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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
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Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 001. 2000-02-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 25, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3304.

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(2000-02-04). Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3304

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000 - File 001, 2000-02-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 25, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3337/show/3304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1006, February 4, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date February 4, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Derek Henkle claims negligence on the part of high school administrators cost him his high school diploma and the chance to be a teenager. Page 5 Comedian Margaret Cho came through a difficult time and learned to love herself; now she's spreading the story with laughs in her one-woman show that started its national tour in Houston. Page 17 ISSUE 1006 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AN D YOUR STYLE. FEBRUARY 4, 2000 Oral sex poses 'significant' risk for HIV CDC study released Tuesday shows 7.8 percent of participants infected through oral sex by I.AURA BROWN Oral 'X "rnntnbu!L's Stgmfic.mtly" to thl' sprl'.1d of 111\', although the pr.1ctKl' is "too oftm n.-garded as posmb littll• or no nsk," acrnrJmg to a studv pre-..mh.'d Tul'sday at thl'&.'H'nth <. onfercnce on Rl'tro\ 1ruscs ,md Opportunistic Infection , lwld m San I r.masni. Almost l'1ght pl'rlmt of m wlv mfr'Cted ga\ mm m .1 m.cnt tudy contracted I IIV through or.11 sex, ,1w1rd1ng to the lcntt rs for D1se.15e (ontml and l'rl·wnhon, wh1lt• S'i pcrcmt said the) h.1d or.ii ~1·x without a condom bt\,lllSI.' thl')' bclil'H' II h.is li tt le nsk of tr,msm1thng I II\'. 'Tor somt', or.ii Sl'X is equated with s,1fe Sl'X. I lowewr for the md1v1du.1ls in this <,tud); and for countlt-ss othl'rs, this folSt• ,1s.~umption h.1s il•d to tragic lifelong consequmces," said Dr I ll•it'nl' ( ;,iyll·, diR\tor of the COC's N,1tional Centt•r for I IIV, S'f D & rB l'rewnlion. Thl' studv brought mixed rl'actions from thOSl' on the front· Imes of public d1scuss1on of HIV- vindication from some, fe,1r • ind frn,tratu>n fmm others Andrew Sulh\'.ln, the fonner '\cw Republic editor and Rallying for Equality author who has writtrn about his bdil'f that he became HIV­pos1hvc through oral 5<.'X, said he isn't surprised by the new sta­tistics. ''When I told people that's ho\\ I got inft'Ctl'd, l was treated with .1t bt.'St mild di.~am and ,11 worst with mocking disbelief," Sullivan told Houston Vo1Cc "But I hone<tly nc,·cr had unprotL'Cll>d anal mtcrcour.:;e before mv infection, and thl' most I cn•r did was unproll'Cted oral~. and then not even to qaculatmn. Pl'oplc don't want to hear this, but that doesn't mean 11 isn't true "I thmk. it's still a verv ~mall n k, but O\"l'T bmc, small nsks bt.'Come bigger nsks. The odds mount I rust hope people" 111 bchen' Slime of us nm\," <;u]Ji, an said. While l'\ CT) one should be ,mare of the nsk.s thl') an• tJking, a new focus on the dangers of oral sex could ha\ e an unm­ll'ndl'd b.ick.lash on gav men Wl'.lr) of const.mtly h.mng to strni;gle with safl'r sex 1SSul>s, '' amt>d )l-H Grah,1m, c:wcutive dirt•dor of AIDS Sum \'al Projt'Ct. "It is important to pomt out to people that thl')' do nt'l>d to take [the new oral sex study] into account when they arc con­sidering how much risk thl'y Jrl' willing to [t.ike] for contracting 1 m: but the bottom line is that 1t 1s unprolL'Cted Jnal Sl'X and injL'Ction drug use thJt Jrl' fueling the epidemic," Graham said. Oral sex may be the cause of mfL>Ction for 7.8 pt.•n:cnt of the stud­ies participants, Graham no!L>d, but that means that the \'~I mJjor­ity, more than 90 percent, contractL'li lllV fmm other modes. "My fear is that if peoplt· point thl'ir fingers at oral sex, ~me 'People don't want to hear this, but that doesn't mean it isn't true . ... IJ'ust hope people will believe some of us now.'­Writer An rew Sullivan, who says he was infected with HIV through oral sex. people \\ill take that as an cxru."(' to engage m lugh ns1' bcha\ • 1or all the way amund" bt.'Causc of a fatalistic attitude that C\WVthing Ls· dangerous and AIDS IS therclorc somehow unavoidable, Graham said . :;..... Continued on Page 15 .. 11:1::-:-:--::-:---':"""""~--,.-~~~--;:,,-,,,,,....,...--, KKRW apologizes over 'inappropriate remarks' Some 70 people gathered in downtown Houston Jan. 28 to rally against Exxon Mobil for the company's refusal to add sexual orientation to its non-discrimination poficy and for ending domesti< partner benefits for gay employees. 'Todoy is the start of a long fight. This battle will not be clone overnight,' said Sean Carter, president of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Pofitical Caucus. After the rally, protesters marched several blocks to Exxon Mobil's headquarters, which company officials closed early and ringed with potice for the event. Organizers plan another protest Feb. 29 to launch a boycott of the company. (More pictures, Page 14) by \1Arf llH\ A !ff '\II \ I louston radio station 1~-ued a terse on­mr apolog) to City Counah\oman AnnlSC P,1rker TuC'\dav, though station offiaals h.'.l\e ) d to talk with P.1rkcr d1m:tly about the dcrog.itor, rnmments .i r.idio rock d1m:ted tm,ards her l,1tc la<t month \nd stallon offiaals took no action Jgamst Kn en Dorst'), producer of 'The Dean and Rog Shm' on KKRW 91 7, for calling Parker a d} kc and upd mu richer dJnng i Jan 21 broadcJ.<t Parker, th l I\ Council s onl opcnl\ ga) member h.1s {,11lcd Dorse) s comments hate speech The comment! cJmc dunng a d1 I.I! 1 n ,1bout P.irker's 1m oh Ement \\1th the \\, theun r Street Fe b\al Dorsey hJs taken part m the fcsll\al forse\cral }Car; last month city offiaals derued a perrmt for the annual gathering, \\h1ch drav.s some 10000J people to J 10-block stnp of \\csthcuncr The h\ o-terrn at\ counalv. man has sa d the f b\al has gro\\n too large and mu..-.t addrr pt. he safe!) conccrru f 1t continu at 1•~ wrrcnt location \\ hich ma m t re • 1dmhalarca In DoNev's apolog) rdered b\ tah nm agcment he 5.11d the pos51b I\ I the f t \ n tt~kmgp.1 c sarr t T\el) I t m I po og1zc for any reT!lJrks tPJt mJ\ otfended her or an l'1 m r I t J murut\, DoNey !Xlld m the t.::ped J \\ h1ch .ured at 61 c; a m The apo ~} wh ch ted I thJ!l ond \\ sand\ 1 hed bchH>en the end ,,.. Continued on Page 14 2 0 ~ ...... Antique Country Pine at ~ ClARKCR; ~ N Competitive Prices ~ en ...i, Phone: 713-266-4304 • Fax: 713-781-8445 ~ ~ ~I E-mail: hbw4gla@acninc.net • www.europinedirect.qpg.com ~ <..> 3029 Crossview, Houston, TX 77063 RICHMON AVENUE One Block East of Fondren and Westheimer Maranatha Fellowship MCC has moved • We Did It! Our move is complete! Please JOin us in our new home at: Central Congregational Church 1311 Holman (across from HCC-Downtown Campus) Offices Located at 117-A Tuam Sunday Service 6:30 pm Bible Study 5:30 pm Come celebrate God's "Moving" in our lives • • • For more info ••• 713-528-6756 or maranatha@ev1.net FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Everything you Right Here! Right No ant I • 2000 mnx1mn SE LONE STAR Sales Hours: 9-9 M-F • 9-9 Sat. Service Hours: 7-7 M-F • 8-2 Sat. 12230 Southwest Freeway • Stafford, TX• 281 -243-8600 • FAX 281 -243-8635 .._ u ollston 's • HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 Cl?.. L1 1i· E HIV tl{l ·----·l -_ some SUSTIVA" is the first HIV drug approved to be taken once-a-day as part of your combination therapy. just take three 200 mg capsule~ together once daily. with or without food high fat meals should be avoided.Your doctor may suggest taking SUSTIVA al bedtime to reduce any side effects you may expenence SUSTIVA, an NNRTI., must be used in combination with other just did! Once Daily SUSTl\r~ efavirenz Pregnancy should be avoided m women receMng SUSTIVA because birth defects have been 5een 1n primates dosed With SUSTIVA Barner contraceptJon should always be used in combination with other methods of contraception. Talk to your doctor when you start taking SUSTIVA. SUSTIVA may change the effect HIV drugs. SUSTIVA is tough on HIV. ·· n..'C!uces the amount of virus 1n your blood , 1d .. , " .. e r . · ,f • · • C >4 ells. SUSTIVA can even be used in young children, 3 years of age or older. This IS based on results from controlled dnical tnals at 24 weeks. Presently. there are no rcs.ults from controlled dnical trials she rg-te<m effects of SUSTIVA Now listed among preferred anti-HIV drugs in government guidelines.' of 01'1er m1·<11~·'>es (1ncll,.· · 11 ""' · · I ·IV'. Nways tell your doctor 1f you are taking. starting or changing any prescnption or non-prescnption medicine when taking SUSTIVA Your doctor may change your mecfiones or change their dose. You should discuss your pnor medical condmoris (such as mel'tal illness. substance abuse, hepatitis. etc.) With your doctor before taking SUSTIVA We l<11<M' that coping with HIV IS difficult enough. Your treatment doesn't SUSTIVA has manageable side effects. Most side effects are mild to have to be Ask yot.r doctor about SUSTIVA For more lfTll)Ortant nformatJOn IP can be managed. Tre most significant Side effects associated with SUSTIVA therapy , rave been 'lervous system symptoms (dizziness, trouble sleeping. dro~ness. trouble concentrating and/or dbnormill dreams) and rash. These usually subside w1th1n the first two to four weeks of treatment. In a small number of patients, ra<J> may be ~enous. faking SUSTIVA at bedtime may help make nervous system symptoms 1ess noticeable •NNRTI llQll-rudeoside reve<Se ~t.Ise 1nhibrtor. for men lrlonmoon onSUSTIVA.al I~<><-°" ....tn«• at h<q>JlwwwsusCM.ccwn for men inlonNtion on c/lt upcbte<f OHHS Guodtinos. • PDF filt of tho ~ ~ ;iv>ilalile " h<q>Jiwww """"'°"I see the next page for Patient lnfOl"Tlatior about SUSTIVA FOR HIV Flnally, a once dally medication to treat HIV. SUSTIVA. It's about time. www.1u1tlvLcom I ~ b-tl>t U.. ot-.iAcerts11HV.w.a.dMAbrod-Pn! onG'IOJ ~ urrun-ot>f'J rioc!ion. ~of llc.iiti rod ttrn.> S<rw:es ~Oocerrt>or 'I'll 5US"'1VA'" nl tile Sorbnl Logo on 1nldemilris d~ PNrmocNlals ~ ~0 =-~ ~"::'~-- ~....Qlll!ll!l!Jlt.i!!m~!i~s 3 4 Once Daily SUSTIVA What is SUSTIVA? s How does SUSTIVA work? efavirenz SUSTIVA™ (efavirenz) capsules Patient Information about SUSTIVAit (sus-TEE-vah) lor HIV (Ii :Jar lmmunodef ciency Vi ) Infect Gener ~name efav renz 1eh-F~ v-h-rehnz ~ TIVA w kS by wer ng the amou of Hl'v the t od ca "vrral oad" SUSTIVA t be tak "' ... anti 111V med c nes ~he." taken w 11 other • '!IV ned c nes S J~ T VAras been hcwr to red ;;e ra oad ar.d ncrease 'he number of CD4 ce Is (a lype of mmune ce in ~I ..:, SLSTIVA may t have "P.se effects 1 Mry pat ent Does SUSTIVA cure HIV or AIDS? SUS~IVA • ~ta cu e I r 'IV ' A.OS f'l!op e tak ng SUSTIVA may st II .leve op other infect ons associated W1 HIV Betause of 'h s t very 1mpc'lant Illa! y rn n undei '.Ile care ct. your doctor Does SUSTIVA reduce the risk of passing HIV to others? SLSTIVA tis ~ h~ I ' he r sk ol IJlli ng H V 10 others Cont ue to ~ractice safe sex and d t y reed Can children take SUSTIVA? 20C 'l'(J es ~ t oocc a day by noutl1 ee Can children take SUSTIVA? d la< SJSTIVA at bed! med ng Ille •st fNI w ks b coocentra ng see What are the possible Yes. ch Idler. wllo are able to swa low capsu es can take SUST'VA Rash may be a serous problem 111 some ch ldren Ten your ch Id's doctOI nglll My If you notice rash or any other Side e!!eds wlllle your dlild IS taking SUSTIVA. The dose ol SUSTl'vA for children may be~ than Ille dose IOI adults Capsules contalmng lower doses of SUSTIVA are available Your ctutd's doclOI wi:I de!ermtne Ille right dose based on your ch Id's weight Who should not take SUSTIVA? Do not lake SUSTIVA tt you are alleigit to SUSTIVA 01 any ol 1ts 1ngred1ents FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What other medical problems or conditions should I discuss with my doctor? Ta • t y ~r ooor right wray I you • Ar pregna I or want to become pregnant • Ar breast feeding • l1ave problems With your liver or Mve had hepafli1s • Start o change any med cine • t<ave side eltects wtule 'akJng <>LSTIVA (elavirenz) • Have a history ol rieotal ness substantll oi a aho1 at What are the possible side effects of SUSTIVA? Many pat ts have dimness •roi.~le seep ng dr~ws ness t•o-ble co:icentrat1 g and/or unL :.JI dreams a 'fNI hou:s after sta~ g treatment w th SUST!VA These 'eellngs may be less not1ceab e I )'Cu ta! • Sl.STIVA at bed! me They a so t <1 to go My alter you ve •ak:." the med c tor a few weeks Ila e y patents :Jve more • nus de effects t~.at may all Cl mood or ab 'Cf to 'h nk Clearly These side effects occur more otten " patients \'; ll1 a h story o; tal nc or substance abuse Te! yv~r doctor i:· y f ary ~ these side effecl!i cont ue II they bother y Th ·e s 'he poss b !y that these synptoms may be mor severe If SUSTIVA s used W1th a cohol 1 mood altering ;tree!) drigs You hould avo u 1v-ng o open! 'g irach1nery I vou are llav ng t ese Side eltects One o• the most comrno: Si e effects s rash These rashes usua ly go MY w1trout any change 1" tment In a 'ifl13 I number pat ents rash may be ~ ous II you de'JI; op a r.:. call yr doctor p ;mptly Other corr or. sule effects nctud hredriess. ,,μ stomach. vc:i1tmg and diarrhea However. this s t a cc~plete is• of s de ellects reported w tr SUSTIVA wt 'ake" with other anti HIV drugs Do not rely on 'h s eal et alc-e to; nforr:at on abou: side effects Vour doctor car rl scu<s a more corrplele hst o• s de effects w th you • "in m mals Can I take other medicines with SUSTIVA? 5l..5'1VA may change the 11ec1 of other med l. ne ( nctud ng ones for lllV) Y r !'actor '!13Y cl'arge your medic nes or dlarge 'her rl • For th s reason I r:y important lo • Lei all your doctors a , pharrr.:: sis know 'hal you '..kc SUSTIVA • Te I your doctors and phannac1sts abc I all med" nes ye_ take This includes those you tJy over-the-countei and ""~I or natural remedies Br ng all your medicines when you see a doctor or make a st of their ranes hnw rr..tl: yr:,,; take and how often you •Jkr. 'herr. T s w give your doctor a comp ete picture of the med1c1nes YCu use Then he or she .:an decide the best approath •or your s1tuaho" The 'o owing med nes may need to • Cnx van® I nd nav i) • Fort vase® (saqumaVlrJ • Biax1n® (clar tf'romycinJ How should I keep SUSTIVA? SUSTIVA IS available as 50 ~ 100 mg ard 200 mg capsules. Keep SUS•fVA at '000' temperature (77 F) In the bottle give'.' to you by your pharmacist The temperature can range from 5~ -86"f Keep SUSTIVA out of h '"·-n How can I learn more about SUSTIVA? Talk to your doctor or r JV1der 1f you have questions about either SUSTIVA or HIV For add1t1onal 1nlormat1on you can v1s11 toe SUSTIVA wclls1te at h11PJ1www sust1va com This medicine was prescribed for your particular condition. Do not use it for any other condition or live it to anybody else. Keep SUSTIVA out of the reach of children. H you suspect that more than the prescribed dose of this medicine has been taken, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. -- ---~ "SIJSTIVA"' - the SUNBURST LOGO are trademarb of DI.Pont PharrnaaMlcals ~ Copyrighl c 1999 DuPont Plwmaceuticals Company "''The brands Isled ... tho regtSl&red ~mari<s of ll1eit f9SP8CllW --... not -of DI.Pont PNtmac:eutiCalO ~ <@1DHD DuPont Pharmaceuticals W' mlng!on, DE 19880 l$5Ued September, 1998 HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 INSIDE NEWS Around the South . . .. . . . .