledl www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com f local news Houston weighs in on gay marriage debate Local activists agree: it's all about marriage equality, and it's just a matter of time By BINNIE nsHER Whenever the topic turns to gay mar­riage, Houston attorney Jerry W. Simoneaux, Jr. said his thoughts drift to an early morning in 1958 in Caroline County, Virginia. That's when law enforcement officers stormed into the bedroom of Mildred and Richard Loving and arrested them for the crime they had committed. Their crime? Marriage. In 19.58. in a num­ber of states, 1t was against the law for whites to marry outside their race. The Lovings (he was white, and she was African-American) had been legally married in Washington, D.C., and in l!lS8 were living ln Virginia. where their union was against the law. Almost a decade later. the U.S. Supreme Court responded to a legal challenge filed by the Lovings and in 1967 declared the ant1miscegenation law that made the mar· riage of Richard and Mildred Loving a crime in Virginia to be unconstitutional. The 16 other states with such laws still on their books were forced to erase them. "In 1958. interracial marriage was a hot· button issue," Simoneaux said. "In 2003, gay marriage is a hot-button issue." Simoneaux, whose practice centers on helping gay and lesbian couples with many of the legal issues related to bemg coupled, said he believes that in time, the ldt>a of same-sex marriage will go the way of interracial mar· riage. It will eventually be sanctioned by the courts and be accepted by sociel): The issue resurfaced earlier this year when the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that it is unconstitutional for the state to exclude gay couples from civil mar­riage. But instead of ordering clerks across the state to begin issuing marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples, the court threw the matter into the hands of the state legis­lature to "take such action as it may deem appropriate in light of this opinion." In Vermont. gay civil unions have gained legal acceptance, and in California, a domestic partner law is being adopted. Meanwhile, across Europe, a number of countries have either sanctioned gay mar­riage or provided some sort of legal protec­tion for gay unions. Simoneaux said like interracial mar­riage in the 1950s and '60s, gay marriage won't go away as a hot-button issue. He said he believes it will continue to be challeng!'d in the court;; and in society until it is not In 1940. when Lucille Ball married Desi Amaz 1t would have been illegal in 37 states. says Houston attorney Jerry W. Simoneaux, Jr. only legal, but accepted. "It's really about marriage equalit};" Simoneaux said. "Marriage equality is hard to argue against. Same-sex marriage is just a component of all that great big, wonderful thing we call 'marriage,' and we want to participate." Although there are some gays and les­bians who say they would be happy with the same rights that are enjoyed by married cou­ples, and that the idea of marriage really isn't that important. attorney Mitchell Katine said. gays and lesbians must demand more. "If we accept equal rights without mar· riage, we're still less than equal," he said. "It says that gay and lesbian relationships are not as worthy as heterosexual relationships. Gays and lesbians should not settle for less." Katine, who was among the attorneys whose argument in Lawrence versus Texas earlier this year prompted the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the state's sodomy law, said with full marriage comes something that the court;; cannot bestow "!want respect," he said. "I want dignil): My family and my children are just as valu­able as the married couple Jiving next door." When gays and lesbians talk about set­tling for less than marriage, Katine said, he wonders what the nation would be like today if African Americans had been will· ing to settle for less than full civil rights. Just as those who opposed civil rights were operating out of fear, he said, the back· lash to gay marriage is fear of the unknO\m. "It's all a matter of ignorance and fear," he said. "I can't understand what people are afraid of. Giving gays and lesbians the right to marry doesn't weaken marriage." To Sue Lovell, a lesbian activist who ran unsuccessfully for city council this year, Simoneau.x's idea of "marriage equality" rings true. "It's about having equal rights in deci­sion making and in decL~ions affecting our partners:· she said. Coy Tow. executive director of the Houston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Chamber of Commerce said he believes marriage equality JS inevitable. "I really don't believe that a country that believes in freedom and equality can contin­ue to alienate any group of people andjusti· fy it under the Jaw." he said. As for the defense of marriage measure being discussed in Congress, Tow said, "There is no justification for it other than bigotry and hatred. We may have some short-term loss, but as far as marriage is concerned, what do we have to Jose? We have nothmg to Jose and ever;1hing to gain." And. as Simoneau.x pointed out, in 1940, when a redheaded lrish·American starlet named Lucille Ball married a Cuban ban· dleader named Desi Arnaz, ''That would have been illegal in 37 states." DECEMBER 19. 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1208 LOCAL NEWS 3 NATIONAL NEWS 5 FORUM 10 OUT ON THE BAYOU 15 COMMUNID CALEHDAR 20 APPOINTMENTS 21 CLASSIFIEDS 22 HOROSCOPES 25 BOOTS 'N BOOGIE: The New Year's Eve cele­bration hosted by the Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce may be the best bargain in the state on Jan. 31 hge 4 WHAT &IVES?: David Benkof, fonner1y known as David Bianco, left his life as a gay media guru. and guess what he's telling Ricki Lake.hge6 LOGS AND SINNERS: Bush talks about gays as sinners and logs in his eye. and Rosie utters the word "wife" in the same sentence with •partner." hge 13 POSTMASlIR: Send address changes to Houston Voice. 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200, Houston. TX 77006. Houston Voice is published weekly, on Friday, by Window Media UC Subscriptions are $92Jyear for 52 issues (only Sl 77 per ISSUe) 4 DECEMBER 19. 2003 I loca s A very Chamber New Year's Eve Gay and lesbian Chamber of Commerce kicks up its heels on New Year's Eve By BINNIE FISHER A tradltlon of several years no\\, the New Year's Eve Gala host· ed by the Houston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Chamber of Commerce is selling quickly this year. Chamber Executive Director Coy Tow said this year's event at the Wanvick Hotel is being called Boots. Black Tie and Boogie. and he maintains that it IS the best New Years party value in HoID>"ton. The evening begins Mth cock· tails at i p.m., and Tow said, there are several ways to participate thts year. "We have two dlnner options this year. a VIP dinner on the 12th floor with a beautiful view of the city and with all the courses, and a buffet downstairs in the main ball· room.0 Another option Is to attend the .New Year's party sans dinner. Tow said those who attend the party will find entertainment through­out the evening with casino games. dancing and a cabaret lounge where l\larsha Carlton. Glynda l\lcGmms and Kelly Lauren will play 45-m!nute sets. "They sing popular songs and Broadway tunes," Tow said "People gather around the piano and sing along." He said those who play casino games will find that their winnings can be used to bid on items in a silent auction later m the evening. For almost a decade, the Warwick has been the venue for a gay New Year's celebration, Tow said. "The Chamber has been doing it for several years." he said. ~1oncy raised from the event goes directly into Chamber coffers and is tl'ied for programs to benefit the gay and lesbian communit): ··1t Is the Chamber's major fundraising event," Tow said. "It helps us get our year going_" In 2004. Tow said, the New Year's gala will provide funding for the Chamber to start a new pro­gram that will be announced after the first of the year. In addition next year. he said, the Chamber '\\ill coordinate v.ith the Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (HAT.C.H.) to estab­lish an internship program. "We're looking to do a lot more community outreach," he said. "We really want to make Houston more high profile." Although money raised during the evening benefits Houston, Tow said, th9 gala attracts gavs and Jes bians from other cities in the state, including Dallas, Austin and San Antonio. Although other cities may have New Year's events for gays and les· bians, he said, he doesn't know of another event in the state on the scale of Boots. Black Tie and Boogie. The Warwick is a first-class venue with excellent cuisine, and it offers just the right space for the Chamber's gala, Tow said. "! don't think an}thing com­pares," he said. Prices for the evening start at $69 per person for those who want to attend the party, dance, lounge around the piano and play casino games. Add the buffet. and Tuw said the price is $89 per person. The formal dinner with wine and cocktails on the 12th floor that includes the additional events is priced at $100 per person. For $.500 per couple, Tow said two people can enjoy the VIP din­ner, the New Year's party and an www.houstonvo1ce.com HOUSTON VOICE Champagne flowed and couples kissed as the clock struck midnight at fast year's New Year's Eve Gata hosted by the Houston gay and lesbian chamber. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) overnight stay at the Warwick. The party includes party favors, champagne toasts at mid· night and a New Year's breakfast. Tow stressed that the party is not just for couples. "This year, we're doing something we've never done before. We're going to have a singles mixer at the cabaret from 9:30 to 10:30," he said. He added that persons who want to stay at the hotel but don't want to invest in the VIP package will be offered a special Chamber rate of $89. "On any night, $89 for a room at the Warwick is an amazing price." he said. Tow said the Chamber has already sold out one of the VIP dinner rooms and is now spilling over into a second seating area. Reservations must be made in advance by calling the Chamber at 713-523-7576. ft MORE INFO Boots. Black ne and Boogie 7p.m-2 a.m. New Year's Eve Warwick Hotel 5701 Main St. 713-523-7576 Houston Holidays Sandy Mock (left) and his partner, Chuck Robinson put the finishing touches on a gingerbread house as Chuck's daughter, Stacy supervis· es dunng the annual Gingerbread House Party hosted by Houston Gay & Lesbian Parents. (All photos by Dalton DeHart) Wes Travis breaks mto song as Josue Casillas provides the accordion accompani­ment during the annual holiday party of Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Michael Anderson is re.1dy to roll on a donated bicycle dunng the Bayou City Boys Club's toy dnve and Christmas Party. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvo1ce.com Same-sex divorce fuels debate over Iowa marriage law DES MOINES. Iowa (AP) Ajudgc.'5 divorce dl'Cree for two women sparked a legal challengl' that could hPlp decide whether some states can bar sa1m!-:iCX Wlions while others permit it. Gay rights activist.~ say the divorce between Kunberly J. Brown, 31, and Jennifer S. Perez, 26, Matt Coles. director of the ACLU's Lesbian & Gay Rights and AIDS projects. said an Iowa judge's divorce decree for two women does not threaten that state's laws aga111st same-sex unions. does not open the door to recognition of same-sex rela· tionships, but a conservative group said it will ask the Iowa Supreme Court to overturn the decree. "We believe the judge exceeded his authority," said Chuck Hmiey, president of the Iowa Family Policy Center; a family advocacy group. Hurley and other conservatives fear the judge's decree. which refers to the Wlion as a marriage, is the first step in legitimizing Wlions not permitted Wlder an Iowa Jaw passed in l!l'3i. Brovm and Perez. both of SiotLX Cit): \\ent to Vermont 1n March 200'.l to take advantage of that state's civil Wlion laws. Their divorce was granted Nov. 14 in Woodbury County District Court. Gay rights advocates said the divorce doe~n·t tlu-eaten Iowa's laws. "I don't think this case sets the basis up for a challenge to Iowa's refusal to marry same-SPX couples," said Matt Coles, di.J-ector of the American Civil Liberties Union's Lesbian & Gay Rights and AIDS projects. "~ltat the judge did here was he eflectively said for the purposes of sorting this out and letting people go their ways, we'll recognize the rela· tionship and end it in an orderly wa):"' Lafayette school board won't apologize to gay mom LAFAYETTE, La. (AP} - After a marathon meeting, the Lafayette Parish School Board refused to apologize last week to a mother whose 7-year-old boy was punished for telling another child she is gay. The incident attracted national attention after the moth· er, Sharon Huff, complained to the American Civil Liberties Union. The school's superintendent, James Easton, maintained that the boy's teacher was not at fault, insisting the boy wasn't disciplined for saying "gay." But that's the reason spelled out on a form Marcus McLaurin brought home to his surprised mother last month. The ACLU demanded an apology, saying the child's free-speech rights had been violated, and asked that the incident be removed from record. But the school board wouldn't back down, insisting again by a vote of 5-3 that it was "never the intent or purpose" to discipline the child for hav· ing used the word "gay." An ACLU lawyer from New York who attended the meeting, Ken Choe, expressed disappointment and suggested a lawsuit could be in the works. Ohio House votes to refuse recognition of gay marriage COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP} Democrats called a bill prohibiting the recognition of gay mar­riage in Ohio unnecessary government intrusion. Republicans said the bill was need· ed to avoid courts dictating state policy. Gay marriages would not be recognized in Ohio Wldcr a bill the Ohio House passed Dec. 11.The Republican-controlled House voted 69- 23 along largely partisan lines to declare that samesex marriage is against "the strong public policy of the state." Republicans said the bill was neces.