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Houston Voice, No. 1098, November 9, 2001
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Houston Voice, No. 1098, November 9, 2001 - File 001. 2001-11-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3509/show/3484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2001-11-09). Houston Voice, No. 1098, November 9, 2001 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3509/show/3484

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1098, November 9, 2001 - File 001, 2001-11-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3509/show/3484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1098, November 9, 2001
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date November 9, 2001
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript I e Service to the commum•t y Montrose Clinic honors volunteers after two decades of health care work for gay men and lesbians. Page 13 ISSUE 1098 www.houstonvoice.com ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. NOVEMBER 9, 2001 INSIDE Michael Milliken, presi­dent of Texas Stonewall Democrats, applauds a recent Democratic Party decision to include gays on a state panel. Page 2 Lesbian Houston City Council member Annise Parker readies for her third term after Tuesday's e lections. Page 2 Theatre New West's 'Boy Meets Boy' offers its charm for audiences only two more weekends. Page 15 Anti-gay Prop. 2 passes Gay activists struggle to see positive side of narrow loss on city charter amendment, may go to court by PENNY WEAVER HOUSTON-Gay civil rights advocates waged an intense campaign agamst the anti-gay City Proposition 2 and lost that effort Tuesday, but now may consider legal action to fight the measure. By a slim margin of 52 percent to 48 per­cent, Houston voters approved the propos­al, which prevents the city from offering health insurance and other benefits to same­sex domestic partners of its employees. Obviously unhappy with the defeat, gay activists still see "hopeful signs" in the cam­paign waged to nix City Prop. 2. "We've got this insidious little thing fes­tering in our charter," said gay political con· sultan! Grant Martin, one of the leaders in the "No on City Prop. 2" campaign. "[But this week),120,000 people voted to protect the rights of gay and lesbian families. I think it's pretty impressive that for the first time in Houston we had an open discussion about gay and lesbian families. "[There are] hopeful signs," he added. "[But I it still doesn't make losing fun." The proposal was put on the J:-.:ov. 6 bal­lot through a petition drive by the conserva­ti\ ·e Houstonians For Family Values, led by Dave Wilson, who has continuously stated that he is not anti-gay, but is pro-family "We are very pleased at the outcome," Wilson said. In most areas of the city, voting showed that neighbors were as equally divided as the entire metropolitan area. Some areas showed sharp divisions, howe,·er, accord· ing to unofficial results from the city clerk. In the hea,·ily gay Montrose neighbor­hood, 30.8 percent of registered voters cast > Continued on Page 8 Gay poGtical activist Grant Mstill speaks to opponents of Qty Prop. 2 01 Election Night at Riva's in the heaviy gay Montrose~ Who's the best, legally speaking? Mississippi Virginia Alabama An analysis of laws that offed goys in all SO states ond the District of Columbia shows that eight of the 12 most inhospitoble states for goys are in the South. Georgia, with its State Copitol in Atlanto (pictured), ranked 37. Texas came in at 24. Several of the worst states in which to live for gays are in the South, based on a state­by- state analysis of laws on the books by LISA KEEN When it comes to the best state for gay men and lesbians to live, 1t might not come as a surprise - Vermont. The worst? Oklahoma The rankings come from a Houston Voice analysb of laws that concern gays in all 50 states and the Distnct of Columbia. For gays across the South, the rankings show a bleak picture: Eight of the 12 worst states in which to live, based on the news­paper's analysis, are m this region. If you're gay and live in the .Northeast, legally speaking, you're in more comfortable territory, as seven of the top 10 most bosp1table states are located there. "Vermont IS the hands-down winner," said Lorn Jean, execu­tive director of the :-\ational Gay & Lesbian Task Force. ult's more than the sentimental favonte because of the civil uruons law. Vermont has been way ahead for years." > Continued on Page 9 2 INSIDE NEWS Stonewall Democrats on state panel ...•.• 2 Parker wins third Couna1 term ••....... . 2 Notional news briefs .•..•••.•••....•. 4 Locnl news briefs • • . • . . . • • • ••••••• .5 State news briefs .....••••••••....• J VOICES & ECHOES Editorial: Terrorists damaged HRC ~ans .. 10 Arenschieldt: Charities still need help .... 11 Quote/Unquote . •.........•••..... 12 OUT ON THE BAYOU Montrose c&nic hoaors its vol­llllfeers, includ­ing Dr. Wayne Bockman. SH Out OI tfie Bayou, page 13 Montrose Oinic celebrates 20 years' service 13 On Stage .••.........•........•• .15 Eating Out at Texadelpbia •. . ......•• .16 Community Calendar ..•••....•.•.•. .19 My Stars! •••.•.•••.••.•••••••••• 23 Issue 1098 AD materia In Houston Vt>iCe Is protecl8d by federal copyright law end mey not be repro­dueed withoUI the written consent of Houston VOICe The S8X'.lll orlenlatiOn of adwrliSers, phOtograpllers. wriers end cartoonists pub-llshed tieretn is neither llferred or lfl1llied The appearance of names or pictorial representa· tiOn does not necessarUy Indicate the sexual orlemauon of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsollciled editorial mater.al but cannot take responslbillty lor ts return. The editor reserves the right to accep~ rej8CI or ea~ any submission AD rlgllts r81191t to authors upoo publlcatlon. Gulde nes for freelance contributors are available upon request Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX n 006 713-529-8490 www.houstonvoice.com NEWS NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE State Democrats include gay members Texas Stonewall Democrats given pair of seats on executive committee AUSTIN - State-level Democratic Party officials have offered new positions of leadership to gay men and lesbians. According to Michael Milliken, president of Texas Stonewall Democrats, the State Democratic Executive Committee recently voted overwhelmingly to add two seats to the committee for repre­sentatives of the Texas Stonewall Democratic Caucus. Milliken called the move a "monumental decision" that was the culmination of several years of action by many individuals, both from Stonewall Democrats and from their allies and friends. "By bringing us to the table, the leadership of the Texas Democratic Party has demonstrated their recognition and respect for the contributions in time, energy and resources by the GLBT community of our great state,".said Milliken. "It further shows the differences between the two major parties in Texas on our concerns and issues." Several current members of the state panel gave praise to the many decades of the work and dedication that gay, lesbian, bisexu­al and transgendered people have given to the Party. "The Stonewall Democrats are hard working, dedicated activists," said Texas Democratic Party Chair Molly Beth Malcolm. "The Texas Democratic Party's leadership reflects our state's rich diversity now more than ever with the addition of the Stonewall Democrats to the SDEC. They are a great example of the Democratic Party's belief in fairness and opportunity." The State Democratic Executive Committee is the governing body of the state party and handles Party activities for state con­ventions. The Committee consists of two people - a man and a woman - elected from each of the 31 Senatorial districts in Texas and additional members from such groups as the Texas Young Democrats, the Texas Democratic Women, Texas Coalition of Black Democrats, Tejano Democrats, and now Texas Stonewall Shannon 8CD1ey, State Demoaati< Executive Committff member from Senate District 16 (Dallas); Michael Millen, president of Texas Stonewall Demoaats; Moly Beth Malcolm, chair of Texas Demoaatic Party; and Texas state Rep. Glen Moxey gathered recently to mark the inclusion of Stonewal Demoaats on the State Demoaatic Executive Committff. Democrats. The Texas Stonewall Democratic Caucus is the official Democratic Party GLBT caucus and is an umbrella organization to foster and promote local gay Democratic clubs in Texas. Its officers and board are elected at the Texas Democratic Party convention every two years. -From staff reports Texas Stonewall Demoaatic Caucus 214-546-6160 www.stonewalldemocrats.org Parker enters third term on Council Sole lesbian City Council member re-elected; other gay-friendly candidates in runoffs by PENNY WEAVER HOUSTON - Voters across the city on Tuesday re-elected the only openly gay City Council member to serve a third term. But Annise Parker said after the election that her opposition to the anti-gay City Prop. 2 did damage at the polls. "My very public involvement with Prop. 2 hurt my re-election," Parker said. Still, she said she is #relieved" to be on Council for another two years. Parker received 114,657 votes or 51 percent of voter support. Her opponents, James Neal and Sylvia Ayres, received 62,762 votes or 28 percent and 48,903 or 22 percent, respective­ly. Parker's 51 percent margin allowed her to avoid a runoff, which is automatic in the city if one candidate does not get at least SO percent of voter support. HJ squeaked in," she said. The next step for Parker is to support incumbent Mayor Lee Brown m his runoff election against former City Council mem­ber Orlando Sanchez, whom Parker called uovertly anti-gay." She also said she is looking ahead to how her political career may change after this last term on the Council. which allows can-llllise Parl•, Houston Qty Co.d's only openly gay member, won a tlird tenn in elections Tuesday by a nagii strong enough to avoid a runoff. didates to serve a maximum of three terms. "I am planning on running for controller in two years," Parker noted. In the mayor's race, longtime gay rights supporter Brown earned 43 percent of the vote to Sanchez's 40 percent. Former City Council member Chris Bell, who also expressed pro-gay stances on several issues, earned 16 percent of the vote. That puts Brown and Sanchez mto a runoff election in four weeks. While Brown supported a city measure that prevents dis­crimination against gays, Sanchez voted against the ordinance. Also, Brown was vocal in his opposition to Tuesday's City Prop. 2, while Sanchez did not address the issue. Jn other City Council races: District D candidates will face a runoff also. Gay rights supporter Ada Edwards earned 39 percent of the vote, with oppo­nent Gerald Womack earning 32 percent. Edwards was endorsed by the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Causus, voiced support for the city's nondiscrimination ordinance and opposed City Prop. 2. That district includes the heavily gay Montrose area. Openly gay Mike Rogers was in compe­tition for the District E seat but earned only 9 percent of the vote. In that area, Addie Wiseman, Bill Jones and Bernard Maristany will compete in a runoff. Wiseman earned 42 percent of the vote Tuesday, while Jones and Maristany both earned 16 percent. Also notable for gay voters, incumbent Carroll Robinson faced openly gay candi­date James Galvan for At Large Position 5. Robinson won a solid victory, earning 64 percent of the vote to Galvan's 36 percent HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 OLRSELVES ON OLR SL"CCESSES - TPRIDE INSTITUTE 800·54-PRIDE www.pride·institute.com even the ones you never hear about. Pnde Institute 1s the best place for gay men and esb1ans to get help dealing with chelT'1ca1 dependency, depres­sion. aro<1ety or other behavioral health issues That's because many lesbians and gay men don't succeed in traditional, straight-run treatment progra,,..,s. (How can you recover of you can't be yourself?) But most patients do succeed at Pride Many of our graduates are eager to share the secret of their success. In fact about a third of our new patients are referred to us by Pnde alumni. V•srt www.pnde·1nst1tute com and find out why Prde is tre place to deal with ctlenical dependel'cy, sexual addiction or other mental health 1ss\les f you are gay. les­bian. b1sexua. or transgerider noose to recover where you can be yourself. Minneapolis - Fort Lauderdale - Chicaso - New jersey - New York City - Dallas/Fort Worth 3 4 Maranatha Fellowship MCC 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) meets In the home of Central Congregational Church Maranatha Fellowship MCC is on the Move! Our church offices have relocated to 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, Houston, TX 77004! The anticipated move to 10:00 A'\1 Sunday morning Worship Service at 3333 Fannin, Suite 106 is Sunday, December 2, 2001. For more information, call the church office at 713.528.6756. Please Join Us For Evening Services And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! !"iovember 11 "The Lamb of God" Church Service begins at 6:30pm and nursery 1s available for small children. Mid-week "Home Group· services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays For more Info ... 713-528-6756 or email maranatha@ev1.net Rev. Clark Chamberlain Guest Preacher I/~ ~~\\ Marsnstha i~ If Fellowship Al•tropolltan Community Church En;oy worship at your home church in the morning and v1s1t us m the evening for an alternate worship expcnence! Want to Quit Smoking? Project CASSI FREE NICOTINE PATCHES AND USE OF COMPUTER! Stop-smoking research study uses hand-held computer and nicotine patches. EARN$$$ FOR PARTICIPATING! 