• ••. •... ... .7 Gay man, mon who used 'gay po~ executed . 7 Southwest odds anti-Oiscriminotion provisions . 7 Rights commission accused of 'litmus test' .. 7 Human rights group to monitor 'Don't Ask' • 7 Around the Notion ...• •. •. . .• •. •.•. .10 Goy couple, trans woman in airliner crash .10 Mi1itary services spell out training •. . .... 10 'M~lionoire' quietly indudes gays . . ..... 10 Report soys priests dying of AIDS .•. 10 Sodomized student sues school board • • 11 Successful HIV drugs prompt risky behavior .15 Weighing the relative risk . . . . • • . . •.•. 15 VOICES & ECHOES Ellitorial: AIDS, the priesthood and hypocrisy 8 Read: Finding the redneck within • • . •... 9 Letters: Mayor Lee Brown, HIV and od ••.. 9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Big hair, big dreams • • • • . • . . . ..17 Cho's time to shine . • • • . • • . .17 On Stoge: Shakespeare's greatest hits • • .18 Eirting Out: A wonderfU tllng . . • . .. , . 23 Out in Print: 'Jerome' . .. . .•. •..•.•.. 24 Bestsellers .. • . • . .. .. . . . .. • • • • • .. 24 COMMUNITY Pride organizers to host medio workshop • 25 Flexology: Are you over-training? . • • . •. 26 Community Calendar .... . .•....•••.. 27 Occasions . . • . . . . . • • • • . . . . . • • . • . • .27 My Stars! .. • • . • . . . • .. .. . . • • . .31 CLASSIFIEDS .. .. .. • . • • • . .. .. .. .. .. .. .28 CARMART •. .. .... .• •.• . •. . .. ..•. .. .••. 29 DIRECTORY ....... . .•• •••. . ... . .. . .• ••. 30 Issue 1006 Al material tn Houston Voice Is protected by federal copynghl law and may nol be repro· eluted wlthoul lhe wrmen conselll of Houston VOice. The sexual orlentaUoo of advertJSer$. phOtographers, wn1ers and cartoonists pub· fiShed herein is nellher Inferred or implied. The appearance ol names or piclorial repre­& enlallon ctoes not necessarily lndocale lhe &G>111al orlenlallon of lhat person or per~ t-jous1on Voice accepts unsOlicited editofial ma1enal t!UI canno1 take re&pons1bihty for its relurn. The editor reserves the nght lo accep1. reiect or edit any submission All roghls revert 10 aulhors upon pubhcation. Guidelines lor freelance trlbutors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 NEWS 5 Youth sues high school over anti-gay abuse Derek Henkle claims negligence on the part of high school administrators cost him his high school diploma and the chance to be a teenager b} PAIC.L PARVIt\J A gay Atlanta youth 1s suing the pnndpals at three high ::.<:hools he attmdl'Cl, and five other school offici,1ls, for failing to prolL'Ct him from anh-gay haras,ment and violence and its interference with his c1\'il right to an cduc,1tion. Derck I lenklc, now 19, filed a :.1wswt Friday again.~t Ross Gregory, pnnapal at ( ,alcn.1 l ligh School in \\a.,hoe Count); :\e\·., for 1gnnnng his repcalL>d compl.imts oi ",mh­g. 1y har.1s.~ment, .is."'1ults, mtimidahnn and d1~rimin.1tion" sutfcrcd while hl' w.1s a stu­dent .it the school. Other plamhfb in thl• suit include the vicl' principal at Galena, .i tealhl'r, the county dirrctor of students serVKC!, pnna­pals .it two other high school,, and two school po lie l' officers. School for I knklc wa' a "daily nightman'," he told rcporters during a teleconference Fnd.i); v.1th .1ttomC"ys Jon Da\id~n and Doni Gew1rtzm.in of l,1mbda U.-gal Defl'nS<' & !:duration Fund. "S(hool on a d.iilv b.isis was an unknown. I would tum coml'r.: and not bl• sure what to l'\pl'ct," I knklc s.iid "It was something I was forced to .itknd ewry day, yet I was not gi\'l'n any .wenul' to be safe. The ignoring by school offici,1ls of my daily complaints only m.1dl' it ~> much worsl'" !X·hool officials not only ignored I knkle's compl.1mts, ,1ddl•d D.widson, they trcalL.J him .is thl' problem. and violated his First Aml'ndment right" by telling him to changl' his bl'h,l\'ior to protect himself. fhe Fi~t Amendment violations break new ground, said D.mdson, who compan.'Cl th<' R~ponst• from I lcnl-.ll''s school administrators to the controvl'rsial "Don't A~k. Don't Tell" polky <'n gays in the military. "We JR' trying to establish that under the Constitution, in schools it is a violation of the Fi~t Aml·ndment to have a 'Don't Tell' poli­cy," D.widson said. "If other students try to harass or .ibusc those students who are 'out,' thl' solution 1s not to tell students to go back m the closet." School offici.1ls had no immediate comment on the GL'iC, the As.<;OCJated Pn.~ reportl'<l. "We hawn't hl>en served with anything yet and until we do, obviously we can't comment on spt.'Cifics," said district spokesman Ste,·e Mulwnon. School leaders blind to abuse? lktwl'\:n 1994 and 1996, Hmkle, who was openly gay while in high school, spent his 'iChool days being harassed, threatened and sometimes physically attacked, and was bounced from school to school "for his own proll'Ction," he said. The intimidation and violence had such a severe impact on Henkle that he was unable to finish high school, according to the com­plaint filed by his attorneys in U.S. District Court m Nevada. "What we have here is a school dL~trict's complete abd1tahon of ts n.~pon~1bility to protect all young pt.'Ople in its care," said David~n. I lmkle de:;cnbed a particularly harrowing incident that hr say~ took place m fa!.! 1995, ~n alter he appt>arl'd on a local pubhc acces.s TV show and spoke openly about bemg py m school. Henkle, then a sophomore at Galena High S.:hool Ill Rl•no. wa~ walkmg through the school parking :ot one afternoon \\hen some half-dozen &tudcnts surrounded lum, taunt­ing him with anti-gay ,1ur~ like "fag," "fairy" and ''butt pir.1tl>," 1 lt•nkll' recalled. Then, in .i chilling scenario rcmim"'ent of a high-profile 1998 hall' mme m which a Texas black man was dragged to death behmd a truck, one of the students producL>d a ro~ and urged his comrades to help him "las.<;0 the fag." tie him behind a trucl-. and drag him down a nearby highway, Henl-.le !'J1d. The studl'nts thrl'w the rope around Henkle's ne<k thn.'C different tunes, but he v. .is able to pull 11 off, he sud. Terrified, 1 lenkle ran to thl• office ot his Englbh mstrur­tor, whrrc he called il5sbt,int principal Denise H.1usauer, rl'<jUl'sting th.it she come immed1- atrly. But I !aus.1ul·r didn't ,mi\'e until ,1lmo:-t two hours latrr, and when I fonklc, still fright­ened, bq~an to stammer out hb stOI)\ shl' l.iughl><l, according to Henkle. After this incident, Henkle ~id, he and his parents were told the attack would be dealt with under thl' school's ~xual hara~~mcnt policy hcntually 1t was decided the offend­ing students would n.-<:ci\'C a letter, wnttm by Hmkll• himself. "&sicall)~ Ross Gregory decidt'Cl to 1gnoIT' it," Henkle said. After a semestrr at Galena, Henkle asked to be tr.tnsfem-d and was sent to Washoe High School, an alternative school for problrm stu­dents, dt~p1te a highly promising acadenuc record. Defendant~ Joe Anastasio, county din.'Ctor of student services, and Wa~hoe pnnc1pal Bob Floyd ordrred I k nkle to hide his sexual ori­ent: 1hon at the new school, Henkle !'aid As a condition of the transfer, he was told not to discuss his scxu.1lity with fellow students and to remove pro-gay buttons from his school backpack. In a mt'\:ting. Floyd told Henkll' to '\top acting like a fag." the young man recalled When Henkle asked for another transfer hl'Cause of the poor academic program at Wa~hoe, he was mihally told by Floyd that a ''traditional" high school would not be appro­priate for him because he was openly gay, Henkle claimed. But eventually he was transferred to Wooster High School for the fall 1996 school year, again after being warned not to di'iCI~ his sexual orientation to other students, he said. Fornier classmates knew he was ga); though, and he fared no better at \.\'~tcr. Midway through the school year, Henkle allegt>d, he was attacked and beaten bv a group of students at Wooster, while h\'O · and Now 19, Derek Henkle hopes his lawsuit will send a message that taunts, threats and vio­lence against gay kids in school is not okay. school pol -e cffilers looked on The off1- wrs, defendants Amel Ranulo and Glen Sclb}; later discouraged Henkle from calling the local police and refu~ to arrest the youth who a.:;aulted him. "I was surrounded by studenb, all encouraging [the attacker], and all I could see \\JS about a hundred prds aw.1y, h\Cl school pohre officials standing thl're," Henkle said of thl' incident "All I can reml'mber thmkmg wa~. 'Why aren't they domg somethmi:; about thb?"' In February 1997, at age 16, Henkle was finally put into an adult education program, where he was ehg1ble to earn a GED but not a high school diploma, he "aid. At 1 i', Henkle ~ued to bffome emancipat­ed from lus parenb and began lmng on his own, working in televbion broodca>tmg. In 1998 he moved to Atlanta, where he works for T uml·r Broadca,tmg' s Cartoon :"\etwork as an operation~ coordinator. Hl' abo volun­tl'ers as commurucations dirl'Clor for ProJl'Ct Fm.·dom, a ik-<lgling ga) rights group. Missing out on high school has placed a conhnumg burden on Hcnkll', he said, ''I have a ton of education stuff that b Jackmg, and I am dClmg the best I can with what I ha\'C," Henkle said. ") thmk the strength for that really has dl'rived from lht:' pas,ion I ha,·e around thl'!'e 1~~uc.,, and what personally happened to me " Dunng high school, Henkle said, his mother was aware of what was happening to him, but "chool officials told her thry \\'l'rl' dealing with thl• probll'm by transfer­ring him for his own !'Jfcty. Smee his troubled high school days, rda­hons with his parents ha\·e become stronger, Henkle said. He proudly reports that his mother and stepfather met at a meeting of Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays. Henkle described his current relationship with both of them as "very supportive," and says hb father is "coming around:" :;... Continued on Page 11 6 Special Guest Speaker Reverend Jimmy Creech Rev. J.:nmy Creect" has been working dill· gently to change the laws within the United Methodist Church that d1scnm1nate against Lesb1ans/Gays/81sexualjTransgenders. A~er performing a same sex holy union ceremony for two men, the Methodist Church Jury found Creech guilty of violating the rules of the church and withdrew his credentials of ordination. Come hear Rev. Jimmy Creech"s remarkable story of faith, hope, and renewal; and how his ministries continue Sunday, February 6, 2000 9a n & 11am services All programs are free and open to the community! Resurrection MCC 713-861-9149 1919 Decatur St., Houston, Texas 77007 www.mccr-hou.com FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodg111g and Catering Accommodatio11s Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Acco111111odat1011s • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • /arnzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Dow11tow11, Museu111s and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Ho11sto11, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • love/ t11111.co111 YOU'LL LOVE IT! Welcome to a world of opportunities in the Foreign Exchange Spot Market I For Auto, Home & Health Your Community Insurance Agency! ROB SCHMERLER & STAFF 713.661. 7700 Buslnt .1 I:' 11ranr1 • Worktr1 Cnmptn1011on Group lltalth • U/t lnsuranC't & much mort HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 NEWS Around the South For more extensive coverage: www.houstonvoice.com Gay man, another who claimed 'gay panic,' executed in Texas I IUNTSVll.l I., Texas (AP)-Glen Alan McGmms, 27, was executed Jan. 25 for gunning down laundromat clerk Leta Ann Wilkerson in 1990. McGinnis admitted shooting Wilkerson and lea,·ing for dead the 30-year-old mother of two Defense attorney William Hall dt•scribed McGinnis as .1 dl'l'ply troubled ll·en whose race and homosexual orientation doomed him m the eyes of the iury. " I le was polite, n•spectful, legitimately sorry about what ht>'d done," I l,111 said. "But he was also a black man who killed a white woman. And he was \UV, very ga}~ and that did­n't help." The Vatic.rn, thl• Europe.:m Union, the American Bar Ass<1ciahon and a collection of anti-dea th penalty groups pleadl•d for tht• life of McGinnis because he was a ju\'l'nilt• whrn he ki lled Wilkt•rson. The l'xccution c.1mt' juq fiVl' d.1ys afll'r another gay man, Rickey lee Bryant, 31, was put to lkath m Texas for killing his lo\'l'r and four nt•ighbors 111 1982. \ !e,rnwhill•, J.1mes Walter Moreland, 39, rnndemm•d for ,1 kmfe .1ttark. th.it left two East Texas men dead more th.in 17 yt'ars .1go, l\'Js executed Jan. 27 The :w-yl'.U·old lndi.m.1 n.1tin• rl·pe.itedly stabbed Clinton Corbet Abbott James Walter Moreland, 39, was executed last week in Texas, years after a 'gay panic' defense failed to dear him of two murders. and John Royce Crawy in the back, robbed them, ,ind left them to diem a Eustace, Texas trailer home ,iftl'r a d.iy of beer dnnking in 1982. Mord.ind m.1111tained he acted out of fear aftl'r Cr,1\'ey, a 41-yl'.U·old iron worker, allegt•dly made sexual .idvances tow.ird him. Relahn•s of :-..1orel.rnd's VJCtims rankle at the suggestion. "\1y brothl•r was by no means a homo cxual I know this for a foci," said Robert Cr.wey ":-\either was Clint. I le'd ha\'e fought you if you c\'l'n mentioned it to him." Southwest Airlines adds anti-discrimination provisions for gays DAI I.AS-Southwest Airlines, the nation's fifth largl'St .iirline, has instituted anti· h.1mssnwnt, .1111i·d1srrim111ation and FF<X' polincs th.it include ~rxual orientallon as a pro­trctl'd category, till' Dal/a, Voice reported The Dall.is-based airline announced the new pro­trctions in ,i l1•tll'r sent to employees by I krb Kl'llalll'r, thl• airline's chairman, president ,ind CFO. 1 lw protl•ct1ons m.1y be the result of ,111 ongomg contrm'C'rS\' betwl'en the airlim• and the flight altl·nd.mts' u111on over domestic partnl'r brncfits for unmarried employres, as wdl as longstandmg chargl'S of homophobi.1 at Southwest. The issue c.1mc to a head in Dtxember when Southwest pilot Gar) S Ward cl.imwd m a pilots' newsletter that "the homosexual rnmmumty alone is a high-risk group medically ' \\'ard also \\Tote that 1f <;outhwest adopted DP benefits, it would bl' ''.1 stab m tht• back of the Amcnca11 fam·lyn f'hght .1ttend.mt \!Jrt:r elson of San f'ranc1sco said m.my pilots will not speak to male flight attend,rnts, .md some will not let men ser\·c cabin cn'ws. Ft. Worth rights commission accused of pro-gay 'litmus test' I ORT WOR 111, Tl'X.