<;ary to prevent gay couples legally married elsewhere from having those marriages recognized in Ohio. House Speaker Larry Householder said he was opposed to haVing "outside influmces dictate public po!Jcy in the state of Ohio." Group launches national program to educate vets about gays in military ATLANTA (AP) - A national project began Dec. 11 to educate veterans about gays in the military, a decade after Congress passed the "Don't Ask. Don't Tell" policy. The Military Education Initiative plans to reach out to veterans groups around the country, providing speakers to chapter meetings and conven· tions to open the dialogue about the mili­tary's policy on gays. ''As a veteran. I appreciate that the 27 million of my fellow vets are well regarded on Capitol Hill," said former Army Maj. Jeff Cleghorn, director of the Atlanta-based initiative. "Veterans' opinions on the DADT policy are very important." The non-profit initia· tive, a project of the Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military at the University of California, Santa Barbara, will begin reaching out to veterans groups in Atlanta, Seattle, San Diego and San Francisco, Cleghorn said. Lawsuit defends GSA at Colorado Springs high school DENVER (AP) The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit against Palmer High School of Colorado Springs on Dec. 12 for refusing to recognize a club that includes gays. The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court, said the school has repeated­ly refused to recognize the Palmer High Gay-Straight Alliance. Mark Silverstein, legal director of the Colorado ACLU, said similar clubs are operating at 50 high schools in Colorado. The federal Equal Access Act requires schools to grant equal access to all student clubs on a nondiscrim· inatory basis. Any schools that allow clubs that are not class-related must follow the statute, Silverstein said. Palmer principal Karin Reynolds said it was the school dIS· trict's dt'Cision not to recognize the group. From staff and wire reports DECEMBER 19 2003 THE ORIGINAL SUV 2004 Discovery S MSRP $34,995 SALE PRICE $30,995 \l~RI' ~1~ ''" '·''' l'n<c ~!O ')')5 •ftcr $1 Sill• r<!>.to •nd Sl ~(J( dc•kr d "°""' Ex<ludo lT&l \tll D81l8 ...,t'C' dc-;ikr loi <k:t.ufi Lmncd umc- ottrr Great Car Insurance! 713.661. 7700 For AUlO, lion.,, Rrnlcn Ufr, ll<'altli B1ut11C5S bu11mnc~ and m14'/11110"' 6' l5 tt l.oop So tr/~ Sk> I BS &Ila IT! TX 1401 H'UU Sdulll'Mr ~(011 5 6 DECEMBER 19. 2003 I national news www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Gay Jewish writer gives up sex with men Benkof's newfound faith in Orthodox Judaism won't allow same-sex relationships By CHRISTOPHER SEELY As David Bianco, he created a syndica· tion service that provides articles to dozens of gay media outlets. including this newspaper As David Benkof, he will soon appear on national televISion to oppose gay mar­riage. When a gay person comes out of the closet, rainbow flags wave and a celebra· tion ensues. But when a gay person opts to pursue opposite-sex relationships, that support turns to stlence or even attacks. according to Benkof, whose legal name change will be final next year. "Some love relationships can be holy and some - such as those between members of the same sex - cannot," Benkof said in the Nov: 28 edition. Later this month. he will defend his stance during an appearance on ·Ricki Lake" dedicated to the gay marriage debate, he said. "I believe that marriage is a fun­damental bedrock of society that comes from God. that has a specific definition that God gave us, which is a man and a woman," Benkof told Houston Voice Benkofs new political views, rooted in his religious convictions. leave gay activists divided over whether Benkof is now an enemy to the gay rtghts movement he once supported. "Nobody gets a parade for leaving the gay commumt}; and rm one of the more high-profile people to have gone through this transition and been public about it," Benkof said. Benkof was formerly well known in gay media circles a,, journalist-entrepreneur David Bianco, who in 1995 founded Q Syndicate, a media service that provides columns, cartoons. crossword puzzles and horoscopes to the gay press. ''The bottom line is that his reli· gious views themselves are despi· cable and detestable because they are saying that gay is bad." said Wayne Besen, author of a recent book criticizing •ex-gay• min· istries. Anyone who would say that is not a friend of the gay move­ment." But despite Benkofs new beliefs. he is not anti-gay, according to Paula Martinac, editor at Q Syndicate and David Benkof, formerly known as David Bianco, left behind his life as a gdy author and media entrepreneur because 1t didn't fit wrth hrs religious views. (Photo courtesy of Q Syndicate) a former co-worker of Benkof. Now Benkof has come out in opposition to gay marriage, calling it unholy in • J." a weekly northern California Jewish publi· cation. "In my opinion. David is neither active­ly working to 'convert' gay people to het­erosexuality nor trying to harm the gay movement." Martinac said. "Although our David Benl«f. s View of qay sex IS at odds with how most Amencan Jewst k. according to Wa'fRe Besen who rs gay Jewt and a bJr o Besen. Anyth ng but Stra1g t UnmaSk1nq the "ica~dals d:id Lm Beh nd t~ Ex-Gay Myth released th1S year (Photo e;:urtesy Wayne Besen) political views are pretty far apart, 'anti-gay is not a term I would use for him." Gays and Judaism Earlier this year Benkof began the process of changing his name from Bianco in honor of the 30-year anniversary of the death of his grandfather. Julius Benkof, and ·secondarily to reflect that I've changed sexual identity," he said. In 2001, Benkof sold Q Syndicate to Ri\·endell Media, another agency closely tied \\ith the gay press that distributes syn­dicates and works with advertisers that want to reach the gay market. In September 2003. Benkof sev­ered his ties \\ith the company completely, no longer \\Tiiing his column, "Over the Rainbow." ~It was increasingly odd to be supervISing content for the gay media on a day-to-day basis when in my own life I was movmg away from gay identity," Benkof said. Pollt1call}; Benkof said he still supports nllow1ng ga}s to servr openly in the military and ban nmg employmrnt dtscnmmatlon based on sexual orwntatlon. Benkof aL~o supports allowmg gays to adopt children. but believes that straight couples should be given priority over gay couples. he said. "I have tremendous respect for the rela­tionship choices and integrity of my gay friends. but I also have to say that I think opposite-sex relationships are in some way better than same-sex relationships. espe· cially when it comes to raising of chi!· dren," he said, "I don't hate the sin. and I don't hate who I was 10 years ago," Benkof said. "Gay sex is just inconsis· tent with traditional religious life.• But others disagree with Benkofs inter­pretation of the requirements of Jewish faith. "I find his version of Judaism to be backwards and at odds with how most American Jews think." Besen said. "Maybe he and Dr. Laura can powwow, but the majority of Jews think it is a slap in the face and an affront to Judaism." Besen. who is Jewish, authored "An}1hing but Straight: Unmasking the Scandals and 1.ies Behind the Ex-Gav Myth." released this year. · Modern knowledge of psycholog}; soci· ology and history has changed the role of women in mainstream Judaism and should be considered when examining gays, accordtng to Rabbi Joshua Lesser, lrader of Congregation Bet Haverlm, a predominately gay Reconstruchonlst syn agogue in Atlant~ Judaism has ne\er been an l'1and it has always shifted and changed ln rE'ia· uonsh1p to the knovo.roge of the da}; said Lesser. who 1 gay "\\e '1ave a completelv different understanding of what it means to be gay than when the Bible was writ· ten." Human error also played a part in the writing of the Bible. Lesser said. "I feel sad for people who have a funda­mentalist understanding of the Bible," he said. "It is so limiting because that view of God is often. in my opinion, masqueraded feelings of hatred of human beings. There is a lot of hatred that gets masqueraded as God when it is really human hatred and ignorance in the Bible." Not just about sex? During a trip to Israel in 2002, Benkof realized that he was ·railing short of the things traditional Jews do, he told Houston Voice. "I was not keeping Shabbat, I was hav­ing sex with men. and I was not living in Israel." Benkof said. The realization came after years of "having all kinds of Internet hook-ups and doing the urban gay male lifestyle thing." he said. Benkof, now 33. came out of the closet at age 19, and had gay sex for years even though he felt unhappy doing it. "Between 1995 and 2001, I was havmg gay sex a lot, feeling like it was wrong but I had no choice," he said. After his trip to Israel. Benkof slowly started living within the parameters of Orthodox Judaism and gradually cut out gay sex altogether. "There was a long time where I believed that gay identity and gay lifestyle was ulti· mately going to be consistent with a tradi· tional Jewish observance because I bought into the notion that God had made mega);" Benkof said.· And if God had made me gay, I thought of course he would expect me to express that sexuality." But Benkof concluded that being gay is a social construct not intended by God, thus ruling out his justification for man­on- man sex. "Historians all agree that there is no evidence of a gay minority," he said. "If that's true, it means that God doesn't make people ga;: That doesn't mean it is a choice, but a social construct." Benkof is now celibate, and said he hopes to meet a "woman with whom I can bring pleasure and joy, and with whom I can have a nice-if-not-spectacular bedroom life and create a beautiful Jewish famil}:" But he identifies as a bisexual who refrains from his desire for men. "l think the story' here is more about my ideas than arousal and attractions, but it is trtH' that if I go to the hcaeh and a handsome man walks by I'm still going to turn my head." he c;aid. Benkof also rcscn es the right to hf.' gav agaln Everybody should be abl to have whatevC'r .1festvlr feels nght for thrm at any pomt in their hfe he said HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvo1ce.com I Gennan lawmakers approve memorial for gay victims of Nazis BERLIN (AP) Germany will build a national mrrnorial to gays persecuted or killed Wlder the Nazis, complementing the planned German memorial to the 6 million Jews who died in the Holocaust parliament decidrd last week. Nazi Germany declared homosexuality an aberration that threat rned the German race and convicted some 50.000 gays as criminals. An estimated 10,000to15.000 gay men were deport· eel to concentration camps, when• few survived. "HomosC'xual victims of the Nazi regime were mostly shut out of Germany's culture of remembrance in the past. That ts now over." Greens lawmaker VolkPr Reck said. Architects will be asked to submit desigll proposals for the memortal. to be built on the edge of the Tiergarten park in central Berlin near the Brandenburg Gate and the planned Holocaust memorial. The German government will contribute $610.000. Few gays convicted by the Nazis came forward after World War II because of the continuing stib'lna and because the law used against them remained on the books m West Germany until 1969. The German parliament last year issued a formal pardon for gays convicted under the Nazis. German lawmaker Volker Beck. d Greens Party member, said gay victims of the Nazis now will be included m Germany's remem· brance of Holocaust atrocities through a new national memorial. Trans perfonner wins fans in South Korea A transgendered woman is taking South Korea by storm winning prominent singing and acting jobs and legions of fans of all ages, according to a report in the Washington Post. In a widely publicized move, the government allowed Lee Kyong Eun, a 28-year-old entertainer known by the stage name Ha Ri Su, to change her gender from male to female on official state documents. Smee then, she has starred in TV shows and commercials and been featured regularly in fashion maga· zines. "South Korea entered the new mil Jenni um as a different, more open nation," Lee told the Post ''Gay rights, transgencler r ights and women's rights things we v.ould never have dealt With before are now open for debate. We are living in a changing society. I am proof of that " South Koreans are experiencing newfound freedoms 15 years after the encl of author· itarian rule and the nation Is In the midst of a renaissance of progressive thought, accord mg to the Post report. Chileans indicted for recording judge saying he visited gay parlor SANTIAGO. Chile (AP) Six people, including five TV journalists, were inclictecl Dec. 11 for using a hidden cam· era to capture footage of a judge saymg he visited a gay massage parlor. Judge Gabriela Perez charged a director, pro ducer and three journalists at the pri vate television station Chilevision, as well as the manager of the gay business. wHh illegally recording Judge Daniel Calvo without his consent Chilevision said it provided a camera to Sebastian Rodriguez, manager of the parlor, who carried it hidden mto Calvo's office to record the conversation. The program aired Nov. 5. As a result of the program, Calvo was removed from a case he was investigating on an alleged sexual child abuse network and now faces expuls ion from the judiciary If found guilty, the men can be fined and sentenced to prison terms ranging from 51 days to nearly a year and a half. Gay Canadian lawmaker changes parties, gets promoted OTIAWA, Canacla Canadian representa· live Scott Brison, formerly a Conservatlve :.IP from Nova Scotia, is the first openly gay man appointed to a Canadian cabinet, accorcling to media reports. New Prime Minister Paul Martin named Brison his Parliamentary &">Cretary. His responsiblli tit>s will tm;ludc work to improve relations between Canacla and the United States; he will have an WlOfficial role as the govern· ment's liaison to gay Canadians, accorcling to media reports. Brison's promotion comes a week after he changed parties to join the Liberals, the Canadian Press reported. Bnson was said to be Wlsettled by the recent merger of the Alliance party with the Conservatives, accorcling to news reports. The businessman and investment banker voted for the merger but told the Canadian Press he did so with serious reservations. Gay couple in Taiwan awaits legaf.ization of union TAIWAN Unprecedented leg1slallon being fmali.wd by government oflicials in Taiwan would complete the marriage process for the nation's first gay couple, Age nee Francc­Presse reported. Shu Yu-Shen. a gay v.Tite1; had hundreds of guests and international media attention for his wedding seven years ago to Gray Ha1Timan, a Uruguay citizen, according to media report.~. The ceremony was Taiwan's fu-st and so far, only pub­lic gay wedding, Agence France-Presse re1xirted Shu, now 42, is ready to add a mar· riage license to his Wlion as the government works on legislation that would allow gay marriages or civil Wlions. "I nm really look ing forward to the clay when it becomes a real· ity," Yu Shen told Agencc France-Press. He said positive media coverage of his union with Harriman helped reduce social bias toward gays in Taiwan. A human rights bill now being drafted by the nation's cabinet would allov. gay marriages and allow gay couples to adopt children. according to media reporl~. Taiwan would be the first Asian coWltry to legally recognize same-sex unions From staff and wire reports DECEMBER 19 2003 December 24th, iPm: Special Candlelight Senice Rev. Janet Parker "Building Community Through Compassion • Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/Children 's area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Shepherd Groups meet during the week for prayer and bible study. contact church office for information. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday 1\forning Service And E:>..perience the Love of God! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@ev1.net www.maranathamcc.com 7 8 DECEMBER 19. 2003 www.houstonvo1ce.com HOUSTON VOICE In t1onal n 5 Salvation Army still target of holiday protests Voucher campaign highlights charity's stands on gay issues By RYAN LEE Gay rights group, continue to target the Salvauon Army's rril kettles, hoping to persuade the Christian chanty organiza· tlon to end its anU-gay policies For the third consecutive holiday season, gay rights supporters can drop a note of protest mto the red kettles in lieu of spare change traditionally Intended for the buckets. "This holiday season I am supporting orgaruzations that do not discriminate in any way against people based on sexual orienta· tion, gender identity or any other reason," reads a voucher created by Soulforce, a national gay rights interfaith group. "I will not donate to the Salvation Arm;; and will instead give to other charities, until the Salvation Army stops discrimi· nating agamst the lesbian, gay, b1Sexual and transgender community in hiring, fir­ing, promotion and in the provision of ben­efits," continues the voucher, which can be downloaded from wv:w.soulforce.org. But officials with the Salvation Army said the vouchers haven't registered \\ith the group. The charity hasn "t noticed the three-year protest, according to :Maj. George Hood. the Salvation Army"s national community rela­tions and development secretary "This is the first I've heard anything about it, so the folks in the field either aren't seeing it, or are not reporting it," said Hood, who is quoted on the Soulforce voucher as saymg that hirmg gay employ­ees "really begins to chew away at the the­ological fabric of who we are " The purpose of the kettle protest is to let gay men and lesbians who want to con­tribute to charity know that they can do so without funding discrimmat1on against themselvrs, said Laura Montgomery Rutt, director of communications for Soulforce. "The Salvation Army has come out in past years and said, in essence, that homo· sexuality is a sin to them," Rutt said. "They are certainly free to believe what they believe, but it's so important that gay people know that when they drop money mto a Salvation Army kettle, they're fund­ing their own oppression." Protest launched after White House lobbying Soulforce and other gay rights groups ramped up protests agamst the nation's oldest charity in 2001, after the Salvation Army's national body officially adopted two gay-related positions. That year, the Salvation Army announced it would allow its four regional Instead of dropping mooey into Salvation Amiy kettles Wing the holklay seasoo. gay refigious group Soulforce wants supporters to gM? ndm protesting the !100IJ'S ~ policies. (Photo by RO. YOl.llgblood) territories to make their own decisions about offering domestic partner benefits to employees. On Nov. 1, 2001, the Western ter· ritory announced it would offer domestic partner benefits in compliance with a San Fransisco law requiring all city contrac­tors to provide domestic partner benefits. Less than two weeks later. the Salvation Army's national Commissioner's Conference revoked the domestic partner policy, saying it was intended to provide benefits to an employee's spouse and chi! dren not unmarried partners. That same year, the Washington Post leaked a 79-page internal memo from the Salvation Army that claimed President Bush made a "firm commitment" to honor the organization's request to be exempt under Bush's "faith-based" initiative from state and local laws banning discrimma tion on the basis of sexual orientation. The Genesee County Michigan chapter of Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians & Gays became the first group to launch a voucher protest in 2001, soon followed by PFLAG chapters throughout the country This year, instead of organizmg a national kettle voucher protest. PFLAG allows each chapter to decide whether to continue dropping the vouchers in Salvation Army buckets. "In a lot of places. it was a really great way for people to express their frustration with the Salvation Army and its anti-gay policies," said Ron Schlittler. director of the field and policy department at PFI.AG. "But in some places - particularly small· er tov.115 where the Salvation Army were the only [charity] in tov.n - it kind of backfired, and our chapters were criticized for picking on this so-called 'good' organization.'' he said. Schlittler praised Soulforce's effort to contmue the protest on a national level. "In the context of movement politics. none of us can really own these strate­gies," Schlittler said. Bush:· Massachussetts court 'overreached its bounds' BUSH. continued from Page l dent Is saymg if we v1rm somewhere the freedom to marry, its necessary to amend the Constitution Thats the necessity that hes talking about. That's unconscionable. Thats outrageous NGLTF has characterized the presi· dent's remarks as a "declaration of war on gay America.• The Human Rights Campaign, the nations largest gay political group, called on the president not to join attacks on American families by supporting a dis­crlminatory, anti-gay amendment to the US. Const1tutton. "Its never necessan: m fact 1t would be shameful, to msert prejudice and d.:scrinu nation mto the U.S. Const1tuUon said \'imme Stachrlberg, HRC's political director But some observers contend that the presidents words were deliberately vague and leav th door open for th Bush admm1Strati m t possibly endorse a p' .m for ~tat sponsored ch ii unions or dome ttc partnerships. Log Cabin urges caution for activists P tnck Guern ro, 'It cuu~e director of Log C'1b n Repubhrru' a ga~ GOP roup, said the orgamzat1on r<es \\Ith Bu h s comment that marnage issues hould be governed by the states. But Guerriero expressed concern over what he called the president's "possible support" for an anti· gay constitutional amendment. "Log Cabin has consistently and clearly opposed any effort to write discrimination into the United States Constitution," Guerriero said. "Log Cabin urges the pres­ident to avoid a diVlsive culture war that will only divide the American family." When asked about Foreman's statement that Bush s remarks arr "unconscionable and confirm his backing of a constltutton al amendn:.~nt, Guerriero urged caution from gay leaders. i v;ould advise us to do the nttty gritt}; non SClC'.' work of educatmg the American people." he said, rather than reactmg each time the president "restates his position agamst ga) marriage something every one has known" and whirh 1s not that d1f· ferent from some of the l admg Democratic pres1dent1al candidates Guerriero said his White House con tacts mform hun that the adm;.mstrat10n b d1\1ded ovrr the 1ssur of a const1t1.a10n al amendment There are strong opm1ons on both sides, he said I thmk )OU ee the entire nation, including the pl"C ident 1s •ru glmg with th1S brand new I uc Althc.:.1gh Bushs remarks on ga) mar nage left room for debate and mt rpreta tlon, he was clear m his opm1on of ti: Patrick Guerriero executive director of Log Cabm Republicans. uged President Bush to c1vo1d a 'd1vt­Stve culture war Massachusetts court. Let me tell you, the court, I thought overreathed ts bounds as a court, Bush said. It did the job of the legislature It \\35 a very act1v1St court m makmg thr dec1s1on it mad • \\'hen Saw\ er asked Bush if h bdwve the Defense of Marnage Act 1s enou(lb to protect th m~utuuon of marr1a e BJ h Id, It ma) be undermmf'd at •his po nt The Defense of Marrmc Act, or DOMA. defines marriage under federal law as a union between a man and a woman. Congress passed the act and President Clinton signed It in 1996. "I also think It's very important, on this subject, that the country be tolerant of people and understand people," Bush said "But toleranre and the belief in marriage aren t mutually exclusive points of view. Mixed reaction from FMA supporters Although Guerriero has said I..og Cabin would llkely not endorse Bush's re-election if the president supports the Federal Marriage Amendment, Log Cabin spokes person Mark Mead said its far too early for the group to reach a decision on a Bush endorsement Mead said Log Cabin remams hopeful that the president will not endorse a constitutional amendment. Fearing that legalizing same-sex mar rmge in Massachusett~ could lead to fu ther court rulmgs requtring the other stat s to recognize such marriage . artl gay groups have aggressively lobbied tht> \\'lute House to endorse the Fedt '"ll Marriage Am ndir. 11t Thr amendment, drafted by c-:ialttlon of fund mentaltst C'hrtst11n •roup \\OU! amnd the US. ronst1tut1on to ba1 sar.: x marnact> as \\ell as r'iv1l umons and domestic partnership lav.s, according to gay rights ttornrys HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com DECEMBER 19. 2003 9 I ocal news Gays and lesbians feeling some relief ASSAULTS, continued from Page 1 "It is not those people's job to prevent panic in our community, it is our commu­nity's job to control panic in our communi· ty," he said. "Panic doesn't help." Hill said unofficial reports in the area, which is already one of the highest crime areas in the city, speak of as many as a dozen attacks. Safety tips • Avoid displaying large amounts of cash. • Try not to carry a bag. • Walk with an attitude • Avoid street solicitors and keep at least five feet between you and strangers on the street. • Park in well-lighted areas. • Have you car keys ready before you get to your car "The investigation of any of these anonymous assaults is an enormously dif· fie ult thing to do," Hill said. "There's no bread crumb trail. All you have is 'he said,· 'they said,' 'they thought."' He encouraged those in attendance to rely on the police to protect the neighbor· hood while community members educate themselves on safety issues. The meeting highlighted a stronger • Check front and back seats before getting into your car. • Avoid walking alone. You can ask a bar security guard to walk you to your • Always lock your doors as soon as you get into your car. • Avoid shortcuts such as parking lots, alleyways or wood· ed areas. I national news Meeting orgamzer John Szewczyk explains why some members of the gay and lesbian community are reluctant to file official police reports. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) need for the neighborhoods and homeown­ers to remove overgrown bushes, clear out cluttered lawns and replace missing or burned out bulbs on lights. making it more difficult for attackers to surprise their vie· tims. attack them and get awa}: Since HPD can't provide increased police presence indefinite!}: group~ like Q Patrol will have to fill in the gaps. Q Patrol provides a team of volunteers to patrol the area on weekends. Q Patrol members report suspicious or criminal activity like robberies and assaults to the police. While not in serious need of funding. the organization has been suffering from a lack of volunteers to join the patrols. The group has six active volunteers who have committed to walking once a month. "The problem is that even though I say we've got six. I'm not saying we've got six showing up every week." Arasin said. "As far as people who are active. ifs a very small number. and they're not there e\·ery week. That's the situation we run into. There's only so much we can do." While some in the community are con· cerned that police have not yet labeled any of the attacks as hate crimes, the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby's Ellis said it doesn't matter why people are targeting the area, only that it's happening at all. "I think the important thing to remem· ber is. they're targeting our community," he said. "\\'hether ifs because we're gay and some stereotypes they think are more susceptible, or it's because clubs are closer together. people are targeting that area." ft MORE INFO Ada Edwards District D City Council Member 900 Bagby street first floor 713-247·2001 Fax: 713-247-2196 districtd a:cityofhouston.net Crime St~ 713-222-8477 Hate Crime Hotline 713-308-8737 Neartown HPO Storefront 804 Westhe1mer 713-284-8604 www.ciJiouston.tx.us/departme/police/ cp5~d001.htm Q Patrol 713-528-SAFE QPatrolHouston a yahoo com groups.yahoo.comlgroup/Qpatro!Houston Mass. Senate asks court to clarify ruling Legislators want to know if civil unions will suffice By JOE CREA BOSTON - The Massachusetts Senate voted unanimously last week to ask the state's Supreme Judicial Court if civil union legislation, complete with all the legal bene­fits of marriage, would satisfy the court's ruling in November that denying marriage rights to gays is unconstitutional. Senate {>resident Robert Travaglini said the legislature is seeking "clarifica­tion" on the ruling in which the court said it is wrong for the state to deny marriage licenses to gay and lesbian couples. "There are a number of legal experts whose opinions differ on the interpreta · tion [of the ruling]," Travag!ini told the Associated Press. "Our intention was not to alter or modify the decision of the court, it was just to seek clarification." Travaglini and members of the Joint Committee on the Judiciary attached to the advisory opinion request a civil union bill that they say confers all the protec­tions and benefits of civil marriage that the high court requested. Joan Kenney, public information officer for the SJC, confirmed receipt of the Mass. Senate President Robert T ravagliri said the legislature wants the state Supreme Judicial Court to clarify its November ruling that denying marriage rights to gays violates the state's Constitution. Senate's request and said that the court is soliciting briefs from interested parties. which must be received by 5 p.m. on Jan. 12. She said the justices could rule •any­time" after the January brief deadline. Gay Massachusetts State Sen. Jarrett T. Barrios (0-Middlesex) said that by seeking clarification from the SJC. the Senate is not moving toward a civil union bill. •we are just seeking counsel." Barrios said. "I'm confident that asking for clarifi· cation is a politically sound approach at this point. I'm optimistic that it will help us gain clarity that this decision won't tol· erate a civil union type of legislation." The SJC issued its landmark ruling in mid· November and gave the legislature 180 days to act as it "deems appropriate" before the decision takes effect. The Massachusetts House, the more con· servative of the two legislative bodies, has delayed plans to file its own civil union bill in light of the Senate's request to the SJC. Gay activists and other supporters of same-sex marriage argue that the high court's ruling makes clear that nothing short of marriage will suffice. "Based on the ruling, it's hard to imag­ine that the court will accept civil unions; said Gary Buseck, executive director of Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders. "The opinion is filled with all kinds of marriage references .... all of it would sug· gest that they are not open to an equal but separate system." Decision expected by Feb. 11 Some legal experts. including Harvard Law School professor Laurence H. Tribe, suggested recently that civil union legisla­tion might pass muster with the SJC. "Civil unions with rights and duties fully equh·alent to marriage except for the \ital label of 'marriage' it~elf could con­ceivably eliminate the one-vote margin by which the SJC last month held that the state's Constitution forbids limiting mar­riage to opposite-sex couple~. not as a mat· ter of principle but as a matter of compro­mL~ e with what the justices might assume to be politically realistic." Tribe WTOte in a letter to the editor of the Boston Herald. Tribe. a recognized constitutional law expert, argued unsuccessfully in 1986 to have the Georgia sodomy law overturned in the case of Bowers vs. Hardwick. Lawmakers say they hope to get a deci· sion from the court before Feb. 11, when the House and Senate convene as a 200-member constitutional convention. At that time, they will also begin debate on a constitu· tional amendment to ban same-sex mar· riage in Massachusetts. Barnos said. The Associated Press contributed to this report ft MOREINFO Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders 30 Winter St., Suite 800 Boston. MA 02108 617426-1350 www.glad.org I 1fdi t>1td ll voice EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION EX!llJIM Elitor CHRIS CRAIN Elitor BINNIE FJSHER - bfisle'.iihoostonYolce.com Procilction KIKI CARR COi 1 espoiidetrts: LOU CHIBBARO. JR. JOE CREA. LAURA DOUClAS.