713-792-2265 TI-£ lNIVERSfIY OF TEXAS lvID ANJERSON CANCER CENTER Makmg Cancer HistoryN NEWS NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Salvation Army to provide DP benefits in 13 states · SAN FRANCISCO (AP)-The Western Corporation of the Salvation Anny announced it will start providing domestic partner benefits. "Health care is a universal good and the only way to acces.s it is through employment," said San Francisco Division Commander Richard Love. Currently Salvation Anny employees and their spouses in the western states receive full health care benefits. Now domestic partners - straight or gay-as well as any adult member of the employee household will also be able to apply for health care acces.s. The Western Corporation of the Salvation Anny covers 13 states plus Guam, Micronesia and Pacific Islands. The agency changed its policy after being cut off from local government funding because it did not comply with San Francisco's Equal Benefits Ordinance, which requires city contractors to offer their employees with domestic partners the same benefits as their married co-workers. Wash. high court says gays may have inheritance rights OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP)- Gays may be entitled to the estates of partners who die with­out wills, the Washington Supreme Court ruled Nov. 1. The justices reversed a lower court ruling, ordering a new trial for Frank Vasquez, who is claiming the $230,000 estate of his longtime partner. A lower court had found the claim invalid because same-sex marriage is illegal in Washington. "Equitable claims are not dependent on the 'legality' of the relation­ship between the parties, nor are they limited by the gender or sexual orientation of the parties," Justice Charles Johnson wrote in the unanimous decision. "It's a tremendous affir­mation of one of the most basic principles," said Jenny Pizer of the Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, a gay civil rights organization. Vasquez, 64, shared a house, business and financial assets with Robert Schwerzler, who died without a will in 1995. Vasquez claimed the estate, which consisted mainly of the house, and was challenged by Schwerzler's siblings. The siblings called Vasquez a housekeeper. Lawmaker in Mass. softens criticism of gay colleague BOSTO~ - Massachusetts Rep. Scott Brown has rescinded disparaging remarks he made recently about .state Sen. Cheryl Jacques and her partner, Jennifer Chrisler, for deciding to have children, the Boston Globe reported. Brown said it was "not nor­mal" for two women to have a baby and dismissed Jacques' role m the relationship as her "alleged family responsibilities." Although Brown has not publicly apologized to Jacques, he said, "Tolerance is some­thing I've been practicing my whole life. Getting away from the 'normal' phraseology, 'nontraditional' is the more accurate term .... I made the wrong choice of a word that is probably going to crucify me," he told the newspaper. He said he was caught off guard during the original Globe interview; the Globe contends that Brown raised the issue himself during an interview. Brown, speaking of Jacques and Chrisler, said, "I don't know what their relationship is. They're certainly not married. There's a difference of philosophy there. Are there two mothers there? Are they husband and wife? Massachusetts state Sen. Cheryl Jacques, a lesbian, was criticized by state Rep. Scott Brown for having children with her partner. He has since c tried to clarify his remarks. 0 .. It's unusual for two women having a baby. It's just not normal." Surgeon General to leave office early next year WASHINGTON (AP)-Surgeon General David Satcher, a Clinton appointee who drew the anger of the Bush White House last summer with a medical report on sexu­ality, said he will leave the government in February. "My term ends on Feb. 13 and I don't plan to stay on," Satcher said. Asked if he would like to stay on, Satcher said, "That's not an issue for me." Satcher, a former president of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn., rankled the White House last summer when his office released a report that found there was no evidence showing that teaching sexual abstinence in schools was successful. The report also found that there was no evidence that a gay person could become heterosexual. The report drew a sharp rebuke from the White House and demands from political conservatives for Satcher's resignation. Satcher became the 16th U.S. surgeon general in 1998 after confirmation opposition led in the Senate by then-Sen. John Ashcroft (R-Mo.), who is now Bush's attorney general. Calif ... school pid<s lesbian~ honlea>ming queen UNION CITY, Calif. -A 17-year-old lesbian at Sweetwater High School was named the school's homecoming queen Nov. 2 during the armual homecoming football game, the San Diego Union-Tribune reported. Jennifer Jay, with crewcut­length hair dyed red on the left and black on ~e right and sporting a pierced lip, tongue, and eyebrow, was the only homecoming queen candidate during a pre­election assembly to appear in a tuxedo vest and black slacks, according to the newspaper. During the assembly, she shouted "I love you" to her girlfriend. Jay, openly gay since her sophomore year, was up against a student government commissioner, two cheerleaders and a leader in a school human relations club. After claiming the tiara, Jay said, "I felt like I won the lottery for a second - without the money." -From staff and wire reports For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 NEWS Temis tourney features players from al'Oll1d the wor1d HOUSTON - The 21st annual HOUTEX Tennis Tournament, sponsored by the Gay and Lesbian Tennis Alliance and hosted by the Houston Tennis Club, will be held Saturday through Monday, Nov. 10-12. Nearly 150 players from around the world will be participat­ing, according to Houston Tennis Club officials. The weekend activities will commence Friday night with a welcome party at the Santa Fe Patio of JR's Bar & Grill from 7-10 p.m. Play will begin at 8 a.m. Saturday at Lee LeClear Tennis Center and will run through Monday afternoon. Proceeds from the tourna­ment will benefit The Assistance Fund, formed in 1988 to assist those diagnosed with HIV I AIDS by paying healthcare insurance premiums. In addition, The Assistance Fund currently serves approximately 600 clients monthly in a medication program for those whose insurance does not cover these needs. The Houston Tennis Club was formed in 1980, designed for the enioyment of tennis and social activities. HOUTEX Tennis Tournament Nov. 10-12 Lee LeClear Tennis Center 9506 S Gessner Houston Tennis Club www.houstontennisclub.org Montrose group to host UH political science prc)fes.sor, author at meeting HOUSTON - Noted and oft-quoted University of Houston political science professor Richard Murray will be the guest speaker at next general meeting of the Montrose Arca Democrats. Murray will analyze the out­come of the recent Houston city elections for mayor and all City Council seats, according to Montrose Area Democrats leaders. !le aho will address the citv charter amendment on same-sex partnership benefits' for city employees, the amendments on Metro light rail, the state, county and aty bond issues and the state constitutional Dr. Richard Murray Montrose Area Democrats 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 15 Noted Houston pot.tical expert Dr. Richard Murray will speak at the Nov. 1 S meeting of Montrose Area Democrats. amendments on the ballot. The public is wel­come to attend. Montrose Area Democrats meet the third Thursday of every month. Bibas One's A Meal Restaurant 607 West Gray 713-523-8432 Event benefits group that focuses on lesbian health care c .e "~' 0 .c -ca ~ e ns HOUSTON - Pacific Street in Houston will host a Military Ball from 5 to 9 p.m Sunday as a fund-raiser for AssistHers, which helps lesbians with a variety of health issues. The Executive & Professional Association of Houston is presenting the ball, which includes a USO show at 7 p.m. and free com­memorative dog-tags to the first 100 people to attend. Participants are encouraged to dress according to the military and patriotic theme, and a cash bar will be available. The cost to attend is a $10 donation. Misty Burdaga and her ' Blue Crew,' a group that gathers to hold various fund­raisers for local HIV/ AIDS causes, recently raised $4,SOO from a garage sale to benefit the Center for AIDS. The crew presented a check for that amount to Center for AIDS leaders. - Penny Wmiicr Military Ball/USO Show 5-9 p.m. Sunday, Veterans Day Pacific Street 710 Pacific 713-523-0213 5 TAKE PART in an important studv onSVPhilis If y11've ••• sr.•111111 1•1 PHI YHP WI w111• Ilk• II lllk II , ... n1 11a•y llYllVll Ill kHP ,, II••· All ... 11111• JIPllCIJHll IPI ,.,. $15. All l1f 1r•1t111 Is c1•pl1111y c1111•11u11. 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NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE When vou're rea greater success with: usiness gets done: SAVE s100 on the NEW i50sx Now Only $4999 Get Right Through 8000 J Love Sex Inner Peace Career Call For An Appointment 713-527-0000 TONY CARROLL, LMSW-ACP Co1111selUcg, PJyclwtherapy, V.'orbhop.1for I11dividuaf\ a11d Couples Serving Houston's Gay and Lesbian Community Since 1983 Authorized Deal FREE PHONE Save $79 Motorola 2282 75 Whenever Mlnutts 600 Whenever Minutes 500 Weekend Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes r.<l*Q\IDW s 1 m9 r.r.01tu~ s3m9 lllOiMld8lt ~ wllWlfatg ;,;... 1000 Whenever Minutes 2000 Whenever Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes 2000 Weekend Minutes :='* $61\99 :~~w s9999 -:O=:"Jt;;;" ~- -:o=:-c:=· - HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 NEWS 7 Malaysian leader says he will oust gay visitors KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) - Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said Nov. I that if a gay British Cabinet minister v1s1ted Malaysia with his boyfriend, both would be expelled. Mahathir, Asia's longest­serving leader, made the remarks in an inter­view with the British Broadcasting Corp., explammg that he had planned to step down from power a few years ago but could not after he found out that his deputy was gay. Malaysia, a predominantly Muslim country m Southeast Asia, would not accept a gay leader, Mahathir said. "It's a difference of values," Mahathir said. "British people accept homosexual ministers, but if they ever come here, bringing their boyfriend along, we'll throw them out." In 1998, Mahathir fired his popular heir-apparent, Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim, after he said he learned that Anwar was gay. Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said if a gay British Cabinet minister visited Malaysia with his boyfriend, they would be expelled. Alberta gets extension on changing inheritance law EDMONTON, Canada - Canadian courts have given the province of Alberta more time to change a law that discriminates against same-sex partners, the Canadian Press reported A Court of Queen's Bench judge ruled last April that the Intestate Succession Act was unconstitutional for excluding gays from inheriting if a partner dies without a will; the judge ordered the province to change the law within nine months. On Nov. 2, the judge agreed to give the government a five-month extension. According to a Justice Department memo, the government wants input from the public before changing the law. "Should the law be extended to all conjugal or marriage, like relationships, or should the law be extend­ed further to persons who have a personal relationship of interdependency, but are not in .i conjugal relationship?" the Canadian Press quotes the memo as asking. "This is the fun­damental issue which must be assessed both through public consultation ... and legal assessment." Brent Johnson of Edmonton challenged the law after he was cut out of the estate of his gay partner, the Canadian Press reported. Zambia mulls outlawing knowingly infecting with HIV LUSAKA, Zambia - The Zambian government has proposed a bill that would make it illegal to knowingly infect another person with the AIDS virus, according to the Associate Press. Anyone found guilty of violating the law would automatically be imprisoned under the proposed bill. In introducing the bill, Vice President Enock Kavindele told Parliament it was important for Zambians to get tested to know whether they were infected and to help the government understand how to deal with the disease. The law would apply to people who know they have HIV, yet continue behavior that could infect someone else with the dis­-... i ease. A million Zambians are known to be living with HIV. Also in Zambia, a German tourist was recently sentenced to six years in jail with hard labor after pleading guilty to having oral sex, Reuters reported. Wolfgang Seifarth was expected to appeal the sentence. According to court records, a 22-year-<>ld Zambian woman, Pumulo Mbangweta, who performed the sex act on him in a bush near Mazabuka, was not charged, Reuters reported. British government mulls gay couple registry LONDON - The British government 1s exploring the possible introduction of a register for same sex couples, BBC Online News reported. Baroness Sally Morgan, an official in the Cabinet Office's Equality Unit, said the government is exploring the same-sex partner registry established in London by Mayor Ken Uvingstone. Ministers say there are no plans to legalize gay marriages. "There is an increasing public debate on rights for same sex partnerships," the BBC report­ed Morgan as saying. "I think it's one that the government is watching with inter­est because there are clearly areas where most people would recognize that at the moment there is some unfairness." But, Morgan added, 'There's no suggestion whatsoever that the government would move on the issue of marriage. We are very clear that marriage remains as it is and there would be no change in that." South Africa to spend more fighting AIDS CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP)- South Africa plans to boost spending to fight the AIDS pandemic over the next three years, Finance Minister Trevor Manuel told Parliament. The provincial government spent about $430 million this year on the fight against the AIDS virus, which infects an estimated 4.7 mil­lion South Africans. That spending will increase over the next three years, Manuel said, though he gave no specific figures. Manuel also promised enough money to hire 6,000 extra police officers, upgrade the police computer and com­munications systems, and modernize the vehicle fleet. More money will be given to the justice system to hire new personnel to improve the efficiency of the courts, according to the plan. -From staff and wire reports For more news, visit www.houstonvoice.com Introducing Our Newest Associate Jason Garcia OU'F Comm.unity Insurance Agency! For Auto, Home & Health 713.661. 