-A man who l\'.is r1·jl'dl•d for a scat on fort Worth's Human Relations Commiss10n h.is chargcd offici,1b l\'lth using nommel$' position.' on a possible g.iy rights ordm.11Kl' as ,1 "l~tmus tl'st" for .ippointnwnt to tlw both~ tht• Dallas Vorce report· ed. Nomi11<·1·s oppo$<'d to lhl' prnposrd ord111,11ic1• wcn• .iutomallc.illy rl'jl'cted, Larry Stc\'cns ,1llq~cd Sll'\'t•ns, who prl'\'1ously ran ,1 f.itll'd bid for ,1 nty council Sl'at, was one of SIX nom111e1·s 111tl•rv1ewed for possibk .1ppomtml'l1t to thl' commi~sion. "Thry asked me, 'How do you kl'! about spt•ci.il protections b.ised on Sl'Xu,11 preference?"' Stc\'l'nS said "This ll111-slJon l\'<lS not about matters of just Kl' or about my historv of working against d1s­cnmm. ihon. It w.1s 1ust about how I kit about someont• who practice:-. ,1 crrt.un behavior that 1s ,1g.111ist the J.iw m this state," Sh•n•ns said. Council member Becky 11.iskin, who chaired the selection comm1tte<>, said candidates for the commbsion all were askl'CI SC\'cral questions. "I thmk hl' had some 1ssu6 ,1he.1d of time.. that's why I think he w;isn't sclectl'd," shl• said Human Rights Watch set to monitor 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' in S.C. ( 01 Ur>.!llJA, S.C (Al') The m11it.iry':; "Don't Ask, Don't 1l'll" pohcy is getting a review by I lum.1n R1i;hts \\ atch Ihc group, best know for 1nwstig,itmg intt•rnation.il torture and child :ibu l', has smt .i dl'legate to Fort J.irkson, tlw Army's largl'st trammg base, to collect mlorm.1!1<111 ,1bout how thl' polic)' 1s working. I he 1-\pw York bJS('d org.mizat1on momtors hum •.i n 11ghts issu1•s m .ibout 70 wuntries, n·port1ng on topu:s that mdudl• prisons, frl'l' d<1m of speech and (,llld mmcs. "I guess tlw simple goal is to look at th s pohc) and the treatmmt of gays aPJ ll'sb1ans m tl'rms of till' rnntl'xt of international human rights stand.irds," s.11d '<'nior researchPr Alhon Collins. "he\ 1s ted the fort w,th rermiss10n of Army off, 1 Is. Thl' group also v. ill comp;in the IJ\ 1•s of g.iy L.: S. crvice members with thosl' m thl' m htarv of other countr.~s. ftw L!mtl·d <;t;ites aPd Turkey arc the "'nly J\:ATO <ot.ntrie~ that b;i'l i:;a) from mi'it.irv sen Id', atcord Pg to the Sen ice MembL..., I 0:11 Dcfl•n e l'tl\ ork .. [rouL 'tgffarz.t 11,1n; m>Q• .W.. When you have issues to deal with, being gay shouldn't be one of them. If you're struggling with addiction o depression, you need a treatment center where you can be yourself .... Where you can talk frankly and safely to people who understand you. We're Pride Institute, the nation's leader in providing treatment for the gay, lesbian. bisexual and transgendered communities. We have programs offering residential, outpatient and halfway house services. You have the power. Call us today. n LAUOEROAl.E NfWY()I!~ Medicare and most Insurance plans cover our programs www.prlde-institute.com If you are seriously ill, money shouldn't be an added source of stress. Selling your life insurance policy is an option to consider. As one of the oldest vialical settlement brokers, we have the experience and knowledge to get you the highest cash settlement possible. M. Bryan Freeman f!Ulder & o Clear Adiucule " * Ore q~icK, simple appl1cat1an * Competit1Ve bidding process among multiple funding sources * Any size poncy * No cost or obl1gafo11 al any time * AU policy types considered, mclud·~g some less than two years old * HIV and other serious illnesses * o~alify up to 900 kells * Your settlemen: may be tax-he * Conf1denl1ality, now and always BENEFITS iii'...1 AMER I CA Returi your Completed application end receive e !rte YJdcotape Exerasu for People wrth HIV by People W'tth HIV. 800-777-8878 Celebrating 10 years as your advocate. www.~nefitsamerica.com Memller Viohco AssoclOllOtl ol America 7 8 VOICES AND ECHOES FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE VOICe. AIDS, the priesthood and Catholic hypocrisy ,. if ii I t'.4 td I 'I EDITORIAL STAFF Associate Publisher Mike Fleming m keOhoustonvoKe com Ed itor Matthew A. Henn e ed1torfthoustorvo1ce com Production Bethany Bartran Grapl>1c Designer M k e Swenson C.r aphic D"'1gr>er Contributon Ric_>, Arensch1eldt. Kay Y Dayus. Trayce Diskin. Ear Dittman~ D L C.roovt>r Robert B Henderson. Gip Plaster, Ella Tyler Photographers Daiton DeH•rt. Kim Tltompsor T~rry Sullivan Advertising Sa les Richard B Hay.., Ken Burd Office Adm1n1strat or Marshall Rainwater Classifieds & D.rectory Carolyn A. Roberts Carolyn White National Adve rtising Represe ntative R1vendell Marketing Company, loc 112-141 ~863 A 'MndowMedia Publication Publish HS Oms Cm R•Es.:tsset rn ....... lfJ&iprpar MEMBER CHARTER MEMBER GREATER HOUSTON GAY & LESBIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERa Established 1974 as the Mor.••ose Star 'iOO L~tt Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 17006 (713) 519-3490 (800) 729- 8490 Fax (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1999 Off Ke hou-s 9 am to S 30 pm week~ To s ubmit a letter Letters should be fewer than 400 words We reserve the nght to edit for content and lergth We wil w1tl>hold names upon request. b:rt you must include your name and phone> numbrr for venf1cat1on Plt-a\e send nail to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd , Suite 200, Hounon, T•xas 77006, fax (713) 529-9531 or e- mail to ed1torQhouston voKe co.-. Opinions expreued therein do not reflect those of the Houston Vorce. "!\Jon quam duo, semper Ires." That's the prevailing rule at St. Stanislaus and other Roman Catholic seminaries acros.' the country. In d.1ys and evenings filled with prayer, meditation and d1SCUS.~10n, a stnct rommand­ment 1s IS.5UN to the young noV1ce;, as those WI.! hing to enter the priesthood are called. NNot m twos, always threes." And try to avrnd "particular friendships" with clas.smatcs. The rules are designed to undenmnc the sexual currency that even church officials acknowledge cmcri;es from an all-male mvi· ronment of th~ sharing so much in rommon. With little or no teaching at seminary about human :;cxuality-much Jes.~ homosexuali­ty- the n~ult~ are chilling. In a remarkable series of report-; last week by the Kansis City Star, the Catholic hier an:hy IS calll'\i to answer for a silent epidemic of AIDS among the priesthood In an exhaustive survey, the ncwspap<>r found the death rate from AIDS among prie;ts to be four times the US. average -rhere have always bem the commml~ made on this that a celiootc priesthoOd must be somewhat attractive for one who 1s homer S<.'Xual, because you're joining a fra ternity or group which has a st.:itus m SOC1ety, and you don't have to come out of the closl'l," acknowledgrd Bishop Raymond J Bol.ind, of the Kansas Oty dioccsc, in an interview with the newspap<>r. "I c,m't .1rgue With that statl·ment. Then.' must be that attraction. Now, how much the .ittr.1ct10n Ii.is ever been fulfilled is very diffi­cult to know." I lafl) Mom<;0n, a (".!' fomia pne>t who has AlllJ, agret.'<i "Young Catholil boys trymg desperately to honor tht: !".trict sexual morality of the chun:h .ind haVIng no attract10n for womm SCC' ,1 \ cxahon to the pnesthood not on)\ as an hon­orable Y.ay out, but al<;0 as a SO(lal way out," he told the paper. In fact, 15 percent of priests n.-;pondmg to tht· Star's survey identified thl•msclves as gay AIDS in the priesthood, Page 10 and another five p<>rccnt said they an! biscxu· al. Assuming m~t priesll> would be extreme­ly reluctant to acknowledge same-sex attrac· tlon, the numbers are extraordinary. And they suggest widespread knowledge among Catholic clergy about the existence of many, many gay pnesb. Four years m the making, the Star scncs tells the heart-breaking stories of pnl3ts under pressure from the church who kept secret from lowd ones their homosexuality, their sexual activity, their infection with I fIV and often even the caw;e of their deaths. And whatever the series says about the failure of the C1thohc Oiurch to deal effocti\·ely ;ind rompa.<;.~ionatdy with AIDS in the priesthood, 1t say~ even more about the church's morally b.mk­rupt truchinb'S about homa;exuality. In seminary, the church teaches the vow of reLibacy as one of the most important obliga­tions of the priesthood. for ~committed men, each of whom feds a speoal calling to devote their entire life to their faith, cclibacy is viewed as a means of achie\1ng the spmtual punty nt'C~sary to p<>rform the holy rites and n~ixm~ibilities of the post. But even with th.it intense and enduring motiv.1tion, many fail to live up to their call mg to be celib.ite, and engage not only 111 sexu.11 activity, but often unsafe sex, .is the Star n•port makes abundantly clear. And yet the \·ery same Catholic bishops who no doubt know much more than the Star about sexually active priests, straJght and gay, recently i sued a modifiL'<i teaching on homo­sexuality that required of g.iy Catholic la1tv the same vow of celibacy that the churcli's comm1t1t'<i rri ,15 cannot fu'fill The b1sh0ps admow1edgcd m •lie r report-sty cd as an open letter to p.ir ~ts struggling with accepting their g.iy duldren­that homosexuality 1s expcnenced as an unal­terable oncntation by most people and har­bonng s.imc-scx desues 1s no more sinful th.in At the graveside of his brother, a Jesuit priest who died of AIDS in December 1990, Dennis Dobbels told the Kansas Gty Star that he regrets his brother waited until only weeks before his death to tell his family about his secret life and cause of death. heterosexual attraction. Implicitly admitting the uselessness of prayl·rful or psychotherapl·utic efforts at "converting" to heterosexuality, the bish­ops Mill drl'W the line at acting on homo­sexu. 11 desires. G1y Catholics are rcquirl•d by their rhurch to hw a lifl• of celibacy, likl' pril~b. nl'Vl'r ad· mg on tlwir n.1tural, God-given ~·xu.il d1>s1n~. ewn within the confinl'S of ,1 lov111g. commit­ted .111d monogamous n•lationship. In fact, m places like I l.iwai1 and C.1hfom•J and Vermont, Catholic clergy h,ive been active in opposmg same-sex marriage even though the institution has been shown by centuries' evidence to fos­ter the type of rnmm1tted rom.inhc rrla­honships that win church approval among heterosexuals. It's true, of rourse, that thl' C1tholic Church has a colorful history of tt•achings completely separated fmm human reality, as illustrated recentlv by .in angry lcctun• from !'ope John Paul II, who urged opposition to secular J1vo11.e J.1ws that ptrmit the lfo;solution of evrn one cort~umm.1tt•d m.im.ig<' But thl' church's t\•,1ching on homosex­u. 1lity 1s particularly cruel bl'c.1use 1t allows for absolutl'ly no <'xpres~ion of hum.in sexu.1lity-thl' proscription rnv­crs masturbation as well, as .111y spilling of semen 1s considered sinful-even though our orientation is Vll'Wl'd as morally nl•utral W1th thi5 new and dev.1stating evi­dence th.it celibacy faib ;it ,1n .11.irming rate c\'en ~mong clergy, the church's most comm1ttl'd ml'mbtrs, thl' Cntholic record on homosexuality has been I.1id bare as 1llog1cal, hypocrit1cal, corrupt ,ind b.1rbaric. Kansas City Star "AIDS in the Priesthood" series available on the web at www. kc~tar.com/projects/pnests/ HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 VOICES AND ECHOES 9 VIEWPOINT A San Fransisco transplant finds the redneck within by KIRK R!~AD As fate would h,n·e it, I moved all the Wa\' to S.in • Frannsco to get in touch with my inner redneck. I recently broke my longst,rnding boycott on country­western dancing. It wasn't so much a bov­cott as it was soml'lhing I thought was for the most part a good idea, but something I never got around to doing. I grew up with these guys and their mother-of-pearl buttons. I remember all too well the clomp of boots and the tip­ping of hats. But as a tl'l'nager, I saw all this hillbilly stuff as my nemesis The third-string foot­ball players with perms and Bocl'phus T­shirts werl' not exactly thrilled with me; their openly way-gay classmate had made it possible for same-sex couples to attend their 1990 prom, naively themed At the suggestion of a Sunday lunch "Stairway to I leaven." bunch, I ran home to change and taxi over to the bar where such dancing takes place. I had the boots already, but the only "boot·scootin' boogie" I'd ever encountered was when I was too tired to pick up my feet and walk properly. "I got that rule changed so you could I: take me to the prom, Stephen," I told one of l;l the hallway cowpokes who greeted me ffi daily with a murmured 'Tag." From that a; L-:--~---------------_...j-;;..__.. moment on, Stephen was terrified of me. I got halfway into the cab and realized I was wearing a black belt with tan boots. Naturally, I did what any self-rc~pccting gay man would do: I made the cabdriver wait while I changed belts. Given this background, surely you can understand that willingly sub1ecting myself to Reba Mcintire and Wranglers was some­thmg of a noble challenge. I admit, I can be a bit culturally stodgy. I can't tell you the last time I played a Merle f laggard CD, and I've never been much for dancing at all. While many friends my age have relished circuit parties and drunken tea dances, I've been continually frustrated by the dubs. I find the music mostly deaf­ening and monotonous. When I hear tech­no tribal, it doesn't send me into a trance. It I recently broke my bngsfanding boycott on country-western dancing, and it was so nice to see a room of gay men who weren't sucking in their guts or puffing their chests out like some pre-op Doi~ Parton. usually sends me for the door. an easier affair than the full-hit kicking and spinning line dances I was about to learn. But I persevered. Worst case scenario: As I badly bruise the feet of strangers, I bat my eyes and work that "It's my first time" charm. But what am I going to say on my second and third vi.~its? See, I grew up in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virgima, so this two-step business wasn't completely new to me. The thing is, the boys who clogged to bluegrass were often the boys who shout­t'< I "Faggot" at me in the school parking lot as their Ford trucks unleashed a tor­rent of exhaust and Hank Williams, Jr They laughed their Yee Haw laughs and sped home to their respective hollers. That Sunday night promised to be either a personal reconciliation or an unmitigated nightmare. On a stylistic note, I must say that I pre­fer men in flannel button ups to stretch nylon muscle tees. I tell you, looking around at a crowd of smiling g.1y men in cowboy regalia was nearly psychedelic So I arrived at 6 p.m. that Sunday night for what my friends ominously termed "The Lesson ." We learned the basic two­step and the wait~. I'd waltzed at my small town's version of cotillion. Two self-anointed society ladies whose mis­sion it was to instruct Lexington's pre­adolescents in the art of ballroom dance I'm not trading my Levi's for Wranglers anytime soon, but the men were friendlier than in any bar I've ever visited, and I did­n't see a single person doing bumps in the bathroom or stumbling around drunk. Not to wax puntanical, but k't'th-grind­ing and nasal drainage are not all that con­ducive to conversation. It was so nice to see a room of gay men who weren't sucking in their guts or puffing their cht'Sls out Ii.kc some pre-op Dolly Parton. LETIERS What will it take for actio11 on lilV? To the Editor: Thank you for writing frankly about Mayor IJ'I.