£ROWN. LAUREL FAUST. MIKE Fl.fMINC. MATTHEW HENNIE. RYAN l£E. BRIAN MOYLAN. KEVIN NAFF. KEN SAIN CHRISTOPHtR Sill\'. SID'£ WEINSTEIN COillriJulors JOH.'.W HOOKS. JOSEF MOLNAR. JASON VICTOR SERINIJS ANO MUBARAK DAHIR ~ DALTON DEHART. KIMBERl.Y THOMPSON Welnaster ~"!\M VAP"111'1 SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANll El.!ERI " ~houstoovoice.oo Aa:oll1t Executives BRETT CUUUM - bcu!lun@houstoovoice.co SCOTT RYAN sryan@:ltoustonwice.com JENNIFER HOUANO • ~houstonvoice.com Mlinistrabve Assista1t JOHNNY HOOKS-jhooks(a.~ National Advettisi1g RepresentatM RivmleD Media • 212-242-6863 Publisher· WINDOW MEDIA UC President-WIWAM WAYBOURN Ecitonal Director· CHRIS CRAIN Ccrpcnt! Controller· BARNrnE HOLSTON Art Director· ROB BOEGER Operations Manager· MICHAEL KITCHENS Mmlllg Manager· DAN GARRIOTT MEMBER ..da1Eer .. ........ liiidm&'OI-CHARTER MEMBER Esl.iblished 1974 .tS the l,fonfrose St.u 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 WWW .houstonvoice.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 530 p.m. weekdays To slDlit a lelb!r Letters sin*! be fewer' lflill 400 IMlnls. We ~ the r9ll to eat fa' coo!ent all ~ We wil with­ldf n;ms ~ rt'!Jies!. bJl JOO llllSt irdde ~ name arx! ~ iUTiber fDr \'el'i!"icatin Please send mail to Hoosloo \Q:e. 500 ll7ietl Blvd. Sllitl! 200. Hou:stoo. Texas T7004 ta (713) 529-9531 or Hnai loedi' !l;lnJslcJNrXe.am ~~ therm do rot relled tOOse d the lhlstm Voce Issue 1208 oru Lying our way to equal rights The gay marriage train is moving way too fast for many of our advocates, so some have chosen to pretend otherwise in an effort to trick our opponents. By CHRIS CRAIN OLITICIANS AND LAWYERS often lib. That won't come as earth-shattering news to any­one familiar with either species. but it is nonetheless troubling when they do. It ts even more troubling when they are truth-challenged in the cause of our equal rights. If we really believe our cause is just and we have faith in the American system, then our advocates should not be forced to tell whoppers on our behalf. For one thing, we lose our moral high ground. which has won us victory after victory in recent court battles and in the hearts and minds of many fair-minded Americans. For another. playing fast and loose with the truth is almost always short sighted and ultimately counter-pro­ductive. Your mom was right about that; just ask Bill Clinton. So who exactly is lying on our behalf? ADAM EBBIN. FOR ONE. EBBIN MADE history last month when he became the first openly gay candidate to be elected to the Virginia General Assembly. He hasn't even been sworn in yet, but as a longtime operative and gay activist, Ebbin is no stranger to how the truth can be shaded in tough political battles. So he was quick to respond when word came down this week that a Republican dele­gate, Robert Marshall of Manassas, plans to introduce legislation that would pro­hibit the state from recognizing Vermont­style civil unions from other states. Activists are worried that something stmilar might be proposed by the Georgia General Assembly, especially since Ron Crews, the ex-preacher turned Republican who led the passage of Georgia's Defense of Marriage Act, is now the point person on gay marriage nationally as head of the Massachusetts Family Institute. Back m Virginia, Ebbln criticized the propos:L as mean-spirtted and ml'aning less, since Virgm1a doesn't currently rec ognize civil unions and already has a Defense Of Marriage Act on the books that would prevent the state from recog­nizing gay marriages. :\lean-spirited? Yes. Meaningless? By no means. Vermont-style civil unions offer very real protections to gay couples, and the "Full Faith & Credit Clause" of the U.S. Constitution requires Virginia to recognize Vermont civil unions, as if they were issued by Virginia il~elf. So if Virginia passes legislation to block that from happening, then gay couples in the state will have an even tougher time get· ting their civil unions recognized. since the courts would first have to find the state's anti<ivil union law unconstitutional. That's no easy task in a state whose judicial sys­tem 1s historically unfriendly to gays and other non-traditional couplings . Ebbin's lie was intended. of course, to calm the anti-gay momentwn. but at what cost? If we don't point out that real lives will be affected, what's to stop the "mushy mid· die .. of the Virginia legislature from taking the easy path and passing the legislation. IF YOU BELIEVE DALE CARPENTER, then Adam Ebbin is lying. But then again, so L~ Dale Carpenter. A longtime Log Cabin Republican now teaching law at the University of Minnesota, Carpenter testified at a Congressional hearing in September that the federal Defense of Marriage Act already prevents states from recognizing gay marriages recognized in other states, making unnecessary a proposed constitu­tional amendment banning gay marriage. But gay activists have said for a long time that DOMA is unconstitutional, due to our old friend the Full Faith & Credit Clause, which can only be trumped by another constitutional amendment The pro-gay forces worltlng on the September congressional hearing didn't really believe Carpenter's testimon}~ but they wanted to calm the momentum behind thl' anti gay amendment. To be fair, Carpenter hunself may not HOUSTON VOICE DECEMBER 19, 2003 PAGE 10 be lying. As a gay Republican, he is used to living with self-contradictions. As a supporter of states' rights, Carpenter may well believe that a state should be free not to recognize a gay marriage from another state. But does he feel the same way about interracial marriages? The Supreme Court never reached the issue directly. but the justices did decide in the 1967 case of Loving vs. Virginia (there's that state again) that it was a vio­lation of equal protection for states to pro­hibit interracial couples from marrying. Does Carpenter honestly believe that the court still would have allowed a state to refuse recognition of another state's interracial marriage? Or does Carpenter believe that same-sex couples do not share with interracial couples a constitutional freedom to marry? LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS LIKE Carpenter have no monopoly, to be sure, on dissembling as a civil rights strategy. Ruth Harlow, one of the heroes from the Texas sodomy win from earlier this year, did her share of fibbing. During oral arguments on the case in March, about the only valirl point made by Texas prosecutor Charles Rosenthal was that the court might be treading a slippery slope to gay marriage, and gay activists would surely take a sodomy decision in their favor and run to the proverbial altar. Hogwash said Harlow, after the argu­ment. Bringing up marriage was a need­less "distraction." she said then. because "this court knows the difference between a criminal law that invades people's lives and the privacy of their homes, and one that offers them legal recognition." Of course Harlow knew then that her cohorts at Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund would do exactly as Rosenthal said they would, and take a constitutional win on sodomy laws and argue that the same justifications are behind depriving gay couples of mar­riage. Even Antonin Scalia, the arch-con­servative, acknowledged as much. IN ALL THREE SITUATIONS, THE LIE was seen as expedient, intended to calm the opposition so that they might not mar­shal their forces too soon, when we're not yet prepared. For many gay activists, the marriage train is moving much too fast, and the more we can delay the better. But is that any way to win our civil rights? Are we really no better than our opposition, lying and misleading in a naked grab for as much power as we can get? If we really believe in our cause, and we belil've in our country, then v.-e should fight the good light, not play rope-a-Oope. After all, v.-e have a lot more than our credibility at stake. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com WAYNE BESEN If presidential debates leave you snoring, try looking at the Democratic candidates like you might size up a potential romantic partner. Flirting with the Democrats FOR A DECADE I HAVE WORKED TO get gay Americans active in politics. The prob· !em is most Americans. including gay men and lesbians. hate politics. They find poli· cy debates boring and politicians boors. I've watched C.SPAN 2 reruns at mid· night. and thought, "Maybe the apathetic majority is right. this stuff is verbal NyquiL I need to get a life and watch Comedy Central." Then I see Sen. Trent Lott speak and realize I am watching Comedy Central. It's political season once again, and we must get interested in politics or bad men in bad suits will pass terrible laws that hurt our families. Perhaps we should look for uncon· ventional ways to reach the, "I don't know who Howard Dean is, but I can tell you what color panties Madonna wears" crowd. One way might be to describe these presidential wannabes as if they were potential dates. Gen. Wesley Clark: The mysterious mil· itary stud at the bar. He's Mr. Right to every· one, but no one really knows him. So they stand and ogle from across the dance floor while projecting on to Clark who they want him to be. But everyone is petrified to talk to the hottest guy in the bar, because they are afraid the moment he opens his mouth he will sound more like Richard Simmons than Rambo and the whole fantasy will be kaput. Gov. Howard Dean: A sexy former high school wrestler with a lot of good qualities, including passion. inspiration and smarts. He's also a wealthy doctor' But there is a monkey wrench in the Jl.11: Perfect sc·enario: He says really stupid things at stupid times and then habitually apologizes for the fame pas. You want to take him home to meet Mom on Thanksgiving, but your scared he'll blurt out that she looks too fat in her new dress to eat that last slice of pecan pie. And then, of course, he will say how sorry he is as he drives away in his pick· up truck adorned with a Confederate flag. Sen. John Kerry: On paper the guy looks flawless. He's got the best online profile. And if he's your boyfriend, you get to sip mimosas with big shots on Martha's Vmeyard! You really, really want it to work with Kerry and you hope it clicks. But alas, there is no chem· istry and you have to call it quits. As you try to leave his house, you have to get in line because his maid, gardener and chef are in front of you at the exit. Even his dog is trying to escape. The poor guy's life is just disintegrating. Rep. Richard Gephardt: He's the old ex· boyfriend you won't marry, but you re;pect enough to keep him in your life. He's once .small comforts '.)4>U'D '1ATE IT."!Hh 1\/~81Altlt«:i,1ll( PLACr IS ~IMRED \o/11H CUT\<;'/ WTTU. l.HGElS AND BEAR' ~D l(CIW 1•1WLL ~vt ~ O<RIST/o\AS CAAP \IP 1'lO. l l\;INK 1K [1111Rf ():)UACf'l&I£ 1<113Qi IND<JSTIQ' 15 ~ Ar~T llY CH!:l'\0 NUl\SES. SU )OU AT Sii<· ~-~~' DECEMBER 19. 2003 ll I 'f1 / again trying to convince you to give hlm one more shot and promio;es "this time you'll fall in love." You agree out of loyal!); but on the way to meeting him at the big dance, you run into someone more attractive and stand him up - this time for good. Sen. Joe Lieberman: You go on a dinner date with him to a Chinese restaurant and like what he has to say But he is so sonorous that you nod off and your face falls into the twice-cooked pork. If you thought Al Gore was wood· en, this guy is a totem pole. He's the nice guy that finished last. Sen. John Edwards: He's the cute guy with potential, but he smiles too much and looks like your little brother. He's more of a one-night stand. and in the morning you roll out of bed and tell hlm you'll see him in four years. Rev. Al Sharpton: He's the guy with no money who insists he can take you on a date at the fme~i ~iaurant in town. Once at the posh btstro he has a lot of good things to sa~; but you are distracted by hb bizarre hairdo. The Rest You might go on date:; v.ith them if you could Just remember their names or where you put their phone numbers. Yes, I know the bleak options I pre· sented aren't prett): But we must vote because the alternative is marriage with a faux-macho cowboy from Maine who wears a bogus "Top Gun" flight suit, runs up his American Express bill and boasts how "big" he is. Despite his insis· tence, we know the mass weapon he claims doesn't exist. IJi;. Wa~ Besen 1s a former spokesperson for ~ the Human Rights Campaign and is author of • Anythmg But Straight Unmasking the Scandals and Lies Behmd the Ex-Gay' Myth." He can be reached at wbesen@aol.com 12 DECEMBER 19. 