7700 Busin'u lns11ranc1 • Work1rs Comp1n1at1on Group ll1•lth • L;/1 lnsurancr It much mor• 6575 W. Loo South, Suite I 85 Bellaire, TX 77401 Gay Owned and Operated Proudly Serving "Our" Community. 2318 S. Shepherd • 713-528-9080 AMERICAN PRIDEDry Cleaners Store Hours: 7am to 7pm (Mon-Fri) • JOam to 3pm (Sat) jbllesseb ~acrament QCburcb Join us for Mass this Sunday at i.2:30 PM. BlesHd Sacrament Church IS an Ecumenical Old C.thohc Community. It 1s our m1ss1on, through the power of the Holy Spirit, to extend to all people the comp•ss1on of God de monstrated by Jesus Christ, our RedHmer •nd Friend. We wish to extend this love to everyone, espeoally to the lonely, the oppressed and the re hg1ously outcast. 4606 Mangum (Between W. 43rd & Pinemont) 713-4 76-9776 • www .blessed-sacrament.net 'Partner <Rings" custom nngs • ll'\8Wl1able In stores Female Version Male Version t Prices vary depending on ring size and material Available in Silver, 14k Yellow or White Gold, or Platinum To order contact Marty at AGoldenGuy@AOL.COM or call 847-635-0261 Copynght 2001 Marty Sherman 8 NEWS NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Organizers proud of efforts to unite gays > Continued from Page 1 ballots, with 22.6 percent of those taking an anti-gay stance, for City Prop. 2, and 77.4 percent agamst the proposal. The Heights neighborhood also is home to many gay men and lesbians, and with 32 9 percent of voters punching in, 33.1 per­cent voted for the proposition, while 66.9 percent voted agamst ti. The areas of Meyerland, Rice/Braeswood and R1vers1de/MacGregor also had strong showings against the measure Kingwood went the opposite way, with 16 1 percent turnout and 68.6 percent voting f City Prop 2 and 31 4 percent against Outer Westheimer showed similar results 35.7 percent turnout and, of those voters, 61.9 percent for the proposal and 38.1 per­cent against ti. In .idditton, Sagemont, Sharpstown and Spnng Branch all showed more voters for the proposition Ffforts to defeat City Prop. 2 were led by orgaruzl'rs of Progrl'Ss1ve Voters in Action and People for a Fair Houston. A political consultant, Martin 1s heavily involved in both groups. National groups also participated m the uNo on City Prop. 2" campaign. The f\iational Gay & Lesbian Task Force contnbuted both funds and staffers to the local cause. Clarence Bagby, Houston board member for NGLTF, pointed out the positive side of the loss for gay men and lesbians. N\\'hile the passage of City P~1tion 2 is a crushing disappointment to advocates for equality, it's important to remember two things: one, we've moved public optnion over 30 points in our direction since the ill-fated 1985 Houston referendum on a non-di.<.crimi­nation law for city employees, and two, thanks to Mayor Lee Brown and Councilmember Annise Parker, we now have a city ordinance banning city employment discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity," Bagby said. The '85 measure was defeated by more than 80 percent of voters who cast ballots, soundly stomping the effort in favor of equal rights for gays. Activists point out that thts week's loss sttll is progress past that mark. This time, they note, the city wa~ almost equally divided on gay avil rights. "On the good side, it means that we have improved our performance by 60 percent­age points," Martin said. "In 1985 we lost by 60 percentage points [but] we lost thts by 4 percentage points [and) this ts a much more contentious issue." As Bagby noted and Martin pointed out, earlier this year, the Houston City Council approved a measure that bans d1scnmina­tion against gay men and lesbians in city employment. That ordinance essentially did what voters in 1985 solidly rejected So while that ts a plus for gay civil rights, Martin s.11d the results of this week's elec­tion also pomt out there ts more progress to be made. "I tlunk what 1t shows is how much work as a commwuty we still have to do," Martin said "Even tf we had won ... you'd still have roughly half the people in Houston that don't believe that gay and les­bian families deserve health insurance. "I would have preferred to have won, but I would sttll have had the same reaction: We have to do a lot more education," he added. The next step for gay civil rights advo­cates may be to take their case to court. Martin confirmed that leaders who cam­paigned to defeat Gty Prop. 2 are consider­ing legal options to fight the measure. "We're going to meet with our advisers, our attorneys, and see what our options are," Martin said. "We just need a little time to analyze this." Gay rights supporters spent Ele<tion Night at Riva's in the heavily gay Montrose neighbor­hood. Above: Youth who parti<ipated in 'No on Gty Prop. 2' were interviewed by televi­sion media. Left: Councilwoman Annise Parker and gay politi<al consuhant Grant Martin spoke to those gathered at the restaurant. Below: Supporters filled the business to watch election retvms. Gays win election battles across the nation Gay candidates do well, anti-gay measures defeated in two cities, despite Houston defeat by ERIC ERICI<SO~ Voters in four cities across the country supported gay civil rights on Tuesday, despite the victory for anti-gay con­servatives in Houston with the passage of a ban on domes­tic partner benefits for city employees. Openly-gay elected officials also did well on Tuesday: Cathy Woolard, a City Council member in Atlanta, forced a run-off in the race for City Council president; Anruse Parker, City Council member in Houston, was elected to a third term. And in North Carolina, Carrboro Mayor Michael elson won a fourth term. In Michigan, voters in two cities reiected amendments that would have prevented passage of gay-friendly mea­sures. In Kalamazoo, 54 percent of voters opposed an amend­ment to the city's charter that would grant gays "protected" status; 46 percent favored it. In the Detroit suburb of Huntington Woods, the margin was even wider. Some 69 percent of voters opted to uphold an ordinance approved by city commissioners earlier this year banning anti-discrimination; 31 percent opposed it. In Florida, Miami Beach voters approved domestic part­ner benefits for city employees. Nearly 66 percent of voters OK'd the measure while 34 percent opposed it. "It's a fabulous victory for GLBT people," said Betsy Gressler, public affairs director for the National Gay & Lesbian Task Force. "The ballot measures in all of these cases passed by significant margins and in some cases they were by greater margins than we've ever seen." Gressler said gay activists in Michigan and Florida have been working on gaining support for their cause for nearly five years, highlighting why she said there is an important lesson to be learned from Tuesday's votes. "The right wing has been using ballot measures as a tool for many years and what we're proving is that they're winnable," Gressler said. "The message that comes out of it is that when we do the work early and often and identify the voters, that we have a much better chance of winning and as we saw last night, we can win by large margins." In Carrboro, N.C., Nelson won his fourth term in office. He became the first openly gay mayor in the state when he took office in 1989 in the town of about 16,000 residents near Chapel Hill. "I like to think I've worked hard for the last four years and the voters appreciated the work I've put in and the direction I've tried to lead the town in," Nelson said. "It's important to have different perspectives involved in the decision makmg process, African Americans, women, Latinos and gay people. I think having the gay perspective in the decision making is healthy for the entire community." HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 NEWS 9 Rankings may not reflect progress in states :> Continued from Page 1 Across the South, Texas ranks 24, Louisiana at 40, Alabama 48, South Carolina 43 and Georgia 37. The District of Columbia (2), Connecticut (3), New Jersey (4) and Rhode Island (5) rank among the top for states in the Northeast, and the entire nation. New York ranked 16, Maryland at 18 and Virginia at 49. The best and the worst Vermont, which scored a 97, ranked at the top of the list. In addition to having the nation's first and only law giving compre­hensive recognition of same-sex relation­ships - through passage of its landmark "civil unions" legislation - the state has a civil rights law that prohibits discrimination based on sexual orientation in employment, housing, public accommodations, credit and union practices. Vermont was among the first of the few states to recognize second-parent adoptions by gay couples. Oklahoma scored a -92, putting it dead last in the rankings, based on the newspa­per's analysis. The Sooner State has no statewide laws prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation or recognizing gay relationships or families; and it has a law that makes sodomy a felony for same-sex couples, while not penalizing heterosexual couples. Oklahoma also excludes sexual orientation from its hate crime law and has a law pro­hibiting recognition of same-sex marriages. A broader picture While the analysis provides an easy way to gauge states and their legal approach to gays, the rankings also provide a sense of legal protections across the country. For instance, while only 11 states and O.C. have enacted civil rights laws prohibiting sex­ual orientation discrimination, the 11 states and O.C. total 24 percent of the U. S. popula­tion, suggesting that almost one-in-four peo­ple live in states covered by such laws. Of the remaining 39 states without gay­fricndly statewide civil rights laws, 26 have at least some cities and counties which have Joc,11 ordinances prohibiting bias based on sexual orientation, like Atlanta and New Orleans. Adding in the populations that those local laws cover, nearly 47 percent of the U.S. population lives in areas where sexual orientation discrimination is prohibited. Thirteen states have neither statewide nor local laws prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation, according to the newspaper's analysis. Fourteen states still have laws prohibiting sodomy for same-sex couples. Although, in a few of those states, the enforceability of the ~domy laws is in question or under active Rank State Score 1 Vermont (97) 2 District of Columbia (92) 3 Connecticut (81) 4 New Jersey (70) 5 Rhode Island (68) 6 New Hampshire (66) 7 Massachusetts (64) 8 Wisconsin (60) 9 California (54) 10 Hawaii (42) 11 Oregon (34) 12 Minnesota (24) 13 New Mexico (11) 14 Washington (9) 15 Nevada (8) 16 New York (6) 17 Wyoming (5) 18 Maryland (4) 19 Maine (2) 20 Ohio (-4) 21 Illinois (-5) 22 Delaware (-10) 23 Iowa (-11) 24 Texas (-18) 25 Michigan (-19) 26 Indiana (-20) 27 Kentucky (-22) 28 Arizona (-25) 29 Nebraska (-27) 30 Tennessee (-30) 31 Pennsylvania (-33) 32 Colorado (-35) 33 West Virginia (·35) 34 North Dakota (-35) 35 South Dakota (-37) 36 Montana (-37) 37 Georgia (·39) 38 Missouri (-40) 39 Alaska (-40) 40 Louisiana (·61) 41 Arkansas (-65) 42 Florida (-67) 43 South Cilrolina (·70) 44 Utah (-77) 45 North Carolina (·80) 46 Idaho (-80) 47 Kansas (-82) 48 Alabama (-82) 49 Virginia (-87) 50 Mississippi (-90) 51 Oklahoma (-92) challenge, the laws are still on the books for about 32 percent of the U.S. population. And by averaging the scores of the 50 states and D.C., the U.S. would come in with a score of -12.9, without taking into account federal laws that affect gays. That score suggests that Iowa, with a score of -11, comes the closest to repreo.enting the general legal climate today for gays in the U.S. Beyond the numbers But even the rankings can be deceiving, according to gay activists in states both at the top and bottom of the ~ale. Vermoot, while ranked firs~ still could do more for gays, said Vrrginia Renfrew, ro-liaisoo of the Vermont Coalition of Lesbian & Gay Rights. "I do think that Vermont is one of the best states to live in for gays and lesbians," Renfrew said. "We still have work to do for our youth. The schools are not all safe for them." "[T]here is homophobia in our state and police do not always recognize a hate crime against gays and lesbians," said Renfrew. "We have much work left to do for the transgender community. They have no laws protecting them." But, she added, "Legally, I believe that we have all the laws we need from gay rights to adoption to civil unions." Only three states have anti-discrimina­tion laws prohibiting discrimination based on gender identity - Rhode Island, California and Minnesota, according to the newspaper's analysis. Across the South, which includes 8 of the 12 worst states in which to be gay, legally speaking, the scores don't always reflect the positive changes being made, according to Jo Wyrick, executive director of Equality North Carolina. The legal climate for gays in North Carolina is "improving," Wyrick said. While the state is one of few remaining with a sodomy law, which treats the act as a felony, the law "isn't enforced in some areas," she said, but "it is in others, which creates a real imbalance within the state." Wyrick said that family issues, like cus­tody, visitation, and adoption, are left to judges to decide what is in the best interest of the child. "We have family courts in some parts of the state that make very LGBT­friendly decisions, and others that don't," she said. The rankings also fail to show to what extent gay activists have been successful in fending off anti-gay legislation and defend­ing gay-friendly laws. Florida, for instance, does not have a statewide civil rights law protecting gays, but 41 percent of its population is covered through its local ordinances, many of which have been defended against numerous attacks. The state ranked 42 in the newspaper's analysis. "As a state, we've won a number of bat­tles to pass and keep human rights ordi­nances and domestic partner policies at the local level," said Nadine Smith, executive director of Equality Flonda. Recently, anti-gay opponents failed to gamer enough signatures to force a repeal vote on a gay ordinance in Broward County, she said. Miami continues to defend its ordi­nance as well, Smith added. But the laws of Florida "as a state, con­tinue to be among the worst in the country," she said. Because New York Gty and so many of the