• Brown's failure to act quickly on the I llV I AIDS front as he had promised back on World AIDS Day ("Mayor stumbles on I llV follow through," Jan. 21). Anybody can give lip !i(•rvice to a probll'm, but a good lcadl'r doc'S more. made this class possible. My sixth grade fox trots turnl'd out to be were lower I low many black pt>t>ple net'<! to get sick before he and hi~ ll•am n'Spond? D0<.•s the black community have to suffer the lessons and losses the gay community did before mas.sive action starts? If a gay person did the same thing to the gay community regarding this disease, we would take strong action. Maybe if we tied an arena deal into the response, Brown might act faster Gary J. Van Oc.1t~lum CJ.11mznn Ryan Wllltc Plannmg Co1mc1I J:d1tor'< note: Tiie Ryan White Plamung Council will d1stnl>ute ahmt $17.6 mi//1011 in fed­eral fimdms, tlus year to lzl'lp county ~"idmts alrmdy mft'Clai with lllV tlzrouglr sen•icrs 11/ie fo<>.i hmks, drug n. ·nbur.'. , ·. ·nts, dental s1:rmcrs, counseling and lrosrict' care Tiil' money is reslrictaf to lrmlmml; I l/V pmrnllon and rdu­cnllon efforts an! hfl lo tlu· city's $5 miJ/ion-a-1r:11r 11/V Pmxnlion Program and prinilc AIDS S<TV- 1ce O~'\mlilJllions. Shell's diversi'l training includes gays, lesbians To the Editor: I was pleasantly surprised by the inten'St of the Houston Voin• in profiling where the oil companies stand with respect to workplace issues pertaining to sexual orientation ("Fill 'er up?" Jan. 28). On·rall you did a tlmrough job, but I do need to com'Ct one of the- quotes from my interview. The men wen admirably patient with me, content to pu..-;h me around like a broom as veteran dancers performed com­plicated turns and dips to our sides. Every hme I tried to add to the dance floor con­versation, I'd I~ the beat and stomp on four people, but none of my missteps required h<>!-p1talii.ation. During my third dance with a particular­ly adorable bear, he whispl'n'<I in my ear· "Don't talk, baby. Just follow." Which is indl'Cd a charming thing for one man to say to another. Cl'rtamly enough to guarantee my return. Kirk Rmd lives 111 San F mnn.;ro and am be rmdll.'d at KirkRrnd&ol.com and wn~ lemenos.nel/k1rkrmd During thl• inkrview, I was asi..ed 1f Shell includes sc\ual orientation in its diversity training. I had explaint'<I that diver~ity training is prc\'alent throughout the company. HoweH'r, training 'peaf1cal­ly on the topic of ..,exual orientation b spotty. Some parts of the bu~inc'' han• included sexual orientation m di\'er~it\' awareness training, othl·rs are looking.at pilots, and soml' parb of the company aren't there yet. Rick Sclrrodtr Shell 011 Co. Hou>lon f.ditor's note· Tiil' article also incorrrctly listed the e-mail addre:;s of the company's gay and /esbmn employee group, w/11c/1 rs S£ASJiemN1cl/11s.com. Bdon• the November l'lt'Cllons, I pt•rson.11- ly gave Brown the lettl'r from Ryan Whitl' Planning Counnl that dt'Clared this slate of emrrgmcy. I le was notifit.J about the \'l'I)' high I IIV mfl'Clion rate in the African American commumty .ind th.it we nrekd bl.ick leaders to step forw,1rd immediately and hl'lp us gd a handle on this problem. I le saw things diffrrmtly I le c,m>tl mon.• .ibout that ,1n.•n,1 projed of his and his trip to Mrm1 than he did tht• cn~1s on his dcxlrst<'I" Let us know what you think Send the editor your letters (400 words maximum) or op-ed submissions (800 words maximum). Since' lw n.'C1·1vcd th.:it letter, more than 2SO Afri,,m Amt·rirans ha\'l' bt'C'n diagnost>tl with I IJV And this 1s from infections th.it actually occurred years earlier when the r;ites Names may be withheld upon request, but submissions must include a name and phone number for verification. Houston Voice, 500 Lovett, Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006 fax: 713-529-9531 • e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com 10 we ta/le jvJ!ide wt ceidhraWn:! CVWJC~. ~TRO:\'GEST IDEAS have always been the simplest ones. The ones that grow from \'ision. At Chase Texas, it is our vision to manage diversity as we would any other strategic resource. ·we have made diversity an integral component of our culture because we know that bringing collecti\'e experiences and skills to the table enables us to do things that none of us could do alone. A simple idea that inspires great rewards. QCHASE The right relationship is everything.n1 Member FDIC FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE the ation For more extensive coverage: www.houstonvoice.com Gay couple, trans woman among victims of Alaska Airlines crash PORT HliE'.\JEME, Calif AP)-The search for sumvors among the 88 people flying on Alaska Airlines Flight 261 ended Wednesday after 41 hours. Among the victims of the crash were Toni Choate, a Santa Cruz man who wa~ living as a woman, and William Knudson and Bradley Long, who owned a bed and breakfast in Puerto Vallarta. Choate was return­ing to the San Frano~co Bay area with his daughter when the plane crashed. Choate was a general contractor and cabinet finisher originally from Visalia, Calif lfe w,1s forwerly known as Lury D Choate, but changed his name and started lmng as a woman m the mid 1990s, according to fncnds and rclall\'CS. In 1995, Choate bought the Savoy Bar in Santa Clara, Cahf. and moved to San Francisco about a year ago. "He was an excellent father, as far as taking her places and showing her things," Elliott said "They were real close" Knudson and Long were headed home .irter visiting their inn They "I \'Cd hfc to tre fullest," said Laura I.yon, vice president at Lyon & Associates Real Estate m Sacramento, where Long, 38, had worked for the past dcc,1dc "Thl'y were very much into boating and h.id a brge hobby reston'lg old cars," Lyon said. "They were always entcrt.iining, Vt'ry, very generous, warmhearll•d gentlemen." Military services spell out training, gay discharges down slightly WASHl'.\:GTON (AP)--The U.S. military services for the first time have spelled out for field commanders a policy of ensuring that troops who wmplain of anti-gay threats or harassment arc not themselves investigated 1he intent is to .illow such complaints to be aired \\ ithout fear of bemg kicked out of the service for being gay, and to reinforce the 1dc.1 that tho"e who make anh-gay thre:its will not be tolerated Defense Secretary Wilham Cohen said Tuesday the nC\\ guidelines on how to im•est1gate anti-gay threats an~ incor­porated in updated training programs designed to ensure that the Clinton administration's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" pohcy on gays is enforced fmrly and uniformly throughout the servlC'cs. "The5e plans make it very clear that there 1s no room for harassment or thrc;its in the military," Cohen said in a written statement The Pentagon also announcl'd Tm•sdav the number of discharges from the military for bl'ing homosexual foll to 1,034 in the fiscal year ended ~pt. 30 fr?m 1,145 in the year-earlier period. 'Millionaire' quietly includes gay couples among game winners I IOLLYWOOD-The game show "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" has garnered attention for more than its No. 1 ratings, according to a New York Times rl'port The quiz show has also quietly broken sexual and racial barriers, including among its contestanb gay and racially mixed couples that in the past wouldn't have been aired. When contestant Rob Coughlin. of Shoreline, Wash, appeared on a show that aired Jan. 23, host Regis Philbin introduced Coughlin's companion, Mark Leahy, JS soon as the contestant walked onstage. "Your partner, Mark, is in the audience, 'Hey, M.irk,"' said Philbin, to .iudience applause As Coughlin began answering questions correctly, Philbin asked Leahy what his partner should do if he won $1 million. "Get a new wardrobe," replied Leahy. When Coughlm won $500,000, Philbin said, "I ley, Mark, come down." Leahy bounded onto the stage and hugged Coughlin. "Hey, Mark, nice to see you," Philbin said. ABC exec­utives, who admitted to some trepidation about the episode, :;aid there was no reaction from viewers. Airing on ABC three nights a week, "Millionaire" has an average audience of 285 million viewers, the Times reported. Network executives were nervous about the Jan. 23 episode of 'Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?' when a gay man hugged his partner alter winning SS00,000, but viewers didn't complain. Report says priests dying of AIDS at higher rate than general KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP)-AIDS hJs btcome .-i serious problem among Rom.m Catholic priests and has caused the deaths of hundreds of pricsb across the United States, the Kansas City Star reported Jan. 29. The ncwsp.ipcr said the actual number of AIDS deaths 1s difficult to determine because death certificates .-ire often altered, but that the death rate from AIDS appears to be at least four limes th.-it of the rate for the general U.S. population. Examination of death certificates indicated several hundred priests have died of AIDS­related illnesses since the mid-1980s, and hundreds more are living with I llV The Star con­ducted a survey of American pricsb with a margin of error of 3.5 percent. Six of 10 priests responding said they knew of at least one priest who had died of an AllJS-rclated illness; one-third knew a priest hvmg with AIDS. Asked about their sexual orientation, 75 percent said they were heterosexual, 15 percent said they were homosexual and 5 percent s.i1d they were bisexual. HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 NEWS Student says school didn't stop anti-gay harassment .- Continued from Page 5 New legal ground: officials responsible llenkle's case builds on a 1996 Lambda victory in a lawsuit brought on behalf of Jamie 1abozny, where after a jury verdict finding liability, school officials in Ashland, Wisconsin agreed to pay almost $1 million for ignoring Nabozny's abuse. Since then, similar cases in California, MassMhusl'lts, New York and Wash­ington have drawn national attention to the problem of anti-gay harassment and \·io­lence in schools. I knkle's c,1se differs from the Nabozny case in its chJrges of First Amendment vio­! Jhons, and because the plaintiff seeks punitive damages against individuals, ra­ther than the school district, according to Lambda staff attorney Doni Gewirtzman. l.;ndl•r the 11th amendment, Gewirtz­man ~lid, it is unlJwful to sue a state entity for damagt~ in federal court. In Nevada, unlike in Wisconsin, the public school sys­tem is considered a state entity and can't be hl'id financi;illy responsible for past wrongs. The school district can, however, be sued for forward-looking relief, in this case Hcnkle's high school diploma. School officials can also be sued as in-dividuals, and Hcnkle's case seeks punitive damages against all eight defendants, Gewirtzman added. Henkle v. Gregory also raises state Jaw claims of negligence, negligence of supl·n·i­s1on, intentional infliction of emotional distress, and negligent infliction of emo­tional distress, and seeks unspecified compensatory damages. Lambda has asked for a jury tnal, Gewirtzman s<11d, and expects to begin the discovery process within a few months. In addition to financial compensation, s;ud Gewirtzman, the best possible out­come for the case would be that it "send a message to school officials around the country that when lesbian and gay stu­dents are being beaten up, they must take action. It's unacceptable to just send the student to another school." Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund Western Regional Office 6030 Wilshire Blvd , Suite 1008 Los Angeles, CA 90036 323 .937-0601 www.lambdalegal.org 0 0 0 0 STERLING MCCALL TOYOTA'S Diana Huntress YOUR BEST FRIE.ND IN THE CAR BUSINESS IS OFFERING A Sweetheart of a Sale NOW THROUGH FEBRUARY 29THI Schedule an Appointment and come in to register to win a FREE DIGITAL CAMERA dhuntress@sterlingmccalltoyota.com 713-270-3900 x 3833 or 713-398-7827 O~sis Esplanade A three leve1 luxury apt., with rooftop garden & best view 1n New Orleans. 3 blocks to French Quarter. All amenities. Available for short term acco:-imodations. FOR RESERVATIONS: 800-575-9166 • 504-524-4248 1260 Esplanade Ave.• New Orleans, LA 70116 Family of sodomized student sues school board FAYETTEVILLE (AP)-A 12-vear­old was repeatedly sodomized m woods near his middle school, accord­ing to ii lawsuit accusing school off1- ciJls of failing to adequately protect students. The boy's grandmother and mother sued the Cumberland County Board of Education, seeking more than $10,000 in damages. The lawsuit, filed Jan. 12, charges that the school system failed to protect the former Westover Middle School student, now 16, from his alleged assJilants, who attended Westover High School less th.Jn 200 feet away. lt also charges that school admmis­trators were aware that woods near the school had been "repeatedly used for assaults, drug use and other illegal activity, but still failed to take proper and adequate "afety measures." Westo\·er Pnncipal Reginald Ennett said there newr has been a problem with ~tudents trespassing onto h1~ schools grounds in his three years therl'. The woods near the school are not a problem, he said. In 1997, Westo\u High student Chris Egglrston was murdered in woods near the school The student said he was sodomized every day for two months beginning m September 1996. He fmally told hb mother about the attacks on Ckt. 22, 1996. His ordeal began as harassment, v. hen the high school students would accu'.'E! him in phone calls of being a homo!-exual and threaten to kill him. Withm wee~, the boys began coming to the middle school from the high !