2003 BERING MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURC Ii l!Jrl/yw lkt'Jr,. U ii//_, Pu. "" 1440 t? old S~ at Mulberry • H\>uston, TX '7"006 • "I 3 '26 I 1 • "'"''* benngumc org: Oflering Peace' & Rcooncilia1ion to the Alienated ]()30 Hei<.,•ht~ BJ..d. Hou'iton, lX 771.XJ."i ph. 713.86l.lffi) Wlltl~rtorg AID FOR AIDS wwwa ora s J AID IDB llDS uds nnd llY mdidles tf 111 lyJas It std It IY-posl!IYe """ ii lat11 llluica , .. Cm•ku 11• lfrlca. If y1111'n rwttcllu tlMraplts tf 1taclplld meds. J1111 can we tim •Y dwtiq tkm llUJutlHS It AID IDB AIDS 11W1 Yort, IT 10013 P~r: 212 337118431 28 CALENDAR Friday Decembet- 19th Mcrn1ng Prayer IOom Monday December 22nd Advent Ser e$ 6 30pm John the Bop! sl Elld>ortst 7 30ptri Thursday December 25th MERRY CHRISTMAS Friday December 26th Movfe Night 7pm George of the Jungle 2 The pro1ect wol be clo,.d the week of December 29!h • Jonuaty 2nd www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I a ction! ale No 'eHarmony' for gays Saying gay could 'turn off' site's users, director says By CHRISTOPHER SEELY GAY INTERNET SURFERS SHOULD spare themselves the 30 to 40 minutes it takes to complete a personality profile for eHarmony.com, an online dating service. The matchmaking site doesn't allow s:i.me sex couplings because some mem· bers could be "turned off ' by refer­ences to "MSM [men seeking men] • or "WSW" on the site, according to Dr. Steve Carter, director of research and product development is "to get people interacting with each other as soon as possible," according to Carl Pritzkat, one of the site's founders. Edwina.com offers services for peo­ple to meet for long-term relationships, friendships and sex. Targeting gay couples exclusively was a "marketing decision," Pritzkat said "We thought it would be a Jot easier to have an impact on the LGBT market than to go out to the straight market as a whole," he said. Ed\\ ina.com uses algorithmic l'qUa· lions based on a quest10nnaire not "We are trying to be senslti"e· but you get to the dtlrmma of trvmg to make everybody happy," Carter said. "A lot of the core audience for the service are the Christlan religious con· servatives who would be turned off." www .ctlwina.C'Olll ldrmony psychological data to assist clients in meet Ing a mate, Pritzkat said. The question· naire and matching advice is based on what the site's founders "have been through," he said. GAY RELATIONSHIP seekers rejected by the "vaiue based" psychologh:al evalua tions trmp~etecl by eHarmony.com can also turn to Match.com, a service that employs profile· matching question naires designed by Some visitors to the slte complain that eHarmoni:com doesn't warn gay hopefuls up front that same-sex matchmaking isn't included before they fill out the site's person· match com Online datmg sites run the gamut from straights only to gays only: Edwina.com services only gay men and lesbians, eHarmony.com excludes gays, and Match.com opens its services to every· one, regardless of sexual orientation. allty profile designed by psychologists. The site's developers considered implemt>ntlng pop-up messages on the first page to forewarn gay surfers of the site's pohcy, but site officials didn't want to scare away their target audi­ence on the first page, Carter said. Instead, an explanation of the site's policy excluding gays was added In the Frequently Asked Questions sub-page, after gay users wrote in. "We're sorry if the placement of recent advertising led you to believe that we offer this service," the explana· tlon states. "eHarmony's matching sys­tem is designed to match highly com· patible men and women." The "phenomenon" of gay singles who want to find long-lasting relation· ships through the site is "relatively recent" since the site's inception in 2000, Carter said. "We don't provide matchmaking for homosexual relationships," Carter said. "What we are doing is trying to help solve a problem, and gay relationships just aren't our agenda." THE FOUNDING PRINCIPLE FOR eHarmonycom is to "mitigate and prevent divorce" in heterosexual marriages by using more than 35 years of research into what makes marriage work compiled by Dr. Neil Clark Warren. In contrast, the driving force for gay-only matching site Edwina.com doctors. The site includes same-sex and opposite-sex matchmaking as part of the questionnaires. ··wo use what we beliove is the most sciontifically valid test in this area on the Internet today to assess a member's personality and allow them to get their matches Ulling the results of this assessment," said Trish McDermott, "vice president of romance" at Match.com. "We have a very thriving gay and les· bian community that we are very proud of, " McDermott said. 0 ACTION! INFO Edwina Mediapolis, inc. 307 Seventh Avenue 11th Floor New York. NY 10001 212·377-3333 www.edwina£Om eHannony 300 N Lake Ave. Suite llll Pasadena. CA 91101 626-795-4814 www.eharmonycom Match P.O. Box 3870 McAllen, TX 78502 800-926-2824 www.match.com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I "I think we're all sinners. One of my favorite Bible verses says, 'Why would I take a speck out of your eye when I have a log in my own?' . .. and having said that, however. I do believe in the sanctity of marriage .. .. But I don't see that as conflict with being a toler· ant person or an understanding person." President Bush, when asked by Diane Sau:ver if gays are sinners and if their sin is any different from the sins of heterosexuals (ABC's "Primetime Lil'e. "Dec. I6) "If the situation in Iraq stabilizes and the economy continues to improve, the debate over marriage could become one of the defining issues of the 2004 election." 1bny Perkins. executil'e director of the anti-gay Family Research Council, on how Saddam Hussein's capture could affect 2004 campaign issues (FRC press release, Dec. IS) "Personally, I favor [Gene Robinson's ordination). But this diocese, and the whole American church, was not ready for that, and a lot of damage has been done." Episcopal Bishop Jerry Winterrowd. on why he now regrets voting infauor of the ordi· nation of the denomination'sjirst openly gay bishop (Associated Press, Dec. I2) "I don't support gay marriages being given the same legal and community sta· tus as a traditional marriage. I believe tra­ditional marriage is one of the bench· mark institutions of our societ}; and I hold that view very strongly. Even if you produced an opinion poll tomorrow that showed me 80 percent of the Australian community disagreed with me. I would still hold that view." Australian Prime Minister John Howard (1itest Australian. Dec. 8) "I thought that [a Seattle contemporary arts center) proposing it to them was bet· ter than the druggie homosexual newspa­per calling up and saying, 'Hey. can we borrow your kids for the weekend?' David Schmader. columnist for the Stranger alternative ll'eekly newspaper in S.'Gttle. on why he encouraged a local arts center to approach a high school about proL'idin,, a venue for a school production of "The Breakfast Club" bonned by administrators (Associated Press. Dec. I2) "I think I'm much more in touch with the average working people because that's actually what 1 am: a working person of the district and independent business owner. and father. and husband and property owner." Chuck Morse, a first-time candidate announcing his plan to challenge Massachusetts Democrat Barney Frank. who is gay. for his congressional seat next year (Prol'idence .!oumal. !Ne. I) "I have a partner. a wife. which is a strange word for me to use. I never really u ed it until I got sued. And you want to knol'. why' If you are a heterosl'xual talk show host and you're sued b} a major cor· poration, anything you have t.ald to your husband is privileged information. But If you are a homosexual talk show host and you're sued by a corporation. anything you have ever said and/or written to your spouse, partner or wife is allowl'd to be entered into the record. It is totally unfair. And never in my wildest dreams, 1f you said to me you're going to become 11n advocate for gay marriage, I'd say you· re on crack." f,esbian comedian Rosie O'Donnell. 1cho ended a lawsuit last month filed by the Gruner t .!ahr publishing firm rr.sponsible for the now-defunct Rosie magazine. A judge ro/ed neither side was entitled to damages. (Sinus OutQ satellite radw. Dec. I I) Donnie Day Life Coach DECEMBER 19. 2003 13 SINTJl'S HOT WHY m 1501 Durham 713 880.9191 www.haustonllYJft.com Tour dub for datafls' Group Coaching A sriall, interactive support group focused on Personal & Professional Development. emphas1z1ng action, accountability and follow-through in a coachmg enVJronMent! Come experience the synergy of the group! Wednesdays 6:30-Bpm, starting January 7 832.283. 7390 • 4040 Milam, Suite 310 (Fitness Exchange Building) www.donnieday.com or e-mail: donnie@donnieday.com Reward yourself. Sc edule on eppo1ntme ~ Specials • 1 hour massage for $45 • Facial for $40 713.523.6905 • 415 Westhelmer, Suite 210 • Houston, TX 77006 14 DECEMBER 19, 2003 Support our community. Holiday gift shopping at: Iiike to advertise with the Houston Voice because my business is primarily geared towards meeting the needs of GLBT.tomrnumty/ Montrose area cl ents. I have had such great l'l!'iponse to our ads, we will always advertise with yoi; guys! -Ryan Fugate MJSSJge Therapist wwwhoustonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE -P1--_~~IOl T Houston 713-595-9952 817-289-1234 214-379-7979 210-933-1234 512-735-5002 (C,all • Toll •FREE 1-888-399-MALE STOP GREEDY CORPORATE POLLUTERS & CORRUPT POLITICIANS '. ork on exciting cnr.ipaigns to protect public health nua the environment. •.ust hnve excellent cor:n:mnicntion skills • .,.345/wk + bonua. 1:30-lCpr.i J:-1''. Call Cl.an Yater AcUon t.od~ ! ?13-~29-9426. Clean \\later Action Gay Video Sex: With the right downloads, new gay-inclusive video games make boy-boy, girl-girl intimacy possible. Page 16 I Familiar Faces, New CDs: New tribute CDs pay homage to Dolly Parton, Cher and other divas of song. Page 18 Out on ( By KAY DAYUS HE SONGS THAT WHIRL around in almost every store these days advise that It's the season to be jolly and that there's "no place like home for the holidays." Visions of famllies gathered together. fire­places ablaze and trees laden with gifts dance m our heads as the music plays. The scene painted by the words of holiday songs is one thing, but reality is something else. Psychotherapist Jamey Collins said whether his clients celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza or Ramadan, the holiday season can be stressful for anyone· but that the tension is often "signifi. cantly higher" for gay men and lesbians. Home for the holidays is a nice thought, but it doesn't always work for gays and lesbians. e u HOUSTON VOICE DECEMBER 19, 2003 PAGE 15 Holidays with the family don't always work out for gay and lesbian couples Newly elected Houston City Controller Annise Par1cer (left) and her partner, Kathy Hubbard. are planning a quiet holiday with friends and daughters. Daniella and Marquitta Par1cer. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) When she was partnered with a woman, Judy Reeves said, they chose not to spend holidays with her parents, who lived in Houston at the time and are now deceased. "I liked to spend the time with people I liked or who liked me," Judy said." I wasn't really estranged from them. They just didn't always quite get it · me being ga)~" She is now married to a gay man. admittedly a marriage of conve­nience. Reevrs and her husband, Brnce, tried spending Christmas apart the first year they were married m 1988. Bruce drove to Mississippi to spend Christmas v.ith his parents but didn't stay through the holi­~ He returned to Houston to spend the remainder of the time with his new wife. Founders of the Gay and Lesbian Museum, the two now choose to spend health insurance. As a single woman vnth health problems in 1988, Judy didn't have access to health insurance. As a married woman. she could be added to the insurance that Bruce had. ''Although our marriage is strictly for conve­nience. we are real good friends and I can·t see that changing," Judy said. Being gay and from different traditions can create its own holiday madness, as Barry Mandel learned the first time he went home for the boll· days with his partner of 11 years. Scott Sawyer. The two arrived by plane m Sawyer's home­town, Little Rock, Ark~ on Christmas Eve, just m time to meet the folks at the Baptist church. Please see FAMILIES on Page 19 Mandel, the holiday together and go their separate ways afterward. This year, Judy said, "The day after Christmas, Bruce is leaving for Mexico to see his latest squeeze." Judy and Bruce married because she had nowhere to live at the time and needed A garland-adorned fireplace with a Menorah on the mantle says that when Scott Sawyer {left) and Barry Mandel got together 11 years ago, they learned to mix holiday traditions. (Photo by Dalton OeHart) 16 DECEMBER 19 2003 I www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Video 'gamers' list top picl<s for gay-inclusive gifts Sexual orientation 'non-issue' in new role-play offerings By VAN GOWER '\\1TH THE GIFf-GIYD:G SEASON UPON us, a growing number of gay "gamers" - or video game enthusiasts will look into the1r stockings for new games or "add ons" to their existing collections. Several role-playmg games on store shelves boast gay content or make sexual or1entauon a "non-Issue," says Chris V.LZZini, a gay gamer" who founded wwv.:gaymer.org, an Atlanta-based online conununity for gay video game enthusiasts. "How [characters] behave is the focus and the bulk of the game, not their sexuali­ty," Vizzini says. One of the most popular gay-inclusive games is the "Sims" role-playing series. which allows players to create characters, give them identities and shepherd them through a wide vanety of lifelike sltua· tions. Characters can build homes, explore romantic relationships and start families. What makes the "Sims" games unique is that male characters can choose male dates or partners, and female characters can choose female ones. Add-On modules allow origjna] "Sims" games to be expanded into new areas with different themes. "Sims: Hot Date," is a popu· lar add-0n \\ith gay players because it allows them to put characters through an all-inclu­sive, non-discriminating dating scene. ·All of the 'Sims' games allow same-sex relationships exactly equivalent to the oppo­site- se.x ones," said Lorelei Feldman. a mem­ber of Outworlders, an Atlanta-based group of gay science fiction. fantasy and gaming buffs. The "Sims" series even enables "hugs, ktsses and - if you have the right down­loads sex," she says. There are even opportunities in "Sims" games to play the home-wrecker, Vizzini says. "In the original 'Sims.' a straight couple could be married, and you could even end up S\\1ping her husband," he says. ANOTHER GA!\IB ~1TH GAY APPEAL IS the Japanese inspired "Dance Dance Revolution.