state's large cities and counties have local ordinances prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation, 72 percent of the state's population is covered under the laws. But, despite this success at the local level, the state, which ranked 16 in the analysis, still does not have a statewide Jaw. "Our progress at the state Jaw level con­tinues to be thwarted by the Republican. ·conservative parties' majority in the state senate," said Matt Foreman, executive director of the Empire State Pride Agenda. "Gerrymandering by both parties has essentially guaranteed that the status quo will not change for the foreseeable future." And while Foreman said a proposed statewide gay civil rights bill might be "close at hand," he predicted movement on significant family recognition legislation will be "extremely difficult." In Montana, which ranked 36, the envi­ronment for gays is uoutright hostile," said Karl Olson, executive director, of Montana's PRIDE organization. During the last ses.sion of the legislature, the GOP leader in the state House tried to rescind an executive order from former Gov. Marc Racicot that protected gay state workers. While that effort "blew up" in the law­maker's face, Olson said, ~we pay very dearly for even the smallest of victories." "We do have a few champions, but not enough yet to tip the balance," he said. How the analysis was conducted The 50 states and the District of Columbia were ranked on a system that migned points for gay-friendly and anti.gay laws in each. Points for each state ranged from -100 to 100. Positive points were awarded to states with pro-gay laws, indudmg statewide laws pro­hibiting discrimination in employment and other arenas. laws recognizing same-sex rela­tionships or enabling gay couples to share domestic partnership benefits, hate crime laws, and laws and court rulings recognizing parental rights and other family concerns. Negative points were assigned to states with anti-gay laws in force, induding sodomy laws, laW5 to prevent Mr; recognition of same-sex mar­riages, and laW5 or court rulings that prevented recognition of 9ifi parental rights or adoption. A ~omy law that prohibited only same­sex conduct was scored with more negat1Ve points than a law that prohibited both same­sex and heterosexual sodomy. A felony sodomy law deducted more points than a misdemeanor. And a constitutional amendment bamng same-sex mamage recognition cost a state more points than a law barring such recognition. Variables were structured in to give weight to certain protections and penalties that did not fit any of the spedf1C laws e.icamined. For instance. if a state did not have a law prohibiting d1scnmination m employment. but its governor did issue an executive order pro­tecting state employees from discrimination (and that executive order was still In force), then the state won an additional allotment of points. In the instance of a tie, the ranking was refined based OI\ protections afforded by local ordinances and on the current governor's record of support on gay-related matters. 10 STAFF Executive Ed ito r Chris Crain Ed itor Penny Weaver ed1torOhoustonvoice.com Production Graphic Designer-Scooter Workinger Contributors Rich Arensch1eldt.. Kay Y. Dayu•. Trayce Diskin, Earl Dittman. laura Douglas-Brown. Erok Erickson. Mike Fleming. D L. Groover. Robert B Henderson. Matthew A. Hennoe, Kathreen Lee, Erm O'Broant.. Gip Plaster. Ella Tyler Webmaster: Dougla• Wroqht Photographers Dalton DeHart.. Kimberly Thompson Advertising Sales Wanda Faulkner wbulk ner hOU'itonvoK e com Jlm Nixon jn1xon h<>U'itonvoice com Administration & Sales Sup port Carolyn A Roberts aobertsCtholl\tonvo1ce.com Natio nal Adve rtising Rep resentative Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-6863 Pub lisher· Window Media LLC Presid ent· Wilham Waybourn Edito rial Director- Ovis Crain Financial Director- Chris Reid Sales Director- Peter Jackson Art Director· Rob Boeger Marketing Director- Enc May rn .......... ~=prp1r MEMBER theCla1iJer .. .,__ ..,.awT&Cll- CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 a• the Monuose Star 500 Loven Blvd. Su•te 200 Houston. Texas 77006 {713) 529-8490 Fax: {713) 529-95)1 Contents copyright 2000 Offoce hours: 9 a.m to 5:30 p.m v.ittkdays To submit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 wor~ . We reserve the roght to edit for content and length We will withhold names upon request.. but you must include your name and phone number for verification Plea>e send mail to Hou.ion VoKe. 500 Loven Blvd • Suite 200. Houston. Texas 77006; fax (713) 52H531 or e-mill to ed1torOhoustonvoice.com. Opinions expressed thereon do not reflect those of tlae Houltoo Voice.. VOICES & ECHOES NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE EDITORIAL 'House poor' HRC can't lead movement by CHRIS CRAIN The terrorists behind the Sept. 11 attacks would proba­bly consider it a nice bonus that, in addition to the World Trade Centers and a section of the Pentagon, their evil plot also destroyed plans for a perma­nent headquarters for the nationrs largest gay rights lobby. Until that fateful day, the Human Rights Campaign had invested a significant amount of time and money toward pur­chasing land on Rhode Island Avenue in Washington, D.C., where the group was set to construct a building to serve as its per­manent headquarters. Unforeseen prob­lems with the site, combined with unfore­seen world events, have scuttled that $25 million plan. The ambitious and inventive idea to build a permanent headquarters is a wel­come reminder of why HRC has risen so quickly to its leadership position in the movement for gay civil rights. Even m responding to the events of Sept. 11, HRC combined political savvy with quick action, setting up a fund to benefit gays who lost loved ones in the attacks, and who won't receive equal assistance from private and public charities. But the same cannot be said for HRC's handling of its own victimized construc­tion plans, or in the group's headstrong plan to go forward with an aggressive cap­ital campaign at a time when other gay and AIDS groups are struggling to meet scaled bark budgets. A solid foundation Since the group's founding, and certain­ly since Elizabeth Birch became executive director m January 1995, the Human Rights Campaign has successfully molded civil rights activism with entrepreneurial vision and political and business savvy. Other activists may chafe at the market­ing tactics, plastering equal symbols on everything from bumper stickers to dog collars, but Birch and her braintrust have reapro the same benefit from that market stratt'gy as would an aggressive for-profit business: Busy gay con~umers, many of whom could care less about politics. ha\'e found a way to connect to the gay rights movement - and they have forked over dollars. If they couldn't get excited about crunching granola at a Creating Change conference, they could at least buy an HRC T-shirt and hob nob with demi-celebrities at a black-tie dinner. The plan to build a permanent head­quarters showed some of that same skill and cunning. Anyone paying rent down a black hole appreciates the benefit of own­ing your own home; HRC estimated that ownmg its own home would save the organi1.ation some $15 million in 15 years. The initial location, on Rhode Island Avenuein northwest Washington, carried an $8 million price tag, and the group planned a $25 million capital campaign to fund the purchase of land, as well as the design and construction of the building. But like many a would-be homeowner, HRC found its dream property turning into a money pit, and as construction esti­mates rose, the group responsibly recon­sidered its plans. Even though the group had put down a presumably hefty deposit on the real estate contract, there was enough interest from a hotel developer in the same property that HRC saw a safe escape hatch should plans run awry. Bad reaction to a bad blow Then came Sept 11. In three fell swoops, Islamic fundamentalists knocked down the World Trade Centers, smashed into the Pentagon, and hobbled the thriv­ing tourism industry that had encouraged hotel development in our nation's capital. When the hotel developer lost interest on the Rhode Island Ave. property, HRC lost its escape hatch, and risked losing some or all of its initial deposit, which could range around $400,000 or more if it is within the customary percentage. It was 1ust one of countless examples of unforeseen and unforeseeable fallout from the terronst attacks, and HRC's solid plan started to look more like a risky gamble. But in responding to that bad news, the Human Rights Campaign has made things much worse, exhibiting some of the same arrogance and myopia that have been the persistent downside to the agency's rise to prominence in the last five years. HRC is not the only cause important to gay men and lesbians that has been nega­tively impacted by the Sept. 11 attacks. Most gay Americans responded much like their fellow citizens to that horrible tragedy, giv­ing millions to the American Red Cross and other charities that promised assistance to the victims and their loved ones. But those spontaneous donations, along with a weakening economy. have com· binrd to threaten the operating budgets of many gay rights groups and AIDS service organizations. Already, AIDS Walks in Washington and Atlanta raised lower funds than expected, with the D.C. walk commg in more than 75 percent less than last year's total. In that fund-raising climate, it is im'­sponsible for HRC to go forward as announced with a multi-m1lhon capital campaign, in addition to the aggressive marketing that feeds the group's hungry $18.6 million annual budget. Putting aside the very real question whether HRC can still raise that kind of money, the move­ment would be well-served if HRC's lead· ership asked themselves another, probably brand new question: ls now the time to be raising lots of money? HRC does not owe it to other gay and AIDS groups to bail them out in time of need, but the group's leadership ought to recognize that now is the wrong time to go forward with a monumentally expensive project that is tangential to its core mission. If HRC persists in its capital campaign, squeezing out other causes important to our community, it will remind many activists of earlier embarrassing HRC mis­steps. in the initial announcement of plans to march on Washington in 2000 and boy­cott Exxon-Mobil in 2001. In both cases, HRC disregarded the input of others, going forward with plans without any serious effort to build consen­sus and support. In both cases, Birch responded to criticism by belatedly seeking cooperation and backing from other organ­izations and activists, but the damage had been done. In both cases, good ideas were unneces­sarily handicapped by insular thinking and exclusionary planning. Apparently that painful lesson still hasn't been learned, and the organization is poised to repeat the error again and again, to the detriment of the cause. Coming clean to donors To make matters worse, HRC has played fast and loose with letting its constituents know about the scuttled plans. In an early October interview with the Washington Blade, the man at the helm of HRC's effort to build the headquarters downplayed the bad news, indicating continued interest in the Rhode Island Avenue property. "We have a contract to purchase it but haven't closed on the property yet," said Jeff Sachse, who is heading up HRC's capi­tal campaign, in an interview with the Blade. "It is still possible we could proceed with that location. A final decision has not been made." But weeks earlier, on the day after the ter· rorist attack, HRC wrote to inform the D.C. Zoning Commission that con~truction bids for the project were "significantly higher than previous estimates and made the prtj­ect financially infeasible for HRC." I !RC was not "proceeding with that location" and a "final dl'Cision" had been made. Anytime a non-profit announces plans to raise millions of dollars, more even than its annual budget, for a major project, donors and constituents are owed absolute honesty and transparency in the effort. That's not what Sachse has delivered to date. Even more troubling is the refusal by Sachse and HRC to tell donors and con­stituents 1ust how much money was lost on the deposit, on ruined architectural plans, and other initial investments in the Rhode Island Ave. site. When asked, Sachse points to ongoing negotiations to recover the deposit and acquire an alternate site as rea­sons not to be forthcoming. But the parties already know the figure, and any plans right now to go forward with another property are irresponsible and insensitive to the plight of other gay and AIDS organiza­tions. It is not too late for HRC to extract itself from this money pit, and do the right thing by its own members, and the community it claims to serve. Chris Crain is executive editor of the Houston Voice and can be reached al ccrain@window-media.com. I I t HOUSTON VOICE• NOVEMBER 9, 2001 VOICES & ECHOES VIEWPOINT To give or not to give - there is no question by RICH ARENSCHIELDT The events of Sept. 11 have left most of us paralyzed but functioning minimally. It ~eems as though the telev1Sion images that were force-fed caused a toxic syndrome that rendered parts of our brains useless. Driving along Westheimer through tawny Highland Village, I saw the first vestiges of Yuletide cheer, the ubiq­uitous twinkle-lit palm trees. Under normal circum­stances I would have experienced my annual fit of irk­some discontent at their pre-Halloween appearance, admitting that I was a victim of the Madison Avenue marketing machine. instead, I was utterly unmoved and somewhat nonplused. Suddenly I make the connection between street-side lighting and the impending holidays. "Oh no! Travel, food, gifts - am I ready for all of that?" I shove the ques­tion aside to a "deal with this later" part of my mind, and then, 1ust as quickly realize that I have to deal with it now. In addition to the normal holiday associations, the period from Thanksgiving to New Year's is strongly linked to many philanthropic activities. From recent dis­cussions with others who work in the non-profit world, several agencies and their donors seem to be blinded by smoke and co\'ered with the dust of the fallen twm tow­ers. In my mmd's eye I visualize a foundation's board of directors sitting at its mid-September allocation review medmg. Three days earlier, fire has engulfed New York City. A large portion of America's wealth has vaporized with the resulting stock market slide. The agenda for this well-meaning and savvy group of funders has changed. The main question 1s: "In light of recent events, how should we respond locally to a global act?" Similar meetings take place; these happen in the less opulent conference rooms of "Shoestring Agency Incorporated," a local non-profit. Their question is more fundamental. "Can we keep the services we offer avail-able until New Year's Day, 2002?" Both questions are vitally important. 