-Chool. The student said they forced him ,1t knife point into the woods, where they raped him. "I was embarrassed," he said m an inten'iew. "I thought I d~n·ed it Thev made me feel bad about mvself, and' I thought they were going t~ kill me and they were gomg to get m} grandmil" One of the h\'O alleged as~ilants, who was 15 at the time, wa~ convicted of rape, sentenced to thrl'C months' probahon and ordered lo perform com­munity service. The other boy was never prosecuted, but b now in prison for another crime IN STOCK, READY FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY! 11 12 FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 e~uality El rocks HUMAN RIGHTS THE CONCERT FOR THE NEW CENTURY CAMPAIGN FOUNDATION RFK STADIUM WASHINGTON, DC APRIL 29, 2000 www.hrc.org GARTH BROOKS * MELISSA ETHERIDGE ELLEN DEGENERES * ANNE HECHE KRISTEN JOHNSTON * NATHAN LANE ~ PlanetOut .com diamond spon or KD. LANG * PET SHOP BOYS Additional major artists to be announced, and are subject to change. FOR TICKETS CAI l: 1-800-551-SEA T (Outside Washington, DC) 202-432-SEA T (Washington, DC) 410-481-SEA T (Baltimore) www.ticketmaster.com Join us at the Millennium March on Washington • Sunday, April 30, 2000 • The National Mall 13 14 LOCAL NEWS FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Rallying for change Michelle Hughes (right) searched through a handful of signs before selecting one to use during a Jan. 28 protest in downtown Houston. Gay men and lesbians gathered in a city park a few blocks from Exxon Mobil's Houston headquarters ta protest the compa­ny's dropping of sexual orientation from its non-disaimination poticy and ending domestic partner benefits for gay employees. Company officials have said Exxon Mobil does not dis­criminate and strongly enforces its harassment poticy. Bob Taylor (below) was one of several protesters who signed a petition from Houston Gay & lesbian Political Caucus calling on the company to changes its pot.des. EDITOR Join the nation's fastest growing lesbian and gay newspaper company. Houston Voice is a newspaper in the expanding WindowMedia chain, offering exci t ing and challenging opportuni ties that extend far beyond one newspaper and one city. Houston's weekly lesbian and gay newspaper seeks an aggressive, experienced, professional j ournalist with management background for position of editor. Applicants should be well-versed in newspaper operation, work well under deadlines and thrive in a team environ­ment. Excellent writ ing, copy-editing and communication skills. Proficiency with Macintosh OS, MSWord and QuarkXpress preferred. Competitive salary and benefits. Houston Voice and WindowMedia are equal opportunity employers. Please send (no phone calls) writing samples, resume and cover letter for consideration to: l1f1iit:4{1]1i voice EDITOR Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 by e-mail editor@houstonvoice.com or fax 713-529-9531 Station mum on other complaints - Continued from Page 1 segment of the show and several commer­cials, leaving little context for listeners to ref­erence the comments. It also made no mention of a reported Jan. 24 incident in which alleged anti-gay lyrics were in5erted into a remake of a Crosby, Stills and Nash song Station officials ha\'e either refused to comment on the second incident, or said that they were unaware of it. Parker said the apology was the minimum the :.talion could do after Dor.;ey's comments. 'They did what I asked," Parker said. "They made a public apology and they agrl'\.'<I that similar behavior wouldn't happen in the future." Parker said she intends to file a letter of protest with the Federal Communications Commission over the incident, an action some gay men and lesbians have already tilken. Station officials initially refused to com­ment to Parker or media outlets ilbout the )iln. 21 comment~. But as media coverage intensi­fied last week, the station responded with a fi\•c-paragraph letter hand-delivered to Parker and the on-an apology. The delay m responding was so station officials could im estigate, SJ1d Brian Purdy, vice president and general manager of KKRW and KLOL "After re\1ewing the tape on the show, kl't?ping m mind that we arc dealing with li\'e rJd10 and ~n emotional topic not only for fos­tival1i .1t for Kewn ... he voiced com­ments d1n'Cll'<I to Ms. Parker which were inappropnate and went too far," Purdy said. No ,1Ction will be taken against Dorsey for the Jan. 21 comments, Purdy said. "We foel like him making a public apology is a reJsonable response," Purdy ~id . "We have sensitized our staff to 1ssul>:; that are important m being a public voice and let tht'm know that was not acceptable bl'ha\'ior.'' Purdy did not outline what steps stahon officials took to sensitize staff members. I It• was also unaware of complainl~ about the remake of the Crosby. Stills and Nash song. "Keep m mind that when you reach over 400,(XX) !listeners] listeners each wt-ek, we do R'Ceive a number of calls and opinions le\·ied on what we broadcast. Most radio stJtions do," Purdy said. In the st,1tion's letter to Parker, Purdy said KKRW has supported through on-air promo­tion "gay community focused ewnb such as a 1 louston visit by the AIDS quilt to hl•nl'fit persons with AIDS, and sc\w,11 conn•rb by opmly gay ,1rtists in which prcx:et.'<ls went to gay related c.1SL'S." But when pres.scd during an intl'rview Monday, Purdy wouldn't list specific gay­related events the station has supported Parker said g.1r men and lesbians should continue to monitor the stJhon, citmg public pressure as a key m KKRW issuing 1 ts apology. "I don't behew they would ha\'e respond­ed without pubhc pressure It dmrly i;ent a message through local rildio orcks that I hope other stations were paying attention to," Parker s,1id. For more information, see story page 25 r-----------------------------, l 2000 Lesbian & Gay Pride Parade l : Grand Marshal Ballot : • Check one name per category • Include proof of residency In Hams or surrounding counties (copy of Texas Driver's License/ID or utility bl:I) • Pnnt and sign your n. ame (for venf·cat1on purposes only) w·-IJjj • Mail to. Grand Marshal Vote e ~ Pride Committee of Houston • P.O. Box 66071 · Houston, Texas 77266-6071 • •• or fax to: 713.529-6929 ' , ' • Ballot must be received by February 24, 2000 Female Grand Marshal Q Pat Gandy CJ Anita Renteria U Barbara Walker U Ton Williams Male Grand Marshal U Tony Brigand1 Ll Kevin DaVldson U Ray Hill 0 Grant Martin U Pete Martinez U Bill O'Rourke U Richard Wiederholt Honorary Grand Marshal :J Jack Mam .J Sarah Gish :J Ann J. Robison :J Don Sinclair ~ Blake and Gordon Weisser Honorary Grand Marshal - Organization L.J Greater Houston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce CJ Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus U Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center U People with AIDS Coalition Print Name---------------------- Signature------::"'"".~---------------- L _________ 3!~~~~~~~~~- - - - - - - - -~ HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 'for some, oral sex is equated with safe sex. This false assumption has led to tragic lifelong con· sequences.' -Dr. Helene Gayle, director of the CDC's National Center for HIV, STD and TB Prevention 'Receptive' partner in most danger :.- Continued from Page 1 The UX. study-<onducted by Dr. Beth Dtlhon in colbbora­tion with the University of California, San Franci~o's Options ProJL'Ct-surveyed 102 gay and bisexual men who had n'Cl'ntly bt.'Come infected with I llV. Using a new testing technology developL'CI by the CDC, rL~.1rchers pinpointed those with recent infections, en.1bling thrm to then rnnduct intens1w interviews with the I llV-~1tive men to dl'krmine nsk f.ictors near the ti ml' of infL'Chon. Of thl• 102 participants, l'1ght, or 7 .S percent, appl'Ml-<l to have bwn infl'<ll'd through or.ii scx. "It any othl·r risk beh,wiors were identifil'CI by the infr'Ctt'CI individual or their partner, oral sex \\'JS excluded as the route of transmission," according to a CDC summary of the study. "IX'l"<lUSl' of thl·~ stringent rt'qu1rements, 7.8 percent may be an undereshm,1te of transmission through oral sex in this group." Thl• rl'Ceptive partner in oral sex is at the most risk, said Dr. RKhJrd ValdiS<.•rri, deputy director of the CDC's National Center for I !IV, STD & TB Prevention All of the men in the study bt:heved to be infected through oral sex were the rL'Ccphve part­ners, ValdisL•rri told ffo11slo11 Voice. "For the individual who became the oral partner, with either Sl'mcn or pre-t'jJcubte m their mouth, that is where the risk ts," he SJid. "If the n'Ccptive partner is I I IV-positive and the m.o;ertive partner is negative, the risk is not as great of transmission to the inscrtiw partner." Simply abstaining from l;aculating into the mouth is not suffi­c1mt, Valdtscm s.iid, OC'CJUsl' Pre-t.'JJCUlate also contains I ilV. Thl• nl'W study "is pl'rhaps the most definitive to dJte" on the risks of oral Sl'\, "and tlw most important message ts thJt most of thl~' mm reporll-d they milly dtdn't think much nsk at all was asson,lted. Tlwy thought low risk means no risk," VJldiscrri !'<lid, noting th,1t nsk .1ppl'<1rs to increaSl' with fl'fX\llL'li e\posurl's. "Or,11 'l'\ is llmu risk than receptive ,mJI intercourse, but bl'l"<lllSl' 1t 1s low rbk dlwsn't ml'an 1t can't n·sult in infettion. You c,rn't put or,11 se\ on the s,lmL' k\'l'I .is mutu.11 mastur­b. 11ton, for l'\,1mpk," hl' s.1id. I hl• studv flxttsed on ml'n h.1nng or,11 sl'\ wt th ml'n, but thl' n•sults wuld m1sonablv be expl'<'ll·d to .1pplv ,1lso to oral sex pt•rforml'll on ,1 m,m h\' .1 wom.111, \'aldtsl'rrt s.ud As tor cunrnlingus, oral sex performed on J woman hv either .mothl'r woman or .1 m,111, "wh,1t Wl' h.n·l· s,ud 1s 1t is Cl'rtamlv poss1bll' Ito transmit 111\' ), but \\ r don't h.1w ,1 lot of i:;ood d.1t,1 ,1hout that," hl• said. I !IV c.111 bl' pn><;ent m \ aginal sC<Telions ,rnd nwnstru.il blood, rn,1k111g tr,rn,1111s. il111 tlworl'l1c,1lly poss1bk, lw l'\pl.11m-d ",\bst,11ning from \'.1g1n.1I. .111.11 .111d or,11 sl'\ 1s tlw most dfl'd1\ ,. I\ .11· to prl'\'l'nt tlw <('\tt.11 tr.111s1111sston of 111 \'," tlw UX 's sumrn.111 of till' stud\' wndudl'd "lnd1\·1du.1ls who choose to be Sl'\Ually ,1ct1n• l,m proll'd themsl'i\ 1•s b\ h.n mg sex \\1th on!) lHll' untnfl'Cll•d p.irtnl'r \\ho has sex Pill\ \\1th them, or using J lall·x condom with ,111 forms lll s \u,1l 111t(•rcoursl anal. \'aginal ,1nd or,11 " NEWS 15 Successful HIV drugs prompt risky behavior by LAuRA BROWN The success of new treatments for HIV I AIDS has led some at-risk individuals to take fewer precautions to a\'Oid becoming infected, accord mg to another CDC study presented at the seventh Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. The stud); led by CDC epidemiologist Stan Lehman, confirms the results of several smaller sun·evs that ha\·e reached the same conclusion: :\cw treatments may be leading to complacency about HIV pre\·ention. • Lehman and his colleagues studied 1,976 HIV-negah\·e or untested individuals in seven states who are considered at risk for contracting HIV: 693 gay and bisexual men recrui ted at gay bars, 600 slrt>el-recruited injection drug users, and 683 heterosexuals recruited at STD treatment cltnics. Overall, 31 percent reported being "less concerned" about HIV infection because of the new drugs, and 17 per­cent reported being "less careful" during sex or drug use Among gay men, 25 percent said they were less con­cerned and 13 percent said they were less safe; 30 percent of heterosexuals reported being less concerned and 15 per­cent reported being less s.ife; and among injection drug users, 40 percent said they were less concerned and 25 percent said they were less safe. While gay and bise\uJl men had the lowest numbers in the study, that dOl'sn't nL'Cessarilv translate to mean this group ts the least complacent beCause of the new drugs, Lehman told Houston Voice. As a group, gay men showed the highest correlation between saying they are "less safe" and reportmg engag­ing in specific risky bl'ha\'iors, Lehman siid E\'en gay men who answered "no" when asked 1f they were "less safe" still reported engaging in specific high risk behanors at relatively high numbers. For example, while 71 percent of gay men who said they wert• "less safe" acknowledged ha\ing unprolt'Cted recepti\'e anal intercourse m the last year, 43 percent of those who said they were not ''less safe" still reported engaging m the acti\'ity. "When it comes to slopping HIV, nobody knows as much-from a personal pl'rspecti\·e and just bccaust' it is 1mportJnl to the community-as what gay men know, .. so possibly the lower reports [of being less concerned and less safe] are based on the higher le\•els of knowledge," Lehman said. "But people are apparently not translating that knowl­edge mto action, or they are putting too much faith in the efficacy of treatments," he said. Study parltcipants were recruited- ffom Arizona, Colorado, M1ssoun, M1ssL"s1ppi, :-\e\\ .\1exiro, O~on and Te\as, includmg Houston, where gay men were recnnted in the Montrose dtstnct popular with many ga)'!· Weighing the relative risl< Most early AIDS prl·vmhon programs focused on the mc:;SJge deli\·ert·d m the CDC's study summarv: Practice abstinence, or use a condom every time, all the hme, for every sexual act that involve::. any contact with another person. While that remains sound advtCe, many AIDS educa­tors say they haw realized that such simple, forceful approaches can end up alienating the very pt'Ople who most need to get the message. Instead, they advocate a "harm rt.'duction" or "negoti­ated safety" model of SJ fer scx education. Such programs focus on encouragtng people to make deCL~ions about thm sexual boundaries thoughtfully, before they are con­fronted with a Sl'Xual s1tu,1tion, by weighing what is known about the relative dangers of particular acts and considering how much risk they ,Jrl' willing to take. Compart·d with acts like unproll'cll'd Jnal intl'rcoursc, unprotected oritl sex has g•mcrally bl'l'n rnnsidca·d rela­tively low nsk, and soml' men haw constderl•d it as a good compromise when dectdmg on their own sexual bc-hav1or, said Tony Bras\\ ell, AID Atlanta executiH· director, espeaall) because many men con.ider oral sex ll"iS plem;urable With a wndom " ~lost fol ks bcl1e\ e that oral sex is therr bt.'51 trade off \ ou are trossmg the !me iust a little btt, being ph) ,icalh intimate without the barner of a condom, but in thl' mmds of some of our clients, you are not putting your,elf at as great a nsk," Braswell said. A harm 11'duchon appmich to HIV pre\"ention, he said, "is all about negotiating in your ov.n mind ''hat you wt.II absolutely never do, \\ hat you will do only 1f the pc™>n L< really hot as a one-time thing, and \\hat ) ou will do all the time "For people who felt secure in unprotected oral sex, this study will prob.ibly rattle their cage and cau~ them to think h\ire," Bra!iwell predicted. Ht• called the new studv "alarmmg." "I think the VJlue of this study is 11 gi\·es us one more opporturuty to .;care JX'Ople mto a little more n.>sponsib1l­ity," Braswell said "I thmk ii is onl' more warrung si~ that we cannot guarantee vou \\On't catch any infectious dt~'a.'e 1f you engage ma se\ual act with another pcn;on, although you can ta kl' Sll'ps to lurut your nsk." Some people ,woid brushing or flossing their teeth before performing oral sex to tn• and a\OJd opening an ea..-..y route for HN toenll•r !ht' blood -tream. Bra.<'.\ ell SJJd. Dr Richard \ ald1scm deput\ dnl'Ctor of the COC's ahon.il Center for HIV, STD & TB Pmmlion declined comment on the dfica(1 of such mea ur~ m prl'\ mting HI\ tran.~m1 ton visit us on-line today at: to sign up for a weekly email l)f"eview, send yollf' address to editor@houstonvoice.com ,\ cco1d1ng to \ ald1s~m. mdl\ 1dual nl'ed to undl'l t.111d www.houstonvoice.com thl' n k .1so;oct.1tl'd with oral sex, kno1\ thl•tr p.irttwrs' 111\' o;tatusr, •.rlnrd .. .r p:.;1,;;l~- .e. ..o."r 'u 1~0.11-<· .1R ..·c i:1;1 .n,1,1,<,, ,n,b.,o.~u ~l ~ ·•·"Y1.1~1 b.,."..:,.,,1_.\ J,.l.,l,,f,. ......, ... _. 16 • Deluxe Jacu11i Room • Elegant Dinner for Two • Full Buffet Breakfast • I Dt>1en Red Roses • Boule of Chilled Champagne • Free Parking •includes all taxes 705 East Houston St. • San Antonio, Tx 78205 • 210.225.8486 FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE to sign up for a weekly email preview, send your address to editorOhoustonvoice.com visit us on-line today at www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME Comedian Margaret Cho came through a difficult time and learned to love herself; now she's spreading the story with laughs in her one-woman show, 'I'm the One That I Want' that started its national tour in Houston last year .0... . QJ ·.E.