• Players buy modules for their systems. and dance pads that plug into the systems are laid on the floor. Onscreen animated characters dance to a playlist of some 27 dance tracks and club remixes. Players follow onscreen prompts and follow the music and steps to make their characters dance. "A lot of the guys who have gotten it so far have been completely raving about it," VIZZlnl says. Some games \\ith less gay-centric themes also have a following with gay players. ·Amped Z' approximates the high-flying thrills of extreme snmvboarding. Players can't designate their characters' sexual orientation. what are you waiting for? it's free! tal<e a closer lool< 'The Sims. Hot Date' vrdro game lets players put their virtual counterparts through straight or gay dating situations. (Photo courtesy Electronic Arts. Inc.) but they can orchestrate how they look. "You can have them take off their shirts." Vizzini says. "All our characters are practi­cally naked and big huge muscle guys.• The most popular game among the mem­bers of Ga}mer.org is Tom Clancy's "Rainbow Six 3." according to Vizzini. Other movie-like games - whether they have spe­cific gay content or not - are popular with gay gamers because they feature fll"St-person perspectives that "get you in on the action," said Byron Erwin, a Gaymer.org member. "It's better than watching movies. because you're in the movies," Erwin says. BUT GAY.POSITIVE GMIBS ARE ON the shelves among others that draw criti-cism for anti-gay content. Violent first-per· son games like "Postal 2" and "Grand Theft Auto 3" include gay characters - complete with pink shirts and other stereotypical signifiers as targets for shooting or mutilation. The games' creators argue that they aren't anti-gay because gay targets are among other, non-gay targets. In 1994, the industry's top sellers established the Entertainment Software Ratings Board. a self-regulatory body that applies and enforces ratings guide­lmes. To date, the ESRB rates more than 8.000 titles from "E" for everyone and "A" for adults. Patricia Vance. president of ESRB, would not consent to an interview about gay con­tent in video games. She released a prepared statement about how ratings are reached. "The raters watch actual footage from the game and study its most extreme con­tent, context and storyline," the statement reads. ·After reviewing the game footage, they assign a rating category based on the most appropriate age audience." All of the games with gay content men­tioned in this article are rated ·A· for adults or "J\1" for mature. But outmoded stereotypes or game sce­narios that feature gay targets don't offend most members of Gaymer.org, Vizzini says. "Most of us don't really care about that sort of stuff," he says. "It is just a video game." I. I JI f1 f1f ,j ~voice I PLACE YOUR FREE AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com mus1• WINNIE MCCROY Tribute CDs and compilations pay musical homage to gay favorites and legendary divas New twists on old songs SOME SONGS ARE UNFORGETTABLE. And in 2003, which might very well be remembered as the Year of the Tribute Album listeners had more than one rhance to appreciate various groundbreaking divas in the rock, pop and country music genres. Remembering Patsy Cline MCA Nashville made;i nice gesture with "Remembering Patsy Cline" an all star trtb· ute album released to coincide with what would have been the musical icon's 7lst birthday (on Sept. 8) and the 30th anmvcr sary of hrr induction m the Country Music Hall of Fame That makes it even sadder, then, that the transcendent works of this country crossover legend are generally watered down in this tribute. The diverse lineup includes established artists such as Amy Grant, singing "Back m Baby's Arms," k.d. Jang ("Leavin' on Your Mind"), Natalie Cole ("I Fall to Pi!'ces"), Lee Ann Womack ("She's Got You"), as well as newcomers Norah Jones ("Why Can't He BC' You"), Michelle Branch ("Strange") and Diana Krall ("Crazy"). Despite the CD's s~rtcomings, it is still interesting to hear Natalie Cole's jazzy ver sion of "I Fall to Pieces," the first track on the en. and Martina McBride's a capella ver· slon of "Sweet Dreams." Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton Say "Dolly Parton Tribute Album." and a flock of female performers come nmnmg. This CD highlights only 11 few of Dolly's most famous hits, such as ''I Will Always Love You" and "9 to 5." But d1·spite the wealth of B side beauties, this understated collt'ction sizzles. Alison Kraus offers a mellow version of "9 to Ii." and lesbian icon Melissa 1-:thcridge sings n beautiful, throaty rendition of "l Will Always Love You." Shan la '!'wains take on "Coat of Many Colors" seems as highfalutin' as n mink stoic, while Sinead O'Connor deli~ers a twangy, appealing rendition of "Dagger Through the Heart" Tht>re are a few low points on this CD. but Parton doesn't disappoint when she makes a contribution with a bonus trark of "Just B!'cause I'm A Woman." a nice end to a worthwhile tribute album. Bette Midler Sings the Rosemary Clooney Songbook Like Bette Midler, this album is short and s.1ssy. Perhaps the best of the bunch. the Divine Miss M JOins Barry Manilow, every· one\ favorite gay icon and her original piano pla}er and musical director to pay tribute to one of the first divas of cabaret in "Bette Midler Sings thc Roseman· Clooney Songbook." Clooney died m June 2002. Columbia Records' quality comp1lat1on starts slow and steady, with Clooney's "You'll Never Know," and "This Ole House." The set picks up when l\lidler croons "On a Slow Boat to China" with her trademark harmonles. And it positively sizzles mid· album when she belts out very urban rendi· lions of "Come On·A l\ly House," and "Mambo Italiano." In addition to her duet with Mantlow on "On a Slow Boat to China," Midler teams up with Linda Ronstadt on "Sisters." The album ends on a sweet. though not syrupy, note with "\\'hite Christmas," which Clooney originally recorded in 1954. Cher Live: The Farewell Tour Cher is back. again, for her final tour and album. In '"Cher- Live The Farewell Tour." the 11geless first lady of rock opens "The Cher-est Show on ~:arth~ with a cover of U2's "I Still Haven't Fbund What I'm Looking For." To Cher's credit the CD. produced by Warner Brothers Records, does not d!Sap· point Her "Song for the Lonely" is heartrvnding in its ability to evoke every dance floor breakup scene in one's lifetime, while her comeback hit, "I Found Someone" is reminiscent of a first crush. f) MOREINFO 'Remembering Patsy Cline' MCA Nashville www.remembenngpatsycline.com 'Just Because I'm a Woman: Songs of Dolly Parton' Sugar Hill Records www.sugarhillrecords.com 'Bette Midler Sings the Rosemary Clooney Songbook' Columbia Records www.columbiarecords.com 'Cher Live: The Farewell Tour' Warner Brothers Music wwwwamerbrosrecords.com DECEMBER 19, 2003 17 Q 1wGu Pmco•~N> c,ll e:; -Js THE LOVETT INN Disti11ctiiie Lodsing a11d Caterins ~ccommodation-. Call us for your next out-of-town guest! ....,.-~~~~;: ~ Historic Accommodation~ • Corporate Meetmg Rooms Bn11q11et Facilities • jacuzzi S11ite;; • Pool/Hot Tub Nenr Dow11town, Mu~eums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lopl'ff Blvd. Ho11:-ton, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lvvettinn.cmn YOU'LL LOVE IT! 18 DECEMBER 19. 2003 king for WHATEVER YOU HOUSTON V ICE CLASSIF EDS DELIVER! I PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM I LL ATTORNEY AT LFlW Authentic Ne\vYork Pizza Pizza - Jte deliver & more than pizza! t?l'11~1 dl~icfteS «s sait Midtown (713) 533-1140 Galleria Area (832) 251-0220 NEWYORK Pl/.ZJ R f\ www.nypizzeria.com GAY FRIENDLY www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE televisio BRIAN MOYLAN A gay actor outs his character on 'CSI' only to learn producers plan to keep Bobby Dawson in the closet, for the time being. A false start on 'CSI' ONE OF THE JOYS OF CBS"s forensic drama "CS!: Crime Scene Investigation"' is that the messiness on the show always has to do with dead bodies rather than the characters' personal lives. Because of that they dec1d· ed to nix it," McCullouch said, adding that pro­ducers of the show called to apologize that his big scene got cut. Regardless, McCullouch said It wasn't a part that he'd lobbied for. "My job as an actor is to pretend to be other people, for me to guide where it's going isn't as much fun," he said. Like the long-running "Law & Order" show on NBC, ~cSI" is almost completely plot-driven. Viewers can watch any episode of either show and not feel like they're out of step with a charac· ter's personal dramas. So imagine the shock when gay actor Gerald McCullouch recently announced that his recur· ring character on "CSI," ballistics expert Bobby Dawson. was going to come Gay actor Gerald McCulloucli"s issued press releases announcing the outing of his character on the CBS senes ·cs1· Crime Scene Invesll· gation." but the storyline was ulti· mately cut. He also said the pro­ducers decided to give the character a daughter, and that he supported this decision. And when they told him that the charac· ter is raising the child with a gay partner he sup-out on the show and acknowledge he is in a committed relationship with another man and that the couple has an adopted daughter. A press release from his public relations team said that the big moment would hap­pen on the episode that aired Dec. Hand McCullouch himself confirmed the story in an interview on Sirius Satellite Radio's gay news channel, Out Q. McCullouch. 36, has been on the show for four seasons, portraying one of the experts in the lab, and they don't usually get lives. They're there to inform the investigators, the series' main characters. about various crimes and evidence, but certainly not to talk about their personal lives. After watching last week's episode, Bobby Dawson does appear in one scene to explain something about special bullet~ used by U.S. air marshals on planes. But he didn't talk about his personal life at all. ~wE SHOT [THE SCE:-.'E \\lIERE Bobby comes out], and it was very true to life," l\lcCullouch told the Blade from his home in Los Angeles. "It wasn't until I got phone calls when the show aired on the East C'-OaSt that it wasn't on the show. I thought, '\Vhat? I've been doing two days of press on this.'" A rep from CBS confirmed that the scene was shot, but that producers always film more material than it takes to create an episode. The cut could have been made for either time consideration or content. The network rep said there are still plans for the character to come out on the show, but that decision could change at any time. "Our personal lives never come into the story, so it stuck out like a sore thumb. ported that decision, too. "It was very natural and very healthy, I thought," he says. DOES IT MATTER WHY CBS ClIT THE storyline? Not really. The network is no stranger to positive portrayals of gay characters, and proba· bly wasn't concerned with possible back· lash against a gay character on televi· sion's highest-rated drama. While this is the network responsible for gay actor Nathan Lane's ill·fated sitcom, "Charlie Lawrence," a show about a gay senator, CBS also has allowed gay characters to appear on "The Guardian," "Two and a Half Men," "Without a Trace," "The Amazing Race," and "Survivor." Does it matter that McCullouch jumped the gun with his announcement? Not really. While it did get a lot of gay viewers' hopes up, TV is gay enough these days without a recurring character on "CSL" Next time, however, he should confirm the ewnt is going to take place before his team whips up a press release. Sure, it would have been nice to have a gay presence on ··cs1." After all, It reaches a larger audience than almost every show on the air, and an accurate portrayal of a gay professional (a gun expert, no less) cer­tatnly wouldn't hurt We can only hope that this false start v. ill help producers reconsider airing something ahcmt Dawson's private life the next time they have room ln the story. IC) MORE INFO CS!' CBS Thursdays at 8 p.m HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I out on the bayou Gays spend holidays with 'families' of choice FAMILIES, continued from Page 15 President and CEO of the Houston DowntoY.n Alliance, recalled. "For this Jewish boy, it was a little differ ent." Arriving at the house, Mandel learned the sur­prises had only begun. "This was the first time I had ever celebrated Christmas with a family." he said. "Not only did they have one of those silver trees, but under· neath it were no packages. only envelopes." Well. when a family resides in the town where Dillard's Department Stores are headquartered. what else are they to do? Eleven Christmases later. Mandel has come to love and appreciate his in· laws and their traditions, although he has con· vinced them to give gifts and not certifi­cates. He admits, he'll partake of his moth­er · in· law's southern Christmas dinner any­time. Although lately she's been suggest­ing the family eat out on Christmas, Mandel said, ''I've been able to squeeze out one more year." This year, he and Sawyer, an ophthal· mologist, will celebrate Hanukkah with the Mandels in Houston on Dec. 20 and travel to Little Rock on Christmas Eve for Christmas at the Sawyer's. Perry Jackson and Richard Hudson, who mark their 23rd anniversary in January, choose to spend the holidays with friends rather than family for a variety of reac;ons. Hudson. an account executive with the Yellow Pages, said his mother died 22 years ago. "After my mother died, there was nothing left of the relationship." His parents seemed to accept the fact that he was ga}; but these days, Hudson said, he has no desire to spend the holidays with remaining family. "My father was an atheist and one of my brother's a religious zealot. It wouldn't be peaceful." he said. Jackson. a graphic designer, is on good terms and out with his famil}: "But, we try not to spend the holidays with them," he said. He is from a large family with Jots of children and grandchildren who all con· gregate in Lubbock. "It's too loud for us. too noisy and not real pleasant." But they usually visit his family after the holidays. Inst!'ad of spending the holiday with Jackson's family of origin, they choose to spend it with a "family" of friends. ThlS year, Christmas will be celebrated" ith a dmner club thl'y have been involved with Peny Jackson and Richard Hudson. who will celebrate their 23rd anniversary in January. will spend Christmas with a group of close friends. (Photo by Dalton DeHart) for quite a few years. Although other gays are in the group, Hudson says it is a "real diverse and accepting group of heterosexuals, women and African Americans." Jackson has worked for his company for several years, and he always takes Hudson to the office Christmas par!): The couple spent Thanksgiving Day at a friend's home in their neartown neigh· borhood of East Montrose. "That's our neighborhood family," Hudson said. NEWLY ELECTED HOUSTON CITY Controller Annise Parker, her partner, Kathy Hubbard. and their daughters. eight· year-old Marquitta and 14·year-old Daniella, will spend their holidays with their "created family," but not because they don't feel comfortable spending it with their biological families. Distance is the biggest factor in determining where they'll dine on turkey. Parker's mother lives in Charleston, South Carolina, and Hubbard's parents live in Buffalo, New York. Parker's mother will join the family in Houston after the holiday. "We spend Christmas Eve and Christmas morning at home with the kids," Parker said. "In the afternoon, we get together with a circle of dear friends, have a potluck lunch and spend the after­noon together." The couple spent their first Christmas together with Hubbard's family in Buffalo. "She (Parker) had never seen snow· she's a native Texan. A huge blizzard rolled in while we were there." They do Buffalo in the summer no\\: Mary Ann McBee. O\mer of Fitness Exchange, and her partner Susan Sosno\\1: a flower importer, have been together for almost eight years. and they usually spend Christmas with McBee's family in Arlington, Texas. "She (Sosnuwy) is very close to my fam· lly and thl'y know we're g~:" McBee said. That doesn't mean that holidays don't have their moments. One year, McBee said, her 4-ycar-old niC'CC blurtrd out, "Whv are \'OU both wearing the samt' rings'"' • • DECEMBER 19. 