1n the midst of "bombs bursting in air" and anthrax everywhere, it's crucial to separate fact from fear. One common misconception is that foundations and Fortune 500 companies fuel the charitable engine in America. News flash: Of the estimated $203 billion given to charity in 2000, individuals contributed 83 percent of the total. Of those "mom and pop" donations, most totaled less than $200 per gift. 1n America, the little guy has the deep pockets. Three things are happening simultaneously - the economy is contracting, the country is at war and the needs of those who access charity are increasing. In a study by the University of Indiana's Center for Philanthropy, 13 separate significant economic and mili­tary events spanning the penod 1940-2000 were analyzed as to their impact on charitable contributions. Examples included Pearl Harbor, the Kennedy assassination, the Arab oil embargo, and, most recently, the Oklahoma City bombing. In the 12-month penod following each event, individual charitable gi\ing increased and the stock mar­kets rebounded in every case but one. People are concerned about the prospect of personal wealth. Unemployment is up, corporate profits are down, and investment portfolios are greatly diminished. Durable goods orders and Gross National Product num­bers tell us that everyone is spending less for refrigera­tors and the food that goes in them. Many of us seem to The MOSUV Unlabulous Social Ufe of Ethan Green You mag recall that Ethan Green Is learning to meditate. It Is recommended that novices seek out place of Inner peace. Ethan, however, has been seeking out martlan cruise bars. be prepared for a winter of economic hibernation. Three things are happening simultaneously - the economy is contracting. the country is at war and the needs of those who access charity are increasing. What should the government do? American political in\'olvement throughout history consists of two principal acti\ities: protection from threat and assistance during calamity. Aside from some bi-partisan squabbling O\'er details, our governance system has fulfilled these pur­poses admirably. The machinery of Washington D.C. is well equipped to transport billions of dollars and mtl­lions of men to faraway places instantaneously. \\'hat they are unable to do is to clean up the trash on the strL>els three blocks from the White House. For many in the non-profit sector, Sept. 11 was no dif­ferent than Sept. 10. Moms, dads and kids still appeared needing diapers, food and money for rent and utilities. People called needing referrals and information. Patients still went to their medical appointments. Direct a~sis­tance has always been provided and funded by those with a specific and per~onal intewt in a particular cause Whether it's chamber music or breast cancer prevention, ind1V1duals are at the heart of any philanthropic endea\­or As we enter this "season of spending," it behooves 11$ to remember that many chantable organizations recel\ e 30 percent or more of their annual budgets during the last eight weeks of the year Most of this comes from mdh1d­ual donors, not from philanthropic houses of power, many of whom have held tight to their original fundmg vision to support local agencies in spite of recent events. The needs of the needy haven't changed - our fear of the economic unknown should not cripple others who ·e economics status has been tenuous at best Ricl1 Arenscliieldt IS a freelance writer for Houston Voice and works al the Center for AIDS m Houston. He may be readztd through tins newspaper at ed1tor@ltoustonvo1ce.com. 11 12 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE VOTED BEST GYM LAST 5 YEARS! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 PERSONAL TRAINING NOW AVAILABLE! PERSONAL TRAINER CLAY MAXWELL :Jlofltfay :Jlea{tft jest - :Jfea{tfi jair ""' ~onsorea6y ~· •• I.es6ian :Jfeaftli Initiative • ~ • & •• ~surrection ~etroyolitan Community Cliurcli lY:JfX:J.f: ~ aturd"ay, 'Decem6er 1, 2001 'IJ. 1X: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm ~~~X: 2025 )Y._J1tli Street ('R:MCC t;iym rr ..Tl. .I: • :free :Mammon.rams • }(eaftft creeninJJ... • a rs on :Jff. tiltli Issues * mtQQYS • Liv usi antf Vancing . .. ... '\ : ; ..... ' ... ~ ..... t : ' ~ ... ~ .. • ~:.. ... .. .. ' •• - .. ' :-; ." 1.~ c;~,.~ 1.'1.l.'~~ LH I H\.'l i :;t..'111.l1.\~~-i\.'I 1..'1..'lll 11 (Q]llil@~®/unquote1' compiled by REX WOCKNER and staff reports "What would bother the Taliban more than see­ing a gay woman in a suit surrounded by Jews?" - Ellen DeGeneres, hosting the Emmys on Nov. 4 "Anne Heche won't be here, but I like Annie. She's a very good friend of mine, even though she does sometimes speak in tongues. Actually, that was one of the things Ellen misses." -Joan Rivers, in her annual pre-Emmy broadcast, Nov. 4 Ellen DeGeneres "AIDS No Longer a Deterrent for Homosexuals" -Headline of an Oct. 29 story on the Christian News Service (CNSNews.com) reporting that a higher incidence of syphilis confirms "homosexual men are no longer constrained by the fear of contracting AIDS" "I think they ought to be treated equally. Period." -Former President Gerald Ford, when asked whether gay couples should get the same Social Security, tax and other federal benefits as married couples, in an inteN1ew with syn­dicated lesbian columnist Deb Pnce "I wrote him a note thanking him .... As far as I was concerned, I had done the right thing and the matter was ended. I didn't learn until sometime later - I can't remember when - he was gay. I don't know where anyone got the crazy idea I was prejudiced and wanted to exclude gays." Gerald ford -Former President Ford, when asked by Price why he never personally thanked Oliver Sipple, who thwarted an assassinc1t1on attempt against the president but later comm tted suicide after his family rejected him when the media reported he was gay "While it would be going too far to say that we have reached the end of sexual identity - reports of the ends of anything, like history or money or Cher, tend to be highly exaggerated - it seems that something different is emerging on the street these days, a new music coming out of the cultural radio. It is composed of, and heard by, ordinary women and men of all varieties who sleep with, fall in love with, live with and break up with both women and men over the courses of their lives, the current of desire flowing easily over the gender divide and leading them where it may." -Stacey D'Erasmo writing in the New York Times, Oct. 14 "The British people accept homosexual minis­ters. But if they ever come here bringing their boyfriend along, we will throw them out. We will not accept them." -Malaysian Prime Minister Mahatir Mohamad, in an Od. 31 interview with BBC radio. British Prime Minister Tony Blair has had three gay cabinet members, Culture MintSter Chris Smith, Agriculture Minister Nick Brown and former cabinet minister Peter Mandelson "I had planned to step down in 1998 and unfor­tunately I had a problem with my deputy. We can­not have a deputy who is homosexual - not in this country. We don't accept it. In other countries they can have ministers who are homosexual. That's OK - but not here." -Malaysian Prime Minister Mahatir Mohamad, defending against mternaMnal criticism the 1998 arrest and conV1ction of Anwar Ibrahim, former finance minister and Mohamad's groomed successor Ibrahim, who 1s married with children, is serving a 15-year 1a:l term for Mahatir Mohamad sodomy and abuse of power Anwar Ibrahim . - . ~ I ' ·.· ; 11 , I I, .{ .I : . -: ~ t I J . 1- , ' "- k- - '"-...-- "'-- ·- HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001--------- by ELI.A TYLER Montrose Clinic celebrated its 20th birthday this week by presenting its first set of lifetime service awards to Sylvia Suhrland, Dr. Wayne Bockman and the Colt 45s. Suhrland, who receh'ed the volunteer service award, began voluntcenng in the clinic's lab m 1987. She later became an HIV counselor - a septu.igenarian who amazed her clients with her ability to talk with them frankly and effectively about HIV prevention and how to properly ust• a condom. "The love and dc\'Otion she has given the clinic and its clients for all these years is immeasurable. She has done more for us than any other volunteer," says Katy Caldwell, executive director of the facility. ''She retired last year, but still drops m every now and then." The profossmnal service award was given to Bockman, a \'Olunteer doctor for the clinic Bockman began offering lus time at the clinic m the mid '80s. He is retired from the Southampton Medical Group but spends about 20 hours a week at the clinic. After 20 years, Montrose Clinic has changed its services to match community needs "I volunteer because I love medicine," he says. "I am a very lucky person in that I found work that I love and find very fulfilling." "In addition to his medical skill, Wayne has the abihty to discern the need for a service in the community and find a way to fill that need," Caldwell says. "He helped to start Houston Clinical Research Network and Body Positive, which became a part of the clinic last year." The Colt 45s, the rcopient of the community seMce award, started as a soC1al group in 1976. In 1981, the organization began raising money and pro\iding AIDS-Continued on Page 14 > Dr. Wayne Bockman this week received one of thrff lifetime service awards given by Montrose Oini< as part of its 20th anniversary celebration this week. Jessica ftrrll'nt 111111 Do1 G..ther stll' ii 'Sylria.' IOW playing at lHatrt Soutliwtst. ongoi• ng Theatre Southwest presents •sylv1a• by AR Gurney, a comedy about a dog who comes between two people Greg's career 1s wind ng down, but his wife Kate's is wind ng up, when along comes Sylvia Performances are at 8 p m Fridays and Saturdays through Nov. 24, with Nov 11 performance at 3 p m Tickets are S 4 or S 12 for seniors and students T at e Southwest, 8944A C arkcrest 713-66 9505 saturday, nov. 10 Houston Arboretum & Nat re Ce te c brates Texas Recycles Day with events t e around 'Too Good to Throw Away Day f 10 am to 4 pm Act1v1t1es stress redu e reuse recycle and rebuy and me ude a recycling relay race and an interactive game to inform part1c- 1pants about environmentally friendly ways to shop Children s act1v1t1es are included Houston Arboretum & Nature Center, 4501 Woodway Drive 713-681-8433 Da Camera of Houston s 2001-2003 1azz series continues with the N1cho as Payton Armstrong Centennial Celebration. Trumpeter N1Cholas Payton leads an 11-piece band that includes a number of well-known musicians. The event also is named for Louis Armstrong, remem­bered as one of the greatest jazz musicians of all time. Cullen Theater of the Wortham Theater Center, 500 Texas, 8 p.m. For tickets: 713-524-5050. sunday, nov. 11 Houston Metropolitan Dance Co. presents its fall 2001 concert including pieces by choreog­raphers such as Liz lmperio, Jason Parsons Dorrell Martin and Kourtney <>wens The per­formance presents the variety of contempo­r ary dance for the enjoyment of both experi­enced and novice dance audiences of all ages. Ticket prices range from $18 to $35 2 pm Wortham Theater Center, the Lillie a Roy Cullen Theater. 713-522-6375 tuesday, nov. 13 The ftrst performance 1n the newly formed, all­female stand-up comedy showcase, Lip Schtick Donnas (LSD), is set for this seasoned troupe of comediennes LSD will offer performances Nov 27, Dec 11 and Jan. 1 as well Tickets are SS n advance or at the doo~ Rudyard s Upsta rs 2010 Waugh 713-528-7839 14 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE 901 Richmond @ Roseland, 2 Blocks East of Montrose 713•522•4485 t ~~1 wi"t:h "this ac:I To send tlowen io your lover, frien&, ~ To send flowen anywhere, acrou town or acroes-tbe coanby. can 1-800-GAY-ROSE or On-line at Clinic volunteers a valuable resource for local patients Continued from Page 13 > related services to the community. "Over the past 20 years the Colts have donated more than $35,000 and countless volunteer hours to the clinic," relates Caldwell. "They also provide direct servic­es to people with AIDS through the Trouble Fund and have the Stone Soup Fund which provides produce and meat for the Stone Soup Food Pantry. Jim Vokoun, a clinic patient and a mem­ber of the board of directors, has high praise for the clinic's staff and services. "It is a lifeline for me. I have AIDS and get all my primary care here. I couldn't live without it," Vokoun says gratefully. He became a patient of the clinic three years ago when Dr. Gordon Crofoot began practicing there. The clinic began in 1978 as a faality for testing for sexually transmitted diseases, but wasn't incorporated until 1981, accord­ing to Caldwell. "The Montrose Cliruc has served the LGBT community through some incredible times," she recalls. In 1985, the clinic began providing free and confidential HIV testing and counsel­mg services through a grant from the City of Houston. Since then, Caldwell says, the clinic has HIV counseled and tested more than 81,000 people and treated more than 36,000 patients in its Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Clinic. "We have grown from a small STD clin­ic in a pnvate physicians' office to a multi­faceted facility with its own building that serves over 20,000 patients annually. We have 70 employees and a budget of more than $4 million," Caldwell says proudly. " "I remember the panic that we all felt when HIV I AIDS first began to take our fnends and families away from us in the early '80s," she says. "There were no experts; there was no place to go." Bockman adds, "Fifteen years ago, we knew very little about HIV. Now it's a dif­ferent world. We know more about the dis­ease and have