-... by MA11 \10\:TGm.trR'i ~largaret Cho descnbes her nat10nally touring onl'·woman show, 'Tm the One Th.it I W;mt," as "still stand up comedy .ibo\'e .111 else " "I hawn't changed the nature of what I do .is .i stand-up comic at all." she l'Xpl.11ns Yet tlwrL"s something d1fferl'nt .ibout thb Cho shm,, corn mg to l),illas's Majl•stic Theall•r on March 4. While the Korean American funny lady has always h.id r,l\'e rc\'ie\\ s, standing ovations, .rnd IL•agul's of lonng f,rns, this show isn't JW•t bn·ing them crving with tears of laugh­ter. "It's about sun·i\'al and self-reh.rnce, sel f-Ion• .rnd self-worth," she said oi the show, which opened its nation.ii tour in I louston's Aerial Theatre last July The glowing reviews that ha\·e hailed IShair big In 'The Big Tease,' Craig Ferguson plays a gay Scottish hairstylist who comes to Los Angeles to match scissors and wits with the world's best beauty operators Craig Ferguson as gay Scottish hoirstytist Crawford MacKenzie in 'The Big Tease' r11mu 'ARI\' \UL...t!A'- "~" her successful run off-Broadw.iy at the •. \\estbeth Theater m t\ew York and arc ~ now causmg her national tour to explode, e are signaling the emergence of a \1argaret Cho who has the kind of stay-mg power of the be.I of stars. Audiences are not 1ust bemg touched with laughter, but moved bv the insp1ra· !Ion of hl•r story of survival and recovery presenll•d 111 her uniquely irreverent style. 1 he irony is that Cho stands at the pin· nacle of praise from her industry. hL•r fans, and the media just at the time that she needs l'Xternal praise the least. On·rcoming the de\'astating effects of the cancellation of her sitcom, "All· American Girl," after one ~eason and a battle toward sobrietv, Cho has dbcO\· erl·d a new sense oi self, caned from hardship, heartache and a fierce survival· ist instinct. After dealing with being presslft'ed to lose weight and overcoming an alcohol problem, Margaret Cho has learned to love herself and is at the pinnacle of her career. "It wrecked m} hf<-," she admitted of thl· camellahon, the pressures to lose weight, and a problem with alcohol. She recalled that the tran~formation of her comedy club routine into a 90-minute ~how wa~ ~omethmg that happened seemingly on its O\\n "My act has a life of ib own. It'~ alwar been orgamc I had been doing a lot of comedv clubs and I felt like I'd got· ten to a point where my act, independent ::- Continued on page 21 by DAVID C.OLDMA Craig ft'rguson moved from hL' nath c "cotland- Y. herc he's ranked among the top corrucs-to Los Angeles in 1995, and well rcmcmbcrc; the shock of hitting the trects m rough-and-tumble Tmseltown. "I \\as kind of ,1 big fish ma small pond m the U.K and I deuded I\\ as gomg to share ID\ gcruus ''1th the\\ orld ' he laughed 'Then I went to L A and found m\ self sitting m long lines of adors holdmg resumes and photographs I started nght back at the begmnmg. It ''as a humbling cxpencnce" But Ferguson's career d1dfl t get bogged down m those Lncs. lie l.indcd thl' role of Mr \\1ck, the boss on ABC s 'The 0re,, ( .1rev SJio\' " ow fcrguson 1s mmmg com c matcnal f•o!l' his Scottish hentagc ,md his fl!St 1mprcss10ns of LA m 'The Big Tease," which opens thlS month Ferguson stars in the mo\1e, '' h1ch he CO-\HO!c (\\1th Sacha Ger. as1) and co- - Con tinued on page 22 18 OUT ON THE BAYOU FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE SOCIETY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Bnnvng 111, ilor/t/'; HM" II• "'on p1 sents ~-0~ 1!{tdtelv, ~ ~O~ PtaJw- Arvo PART - Fratres (1980) Ottorino RESPIGHI - Sonata (1916-1917) Sergei PROKOFIEV - Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 94bis (1944) Maurice RAVEL - Tzigane rapsodie de concert (1924) Wednesday, February 16, 2000 8:00 p.m., Jones Hall For program notes VISJI our website at www.spahoustan org ART'> HI~ •• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• • G ~ \ ~ fs A!'- "Fun" - Tb1 ldv1c1t1 • '()rs~ · k\h,~~\1.- "t ,e ~rs"\fe\ ·c111s111r-v11111 • GP e"J, ~e · \ "'h rsAi'Y 'sJ "Best 111111 •1tcbm1ker" • a-.. . L 0. ~/\,I, 4JV v - HX MlllZIDI • Ai')' , ... }Jtv 0 •• • The lnterners •Funnest : Dating •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •service • •• •• •• Edwina-~ ...__ _____ www.edwina.com • • ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• On Sta e Shakespeare's greatest hits by DL GROOVER Sometimes, it just doesn't pay to be the world's most famous dead dramatist, exc~'Pt that Shakespeare luckily doesn't ha\'e to ~~ what contemporary playwrights do to his work. Case in poinl: Joe Calarro's adapbtion of Shakespeare's most accessible play, "Romeo and Juliet," now titled SHAKESPEARE'S R&J. The conceit in this \'ers1on is that it's 5et to tell the story of four male students in parochial school. We know this because they wear matching school uniforms, genuflect before they begin, and recite by rote some cat­echism precepts and rules for li\'ing well. ~ What we don't know is why they do this, or i;; who they are in a poor introduction to the : new selling ~ Calarco d0t.>sn't gi\'e his new characters "' any dialo_gue to let us know what's going on. Drake Simpson and Dustin Ross in an all-male l le doesn't even give them names, only num- adaptation of ' Romeo and Juliet' in bers The four slink into the room almost on 'Shakespeare's R&J' at Stages. tiptoe, warily looking O\'er their shoulder~ and putting fingers up to their mouths to shush each other, and then proca'<i to make enough noise to be heard in a neighbonng diocese. There's much back-slapping and youthful playing in this forced dumbshow, but strangest of all, none of them seems con­cerned that this particular play might dredge up sexual stirrings and forbidden feelings. To say nothing about ha\'ing to kiss a Juliet who needs a shave. Once you realize that Calarco's contempo­rary subtext is under-realized and haphazard­ly draped over the play like a wet shroud, a remarkable thing occurs: Shakespeare takes O\'er, and we get a surprisingly splendid ren­di~ on of "Romeo and Juliet," albeit in zip d~ve and reduced to a Greatest Hits. Nimbly directed by Rob Bundy, the play sun~\'es and generates real thrills and heat James Lee Burke makes an impetuous Roml'O, and is matched by the distincti\'e clear-€yed Juliet of Dustin Ross, who rounds out this maiden with new-found edges . john. Raymond Barker, a sharp-tongued '.l.1ercubo and meddling Friar Lawn.once, is least successful as a surprisingly fey Lady Capulet Drake Simp;on shines as the Nur..e, imbu­m~ her addled but loving speeches a sp<'C1ill depth that only a trustL'<i member of the fam­ily could impart. If you think glaciers mm·e slow!}\ vou haven't heard the justly famous prelude to \\agner's masterwork, TRISTAN UNO ISOLDE conducted by \1aestro Christoph Fschenbach. Furt\\'angler sounds like Toscamm at this dirge pall' As those chro­matic \\'aves of sound lumbered through the \\ortham, I flashed forward to the end of this produchon-soml'lime in 2003 . But once this unpcdimcnt \\,15 hurdled, this glonous opera-a musical h)1nn to sex­tumed out splendidly. Even the maestro fell under \\agner's magic spell, conducting thts ultra-Romanbc masterpiece \\1th fiery pa~ s1on, meticulous care, and Im mg speed "Tnstan" IS not for the faint of heart, nor the novKe. If it's not ~ung with com1chon, if the s;ngers look hke sideshow attractions at Barnum and Bailey (~'E' the Metropolitan Opera), if it lacks the magic-realism, it can fall apart with a deadly thud. By all accounb, l ICO's rendition of Wagner's titanic opus came \'Cry near perfection. Visually stunning, this production, designed by the artist David l lockney, is a child's pop-up storybook realized in pulsat­ing colors where psychedelic neon meets the medieval: emerald next to orange, ruby next to lapis. This hot scheme, complemented bv hallucinogenic lighting, perfectly captun.>s the seething, throbbing emotion in the music . And what music they make! Renate Behle is a powerful Isolde: haughty, spurned, humrhated, then transfixed and ultimately transfigun.-d. Her dark lustrous voice, befit­ting her early days as a mezzo, wraps around Wagner's soaring dramatics with flawless diction, pitch and control. Stig Andersen fills out the heroic Tristan with great sense of character and mtclligcncc. l le looks the warrior prince, but seems slight­ly ovcrpowen.-d by the tempestuous orcht>stra. The veteran mezzo Florence Qu1\'ar with hl·r burnished seductive voice prove:-. how beautiful the role of Brangacne can sound, and Carsten Stabell's sonorous b.1~s and com­manding presmce as King Markt> b rt>gJI dig­nity personified. Any production of "T&I" is fairlv rare, l~peci.1lly one like IJGO's with surh out­standing musical caliber, so this production 1s your chance to set s.1il Shakespeare's R & J Stages Repertory Theatre Through Feb. 13 3201 Allen Parkway@ Waugh 713·52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com Tristan und Isolde Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center Through Feb 11 HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 lllllJJ The first and only cillkaly proven to treat hair los.s in men. PROPEllA "' a ~edical breakthr0t.gh lhe f1~ pill that effectively treats male pattern hJJr loss on the vertex (at top of head) and anterior mid-scalp area. By an measures, the cl:111cal resul!S ol PROPE(IA m men are rnpre5Sll'e"• • 83% m3mta1ned then hair based on hair count (vs. 28% with pldcebo). • 66% ~ad V1S1ble regrowth as rdted by independent dermatologists (vs. 7% with placebo) • Ba:lb were rated as .mproved by chrncal doctor> (vs. 47% With placebo). • Most men reported an lllCrease I:' the ariourt of harr, a decrease m hair loss, and improvement m appearance. •Based on Vffiex studies at 24 months of men 18 to 41 With rdd to '!'oderate hair loss. ~bs!S ~ve recently d&overed that men With rriale pattern har loss have an ooeased level of DHT m their scalps. PROPECIA blocks the forrnatlOO of DHT and. m this way, appear> to interrupt a key factor 1n the development ol 1nherited rriale pattern hair loss 1n men. Importantly, PROPECIA helps grow riatural hair-not Jlf.>t peach fuzz-and IS as convenient to take as a VJtamm one pill a day Only a doctor can determine 1f PROPECIA r; right for you PROPECIA JS for men only. Further, women who are or rriay potentially be pregnant mu'>! not use PROPECIA and should not handle crushed or broken tablets because of the nsk of a spec1f1C kmd of birth defect (See accompanying Patient lnforimat1on for details) PROPECIA tablets are coated and Wiii prevent contact with the actNe ingredient dunng normal handling Cf MERCK You may need to •ake PROPECIA daily for three months Cf rore to see visible res.;lts. PROPECIA ~Y not reg;-ow all your harr And ~ you stop USlll& this product. yo;. w. gradua 10Se the ~;in you have gained There IS not suffJOen: evidence thal PROPECIA WO.is 101 rect"iSIOl1 at tre teniporal a~s. If you ~.aven" SOC' results a.1ter 12 months of usmg PROPECIA, further treatlll(""t '5 unlikely to be of benefit l.Jke all prescnpbon products. PROPEC IA "1<lY cause Side ef!ect5. A very sma n mber of ~en experenced certa1r side effects, sud> as less desire for sex, d1ffic~lty in achieving ar erection, and a decrease in the aMount of semen Each of these side effects occurred in less than 2% of men. These s.de effects were reverslllle and went away " nen who stopped taking PROPECIA So start hf kins to your tlodor. And stop thinking further '1air loss 'S inevitable CALL 1-888-806-3725 " . llt our website at wwwpropecia com today to receive d1 •ri .d 1f1 ,. Jud ~g chrncal "before and after" photographs. Please read the next page for additiorial information about PROPECIA Jll-=aa~ (finasterili Helping make hair loss history~ 19 20 ~ropec1a··, (finastende) Tablets Patient Jnfonnation about PROPECIA' (Pro-pH-shal Genenc name. finastende (tin-AS-tur-eyedl PROPECIA" 1s for use by MEN ONLY. PIAN 1.ad "'1 1n.t ktort YoU ltllt ~~ PROP£CIA. AllO reed ile ""9n1Mt1Qn. lnc..'..:!lded W1d'I PRQP(CIA uch 1NM YoU ...,..YoUl',,UC _.,,.uu~hncl'ltnQ9d.Remtr:-Mr. :tllaUftecdonltOltakelhepltctllc.,.t\ltddctlUIO!ttwi!h "XIDr V. ancl vow--~ dlsc1i111 PROP(OA wtten yau Nit taklnf 'IOUt' Mdrc end It ir;tftr chtrkuftl. Wllat 11 PROl'fCIA ....i lot'! PROPECIA LS 1o1std for IN lftaunent of male P1tttm h11r loss on the vtrttx ind the antenor mfd..scalp art• PROl'ECIA ,. for use by MEN ONLY end -.id NOT Ile by-01 cMdren. Mat • ..te ,.aenJ bit loa" Mate patWn hair km • a comnon conc:Uion in wtuch r.-..en Poentnct l:hinning of lhl hai:r on the scalp. Often. CM results in 1 tKedin; harine and/or balding on lhe tDp of lht head Tbne changes typcafty begwt gradulfty'" men .. -20s. Doctors believe Nile pattern hllf Ion 11 due 1D heBCbty ind 11 dependent on hormonal effects. Doctors refer IO this type at haK lou H aftdroetnnc 1Jopec11 _., __ f'Ot 12 months. do'ct:ors llUcktd over 1800 men 1ged 11to41 with_.. ID moderate amounts of ong<>Jng ha11 lo11. A.I men, whether ttceivrng PROP£C1A or ¢,acebo fa pill containing no medititJon) wtre gfVen 1 med1cltld lhlmpoo 1N1llU'OVfN T,1;.,.... Shampoo~ Of ltlln men. 1ppnwmet<Jy llC0 ""11hairkJSS11 ltl1 top of ltle h11d "''" lltlJdied for 111ldditional12 mon:h1 In gen1r1I, men who IOOk PROP£CIA ma ta ned or ricr11std tht number of w1bl11c1tp tt11t1 and nonctd rnprovement in lhe11 hlir "'lhl firJt yeu, wrth tM effect maintained in the stcond yt1r H111 counu 1n men wf'M> tfjd not tlke PROPECIA continued to decreast .In.. o,n .e. .s t_ud_y.. p a1Jen!S -•qutS!lOnedanltlt growltl of body ltao.PROPEC1Adidno1-1Deflvc1hair11placn­Will PllOt'fCIA- tor ,..7 For most mll\ PROPECIA 11\CrtUH lhe number of 1c11p tJ11rs, hellMQ to filll tn ttnn °' balding ereu of the 1e1lp. Mtn gu.g PftOPECIA noted a slowing of haa loss dumg IWO yttrs of use Afthouah mulls wil <1ry, gentrol!y you wll not be 1ble to grow blO. 11f al the tl.1r you b.vt lost There ss not sufficient IYidenct th•? PROPEClA WOfb n the lreltment of recedino ti1trtine '" 1'11 ttmp011t ,,., on both sides of the head Mate patwn hair loss occurs gradualy over tame On nera;e. hta!thy hair orows onty about ti.If 1n tneh each"'°"°' Therefore.• wiU take bm9 10 see •nv eHecL You may need to I.Pi PROPEOA di for Chrte months DI IROll blfotl you 111 I bane"': lntm tlkmg PROPECIA PROPECfA un only wort onr 1!".1 long tarm tf you conanue tilting c. tf the drug has '1ot work.eel for you" tweWt ---"'" tlymboolllentfrt. u,.. ..... ,.,"ll PROPEClA.,....._ •lvlostltltlllr,..111" p;ned Wlltlin 12-of lllDppng Oletmenl. You-doKUSS Illa wiUI your doaor - - I !He PllOPECIA' Follow your doct:af's 1t1JtructJons. • Take on1 tsbfet by mouth each day • l'ou may gk1 PROPECIA wiUI or wllhoul toad • ti you forget to like PROPEClA. do rm1 tat• 1n em. tibfet. 'j.,st take tht next tablt1 u usual PROPEClA will ll52l won tastar °'better d you take re "'nOrl lhln once 1 day 0 s s • c FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Wllo llllaof4 l!!!I Ill<• PllOPECIA' • PROPECIA 11 tor thl trH1ment of male pattern httr toss n MEN ONLY Ind should not be taken by women Of children • Anyone alergic to any of the mgred11nts A wamiDt 1bout PROPEClA 1nd pregn1ncy. •Women who are or..,, potent.i1lly be prtt111nt - IMISt not use PROPECIA • ehoul4 ... undl1 crusllff .. brolo .... blob .. P110PECIA M •woman wlle 11 prtgn.ul widi •male baby lltsorb drMi Kb~ iltndi•• in PROPECIA. either by sw1llow11'1 Of lbrougil dM sJua. it •Y Clast .UO.