2003 19 There's a Fine line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash 'Will &Grace' creators sue NBC, the royal family in another gay scandal, and gay comic book makeovers Will & disgrace IT LOOKS LIKE THE EM~tY-\\1N11.'1NG show about a gay lawyer and a straight interior designer is going to need a lawyer of its own. MAX MUTCHNICK and DAVID KOHAN (gay and straight. respectively), No longer employed at the palace, Kaye is currently working retail (how IJ'Pical), and only works at the palace for special events, including serving the queen for this upcoming Christmas and Boxing Day. It also came out that Kaye had acted in a gay porn movie where he was in an orgy of his oY.n. Now Kaye's dirl)• !aun· dry has been aired, and he didn't receive a dime Looks like he'll have to keep working retail. By the book co-creators and executive producers of NBC's hit comedy "Will & Grace," filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Tuesday, Dec. 9, for breach of contract against NBC, the network that airs the series. and NBC Studios, its production arm. The Associated Press reported that the plaintiffs con­tend that the net· Will & Grace' creators and executive producers David Kohan (left) and Max Mutchnick are smng NBC. (Photo courtesy of NBC) JOINING IN o:-; THE "QL'EER EYE" craze, ~rl.1.ard magazine, the offi· cial source for comic book lovers, decided to throw its hat - or magic tiara, if work, in part, failed to find a production company that would offer the duo the most money for the series and. instead, forced NBC Studios to make the show for less money. They also accused the net­work and NBC Studios of colluding to keep profits within the NBC famil): General Electric O\\ns both companies. A spokesperson for NBC entertain· ment had no comment pending a review of the lawsuit. Kohan and Mutchnick said the law· suit stems from the industry-wide trend of media conglomerates buying up inde­pendent production studios. All the queen's men FIRST THERE WAS A SCANDAL when a reporter posed as a royal footman in QUEEN ELIZABETH's court and exposed her horrible decorating sensibil· ii): Then there were the "unspeakable" allegations about PRINCE CHARLES's sexual orientation. Now, it appears that another footman is a gay porn star. London's the Sunday People reports that 25-year-old STEVE KAYE approached the paP'~r about selling his secrets about drug use and orgies in the palace. The wrongdoing was not among the royals, thankfull}; but among the ~1aff. Kaye claims that palace staff mem­bers regularly use dn1gs, even under the queen's nose (thougn they don't put drugs under the queen's nosl') and have wild sex parties "as often as they can " Kaye was plannmg to charge close to $40,000 to talk to the paper anonymous!}: you will - into the ring and had gay comic artists redesign some of comic· dom 's more fashionably challenged heroes and villains. Artists Phil Jimenez ("Wonder Woman," "New X-Men"), Jose Villaruia ("Promethea"), and Robert Rodi ("Elektraj went after the likes of the Justice League's MARTIA.~ :'.\fAN­HUNTER (he·s not as gay as he sounds) and AQUAMAN and the X-Men's ANGEL, to give them fabulous redesigns. "What Aquaman needs is a costume that doesn't make folks instantly think of the guy sitting in Wonder Woman's invisible jet on the 'Super Friends' [cartoon], waittng for some­thmg to do," Jimenez said before givmg Aquaman a sex)~ Roman Centunon-esque Galactus makeover. The most shocking recreation. however, involved the "dewurer of worlds" GALACTUS, from the "Fantastic Four" comic. The trio changed him from a magenta and purple thug with a huge headdress mto a hot leather daddy right out of Tom of Finland. Devour mdred' re =~~gesti~to 20 DECEMBER 19. 2003 HWFFL presents • • -« • •new year's eve • .,,_. .s.. _ta....r.d, _u_st december 31st 2003 Rennaissance Hotel Tickets www.aaevi.com/go/NYEve or Bl»-462 2838 A portion of die proceeds benefit A.ssatHen and die "lontrose ~I YOU DECIDE! FIND EVERYTHING YOU ARE LOOKING FOR IN THE HOUSTON VOICE CLASSIFIEDS PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD ONLINE NOW1 AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM vt;nt·J·l I OR CALL TO PLACE YOUR ICe AD OOH fIT7 8631885 I community calendar To list an event aR 713-529-8490, fi3X at 71J-529·9S3L or e-marl ed1tort.houslonV01Ce.com Dud/me ts Friday at 5 p,m.. one week before the JSSue in whrch the Item would SATURDAY DEC. 20 All-Sparish Worslup Setvice/Noche Espiritual 7 p.m. ResurrectiOn Metropolitan Commumty Church. 2026 W 11th. 713-86I-9I49 Alie Hours. KPFT 90l FM. 1-4 am. DiQnrty mass. no p.m. for gay Catholics. 713-880-2sn. Fm HN Testing. Montrose Clmic. 11 p111.-2 a.m. at Viviana's. 713-830-3000. Gay & l.asbian Breakfast Club. 9:30 am. 28I-437-0636. Lambda Center Alcoholks Anonymous. Il:30 a.m. Eyt Opener Group 8 p,m. Saturday N ght Live. 9:30 p m. Willing Ones Group. I20I W Clay. 7l3-521-I243 or 713-528-'1772 www lambdahouston.org. Montrose Socter Club. IO am. practice. Woodrow Wilson School. Fairview and Yupon, New playtrs welcome, but beginners not currently being admitted. n3·862·949l http://geoc1t1es.com/montrosesoccer E-mail: montrOSMOC· cer 11yahoo.com Q-Patrol. Vohmteers walk the stmts to help prevent hate cr'mes. 9'30 p111. Corivene at commuruty center 713-528- SAFE. E-ma~: qpatrolinc;.a;aolcorn Sl Stephen's Episcopal Ct111rtl1. Rosary 8 am. I805 W Alabama 713-528-6665. Hollston GLBT Community Center. Drop-m, noon-5 p.m. • CATS (Convnunity Awareness for Transgender Support) board meeting. 2 p111. 3400 Montrose. Suite 201 713-524· 38I8. www.houstonglbtcenter.org. SUNDAY DEC. 21 Front Rur'M!f'S Houston. Runners meet at Memonal Park at 81 .... ;.,. a ... «-mile run. http://home.swbell neVlarathon/ houfr.htm. E-man brathon;i.swbell.net 713 522-0899. Benng Memorial United Methodist Chllrtlt Services at 8:30 & 10:50 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 am. 713·526·IOI1 Center for Spiritual Living. Services at II am for children at IO:SO am. 66IO Harwin m-339-1808 The center also has cornmltment ceremonies. metaphysical bookstore illld classes. Community ~ Service at II am. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children IO a.m. 713-880-9235 or www.cornmu­rutygospel. org. Commllnity of Kindred Spirits in Beaumont Worship at 6 p.m. 1575 Spind etop Avt Beaumont. Texas. 409·813-2055. E-mail: cksrevl11netzero.net Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist. Service 9:30 a.m. & education hour 11 am. 7l3·668-8830. Emerson Unrtman Church. Adult educatiOn. IO a.m Service 11 am. umch at noon. www.emersonhou.org. First Congregational Churtl1 (Memorial). Service at 10 am. Christian Education. Il30 am.. 713-468·9543 or fcc-hous­tonorg. Finl Unitarian UnlvlfSalist Chun:lt Services at 9:30 & IUO a.m. 8rundi at 10:30 am. 7l3·526-5200 churc~firstuu.org. Fm HN Testing. Montrose CIUlic. 9 p.m.-nudrught at Club Inergy. 713·83().3000 Gay Bowling lugues. 7 PJ11. Palace lAnes, 4I91 Bellaire Blvd 7l3-86I ·1187. Gay Catholics of Sl Anne's-Houston. 5 p.m. worsiup service Dinner and social alexcam@'wlnel 713-623·0'l30 Grace Assembly Chun:ll Gay/gay-affirmmg congregation. 11 a.m. serv1te 567 Cedar Grove, LIYlngston, Texas. n35l 936·640-nl4 E-mail: leol iGSttex.net Grace Lutlwan Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 am. Service 10'.30 am. 713-528·3269. HA T.C.lt Houston Area Teen Coaltt1on of Homosexuals meets 6-9 p111. For meeting mfonnation. can 7l3·529·3590. wwwhatchyoutltorg Hollston Tennis Clib 9 am.-noon. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center hOllstonteMtSClb@aotcom Umbda Center. Alcoholics Anonymous. 9:30 am. Came to Believe Group. I20I w Clay. 713-52I· I24J or m-528- qm WWW lambdahouston.org. ~ Ftllowship Metropolitan Churtlt IO a.m. semce 3333 f;iM1n, Suite I06. 713-528-6756 Nortliwoods Unitarian Universalist Church. Services at 9 4 5 & IU5 am. Sunday school 9:45 am. 28I-298·2780. Resurrection MCC. Semces, 9 and 11 a.m. Chfldren and Youth Sunday School, IO am. Children's service. II a.m. n3- 86I·9149 Sl Patrid(s Reformed Catholic Mission Sund.iy M.iss at noon. Holy Uruons available. Group meets at the Hair Express, 33IO Delaware. Beaumont. Texas mOl 40'H81· 8152 E-mail: bwatsonl@lllRR.com. St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Euchansl Rite I, 745 am., Holy Eucharist. Rite II. 8:55 am. Education hour IO am.. Choral Eucharist. 11 am. 713-528·6665. Sunday Bruntlt For HIV-posit1vt men. 11 a.m. Riva"s, lll7 MISSOUl'l St Paul 713-880-0690. e-mait PoznBuft(Daol.com. The Women's Group. Meeting and discusslOn. 10:45 a'1l 7l3·529-Bill Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Adult doscus­sion. 9 am. Service. Il:l5 am. 28I-2n-88B2. WWW luuc.org. Unituian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Service, 11 a.m. 713·686·5876. Houston GLBT Convnunity Center. Drop-in, 2-6 p.m. • New Covenant Chnstian Churth. IO am-noon • Lesbians Over Age f,Jty (LOAF) 2-3 p.m. • S.IS.lE.R.S. 330·6:30 p.m. • GLOBAL meeting, 6 p m. • 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. ID- 524-3818 www.hOllstonglbtcenter.org. MONDAY DEC. 22 Fret HN Testing. Montrose Chruc. I-7 P111. at the clm1c. 2I5 Westheimer and 3311 Richmond. Suite IOO; 4-B p.m at Bricks, bl7 Fairview; and 9 p.m. - I am. at o. no Pacific. m-8»3010. Free HIV Testing. 4-8 p.m. at All Star News. 3415 Katy frteway Health clime with free testing lor HIV and syphihs. 713-869-7878. Gay Bowling Leagues. Womerfs league. 6:4 5 p.m. Dynamic Lanes. 6I2I Tamef Drove 713·861-1187. Gay Fathel'$/Fathers First Support group. 8·9:30 p.m Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. To111. n3·726· 8736. www.geoc1!1es.com/gaydadshouston/ Grau Assembly Church Gay/gay-.lffirm1ng congregation. 7 pJll. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston. Texas, m5I 936-646-7214 E-mail: Jeoita:easttex.net Grief & Oivon:e Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering 713·526- IOl7. ext 208. Kolbe Project. Euchar!st 7:30 p.m. 713-861 ISOO. Umbda Center. AlcohollCS Anonymous. 8 p.m. Begumers' Group. I20I w Clay 713-521-1243 or 7l3-528-9n2. wwwJarnbdahauston.org. Montrose Clinic Offers weekly peer support groups for gay and bisexual men with HIV Sparush speaking group meets. 6:30 p.m. 2I5 Westhe1mer. n3-830·3050, Grupo de Apoyo para Latinos gay y b1se•uales VIH poslt1vos. Lunes 6:30. Para mas lnformaclon llama al 7l3·830·3025. Queer VOices Radio Show. 8·IO p.m. KPFT 901. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-on 2·9 p.m. • 3400 Montrose. Sutte 207. 713-5208I8. • HRC PAC, 7.9 p.m www.~ t< 1ter.org. TUESDAY DEC. 23 8er1ng Support Network. Lunch Bunch Gang, 11 a.m. 713- 526-IO ... Fm HN T~ Montrose Clinic.1·3 p.m. at the clinic. 215 Westheimef and 33ll Richmond. Suite IOO. n:J.830-3070 GLBT Pef11ecosUls. 81blt study, praytr, 7 p.m. on the Heights. For onto: 936-93I-3761: t-mail. wwwWgbl947 cs.com. Houston Roughnetl< Rugby. Practice from 630 -8 30 pm. for more information. log on to www r0119hnecksrugby org Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience netessary. Practice, 630-8 30 Westland YMCA Kay. 713·208· 1529 Introduction to Buddhism. All welcome at 634 W Temple In the HeiQhts. 7 pm. Carlton. ffi-862·8129 Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W danet lessons. Brazos Rover Bottom. No partner needed Beginner 2 Step, Waltz. Shuffle & Swing. 8:30 pm. 7l3-528·9I92. Houston Gl8T Conmmity Center. Drop-In 2·9 pm. • Lesbian Corrung Out Group, 7 p.m • 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. 713-524 3818. www houstonglbtcenter orv www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE WEDNESDAY DEC. 24 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (dropinl.1130 a.m. I p.m~ SOM D1><;u;,.on & Ex.,loratmn. 7 p.m. 66IO Harwin. 713·339· 1808. OutSk.ate. This roller Rmk skate club hosts Gay Skate Night at Zenith Roller Rmlt 8075 Cook Road every Wednesday from 8 p.m. to IO p.m. entry plus skate rental 2BI ·933· 58I8. Dob1e367 n aol.com. Crystal Meth Anonymous (CMAJ. 8:15 p.m meeting Montrose Counseling Center. 70I Richmond Ave-, Room I5 Bering Memorial United Methodist Church Support Networlc !'ot Luck Dinner, 6:30 p.m Vanous support groups, 7 pm. 7l3-526-IOI7. Bible Sllldy. Noon & 6:30 p.m. St Stephen's Episcopal. 713- 526·6665. Fm HN Testing. Tltotnas Street Clinic. 9 am l p.m. 2015 Thomas St OraSurt method. Call for appointment. Sharon. ll3-873-4I57. Gay Bowhng Leagues. 6:30 p.m. Palace Lanes. 4IqI Bellaire Blvd. 7l3-86I·llB7. Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal. 7:30·9:30 p.m. 1307 Yale. 713-862· I488 Houston Tennis Club. 7·9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tenms Center houstontenmsclb <Laotcom Spiritual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713·861· 9I49 Houston GLBT Community Cen!B Drop~n. 2-9 p.m. · Free HIV testJng, counsehng. 7.9 p.m. • Houston Pride Band rehearsal. 7:30 pm.• 3400 Montrose, Suite 207. 713-524· 38I8 nglbtcenter org FRIDAY DEC. 26 Free HIV Testing. lhomas Street Chnic. 9 am. 1 p.m. 2015 Thomas SL OraSurt method. Call for appointment. Sharon. 713-873-4I57. Grace Assembly Church Gay/gay.affirming congreoahon. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove. L1v1ngston, Texas. 7735l 936-646-72I4 E""'1it leoI n;easttex net HAT.C.H. Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals meets no p.m. For meeting information. call 713·529· 3590. www hatchyouth.org. Houston Tennis Club. Vi p.m. Memorial Parle at the Tennis Center Houstontennisclub.org Kolbe Projed. Morning prayer, 10 am. 7l3·86J.1800 Q-Patrol Volunteers walk the stretts to help prevent hate crimes 930 p.m. Convene at community center. 713·528· SAFE. E·mait qpatrohnqyaotcom Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-ui 2·9 p.m. • Women"s Game Night 730.9:30 p.m. • Jn Our Own Write (Poetry Night) 8-10 p.m.; 3400 Montrose. Suite 207. 