medications to treat it." Patients, too, see the differences. "It used to be that when you found out that you had AIDS, you got ready to die and that's what I did 10 years ago. I sold my insurance and cashed in my 401K. so now I'm broke," Vokoun says. "With the new drugs, we focus on how to live with the disease, management of side effects, and healthy living. "However," Vokoun cautions, "the new drugs are so successful, and the media has played that up so much that people forget that this is an incurable and fatal disease. I hear from a lot of teenagers who think AIDS is this disease that gay men in their 40s have, but that they'll never get." Vokoun is the chair of the clinic's pro­gram committee. "We have IO very worthwhile pro­grams, including several which people don't know much about, such as our women's clinic. So many people think of the cliruc only as the place to get treatment for a STD," he says. The clinic's services include primary care for people with HIV; testing and coun­seling for HIV, sexually transmitted dis­eases, and Hepatitis C; eye and dermato­logical care for people with HIV; Body Positive Wellness Center; community out­reach; medical case management and a Women's Health Program. The clinic accepts Medicare, Medicaid or private pay­ment. "So few of our friends that helped found the clinic are still living. I am certain that they would be astounded to see the level of care that 1s provided by the clinic today," Caldwell says. Montrose Clinic 215 Westheimer 713-830-3000 www.montroseclinic.org 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Fridays Houston Voice all the news for your /if e. and your style. HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU 15 out on the aisle THEATER CALENDAR 'Boy Meets Boy' a delight Theatre New West's ongoing production offers plenty of charm by GEORGE JONTE Considering the recent events that have, once again, put our country into the histor­ical forefront, an evening of sheet entertain­ment is what we all are in serious need of. And sheer entertainment is exactly what you'll find at Theatre New West with the troupe's latest outing, "Boy Meets Boy." For starters, it's a musical. It may be short on substance - with no fabulous story line or book to speak of - but it is jam-packed with songs that have clever lyrics, a cast that is winning and a mount­ing that is full of top-notch theatrical val­ues. Thankfully, there are no political issues to think about - although there is a very clever song about being a Boy Scout which is certainly relevant today. But other than that, there are no health, gender identity or social justice issues to deal with. You can sit back, relax, have a drink (you can take your drinks from the bar into the theater) and forget about anything that is worrying you. I won't bore you with the storyline - it's typical boy meets boy, boy gets boy, boy loses boy, and gets him back. Set in the 1930s, it is very Noel Cowardish in its stag­ing and style, very reminiscent of those great plays of the late British playwright - full of wry humor and sophisticated stylish costumes. This is all blended with Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers-€sque filmdom by the use of slide projections against the back wall. The real standout in a well-blended cast of char.icters are the two leads: Casey and Guy Rose, played by David Brett and Christopher Wright, respectively. Brett commands a presence rarely seen by an mgenue actor on I Iouston stages these days. A fine actor, a fine singing voice and a winning smile - what more could you ask for? Wright is likewise adroitly suited to his role. I won't let one of the show's big secrets be told here, but the transformation you will see in this character is fairly awesome. A pleasant singing voice for the ballads and a nice sense of comedic timing combine to make his performance a winner as well. The supporting cast does well enough, especially Craig Bushey as Clarence and Dorothy Edwards in the dual role as Guy's mother and aunt. The music is incredibly difficult at times Houstonians have two more weekends to catch 'Boy Meets Boy' - maybe not in a Sondheim vein - but certainly with close harmonies, and the ensemble was still experiencing some diffi­culties during early performances. These, with the able music direction of Charles Baker (you'll remember his splendid musi­cal acumen from "Dirty Little Show Tunes" last season) surely have smoothed out in more recent performances. Director Joe Watts has moved the cast through its paces with his usual expertise, paying attention to subtle details that make the whole evening one to be enjoyed by all. The set, designed by Gary Lyons, adds a touch of panache: not too obtrusive but pro­viding eye pleasing support to the overall concept. One interesting note, and I hope it won't kt•ep anyone away No one is nude in this outing. Nudity is something that has come to be expected by audiences when they attend a gay-themed play in this town. There is some eye candy (complete with very attractive male bodies), but 1 won't tell you any more than that. . . You'll just have to go see 1t - and see 1t you should! It is a show well worth any thl'­ater- lover's time Don't miss this one before it closes late next week. "Boy Meets Boy" Through Nov. 17 Theatre New West 1415 California Street 713-527-8219 Vtvttitv6tP P~OPQ(lf Otv'S presents Opens Friday November 9 at 8 p.m. Plays Thurs. - Sat at 8 p.m. Through December 15 Tickets $15 Call 713-524-8707 Unhinged Theatre 3304 la Branch Sol Met This Guy • • Two very funny, oriqinal plays about modern lesbian and qay relationships. Theater LaB Houston presents Direct from her recent Off Broadway sold-out engagement ... SHUT UP and LOVE ME written and perfonned by KA RE N F I N L E Y 4 Performances onlyf Opens Wednesday, November 7th at 8pm Friday, November 9th & Saturday, November 1oth at 8pm Sunday November 11th at 6:00pm 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE ~ 2815 S. Shepherd • 713.523.5FOX • www. foxdiner.com New South Kitchen & Bar r. °';\ \ WHERE LOW COUNTRY MEETS HIGH COTTON! In our historic 1936 Art Deco Location. DINJ:".J Fried Green Tomatoes, Daily Blue Plate 1.J"\. Specials, Houston's Best Fried Chicken Thursdays & Sunday Brunch! Open 7 Days from 11am ~.® ... Mellin~ Pot. a fondue- -r-e-st-aurant A four courw fc-..acurc 1lu1 1~ly completn th< fondut cx~ncncc. CHEES£ FONDUE COURSE $6700 Unique Gifts For Al Occasslons Sww or Chcdcbr Chea< Fondue, Seasoned Tr f'<rfccuon T>blc·Sidc SAU.D COURSE Bnrer SWttt..c.l1fomi> s.J.d. Chers S•l.id or Musl1room S.bd MAIN COURSE DESSERT Twm M~inc Lobs1cr T4lils. ~mer-Cul Fdct M1~non, J•p;rnesc Tiger Shnmp. Ow>u.c Sirloin Tcny.aki. Bron Of Ch JC ken. Accomponicd By Aro EJ<ouc Aslonmenc or V~et>bles •nd 5•UCC1. Milk. White or Biucr·Swttt O.uk Chocola1c Fonduc1 Aa:omponocd By Fmh Fruin •nd C..kcs for D1ppin~ fl''"°''Fl' ('33 .. fU" fUWHt tkua/t") eating out RESTAURANT REVIEW Distinction in dining Texadelphia offers good standard menu items, but one-of-a-kind atmosphere by KATHREEN LEE On Sunday afternoons during the fall foot­ball season, small but fonnidable packs of meaty thick-necked post-adolescent boys sporting backward caps and Abercrombie & Fitch T's flock to the cramped corridors of Texadelphia sandwich shops in Austin, Dallas, Houston and College Station to cheer on their favored team with wild hoots, intoxicated laughter and table-pounding loyal fervor. Guttural groans, exasperated cries and countertop smacks, periodically staccatoed by roaring cheers, oscillate between the devout fans of opposing camps lamenting over their beloved team's latest fumble, incompletion or failed defensive line. These agitated and excited fans, capable of leaping bar stools in a single bound and guzzling beer in obscene gulps, can only be interrupt­ed from their single-minded absorption to the game by the service of food. Just as other major cities hail signature foods, like pizza from New York, barbecue from Kansas City, toasted ravioli from St. Louis - yes, I said toasted ravioli - and buffalo wings from Buffalo, Houston is now on the culinary map after appropriat­ing Philadelphia's hallmark - the cheese steak - and creating Texadelphia. With various locations in Texas' most pop­ular college football towns, Texadelphia offers its patrons a small variety of sandwiches and snacks to go along with the televised sporting event. Featuring an all-day Sunday happy hour with $1.50 domestic beers and 75-<:ents off imports, football fans can congregate, eat, drink and cheer from noon to nine. Two of the mast popular fares at Texadelphia are the standard c:hee;e steak and the chicken c:hee;e steak sandwiches ($4.99). In order to maintain the sequoia necks of the strapping ath­letes, Texadelphia crams thin slices of sauteed sir­loin or chicken breast into a soft hearth-baked roll. The lean and juicy meat, seasoned with Siluteed onions and melted mozz;irella, OOU'S onto the soft torti-like bread. Each sandwich can be topped off with homemade sauces including Red Italian Marinara, a "secret" mustard blend, ranch, p1cante, or sweet hickory barbecue. Don't mistake "homemade" as just-whipped-up­by- mama-in-the-kitchen "homemade," but rather as produced-and-distributed-by­franchise- and-hea ted-a t-loca 1-ou tlet "homemade," a la Subway's breads. For those slightly more health conscious, Texadelphia alo,o offers a Veggie sandwich ($4.29), smoked turkey sandwich ($4.69), and even a hou.~ ($3.49) and grilled chicken salad ($5.49). In addition, the standard fare of ham­burger ($4 29), grilled chicken sandwich ($5.19), and Italian Sub ($4.69) are available. All sandwiches are served with tortilla chips Houston, TX 77005 www.texadelphia.com 713-522-8588 Food: f91 f91 f91 f91 Service: fel fel fel ft Value: felfelfelfel Scene:felfelfelft **** Worth the drive, so live 1 little ***** A5 good as it gets and homemade salsa, which tastes just like Tostito's salsa. In addition, all homemade sauces and dressings are available by the jar ($3.50), in case you feel the urge to recreate the Texadelphia experience at home. However, the true Texadelphia experience is not necessarily found in its low prices, cheese steak sandwiches, or signature condi­ments. For the most part, the sandwiches taste familiarly like your standard but good fare of hamburgers and grilled chicken sandwiches found elsewhere. Even the homemade sauces, like the Red Italian marinara, which tastes similar to bottled pasta sauce, possess nothing particularly distinctive. A friend did remark, however, that the "secret" mustard blend stands out from the rest with its piquant fla­vor and is the preferred dipping sauce for the tortilla chips over the "homemade" salsa. Texadelphia's distinction, actually, lies in its dining experience. Imagine yourself sur­rounded by the victorious howls and defeated wails of a horde of mildly inebriated robust and hearty college lads wh~ very soulful existence depends on the success of the next blitzkrieg. Yes, not quite my personal pre­ferred demographic, either. But, as one sits in Texadelphia's cramped quarters engulfed by the ebullience and energy of the crowd, one cannot help but to also become personally involved in the outcome of the game. While enjoying my chicken chee;e steak with picante, I found myself absorbed in each momentous play When the crowd groaned at a missed pass, I, too, twitched in reaction. When the crowd roared at an interception, 1, too, silently reveled. While I would have quickly clicked past these games at home, I found myself embraong the verve of the col­lective dining crowd and enjoying somcthing I would not have elsewhere. HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 We are proud to offer S300ff' Any Complete Tuxedo Rental ----or----- 150/oOff Your Retail Purchase wwaalsformalwear.com 24 HOUSTON AREA LOCATIONS F<r thP loca1 Im neareSI you. dial your area codt and 710oUl.I <r call t.m.uLl-Ttl ·0n 1 .. oc1os 1to~11g ot 1!19.95 ··~o «!lo :k<amts O' promal"""'W'I Soo ot"for daeola E.tP'os 1V17i1001. ON YOUR NEXI VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAY B&B we•re right INthe neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars. 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com The Gay Men's Chorus of Houston invites you to join them in a season of Jubilation, Sophistication, and Celebration! James B. Knapp takes the helm as Artistic Director to launch the 23rd season! With the electrifying new accompanist, Beth McConnell, James is set to launch GMCH into a new era! GMCH Season Ticket Subscription Order Form Name· Address --------------1 City -------------- State __ ZIP Code· HomePhone ------------ Work Phone: - ----------- Payment Method OCheck or money order enclosed OCharge to my O\llSA 0Mast81Card Name on Card.__ _________ ~ Card Number. ___ _ -____ - _ __ _ -__ _ _ Expiration date (MMIYY) _ _ I _ _ Signature Item Quantity Price Total Season tickets x$40= $ __ I prefer these dates (please ched< one for each COflC8<t). Jubli.tlon (holiday show 111 December) OSaturday 1218/01 8 p.m. at B&nng OSunday· 12/9/01 3 p.m. at Bering OTuesday 12111/01 8 p.m. at Bering Sophistication (spring show in March) OFnday 3/22/02 8 p.m. at Benng OSaturday• 3123/02 3 p.m. at Bering OSaturday 3123/02 8 p.m. at Bering C.labratlon (pride week show in June) OSaturday 618102 8 p.m. at Hemen OSunday* 6/9I02 3 p.m. at HIMl180 • Matinee pelformanc» Don•tlon I'd hke to make the following donation $ __ The MonlroN ~ cfle GMCH la ., IRS aec:t10t1 501 (c)(3) tax~ o;peniution. 17 Ju~ilation ... =--·G=lori~a. - )t' onlhehlwooue'\Mulltf' CM!ll$, and lndWge a bot o( noolalgo9 ..;ii, AC.., dCl>r>llmu T•. Thm -­wtlll - ol llgtll - lt8dillonal C8'<Jlo wt:h all - linl>-along lo pul UI al I\ Ille holidey~ Jubl~ eonc.rtT-Salurdoy ~a. 2001 .ca oo p ~ ~9. 2001 •300!>"' T~ o.c:.no.r 11 2001 • ltOO p.m. Conceit locallon Mommoi~-°"""" Sophistication ... Be-lorfle ----..,.., =N~ i~ · ~Robwt Seeley and -II Phll!p ~ .-.111e m;;;,;;;:;.;..==;;i gay--n~ -rtnat~C811 l/la<e,adtmMI rrcm - al Ille membetw ol the San Ftancioco G-v 1.1en·a Choru&. Fond O<JI wt,,. ~111'11"d:lgabcul~ Roinling out ... _... ... oonga ol elegance, - · and no-· 'l'ou _, t WW!llomiaalhecemp.-and lougtla llopl>lsllc8tloeonc.rtT._ f'ri08v, Man::h 22. 2002 at 81l0 p.m Salunley, Mard1 23. 2002 at 300 pm Sah.woay, Marcil 23. 