-htin If • IMI• blby s su erg1n1. tt 1 WDfMft who ts pregnant tomes into cort­& Kt wilb IM edivt ~Mi PROPECL\ 1 lloctor lbouW M cDftl&lhM. PROPEClA tll:llltl lrt co.fed Md will prnot cllltlet widl ._ Kl1Yt ..,ed*91dUf'IAI110nMl 1atlldJi.._ prowided ...... &lbfetl.,.. Mt broil" or crwa..d Wiit!.,. lltto ..-i>I• Udo of!ects el PROPEClAl Lu an P<•SC- P<odueU. PROPECIA may CIUSI - efftcll. In meal - - en.cu ham P110PECIA -· uncommon and did not affect most men. A smal number of men e2perienctd cenain sex side tffttts. These men reported one °'more of the lolowtn;: ms desire bu~ dafftetdry "achieving 1n erectlan; 1nd, 1 decrease '" me lmount of semen. Each of these side effects occurred "less then 2% ol men These side effects went eway" men who smppedl>k>ngPROPECIA Theylho~ed.,mosionenwhocontonoldtakmg PROPECIA In venerai uu. lhe fo!lowing haw been reported infrequenlty 11trg1c r11C1iOnS lnducfing rnh, itch.ig. twe1 ind swelling al 1hl lips and t1c1. problems wiSh 111culanon; breast ltndtmHI and tnlargtnleflt Ind t111ticutar put Tel your -P<Olllllllv 1bold lhne or any ollwir unusuel IOde efflC!s. • PROPECIA CH 1ffect •blood tnt e1llH PSA lf'rostate-Spec1k Anbgtnl for the scrHn•nt of prostata carteer tt ,_ h1w1 1 PSA tltt ltone. Y'* ..._Id tell yHr 40C1or dul YCMI 1re 11l11n9 f'ROPECIA. ""' ... ""~"" KHO PROPECIA 11'1 the Oft9•Aal container Ind keep tht container cloud Store 11 lfl 1 dry pqce at room lemperltuft f'ROPECIA tablets lrt COiied inti will pre•tflf contact"-'°' the Kh•e 1ngre4l1tnt dunng normal hlndhna, pro•1ded th•I the tlblets "' not l1robn or cn1she4 Do not G ve your PROPECIA 11btets to anyone tlse. ll hn baen pr11cr1b1d onty for you kt-ii PROPECIA 1nd 111 mtdicatJOns OU1 of thl r11ch of chMdttn TlflS LEAH.ET PROVlOES A SUMMAl!Y OF INFORMATION ABOUT PROPECIA If AFTER READING THIS LEAFLET YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR ARE NOT SURE ABOUT ANYTHING, ASr. YOUR OOCTOR. 1-7m.-. ....... fnAy.tJIAJf, TOHmPM.Jm Propec1a ~~ "'~dUUCl&CO Ille -~·ldelNR ol M(Rti(. co.. Mc -~ SrademaJt Of Jofmsan &. Joflftmr'I .C.O.P.Y NGHTCMERCK &CO Ille 1•1 0 MERCK & CO., INC., Wti tehouse StatJon. NJ 088BS ..!SA (f inasteride) Tablets HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 21 CH01.iSHINE _..Continued from page 17 of wh,1t I was doing. ch,inged a'ld grew into something that had too much emo­hoM! weight and was too long, too big for comedy clubs," she said Tlw tour c;t;irted out with just a few c1t1e5 and h.as grown to include 25 c;tops. New c1tres and shows .ire being addl'd every d,iy. Cho hJs presented her person.ii life in her wmedy from the start, poking fun at her Kore<1n f.im1ly and her childhood in the I la1ght of S.111 Francisco of the 1970s. "\1y philosophy is th.it truly nothing is rt•,1lly pt•rson,11. We ,11e .111 111 ing expt•ri­t• ncl's th.it .HL' un11·l•rs,1l, ,rnd to show them you do pPople ,1 grpat Sl'rvice," sht• said. Cho, who began perforwing stand·up coml'd}' when ~he w,1s a teenJge high school dropout, confesse:. that "I started .,o young th.it I didn't have a cle.ir percept10n of who I was, ilnd I s.11d yes to a lot of stuff and th.it c.1used problems." "All I k1ww was that I wanted to get out of school and out of my family and out of where I,,._,, linng. I wanted to ch,rnge my ltfl•," she s.1id Saytng th.it "my sense of humor h.is helped me to survive," Cho explains that whm she presents im,iges of Asian cul· tun', it's bs about making fun than just pn•st·nttng it to thl• world "There's ,1 lot of lo\'l' in everythmg I do. han' rpspt•ct and low for [my parl'nts] ,ind for m1· culture," she said. "Throughout my career, l\·e been pulling out my culturl' .md prL"•enting 1t " Cho says th.it when she first .:;tarted pL'r· forming she 1ust did wh.it 'he knew-her mother "I began doing my mother TherL' h,1s always bL•en truth in the way that I show As1,1n culture," she said. I ll'r mother takes rt all m stride It seems. "She loves It Sh( feels hke a stJr She's )US! so happy .ibout mr career," ~aid Cho, who was the first Asian Awerican to be the focal st,1r of .i sitcom "I Pevcr s.iw prople representing me, so I .ih' avs had .i ~light inferiority complex ,1bout what I w.1~ domg. For me, personal­ly, I w,int to inspire a younger generation of pPople who want to do better than me. 1\'ot just ,\si,111~. but anvbod\· who feds th,1t tlwv" rl' not rl'presentL'd," ;he said I kr pL'rforming h,is brought her doser ,... to some womL•n who she constdl'rs msp1· i rational She recent!} performed for Vir:ot •. t .1dy I hl1ary Clinton !5 "i\e first met at the White House and ~ she ,1skt•d me to come to :-\ew York for a bl'llrtit for a fund-raist•r for hrr Senate ran\ We've been acquainted for a while, ;ind she is a hl•ro for me, so brilliant and so lo1·ely," s.11d Cho. "I !er ,111d M.idonna," she added. "It's sort of .i joke .ibout gay men and Madonna, but it's really not a 1oke She is a cornprstom·. For me and mv friends, l'\'l'rythtng that she does is really impor­tant," shl' said. Despite hl•r admiration for other intelli­gent, crl'ati\'L' woml'Jl, tht•rc has not always Ready willing and very able ... to give highly skilled. professional insurance service in your neighborhood. She's an expert in planning all your msurance-- auto, life, home and business. And she may save you money. too. Come 111 and meet her and take advantage of her broad msurance experience GWEN FOSTER INSURANCE AGENCY 5414 Katy Freeway @TC jester • Houston.Texas 77007 71 J.961-9455 fax: 713-850-0856 Margaret Cho hit it off big with the audience at a gay bar in Atlanta last Sunday when she contributed live broadcasts from the bar for 'Porrticaly lncorrect's' post~ Super-Bowl show. bcl'n Ion• m the way shl· 1ookcd at her;.clf, she s.1p. "I usL•d to cringe and be sad Jbout myst'lf, but now I'd want to be m) fnmd af I didn't know me. Th.it's pretty cool," she said Shl' l'xplains thJt an active spintu,11 lifl' of ml'dllallon, healthy living ;ind good friends has helped build this empowering self-IOI e "H's not Jbout real11• \•aluing m1 self Ol'er other pL>ofle 1:-ut ,1bout not bemg neg· .itl\ e of mvself," she s,11d. '.-he doesn't let the roJd keep her trom sta\ mi; m touch with Jtl of her fnends. "Vie hook up Jtl 01er the \\odd, and e­mJ1I is ,111 Jmazmg thmg." she said Thec;e tnendshrps Jnd relahonshrps pro­\' 1dt the foundJhon of Cho's beliefs Jbout her own self-IOI e The kc\ to lmdmg loH for 1 ourselt comes from gl\ mg 1t to other<; she s.iys. "If } ou belt 1 <' m \\ orld Im mg, the11 } ou tJn t help but to al~o mdude} ourself m that, and 101 <'} our~elf," she 'aid. "Once I made the connection that I had to be mv own support s1· ... tem, :-obnetv w.is an out· gro\\ th c>f that It grC'w from that thmk­mi:;.' \\'h1le (ho sJ\ s th.it -he" ould t"on~1der another sitcom 1£ sfle were to ha1 e mon• control, for no\\ ht•r plJtc b more thJn lull "faervthmg I'm doing no\\ 1:- sell-gen· crJted "she said She 1ust llmsheJ the 'ilmmg of her sho\\ tor cmem3tac release this fol She':-\\ nhng a book, workmg on a new sho\\ and con­:- 1dcnng a Europc;in tour "I fmd It \er} 1oyful. 1'.1y life 1s full of love," she said. I'm the One That I Want March 4 Majestic Theater Dallas www.margaretcho.net Chat I Personals I News Travel I Entertainment People ~ - PlanetOut.com www .planetout.oom I AOI. KeyMYd. PlanetOJt engage --+ enjoy 22 BIG hair bigDREAMS ::- Continued from page 17 executi\e produced (with Gerv.i~1 and Kevin Allen} Allen also direct,. Houston Vmce mterv1ewed Ferguson recently when hIS publioty tour stopped m Atl.inta last month. In the movie, Feri;uson plays Crawford Macke!lZle, a gay harrstylist in Scotland who recei\"CS wh.it he believes b an invitation to come to Los Angeles clS a contestant m tht• World Freestyle Hairdl"l.':'.,ing Championship. Crawford geb a roy.il send-off from his lover, fanuly and friends. Such big news 1s his invita­tion that a documentarv filmmaker (Chris Langham) and camera crew come .ilong to mcmonalize his pend.ng triumph for the BBC But soon after he checks into hL~ pa,h suite, Crawford !rams the homble truth: lib pn.~ oous invitation Wib simply a form letter mnt­ing him to watch the hair-doings from the cJudience. A lesser man might have headed home (thus making cl very ~hort movie), but not Crawford He meets a high-powered Hollywood type Candy (Frances Fisher), saves her hau (which had been tn'ated to within an mch of its life) and scb about snip­ping away at the nod tape that's keeping him from stand.:ng centerstage on the big night. f.crguson's own experiences in the City of Angels gaw him the ideas for Crawford's adventures. OUT ON THE BAYOU FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE "We didn't take anv license ·with our stuff. Pretty much everything that happened, I based on some kind of reality~ven the world of competitive haird~ing. There arl' a lot of desperate people in LA, so it heightens things. There are a lot of people chasing stuff." But while Crawford gets shot at and encounters plenty of typical Hollyweird char­acters direct from central casting. he also moves with an .ilmost child-like innocence through the urban 1ungle. "We kept trying to get into the movie that although, per square yard, there arc more dip­shits in LA than you meet anywhere else in the world, there are also nice people there a~ well. I've met some great people in LA" Questions about Crawford's sexuality don't throw Ferguson-though his answers may raL<;e more questions with some viewers. WhJt's hIS own relationship with the gily community' "I don't know, really. I don't know that I have one" So why L'> Crawford g~·? "Because he would be. Because it would be homophobic for him not to be gay." &•c;iuse he's a hairdresser' ":\o. Because he's based on a !\'al human being. And bccau.-.e the real human being he's b.1sed on l~ gay. You notice that none of the other hairdressers are gay m the movie. That's on purpose, beCJuse we didn't want to s.iy hairdressers are gay. But a lot are---<luh! ''We wanted to make a movie where the lead guy from the movie was gay. but it reillly wasn't Jn issue. Whether that b<.'Com<.-s an issue or not depends on you i;uys-the prt-:;s- and the gay community. I hope it Celebrating 25 'fears in tfze Community · Satunfays at 7:30pm 1307-Jf'Yafe • 713-880-2872 doesn't. "The only tlung I was asked about was what about a straight man playing a gay char­acter I don't really get that. Tony Hopkins ['Silence of the Lambs'] isn't really a senal killer You don't really have to be what you portray." Feri;uson said his inspiration for Crawford was "a guy I used to share an apartment with in Glasgow years and years ago.'' He dcsrnbed the man, whom he would identify ~ only as Robby. as "a fabulous human bemg. . :5 fearless. He had a strange mixtul\' we tried ~ to get with Crawford. He was arrogilnt, but ht• "' was also innocent. It's an odd combination in Mee-ow! Crawford confronts rival beauty operator a character like that." After seeing the movie Stig Ludwiggssen (David Rasche). Ferguson said, Robby sent him a one-sentence letter; "It's me, isn't it?" In one scene, morning finds Crawford and Candy waking up in bed together after a long night of partying. Both arc shocked and can't remember if they did more than cuddle up and snore. Did they? "My belief is that they didn't," Fcl/,'1N>n said. "That's because Crawford is a character [for whom] from the waist down ain't nothing happening for that particular set-up. It's iust not his inclination." He speculated that strong friendships sometimes grow between gay men and straight women because gay men bring "listening without an agenda, which is not what a straight man brings to a l\'lation­ship with a woman. It just isn't." A punk rock band first brought the young Feri;uson to the stage in Scotland. I le grad u­ally made the transition to stand-up comedy and acting in some of Glasgow's "brainy European theaters." "I wanted to be involved in a profl-ssion thilt Wils very forgiving toward erratic bt·h,w­ior," Ferguson said, though he noted he lives quite a different life these days. "Now I'm sip­ping cocoo and in bed by JO o'clock. But I was a bit wilder then." Ferguson and his wife milr­ried right after he shot ''The Big Tease." They live in Hollywood Hills. You wonder if Feri;uson drew on his mem­ories of those "wilder" days when he wrote hrs second film, which rs illso due out this yeilr. In "S.wmg Grace," an English country gentlewoman on hard times decidt-s with her gardener to bring m extra money by "grow­ing really strong gan1a in her greenhoust•." Feri;uson didn't go gay to prepan' for his role as Crawford, but he did have to learn to cut hair ''I'm not very good at it. I cJn fake it. I lt•arned to cut on nylon wigs. No one would actually let me cut human hair. If your hair wils nylon, I could give you a reill nice bob and wmve" CBrtng <your OTD'1'11h'1arl lo lhe 9/dam :, Wark 9/ol'11 and '1njoy a Valen line :, eo'1nlng you 11 r'1m'1mh'1r for a li/'11/me! Spend Saturday, February 12th in the luxury of Houston's premier hotel. Enjoy a romantic dinner, complimentary rose for the ladies and dancing to van Lang in Tiffany Rose. then retire to the privacy of your deluxe guest room. s t Gr> per u>uple. .nllu~ive . For re'>UY<1t1ons and i11fonnc111on. Celli 713·978·7400. Dinner begins. 6:30 pm• Entertainment: 8:00 pm JI.. adam smamc the ho18 ot howlton 2900 Brlarpark Drive • www.adam.smark.com HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 23 Eatin g_O__u _ ___;_;.;RE=-ST:..:.....:.AU.::::..:.cR::....:..:AN_:...;_T..:...:..:RE::....:...Vl:..=...:EWc..:.