713· 524 ·38I8. www houstonglbtcenter orq VOLUNTEER/SELF-HELP ECHOS. This non-profit rrunistry of the Episcopal Church ol the Epiphany Is dedicated to helping people access health and social service systems. Free medical serv1Ces include HIV, STD and hepat1ti; testing. Call for dates and times of services. 9610 S. Gessner. 713·270·0369 E·ma1I echos· houstonrn swbell.net Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Houston. Volunteers offer a Jriendly ear to callers in need of infonnatoon. nonjudgmental support and anonymous counseling to the GLBT community. 713·529-32U www gay1w1tchboardhouston.org HoP-ON Anyone can join this non·prof1t moderated e·mail announcement Ost that helps facilitate advocacy work and organmng efforts for gay Houstonians. Quantity of postings IS stnctly limlted. Posh~ include press rtleases and action ilerts from national, st•te and local gay and allied orgaruza· hons. For info or to join, access www groups yahoo.com/group/HoP·ON/ Houston GLBT Convnunity Center. Volunteers perform a variety of critical tasls which include staffing the informa­tion desk during drop-m hours; helping with center pro­gramming .ind events: wortung on commumty outreach efforts, fund·raismg and publicity. Card players. write" and artists on particular are needed 713·524·38I8 Peer Listening Line. Youth only. Staffed by GL8T youth for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth 5· 10 p.m. Monday·fnday 800-399·PEER. ri!\ To list an event, call 7Jl529·8490. fax at ~ 713-529·9531. or e-mail editor® hOiistomOtCe.COm. Deadline is Mond.Jy ai 5 pm. HOUSTON VOICE www houston voice.com I a ts. SATURDAY, DEC. 20 Re~.urrection Metropolitan Community Church will celebrate Chnstmas in Spanish at 7 p.m. with a Noche Espiritual Christmas Service and at 8 p.m. with a Noche Espintual Posada celebration. 713-861·9149. It's been 16 years since KPFT. 90.1 FM. has done a live broadcast. but that changes beginning at midnight. when the station takes it's 'After Hours' show on the road. The first stop on the 'Face For Radio Tour' will be at 'O' Houston, 719 Pacific St. in the heart of Montrose. The station's Michael Williams said the goal is to attract new listeners and to reach out to gay youth. AIDS Foundation Houston will provide HIV/AIDS and safe sex liter· ature. Future tour dates and venues will be announced later. 'vVEDNESDAY, DEC.24 If holidays are getting you down. forget your problems and volunteer to help others. The City Wide Club of America needs helping hands when it hosts the 25th Annual Christmas Eve Big Feast of Sharing at the George R Brown Convention Center Volunteers are needed as early at 7:30 am. and the doors open at IO am. The club expects to provide holiday meals. food baskets and toys for more than 15.000 families. 713-523-1640. Don't get run over by a reindeer on the way home Christmas Eve Instead, hop on a free METRO bus METRO is offering free rides on all local. commuter and MfTROLlft buses beginning at 6 p.r.' and erdmq with the last bus run of the day. Free rides will be of!ered again by met•o on Dec 31 New Year's fve 713-635 4000. Christmas Eve se1V1ces arc planned .it many gay and gay·mclus1vc churches in Houston. 111clud1rg 1 pm and 10 p n at Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church 2025 W 11th St 713 861· 9149 7 pm and 11 p 1.at Bering Memorial United Methodist Church 1440 'inroid St and 9 pm at cathedral of the Holy Splnt 4505 Highway 6 North, Suite 200, 832 372 ~300 DECEMBER 19. 2003 21 I appreciate being a part of this community! I want to see Fitness Exchange as more than a health club. It is a community center! So I use the Houston Voice to show my appreciation, and as my invitation to its readers. -Mary Ann McBee Fitness Exchange 22 DECEMBER 19. 2003 CLASSIFIEDS iell - SAME DAY WEBSITE P05TING RENT I HOUSTON SHARE I HOUSTON COMMITMENT CEREMONIES EMPLOYMENT FT I PT OUTREACH WORKER NEEDED M:..: t ,... dlO 1hrL BR l t wr:.. 1n . ' •o on www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Visit houstonvoice.com to place your ad. Lip to 25 words only $12.50 per week 504 each additional word Fax toll-free 1.888 409.6768, or ca'.I to: -free 1 877.863 1885 TRAVEL I INTERNATIONAL GAY CRUISE FOR OLDER GAY MEN & THEIR ADMIR· ERS leaves Ft. Lauderdale Feb 8. 2004 on a brand new luxury cruiseship. 7 days western Caribbean. visiting Key West. Progreso/Merida. Cozumel, Grand Cayman & a couple of fabulous days at sea. Come find your Valentine & join a groat group of guys for a fantastic week of fun & friendship. For more info contact Norm at (9S4l 73S-80SS or toll free (877) 469- 8055. GAYRIBBEAN CRUISES IS SAILING TRAVEL I U.S.A. DC GuestHouse Elegant Victorian mansion built in 1867. Logan/Convention Center location. Blks away from world class dining & diverse enter-tainment. Gay owned & operated. (202) 332-2502 www.dcguesthouse.com. MOOSE MEADOW LODGE v • loq home Wate"'ltnV C7Mle1. xunoo Ad rondack ~tyle 8&8 on 86 a re~ ~re qet.JWa'h 8021 '<s1B NEARBY GETAWAYS • com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I CLASSIFIEDS VEHICLES 1967 CADILLAC DeVILLE Runs & rides like a graceful queen. New interior & roof. Red, 2 door. 15,000.00 Call (713) 521 3675 or (713) 3~7· 1565. Ask lor Craig. RUN IT 'TILL YOU SELL IT. Take advantage of our new "Run it 'till you sell it" promotional. Place a n ad to sell your car and email a photo of the car and run the ad until it sells. It's only $39.99. Call our friendly staff toll free today! (877) 863-188S. FINANCIAL SERVICES LEADING FINANCIAL INSTITUTION approving small busi· ness, mortgage & vehicle loans. Immediate response. Give us a call at (866) 219-7661. INSURANCE SCHMERLER AGENCY Great car insurance' Also great for home, renters, life, health, business insurance & much more. Call (713) 661-7700 or www.SchmerlerAgency.com. HOME IMPROVEMENT YOU BUILD HOMES ... I BUILD ADS FOR YOUR SUCCESS! Call me, Rodney, to place your Home Improvement ad with Houston Voice Classifieds (877) 86l 1885 ext 247 or rwoodland@washblade.com WELLER & RYGIEL CONSTRUCTION Interior & exterior re· modeling, add1t1ons & new construction. Any kind: homes, gar­ages, etc. Commeroal & res1dent1al. Free esumates. No )Ob too smalll Richard Weller (832) 867·0391. NEW CONSTRUCTION I REMODELING Free estimates on residential & commercial projects. LAWRENCE CON­STRUCTION (713) 205 7016. CLEANING SERVICES HOUSE CLEANING Experienced housekeeper for top quality maid service. Apts, homes, offices. References avail on request. (281) 492·8460. MOVING FRENCH'S MOVING SERVICE Local & State Wide. www.ahoustonmover.com. (713) 861 -1212. PHOTOGRAPHY I VIDEO DAVID LEWIS IMAGES Events, headshots, ponraits. New studio location. (713) 240-5503 or www.davidlewisimages.com. MASSAGE BODY STRESS RELIEF Montrose locauon. In/out. Priv, dis­creet. Dan (713) 529-8787 or (713) 857-1009 SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK Relaxation, Myo­therapy, deep tissue. $60/1.5hrs; 550/hr. (RMT #024S89) (713) 739-0087. (713) 501 -9852, deeptissueman2@aol.com. MASSAGE BY BILL All Knotted Up Massage. lncallsloutcalls. 8am-10pm. 7-dayslwk. Excellent rates. Call Bill (281) 530- 475t THERAPEUTIC SWEDISH sports, deep tissue. myotherapy, relaxation therapy. Jason, college guy. Memonal Park & Mon­trose Studios. (713) 524-5400. www.sizzilingmassage.com. DECEMBER 19, 2003 23 COUNSELING I SUPPORT JON-PAUL HAMILTON Board certified Psychiatrist. Spe­cializes in Psychotherapy & medication management for ado­lescents & adults. New office in Montrose wt immediate ap­pointments avail. Sliding scale fees to those who qualify. Call (713) 522-7014 BECKY INGALLS, LPC LPC-Supervisor, lnd1vidual/Couplesl Groups counseling available. Therapeutic Support groups form­ing for January. Call now for more information. (713) 721- 9343 BODY I SOUL MANSCAPING Waxing & dipping. Dale. Prrv location in Mon­trose. Call (713) 529-5952 for appt. ADULTS ONLY YOUR ONLINE TOYSTORE Save your money. Visit Ou• site & see. www.1rsd1scountdun~eon.com. (954) 565-KINK (5465). r--------------------------------------------------------------, UT1!! r.-1 r111 I OUR RATES HAVE CHANGED voice Classified Order Form • www.houstonvoice.com • Phone 877 .863.1885 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring corrvleted fonn with payment to the Houston Voice offices (M·F, 9am-5pm) 500 Lovett Blvd, Suite 200. BY MAIL: Ma,1 completed form with payment to Houston Voice Classifieds, 500 Lovett Blvd, Suite 200, Houston, TX. 77006 BY PHONE: Call in with completed fonn to 877.8631885. BY FAX: Fax completed fonn and credit card information to .!\TIN: CLAS-SIFIEDS 8884 09.6768. BY EMAIL: Visit houstonvoice com to place your order online. AD POLICY: The Houston Voice reseives the right to edit, reclassify or reject ads not meeting Houston Voice slandards. No refunds for early cancellation. Misprints The Houston Voice 1s not responsible for misprints appearng after the first week. Check ads promptly. DEADLINE FOR AD SUBMISSION • MONDAY AT 5:30PM FOR FRIDAY'S PUBLICATION PICK YOUR CATEGORY RATE $12.50 Legal Not1c.es Announcements In Memon<rn Lost/found Resumes Er1'4'loyment _ Domestk Help Careers Posrtlons Wanted Volunteors _ Gro~ _Performing Arts Spans _ Instruction _ Local Accomodatrons Travel International _Travel USA Nearby Getawa~ _Travel Tickets _ .. Travel Companions Buy/Sell Arts/Antiques Vehicles S3:~s Pets Ptd,IKdtlon. Mail Order Phone S.rvi<eS t):"!(x>rt'Ullltl Flr.anOJI Lega1 SeivKes Computer _Graphic Design General Services Funeral Umous1nes/Orrvers Calering Archttectural Se!vkes Home Improvement =Painting/Wallpapering _Flooring _Electrical _Landscaping _Cleaning _Hauling/Removal _Moving _Photography Massage H)l)no:;is Dating -= Counso.ling/Sl;pport Body & Soul Coaching Rf!<ll Estate <i£-rvices. Open House S•'• (Real fstate) _Wanted to Buy Rental S.rJ1ces T•l Rent (Real bt ite) Want<id to Rent ~OC/!lm<lte 5£<V1~ To Sh.ire 'Real E.tate) Parlong WRITE YOUR AD PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY TEXT: ------- ------ TOTAL YOUR COST AD RATES Up to 25woldsfor 112.50 perissue. Additional words are 50¢ each per issue. This includes Website posting. ADDITIONAL FEATURES: Phot<>'Logo S35 addrtiooal; Boxed ad is SS add1t1onaL Solded ad~ SS addrt1onal H)!letli'lk ~ S2 addrt1onal. UP TO 25 WORDS: S12.50 ADDITIONAL WORDS __ @SOq: PHOlOILOGO $35~ssue: BOXED AO SSflSSlle: -----­BOLDED AD SSlissue HYPERLINK S2/issue: SUB TOTAL: ______ x# of issues TOTAL' Your dassified ad w1 I be postPd at www.nybla:le ".Om NAME -------- ---- ADOR:SS: --- CITY - PHONE: STATE - z p- CHECK EtKLJSED: ----CHARGE 'O MY Q.\MEX ::JY\SA or~c CARD#------------------~ EXP L--- - - -- - ---- - ------ - - -- ------ - ---- --- - - ------ - ----------------~ 24 DECEMBER 19. 2003 I SHAWN PENN ! Ir CHIROPRACTOR ~I !i1 TH~ ROM6N Dr. Richard W. fletcher • SERVICES • Remodelmg · fnterior and ex!enor. Add1t1ons lv1y kind of room added to your home. New Construction· New buildings of any kind, home. garage, etc. ~'?~''l'll'ili....~ Commercial and Res1denr al No Job Too Small Ult mote Swedish Massage MALE LOPEZ for Today's 281 ~7456 Business Man. aid c:mociate Slng'e & Tondem KENTON LITTLE •4 Hands' Massage Body Waxing & 832-577-2905 Body Culs Ava1klllle! mlopez@wt.net • Neck/Beck Pain • Auto/Work Injury • Medicare/Medicaid U41 Mr • ID 86Z 1897 \. ~ ..... 11l1Ui.lr ,..a.i1Mllloallfll.Uti .. IW ~ . . ·- ... ,.. ~ . if your hair isn't ' .BECOMING to you; then .. : , ... ~ , - ... -· -·. , ~ yo-Li should BE COMING Jo "me. ..,_~J,;~ ~~· - ~ . ·~~; :1 •. ::, ~~_,,. ... _ ., :.--- ~ DON GILL STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APPOINTMENT OllLY Advertise Here! ~ 713.529.8490 Call Now! Back From !'lew York! Nationally Cen1fied Massage Therapist 7 Days A Week. Day' 'Early Evening.' Recommended I 5 Hou,.,, .. S75.00 I Hour .... .S60.00 20% DISCOUNT ON FIRST TIME VISIT 713-527-0400 or 832-524-7700 MASSAGE Full Body Relaxallon ma~ assage.net 713.942.2399 • Mo:-trose Locat oo • 7 days even ngs • Visa Mastercard • Outcalls welcome Rvan Fugate RM I N 111 1\i;i111 I •-ct11.:llmcpori111ca -"'· dll!l bstuo, Rall nu0-musoa,sport1.-. SPfC141 •1UWtlK&fma' 713-269-7926 ASSA GE MIND • BODY • SOUL •Swedish ·Deep nssue •Relaxation • Montrose Location www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE A N M <. LtAN •CORPORATE LANGUAGC 11\AINING • PRIVAH TUTORING 7'l 864 7319 d.l'""~r•t WWW houwtb com'd.tnmc ta,, Jer W. Simoneaux Jr. nUorn.-~· nf In" 713-227-1717 legal Protection for Cl Bl families ......H nml•. lws ~-.,- l.ic.tD4 1 ........ Jl.,.is,.o.a,- ••& ~·· THI 11al PlACI •Alignment •Brakes Inc. 1307 Fairview (3 blocks west of Montrose) 71 3-529-141 4 I I L--=====~~~~~~~,,,,,,,,!I 832 978-7017 CE..,..RAll Y lQCATEO 7 DAYS/EVENINGS OUTCALLS ~E COW' HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com astrolog JILL DEARMAN This is the week for you to escape the day-to-day grind with a Leo and let worries wait until 2004 Don't brood, Virgo! (\(> Aries (March 21 to April 20): Y The moon. Venus, and Neptune will all be in your house of friends on Christmas Day, so get in the spirit and make every effort to reconnect with Jost pals. Forgiveness happens natural· ly; don't worry about what to say or how to say it. Just call a Virgo, will ya? }..{ Taurus (April 21 to May 20): U Saturn retrograde in your social third house could make planning get-togethers a little challenging. Why must everyone's schedule be so com· plcx? Be the persistent bull that you are and keep calling and e-mailing folks. If anyone can bring an isolated Aries out for some holiday cheer, it's you. II Gemini (May 21 to June 21): You don't need every last bit of information in order to make a major decision, darling. You know enough. Now a leap of faith is necessary. You can do it! Consult with a Leo who is always a bastion of strength and wis· dom for you. § Cancer (June 22 to July 22): Some people are more into playing games than you think. It's up to you to use your judgment when hook· ing up with new friends and para· mours. When in doubt, err on the side of caution with a Virgo. Saying "No" to the wrong person leads to saying "Yes" to the right one. .i) Leo (July 23 to August 22): Let U l an old grudge die and make room in your heart for a breakthrough in a relationship. An Aquarius really docs understand you. You just speak different languages. Get a translator! All problems have solutions this week. 'tln Virgo (August 23 to September 11.f 22): This is the perfect week for you to escape the drudgery of your day· to-day life and take a few side trips to cool places with a cool new friend A Leo. perhaps'! Light fun is called for Don't brood over anything till well into 2004. Worries can wait. .fl. Libra (September 23 to October 22): This is the nght time for you to change your look and show the world the wilder side of your nature. You are fabulous to begin with, so a make better (not a makeover) is in order. Indulge yourself this holiday season. and a Taurus will indulge you ev
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1208.pdf