2002 at 8:(11) p.m. Concer1L- 1...._ Menmnll UWed MoCrodoll Cllurttl Celebration! Pl>l1'cal upt._..~ cMI r righls. - · - the I ) I §;.~§:~\ ~) the ""'"" yolJ ""'"' lo ling Talal e groowy ~ b9cl< In Ce...,,._ eonc.tnm.a Salurcl9y, June a. 2002 ot 3W p.m. ~ ...... 9, 2002 at 800 p.m Conceit~ -1- Concert~ 1-----------------1 ..... _u........_a-.... Total $ __ ..4.4.0.I_W,a,l_d1.n,1 C. i-.T X mJOI 1-----------------1 3517 ~ Houolon, TX77004 PlelH mall order and 119Y1Mnt to: ----~ GMCH-Subea1pllons 0ntor-. ....-.c P.O. Bee 541004 www.gmch.org/tlckets Houston TX m54-1004 ~Cill&all(Tt~ 1521-1*4or.,,.,&all~ 111~ .. -,_'-_,,,_""' _ ~..-our lhanlra b DetWI l..m tor conc:wt att - StM1al ~tor design.- • THE • CALENDAR I KOLBE I Friday • Nov 9 Friday • Nov 16 PROJECT 1 Morning Prayer 1 Oam Morning Prayer 1 Oam Movie Night 7pm •Along Came a Spider" Monday • Nov 19 Eucharist 7:30pm e-mail: info@kolbeproject.org Saturday • Nov 1 0 or visil our Web site at Breakfast 9 30am Happy Thanksgiving www.kolbeproject.org Office dosed No..... 22 & 23 Monday • Nov 12 No activities on Friday, Eucharist 7:30pm Nov. 23 PH.(713)86t ·t800 • IOJO Hetghts Blvd. Houslon, TX 77008 - 18 is looking for a Graphic Designer with 2·3 years experience m the print media. Must be skilled m Quark 4.1 . Photoshop 6.0 and Microsoft Word. Portfolio 1s required. Newspaper layout a plus. Must be comfortable with fast and tight deadlines. This JOb 1s an ideal opportunity for the next stage 1n your career. Houston Voice 1s an equal opportunity employer. Please send resume and cover letter t o: Houston Voice Attn· Human Resources, Graphic Design Pos1t1on 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 Fax: 713.529.9531 Or e-mail: ed1tor@houstonvo1ce.com THE LOVETT INN Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE Cefe6rating 25 'fears in the Community Saturaa:;s at 7:30pm 1307-Jl 'Yafe • 713-880-2872 Executive & Pnless11111Association11 Houston IEPllJ presents ~~ Sunday, November i 1 · 5 . 9 pm $10 Donalion al the Door USO SHOW at 7:00 CASH BAR FREE COllEIORA11VE DOG-TAGS TO Fiil 100 GUESTS! Military and Patriotic Dress • Highly Encouraged HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU community calendar saturday, nov 1 O After Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM. 12 a.m. to 3 a.m. 713-526·573B. Q--Patrol walks the streets B:45 p.m. 713-528-SAFE. Dignity mass 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics. 713·880·2B72. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary B a.m. 1B05 W. Alabama. 713·52B-6665 Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club Call for ride locations. 713-B63·1B60. Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club. 9:30 a.m. 281-437-0636. Houston Wrestling Club. Practice. 1:30 p.m. 713·453·7406. Rainbow Fishing Club. Meeting. 713-526· 7070. 713·880-9235. Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center. Drop-in noon-4 p.m. • Gay & Lesbian Switchboard Houston volunteer appreciation reception, 1-4 p.m. • Texas Association for Transsexual Support, 3 p.m. • B03 Hawthorne. 713·524·3B1B. Asians & Friends Houston. Bar night at Guava Lamp. 713-626-6300. www.AsiansAndFriendsHouston.com. Houston Outdoor Group November social. 5109 DeM1lo. 713-290-0220. AsslstHers. Meeting. 713-521-462B. sunday, nov 11 Rainbow Riders A bicycle club for women. 713-8691686. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rite Eucharist I 7:45 a m., Holy Rite Eucharist II B:55 a.m.; Education hour 10 a.m.; Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 713-528-6665. Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. Service. 6:30 p.m. 713·52B-6756. Resurrection MCC. Services 9 and 11 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10 a.m. Youth Sunday School 11; 15 a .m. Handbell Choir rehearsal 1 :30 p.m 713-861-9149 Grace Lutheran Church Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-528-3269. Community Gospel. Service at 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children 10 a.m. 713-880- 9235 or www.communitygospel.org. Houston Mission Church Service 10:30 am. 713-529·B225. Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist. Service 9:30 a.m. & education hour 11 a.m. 713-66B·8B30. Bering Memorial United Methodist Churcn. Services at 8:30 & 10:50 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m 713·526-1017. The Women's Group. Meeting & Discussion. 10:45 am. 713 529·B571 Un1tartan Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Service 10:30 a.m. 4W-765-8330 First Congregational Church (Memorial). Service at 10 a.m. Christian Education. 11 JO p.m. 713-46B·9543 or fcc-houston.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum 10 a.m. Service 11 a.m. 713-686-5B76. Gay Catholics of St. Anne's-Houston 5 p.m. worship service. Dinner and social alex· camOwt.net. 713 623-0930 Thoreau Unitarian Unlversallst Congregation Adult discussion 9 45 a.m. Service 11 a.m 2B1-277·88B2. www.tuuc.org. First Unitarian Unlversalist Church. Services at 9:30 & 11 :30 a.m. Brunch available 10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion. 1:30 p.m. 713-526- 5200. church@firstuu.org. Anarchist Black Cross Federation/ Anarchist Reading Group 1 p.m. www.houstonabc.org. 713-595-2103 Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m to noon. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houston­tennisclb@ aol.com Houston Gay & Lesbian Community Center Drop·m 2· 5 p.m. B03 Hawthorne. • 713-524· 3B 18. monday, nov 12 Gay Fathers/Fathers First Support group. B p.m. www.GayFathers-Houston.org or713-782·5414. Frost Eye Clinlc. Free eye exams for people with HIV 713-B30-3000. HIV testing STD Exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 1to6:15 p.m. 713-626-2837. Kolbe Project Eucharist 7:30 p.m. 713-861-lBOO. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 936-441-1614. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. 713-692-2703. Lesbian & Gay Voices Radio Show. B to 10 p.m KPFT 90.1 . 713-529-1223. AIDS Mastery. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713-529-0037. Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, Ext. 20B. gayDAR Wellness Community. Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-526-1017, Ext. 211. Gay Men's Chorus of Houston. Open rehearsals. 7 p.m. 713-521-7464 Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center Drop-in 6-9 p.m. B03 Hawthorne. 713- 524-3B1B. tuesday, nov 13 HTGA Support Group. 7 p.m. 713-520-0439. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clime. B p.m. to m1dn1ght. Club Houston. 713-B30-3000. Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous Support group. 7 p.m 713-524-0439. Bering Support Network Lunch Bunch Gang 11 a.m. 713-526-1017 Gay Men's Process Group. 7 p.m. 3316 Mt. Vernon. 713·526-8390. Men's Network. Discussion group for soclal, educational development of gay and bisexual men. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center. 713-529-0037 Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 2B1-633-2555. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. Two-hour free dance work­shops. No partner needed. Be9inner .. 2 Step, Waltz, Shuffle & Swing. Drop in anytime. BJO p.m. 713-52B-9192. CPR Classes 3 p.m. 713-607-7700. Bl-Net Houston. Men's Social. 7 p.m. 713-467- 43BO. Mpowermeiit New program for young 9if'I males, ages lB-29. 7 p.m. 614 Avondale. 713-533-97B6 Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6·9 p.m. • Lesbian Coming-Out Group, 7 p.m. • B03 Hawthorne. 713-524-3B1 B. PFLAG·Houston. Meeting. 713-B67-9020. wednesday, nov 14 Free HIV Testing Thomas Street Clinic. 9 a.m. 1 p.m. 2015 Thomas Street 713-793-4026. Women's Network. Montrose Counseling Center discussion group for social, educational development of gay and bisexual women. 7 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center 713-529-0037 Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a m.-6 p.m. 936-441 -1614. Bible Study. Noon & 6:30 p.m. St. Stephen's Episcopal. 713-526·6665. Spiritual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Bible Study 7:30 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861-9149 Freelance Art Classes By Kermit Eisenhut for HIV+ individuals 1-4 p.m. Lunch provided. 713-523-9530. Houston Tennis Club. 7:30 -9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclb@aol.com Lesbian Literature Discussion Group 7 p.m. Meets eNery other Wednesday. 713-383-6738 Houston Pride Band Open rehearsal. 1307 Yale. 713-527-0931 www.houstonprideband.org. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Various Support Groups 7 p.m. 713-526-1017. Blessed Sacrament Church Workshop Series for Christian Faith and Ecumenical Old Catholicism. 713-476-9776. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m. • Free HIV testing. counseling. 6· 9 p.m. • Houston Committee for People's Radio, 6:30 p.m. • Bi-Net Houston. 7:30 p.m. 713·524·381B. thursday, nov 15 Rainbow Ranglers Free C&W dance lessons. Two hours free line dance instruction. No part­ner required. Drop in anytime. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 p.m. 713-52B·9192. Hep C Recovery Support group. 6:30 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, Ext. 211. STD exams & treatment. Free. AVES. 713- 626-2B37 Free HIV Testing By the Montrose Clime. B p.m. to midnight Toyz Disco. 713-830-3000. Northwoods AIDS Coalition Food Pantry. 10 a.m. -6 p.m. 2B1-633·2555. Lambda Skating Club. B p.m. Tradewinds. Skating Rink. www.lambdaroll.org. 713-410- 7215 FrontRunners Running club. 6:30 p.m. 713· 522-B021. HIV Art Therapy Program. 1-4 p.m. Kermit Eisenhut 713-523-9530. Women's Clinic. Montrose Clime. 713-830- 3000. Community Gospel. Service. 7:30 p.m. 713· 880-9235. www.communitygospel.org.' 19 Gay Houston. New social group for all ages. 7 p.m. 713-526-9318. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop in 6-9 p.m. B03 Hawthorne. 713· 524·3B18. Bl-Net Houston. Mixed gender gathering. 713-467-43BO. Gulf Coast Archives & Museum. Meeting. 713·227-5973. friday, nov 16 Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (H.A.T.C.H.) Meeting 713· 942-7002 Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV 713-830-3000. Q--Patrol. Walks the streets. 9 p.m. 713-528- SAFE Kolbe Project. Morning prayer. 10 a.m. • Movie night. "Much Ado About Nothing." 7 p.m. 713-B61-1BOO. Houston Tennis Club 7:30-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. houstontennisclb@aol .com Lesbian & Gay Voices KPFT 90.1 FM. 7 p.m. 713. 526-573B. Govlnda Yoga Club. Free yoga classes at 3115 West Loop South, No. 21 713-439-0455. Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center. Drop-in 6-9 p.m • Lesbian Film Night. 7 p.m. • 803 Hawthorne. 713-524-3B18. To list an event. call 713-529-8490, fax at 713- 529-9531, or e-mail editor@houstonvoice.com. Deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. 20 CLASSIFIEDS NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE houston classifieds Houston Classifieds deadline is Monday at noon FULL BODY RELAXATION PET OF THE WEEK OCCASIONS John Suns. DJ extrodinare spins his birthday fun on Nov 6. GLYP's star Cristina celebrates her birthday on Nov 22 Happy birthdays to Asians and Friends members Chin W. (11/09) and Carl h (11113). CCCC member Nocholas F cele· brates his b1thday on Nov 16. big Bear Brithday hugs to HAB members JJ (11/09), Robert B (1 lnD) and Joe H (11n5) Tl>e one and only Tiffany Penn gives out birthday spark1'1gs on Nov 13 Can rt be true7 Miss Alabama has a birthday on Nov 12 BUTCH-FEM Starting Butcli·Fem group for lesbians • If nterested call 713· 917·8987 Press 4 to eave a mes· sage for us Hf PLOl'MENT EXPERTISE SERVICES Two openings for cleaning post· t1ons • Mus be bondable and fr endly • Transportation provided during working hours Mon-Fri •30 am to 6 p.m. located 1-10 & Hwy 6 • S7 50 /hr with two ratSes the first year • can 281 556-8054 RYAN WHITE PLANNING COUNCIL seeks a highly organized individual with excellent telephone, writing and computer skills to fill position of Support Staff secretary/recep· t1omst • Must be fluent 1n English/Spanish • Requirements. Knowledge in Microsoft Office and typing 45wpm • Starting salary S 1900 per month • View job description at www.rwpc.org • Apply at 1310 Prame, Suite 240 • Reference t7982·C COUNTER HELP DELI Gay owner and operated deli In the Heights seeks counter help. Call Doug 0 713-864-3354 SOUTH BEACH JR'S MINE 800 PACIFIC AVE Taking applications fo all positions • High Volume • Gay night dub • Group health rnsurance offered • Apply m person Wednesday thru Friday • 1 to 4 pm Recent photo is required FREE EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE Offering Ire~ employment assis­tance fo HIV+ individuals. Including job preparedness, training. resume development, and job searching assistance. For more info call 713- 981-1543 SHEETROCK $8 PER HOUR Experienced with paint. sheet rock. and flooring• Must have own tools and work references • AIDS Housing Coalition Houston AHCH • 713-521-1613 PWA COALITION PART-TIME Warehouse Assistant • Clean dnv· mg record required• Fax resul'le to 713-522-2674 MONTROSE House help wanted • Yard • House • Pool • Maintenance work • 713·52~ 5993 STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking cook • Responsible for preparation of nutntional meals for progra~ part1C1pants • Meal planning • Prepare grocery ltSt • Clean kitchen and utensils after use • Call Taylor 0 713-522 5757 Home repair helper needed • Montrose • S10 per hour• 713-521·3359 STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregiver for HIV+ adults • Part-time overnight and weekend staff • Minimum requirements include high school diploma and at least 3 years prior work experience on caregrving • Light duties include cooking, cleaning. administration of medications and cnSIS interven· t1on •Call Taylor i 713-522-5757 Resurrection MCC is seeking a maintenance specialist/caretaker • lnd1v1dual will dean and main­tain interior and extenor of church properties • Quahf1Cation: High School d1ploma/equtvalent • Salary & benefrts • Send cover letter with resume to Resurrection MCC • 2025 West 11th Street • Houston, Texas 77008 • Attn. Marntenance/Caretaker FOR SALE/RENT orncE FOR RENT Second floor office available at Houston lesbran & Gay Community Center • 803 Hawthorne • 14 • X 12'6" • Nonprofit GLBT organ1za· tions preferred as tenant partners, but all onqumes welco~d. Call Tim Brookover i 713-524·3818 GALVfBTON 3 story corner building with deck on top for panoramic views of the East End & the Gulf • 4 bedrooms • Fully furnished • Hot tub • S168,500 • David Bowers/Agent • 409-765-8830 1 b • Quiet duplex • Hardwoods • Central AC/Heat • laundry room • Great location • 1239 W. Bell •S650/rr>o + gas & electric • 713· 527-8026 Westbury Square Townhomes. 211 5 • 1300sf •New caarpet, floor· ing & paint • CAC/Heat • W/D • Large rooms • Gated complex • Utilities included • S900/mo + deposit • Available 1mmed1atly • 713-501-6229 Furnished rooms on Montrose from S295ffleek • For single, quiet per· son • Free cable tv, breakfast. park· mg, maid serv1Ce • With queen bed, kitchen, & laundry access Montrose Inn • 408 Avondale 713·520-0206 MONTROSE COTIAGES in Garden Cottage • SlOO and up • Reserved for People living with AIDS • 90 day MAX • Phone, fur· niShed.AC • Maid paid • No deposit • Suding scale fee • No drugs or Alcohol on property • AIDS Housing Coalition AHCH • 713-521·1613. PRIDEREALTY.COM SALES RELOCATION HEALTH FREE YOGA CLAS.5ES FREE yoga classes every Friday i6:30 p.m. • 3115 West loop South #21 • No restrictions • No reserva· tions needed • 713-439-0455 MASSAGE THERAPY by Young Athletic Male • RMT#016479 • Tim• 713-876-3811 Massage by David Rangel • Swedrsh • Neuro Muscular Therapy • Montrose area • MCNISA/AMEX welcomed • RMT #8069 • Appointments 713-523-0738 MASSAGE Therapeutic • Deep tissue • Jason • College guy • 713-863-8888 • 713· 908-8020. SWEDISH MASSAGE BY PATRICK • Relaxation • Myotherapy • Deep tissue • (RMT#024589) 713·807· 7109 • 713 501 9852. • 1 1f2 hours for SSO. 1 Hr. S40. MASSAGE THERAPY AT IT'S FINEST Swedish • Deep tissue • Sports • Reflexology• Don't settle for less • In/Out • Hotels • 7 day• Nationally certified #016074. Jeff. 713-825-4062. MASSAGE Treat sore. stiff muscles, tension and stress • Renewed flex1b1loty and wellness • RMT #016479 • Tom • 713-520-6018 PRO-THERAPY Professional Therapy for men and women • Legit therapy for those searching for quality body work • Evenings and weekends •Timothy • 832-687-5786 JOB STRESS? TOUGH WORKOUTS? Call now for a relaxing therapeutic Swedish massage • Body builder & licensed therapist • RMT#005930 • Randal• 713·529-3348 Meet Kyle an 8 month old lazy kitty. PURRfect to snuggle with as 1t getscooler outside• E-mail the Houston Humane Society at pr@houstonhumane.org for adop­tion information. AFGHAN HOUND PUPPIES Cyan and Devashuni1 Kennels • AKC Black • s;ack & tan • Cream • Blue • Blue & Cream • White • Hand raised • Cl>amp1onsh1p !ires • Starting at S 1500 • www.devashu· nu com • 202-546-0854 PETSIIBNG BOOK FOR YOUR VACATION PLAN YOUR FALL GETAWAY NOW!! 0 Pets love their own home even when you can't be there• Established 1995. Book your vacation now E·mail loyal9890aol.com Call loyal at 71 ].942-8816. PRODUCTS & SERVICES KJNGSIZE MATTRESS NEW IN PLASTIC 20 year warranty • Must ;ell S250 • 713 560-7108 MASSAGE BY KEN MOVING SERVICE Experience stress relief • PLANNING TO MOVE? QUEEN PILLOW TOP Convenient Montrose location • By MATIRESS SET appointment only • 11 am to 8pm • We'll move you in the right direc· RMT#028519 • KEN CLAUDE • 713. t1on • American Movers • 524-4759 Experienced • Trusted • Insured • MASSAGE Absolute Let-Go Houston Mttro 713.942.2399 • Montrose Locauon • 7 dayt/evenlngS • Vlsa/Mas1ercard • OVtClllll weJ....- FOR ACTIVE MEN Your tome for personal attention • Full Body Swedish Massage • Jose • RMT#17316 • 713-397-8286 Tx Dot # 5282035C • 713-522· 1717 • www americanmovers.org • 800- 522·2670. PETS HOUSTON HUMANE SOCIETY NO ANIMAL TURNED AWAY!• The HHS relies solely on donations. They receive NO local, state or fed· era! government funding. Call 713· 434-5555 to find out the many wa)'1 YOU can help Brand new • list S699 • Sell S200 • 832-435-2677 • Can Deliver. PROFESSIONAL SERVICES M2M BODY GROOMING Body Waxing • Clippings• Coloring • Personal grooming by Dale . Waxing specialist & licensed Cosmetologist. Private location In Montrose. Call 713·529·5952 for appointm•·nt. PSYC1HC EDUCATION PSYCHIC READING BY GINA Spiritual reader and advisor • advises on love, health, and marriage • Unfold the mystery of your past life and interpret your dreams • S 10 Taro card reading • 713-524-1298 LEARN REIJ\I COMPLETELY 2 1/2 DAYS NOV 16-18 ONLY S425 • Gift certificates available for this and many other intriguing (and cheaper) seJVices • Details at rainbow­prod. com/bilbo • Reiki Master Bill O'Rourke ROOMMATES GW Couple seeking roommate to share 3/1 in NW Houston • 314 acre overlooking Cole Creek and forest • (Tidwell & 290) • S400/mo and 1n elec • References required • 713· 462-8511 Share 212 remodeled home in the Heights area with 30's WM • Non· smoker • Hardwoods • S425 + ut1I· ities • B32-309-0822 SGWM seeks nonsmoking room· mate to share 212 condo • New kitchen & bath • Pool • Securrty • 1 block from River Oaks shopping center next to Barnaby's• 713-520- 7662 TRAVEL IF YOU LIKE KEY WEST OR HAWAII, YOU'LL "LOVE" PARADISE • Accepting reservations • 409·762· 6677 • Toll Free B77-919-6677 • 2317 Ave. P • Galveston • www.galveston.com/paradise paradiseOgalveston.com. VOLUNTEERS STEVEN'S HOUSE Seeking caregivers for transitional housing program for HIV+ adults • Must have high school diploma and experience as a caregiver • Contact Ms. Straham O 713-522· 5757 or fax resume to 713-522· 1910 FOR INFORMATION ON PUTTING YOUR CLASSIFIED AD TO WORK FOR YOU, GIVE CAROLYN A CALL AT 713/529-8490 HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 21 COM Houston Voice all the news for your /if e. and your style. r--------------------------------- - ---- - ------------------------------~ PICK YOUR CATEGORY FREE': call for guidelines HIV Services & Education _ Volunteers _ Non-Profit Organizations 'First 20 words INDIVIDUAL RATE $10: Announcements _Auditions _Employment-Seeking _ Pets-Free or Lost & Found Roommates Personal Web sites BUSINESS RATE $18: Auto Repair _Business Opportunities _ Entertainment _ Help Wanted _ Help Wanted-Seeking _ Home Improvement _Items For Sale _ Licensed Massage _ Moving Services Professional Services Real Estate For Rent Real Estate For Sale ~11713-529-8490 for other categories Classified Order Form Fax: 713-529-9531, Phone: 713-529-8490 TO PLACE AN AD: IN PERSON: Bring completed order form with payment to Houston Voice offices (M-f. ~5:30 pm) 500 Lovett. suite 200. BY MAIL: Mail completed order form with payment to Houston Voice Classifieds, 500 Lovett. Suite 200, Houston. TX, 77006. BY PHONE: Call in with completed order form to 713-529-8490 BY FAX: Fax completed order form and credit card information to Classifieds 713-5~9531 BY E-MAIL: crobertsOhoustoovoKe.com AD POLICY: Houston Voice resel'Vl!S the right to edit reclassify or reject ads not meeting Houston Voke standards. No refunds for early cancellatlOO. Misprints: Houston Voice is not responsible for mispnnts appeanng after first week. Check ads promptly. Deadline for ad submission is: MONDAY at 12 NOON WRITE YOUR AD TOTAL YOUR COST Please print clearly CALL FOR DIRECTORY AD RATES CATEGORY: __________ #OF ISSUES: ___ _ Giant or Bold Headline - Not to exceed 14 characters and spaces I I I I I I I I I I I I I I INDIVIDUAL RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 10.00 per week. Additional words at 50( each per week. Up to 20 words: $10.00 Additional words __ x 50(: ___ _ Bold headline: 5.00 (per week) ___ _ Subtobl x # of issues Tobi s __ _ BUSINESS RATE ADS Up to 20 words for S 18 00 per week. Additional words __ x 75( per word ~ werl<): ___ _ Bold headline 5.00 (per week) ___ _ Subtobl #of issues Tobi s __ _ Name: Address: ------------------- City ____________ State _ Zip __ _ Phone ___________________ _ Check Endosed __ Charge to my D AMEX 0 MC 0 VISA Card # &.p.__J __ Signature __________________ _ ------------------------------ -------------------------- 22 •••• • DIRECTORY American & Foreign IHI 11a1 PLACI TAFT STREET AUTO Auto Repair & Service •Alignment •Brakes • 1307 Fairview Inc. 113-526-3123 1411 Tall Houston, Tl. 11D19 CJ blocks west of Montrose) 71 3-529-141 4 Alignments Brakes 2314 Washington 713-880-4747 to place JQUr directory or classified ad in the Houston Voice today! Absolute Let-Go iilfm anmassage.net 13.942.2399 Montrose Location 7 days/evenings Visa/Mastercard • Outcalls welcome Or. Richard W. Fletcher • Neck/Back Pain • Auto/Work Injury • Medicare/Medicaid NOVEMBER 9, 2001 • HOUSTON VOICE If your hair Isn't BECOMING to you, you should BE COMING to me. DON GIU STUDIO 911 713-521-0911 BY APPOINTM£HT ONLY Penis-Enlargement.net FDA Approved vacuum pumps/surgical. Gain 1-3". Permanent & safe. Enhance erection. FREE Brochures! Latest enlargement info: (619)295-HUNG or 900-976-PUMP ($2.95/min.) STIU~\.'i • \Ol. ('." l.IU: \\IUIOl l' n - ~~·~wli4· Cont·iPMnl U11ntro.•~ location 713-524-4759 KE!\ CLAl,DE The House Company DAVID BOWERS Realtor 2815 Broadway GaMls1on. Te•as 77550 C11: a-nH817 ,...: 40t-771Hll11 lll ft'tcllOO-~ RMT#028519 lid~ 81, UNLIMITED I Photography I PiLture your home BEFORE disaster strikes. Pt1otograph1c documentatior of your 111sured. personal possessions w1I, Insure your receiving a fair price for replacement. lneluding Port1a1t. Pets & Chat Room Photos Kathy "Kat" Frazer 113-981-8958 Kat2travel@msn.com BONDED Professional ~assage1n Montrose Swedish manage by Thom loch 713.256.9490 RMT#026584 HOUSTON VOICE • NOVEMBER 9, 2001 OUT ON THE BAYOU M Sta by JILL DEARMAN YOUR WEEKLY HOROSCOPE Nov. 9-15 ARIES (March 21 to April 20) Be choosy about whom you attach yourself to during this key period. Use your brains and your instincts, babe, and for a couple of weeks (during mid-November) try to not be so impulsive. TAURUS (April 21 to May 20) The new moon on Nov. 15 falls in your house of love and could bring you a roman­tic partner who is totally different from the normal idiots you go out with. If you are already involved, your partner could get reinvented in a shocking (and delicious) way. Pay attention to a Leo. GEMINI (May 21 to June 21) You have every reason to feel confident about your sex appeal, sweetie. Just don't push it in the face of everyone. There's a line between confident and cocky. A Capricorn can't help but want to ride that line with you. CANCER (June 22 to July 22) The drama called your so-called life continues m mid-November. You need to be on call for impromptu auditions (for new organizations and love interests) and stand­ing- room-only performances (for an Aquarius). LEO (July 23 to Aug. 22) It's easy for you to get what you want during this cycle if you are nurturing and kind to the people around you. Since you are such a sweetie, that shouldn't be hard. Just refram from going into ''bos.5y Leo" mode while the Sun and new moon are squaring you. VIRGO (Aug. 23 to Sept. 22) Someone from your past can help hook you up with an influential new partner. You're ready to change your spots, so start by breaking a tedious old romantic pat­tern today. A Gemini wants to tame you, you animal. LIBRA (Sept. 23 to Oct. 22) You may have to push the limits of your own courage when it comes to finances, dear. The new moon falls in your house of money on Nov. 15. That's the perfect time to ask yourself: "What kmd of lifestyle do I want in 2002?" Plan ahead. A Leo awaits - with an offer you can't refuse. SCORPIO (Oct. 23 to Nov. 21) Be a force of good for yourself and the world during the new moon m your sign on Nov. 15. You can do amazing things if you believe, baby. Cynicism has no place here. Talk to a Sag for inspiration. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 to Dec. 21) You are your own best press agent when it comes to your love life, baby. Let a new love (or .1n old one) know what your hopes and dreams are. You come off as more noncha­lant than you think you do. Spell it out for a Cancer. Don't be afraid of the "L" word. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 to Jan. 19) The new m<x'n on Nov. 15 fa lb in your house of friends, which means that you need to make ten wishes on behalf of your pals. You can do it, you latent altruist, you. Be a guardian angt!l for an Aries, who can bring out the sexy devil in you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 to Feb. 18) You are reaching a real peak when it comes to your career, sweetie. The new moon on Nov. 15 hits the top of your chart, and brings you closer to a position of power that you've been seeking for a long hme. Remember; for you power equals freedom. A Libra plays a key role. PISCES (Feb. 19 to March 20) There's definitely a melancholy vibe surrounding you now, dear, and that's okay. Allow yourself to feel everything, without censoring youn;elf. A Libra is more unshockable than you think. fill Deam111n rs tire author of the btst-selling "Queer Astrology for Men" and "Quur Astrology for Women" (both from St. Martin 's Griffinl. For information on charts and am­sultalions, et111212-841-0177 or t-mail QScopes@aol.com MNDTHf . , BM <iOfS ON ... Open Bar Silent auction 6:30 pm Seated Di ne~ and Dancing at 8:00 pm Valet parldng available. George R. Brown Convention Center OU T 71J.S21.9,ll www.hous blacktiedinner.org 23 - - H Houston's largest Adult eouuaue 100'1" llW lll'Olluctl lll'IVIDI WIUll. 11111 us lldaJI Menswear Lounge wear Thongs G-Strings Sexy Gifts Leather Novelties J'ideos I DVD's ~l""'-ld AIDS Day LT H F'A IR Saturday December 1, 2001 • 9:30 am-2:30 pm Bering Memorial United Methodist Church 11440 Harold FREE Body Composition Measurement FREE Food FREE Door Prizes ITV or Gym Membership) FREE Back Adjustments FREE Giveaways from Houston Buyers Club Lark Lands, PhD, Keynote Speaker 10 a.m POZMagazine Science Editor and internationally respected treatment expert Also presenting are Patricia Salvato, M.D. and Nelson Vergel miiinrl1 RSVP REQUIRED for FREE Lunch and/or FREE Child Care. Please call Houston Buyers Club for more information. """ • 713-520-5288 I hbc@neosoft.com I houstonbuyersclub.com - . ~serono (t) UNIMED [i)~ a ~ 11M~ IWl vv1ro1.o11c ,.._, bca•olw QI LEAD s CLE R iarrhea got you on the run(s)? Lipodystrophy making your face old and your belly big? Se drive down the tubes? erves shot by neuropathy? Sky-high blood fats making you heartsick? Come hear answers for preventing or el mmatmg these and many other HIV related symfJloms and drug s de effects
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