=..S A wonderful thing for veggie-lovers by TRAYCE DISKI1\ A rl'staurant that names itself ,1fter .1 sin­git• ~uperlatin• srts itself up to be chal· lenged. When entering WONDERFUL'S !:tripm.111 storefront, I was startll'd bv tht l.irge, bare dining room nearly empty but for a slew of muddy green Formica tables. Clean .ind cl meal, with bright track light· mg and only one or two pictures on !ht' w.111, I hardly felt compelled to sit down. But rl friend urged nw on. "C'mon," sht' said. "I fl>l'I lik.t• I'm t•atmg 111 a m1111mahst ,1rt g,1llery, wlwre th<' only art happens to bt• .1 ml't,11 buffet t.1ble O\W in the cornt·r." But the .irguR1t·nt w,1s soon made mlx1t by tlw warm ,rnd lnmdly greetings from the :;taft. "Have vou many times O\'cr, and will C\'en please ad\'enturous carm\'ores, too. Although the st,1ndard menu divides into (fall\) bed, chicken, seafood .ind \'egetable dishes, the most scnsiblt• option is the bufft>t, which includes most C'\'erything on the menu, soup .rnd dessert for $6.9S. t\ly favorite by far is the Vegan Fish, a SJ ult• of eggpl.mb, fish sauce and \ t•gt•ta· hies. It wasn't onlv the fool-proof taste thJt sold mt•, but the moist, flaky texture of the eggpbnt helped, too. Ii it ~' ercn't for the purple skins surrounding each slice of "fish," I would be worried I was biting into a t;mgy p1l'Ce of l't'I or cod. I made sc1·eral trips to the buffl'l for the Vl·gan Sesaml' Soy Protem, slT'all pulf) sov disks smothered e\'er been hl're in sweet ;md sour bctorc' i\rt• vou both veget:1ri· ans'" one ot the two st•n·crs C\1 u • ,11lv a ked "Tell me, wh.1t kmds of food do vou hkc? I'll tell you wh,it would be good," cht•t•rily offt·rl•d anotlwr. -t.1t.f.hi Wonderful 0 Vegetarian orange glaze The Vegetable Curry also kt•pt ml' returning for 1b potatoes, carrots and a cream1· curry that soaked up the fresh steamed rice In fact, it seemed that all the customers that began to trick.le in-from funky Montrose teens to young families and flashy affluent cou­ples- had one thmg in common: a lo\'e for Wondl'rful's strictly wgetarian food and pl•rsonalized serv1Ce. Although more main­stream veggies can always find something on a typical Chinese menu, vegans usually ha\'e shm pickings. Wonderful's food, which uses spices, veggies, wheat gluten, tofu and other soy products to imitate any number of meat dishes, takes c.irt' of the vegans and \'eggies Wonderful Vegetarian 7549 Westhe1mer (at Hillcroft) 713-977-3137 Food: ~t>t>t Service: t>S>t>t>S'-> Value: t>SJ t:;:>~t-_,) Scene: ~ b) f:> ' Opt for bread. water at home Fine for most Worth the drive, so live a lntle As good as •t gets Restaurant The Vegan Chicken was less impressive, as its greasy, clear sauce did little for the chicken substitute, and the cabbage in the sauce was bitter and slightly over­cooked. The Vegetable Fried Rice was delicious, though, with bib of peppers and marinated soy. The Vegetable Balls were compelling in texture, but were a t.id bland. From the regular menu, we also tried the Kung Pao Vegetarian Chicken in Hot Pepper Sauce ($8.95). Lined with fresh steamed broccoli and cauliflower, this dish Sl'l'med more fresh and a bit less greasy than some of the buffet options. The peanuts arc stewed in sesame oil and hot peppers, and toasted before being added to the sauce. Its these little nuggets of heaven that gi\'e the dish its spark. Although my friend found the soy chicken substitute incredibly rubbery, l loved the chewiness and thoroughly hot, nutty flavor. For dessert, the buffet offers fresh grape­fruit- deep, dusky pink and incredibly juicy. We stared at the mango-colored 1ello cube for minutes before a server informed us it was Vegan Pineapple Pudding. With a • t.1ste l could only describe as that of Chinese White Rabbit candy, its made from water chestnuts. Although Wonderful doesn't necessarily present an escape from the often greasy and heat lamp-singed foods of the typical Chinese buffet, it does live up to its name in some respects. It provides vegetarians with a wide range of options that can't be found clsrwhere. And 1t does so with some of the most gt·nuinely kind service around That's a wonderful thing. S1.7 · wednesdays our food wins awards, but our martinis aren't bad either mo n g "but In hoa1ton· • houston prtss 1201 wtsth•lmer #b VIETNAMESE (ntxt to 24 OUT ON THE BAYOU Out In Print BOOK NEWS Modern epistolary recalls star-crossed love by VIJ'-:CE\IT KOVAR ''Dunno where to begin. Dunno really how to wnte a letter' We buried him, Jerome." And so the exchange begms. Award wm­rung ew Zealand author, William Taylor, has wntten another rending story of young love, star-crossed with the irrevocable reali­ties left behind after a death nus short (96 page) novella IS wnttm with a modem twist on the classic ep1Stolary tale Confused and emotionally shattered by the death of their friend, Jerome, the remaining pair of an intimate trio span thousands of miles through e-mail, faxes and on-line chat sessions. Across the dis­tance of both miles and misunderstanding, Marco and Katie find a caustic closeness that strips away their pn.>conceptions and erodes the illusions that kept them apart, even under the fa\ade of togetherness. Marco, in :--:ew Zealand, grows to under­stand that the fnmds' lifelong connections werc piece; of a puzzle whose illustrations only appear when broken apart. The book is not about Jerome, though his death prccrpilatcs the story. Instead, Taylor tells a tale about the two still left behind. Marco is a punk, an adole<ent rogue whose charm 1s dinunished after the death of hlS friend I le must struggle to understand his homophobia both in regards Katie's lesbian­ism and her former relationship with Jerome. "You arc going to miss him so much your-'other half.' I used to laugh at the two of you. You werc so close ... ! loved him, too, Marco, altho' maybe not quite in the way you think," she writes. In Amenra, Katie, the more mature of the two, finds her adolescent crushes blos.-;oming into adult love with Ann, an African­Ameriran woman who completes her in a way Jerome could not. "She is part of me and I am part of her," Katie writes. Eventually, their correspondence brings Katie face-to-face with Marco over the Christmas holiday. The two at last confront the futility of denial and bring the tragedy of errors and mistrust lo its heartrending fin­ish. Although these moments take them fur­ther from the death of their friend and bring them closer lo each other, Katie and Marco also find the hidden truth of Jerome's own desire for closeness, deepening the mystery of both his death and his life. The two tear open their souls atop Jerome's grave, drinking cheap champagne and smok­ing American cigarettes. "There was only one ... he ever wanted, Marco," Katie reveals, "Only one ... that Jerome Winter Fucking lived and breathed for ..• Look!" she points al a photo. "Who the fuck was he looking at with that beautiful, beautiful smile acros.s his face and that shine in his eye?" As the novel draws to a close, Katie's developing love draws her back lo Am- THE PLAZA AT RIVER OAKS ~ 1920 W. Gray • 1945 W. Bell 713-528-5277 SEE THE CLASSIFIED SECTION Doggy Daycare Cent:er It ' ~ QI Jo.,h l'oorli ol llu• \\1•t•I. 1rn.:>20.7880 erica. Marco is left with the painful truth of what might have been and an uncertain future where he must choose between fac­ing life alone or embracing the facts he doesn't want to deal with. The epistolary form and the novel's length make it a quick read, but don't mis­take it for fluff. The immediacy of the faxes and e-mails give the book a lifelike element wherein the characters both think and talk in way that is less literary than lifelike. This form is difficult, and while one or two chapters are made UflSteady by incon­sistent points of view, overall Taylor uses the technique to deftly create tension. What makes this form crucial to the novel and prevents it from being merely a gimmick is the honesty with which the characters write. The sense of separation inevitable in mod· em communication gives the characters' fed· ings and dialogue time and space lo develop. Readers who are used to the immediacy of half-hour TV dramas might find this ini­tially slow, but the pace and brevity of the book keep it from dragging. These element.~ also make the book accessible to both young adult and older readers, though its realistic language would probably be inap­propriate for those younger than 14. Though William Taylor is known mostly for his humor writing ("Agnes the Sheep"), "Jerome" is his most striking foray in to the crucible of young love since his novel "The Blue Lawn," which garnered him the AIM Senior Fiction Award. "Jerome" is a fast read, and while 11 is soml'what predictable in its development, the story has the same effect as a doctor's needle-you st>e it coming, but it still make.s you flinch and stings your insides. Jerome by William Taylor Alyson Publication, S9 95 FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE What yo!'r neighbors are reading . . . Men on Men 2000 ed. by David Bergman, $12.95 2 Whole Lesbian Sex Book by Felice Newman, $21.95 3 Cybersocket 2000 by Caynet Directories, $9.95 4 Don't Get Me Started by Kate Clinton, $14 5 Pussy's Bow by Neal Drinan, $23.95 6 Way to Go, Smith by Bob Smith, $24 7 Foster Child by Buddy Foster, $6.99 8 Breathe Again by J. Rice Rollins II. $16 9 Best Little Boy in the World Grows Up by Andrew Tobias, $12 10 The Talented Mr. Ripley by Patricia Highsmith, $13 Crossroads Market BOOKSTORE & CAF~. 1111 Westheimer 713-942-0147 Legends-Men of Falcon Bruno Gmunder, $42.95 2 Best of the Superstars 2000 edited by John Patrick, $11.95 3 Naked Heartland by J.-mssen $49.95 4 Captured-The BeSt of Dean Keefer $-19.95 5 Foolish Fire by Guy Willard, $12.95 I> Page Turner by David Leauitt, $13 7 Mammoth Beer of Gay Erotica by Lawrence Schimel, $10.95 8 Outfoxed by Rita ~1.ie Brown, $24 9 Out of the Shadows by Sue Hines, $6.99 10 Don't Get Me Started by Kate Clinton, $14 LOBO ~\\''"' 3939 Montrose Boulevard 713-522-5156 community FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE FLEXOLOGY • COMMUNITY CALENDAR OCCASIONS • CLASSIFIEDS • CARMART BUSINESS DIRECTORY • MY STARS Pride organizers to host media workshop for local groups byKAYDAYUS Though the Pride parade is still five months away, the Houston Pride Comm1ttl'C is in full swing. Officials n'Cently unveiled the logo for Pride 2lXX1 and .in· in the midst of rollec:ting ballots from throughout the community that will dl'Ct grand marsh.1ls for thl' June 24 event. The all-volunttw mmmittl'e is also hosting a rl>gton.il rnnfermce and putting the fin.ii tout:h<'S on .1 ml'<ii.i workshop this month. The logo for Pride 2CXXJ interprets the theml', "T.ike l'ridt•, Take Joy, Take Action." lA'Signl'<i by local graphic artist Diane Jolll'Y, the colorful design depict~ two heads th.it .w clOSt• enough to portray intimacy. Jolley s..1id that the image c.m bt• interpreted as either a gay or lesbian couple and as a symbol of unity ;md low. The logo's violet, yellow and magenta rol­ori; were rho:-cn for strength and warmth, Jolley said. The prnk tnangle, a symbol for gays smce it was U.<;(-d as p.:irt of the Nazi per.;ccution of gays, is also 111corporatt-d 111to the logo as a point of 111timacy bctwecn the two faces, Jolley said. I..oc-.il l'ndl• org.mizers adopted the them from an international pride conference hdd in Scotl.md last (A·tobcr, said Jack Valinski, exec­utive din>ctor of the l'ridt• commitlCC'. For the st•rnnd con.st>cutive year, voting for parade grand marshals is community-wide, meaning residents of Harris and surrounding counties can take part, he said. Organl/.ers arc hoping to surpass last year's vote tally of about 200, Valinski said. To help, moll.' th.m 3,CXXJ copies of "Inside Pride" -the comm1tll•c':; newsletter-will be distributed throughout I louston and will include a ballot for pt'<>ple to fill out. Pride orgamZl'l'S .iL'iO reverst-d a year-old dms1on and allowl'<i toe.ii gay publications, like the llousto11 VoiCI.', to 111cludc the ballot for residents to clip, fill out and mail to the pride committl't.' (Ballot, page 14) Ballots must be returned by Feb. 24 and should include a signature and proof of resi· dmcy, like .i copy of a driver's license. Voting will J)so be held Fd>. 26 at the Hou.~ton Lt-sbian & Gay Community Center, 803 I lawthorne, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Result~ of the vote will be announced Man:h9. Grand Marshals for the parade are divided among four categories-female, male, hon­orary and honorary organiz.ation. Nominees for female Grand Marshal include Pat Gandy, a longtime rommunity activist who is now retired; Anita Renteria, past prt~ident of the Greater I louston Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce; Barbara Walker, a lesbian ht•alth advocate; and Tori Williams, CC}-founder of As.«istl lers, a volun- THIS YEAR I will set out to do something great for myself. m ~ ~ rm MUSCLE MECHAN ICSSH PERSONAL FITNESS STUDIO 713.523.5330 617 Richmond • NEW LOCATION! Crad Duren, M.D. Internal medical practice offering discreet confidental care to the community, including HIV/AIDS diagnostics & therapeutics ~ I Healthcare from the Heart Anonymous Testing and Counseling M111or Cm/it C.ml~ Accepted • l'ersc11111/ d1e·C'ks Acrcpt1·d lrmm111c1• with Q1111/1firnt1011 • Mrdimrc· I : ~ Clip a ballot and VOTE! Page 14 teer group that provides support to lesbians wi~~;~e-~~~~en~~~~:~~~=~duJc 2 Tony Brigandi, who has helped rais..' money ~ for AIDS organization."· Ke\1n D•nids..m, < 1..ic1~­founding btlilrd !rustre and president of ~ ll€~~~~1C I louston Arca TCC'n Coalition of ~ l lomost•xuals; Ray I !ill, a longtime gay ;;;, activist; Grant Martin, a community lund raiser and political acti\'l'it; Pete Martinl'z, longtime volunttw for NAMr..S Projt>ct; Bill O'Rourke, a community volunteer; and Richard Wiederholt, a member of :;cn·ral I llV I AIDS groups. 1 lonorary Grand Marshal nominl'l>s arc: Jack Adam", who has been active in many fundrai"ing activities in the community sinet• 1982; Solrah Gish, founder of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Film Festival; Ann J. Robinson, executive director of the Montrose Counseling Center; Don Sinclair, retired pastor of Bering Memonal United Methodist Church; and Blake and C.ordon Weis:;er, longtime mem­bers of PF!AG. On Feb. 19, llou.«ton organizers host a rt>gional Pride conference, with voluntl'{'l'S from five states expected to take part, to share ideas and to help improve Pride cell.'bration." Jack Vafinsk~ executive director of the Houston Pride Committee, wants to increase participa· tion in community-wide voting for the parade's grand marshals. In con1unction \\1th the confl'n·nce, a da}­long ml'<iia work,hop will be hdd fob. 20 for community organizations to learn how to bt.'t­ter get the word out to local media outleb .ibout their .icti\1ties and e\.L'llb. Pride Committee of Houston media workshop Feb. 20 Hollyfield Conference Center 2700 Albany 713·529-6979 www.pndehouston.org A fresh approach for ·restoring the skin you ore born with. Avo1lablc NOW for men and women SPECTACULAR RESULTS! •improve skin tone, clarity, elastrc1ty •effectively treats fine lines, wrinkles, sun damage, acne scarring and hyperpigmentahon ASK ABOUT OUR TRANSDERMAL HAIR REMOVAL PROCESS 3843 N. Braeswood 713-669-0466 WE SERVICE AND REP AIR ALL lYPES OF HAIR SYSTEMS, WHILE YOU WAIT. FULL SERVICE, $30 26 COMMUNITY FEBRUARY 4, 2000 • HOUSTON VOICE Now Accepting Medicare, PPOs & Standard Insurances. Exercise Programs Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention Massage Therapy Stress/Pain Managment Neuropathy Therapy Peer Support Workshops & Seminars Steroid Education Increase Self Esteem Our Reputation is built on OUR MEMBERS! /§)Fil~ \e)XCJH~ Voted #1 in Customer Satisfaction! 4040 MILAM 77006 (713) 524-9932 ONTH BY ONTH NO CONTRACT! Monda) to Frida) 5 am - JO pm Saturda) & ' unda) 8 am - 8 pm Ed Kinser BSMl,CRS Director: Kinetic Sports Flexolo A GUIDE TO BITTER HEALTH by GREG HERREN Are you over-training? The body has limits. No big surprise there, right' Everyone knows that the body can only be pushed so far before something has to gm>. The body will often send alarms out to the brain whm 1t 1s being pushed too hard: short­ness of breath, mten.<;e sweating, cramps, extreme thirst .1nd loud beating of the he.1rt. \1ost people heed these warning signals .ind stop exercising, as well thev should Pushing your body beyond its iimits can frequently caw;t• heart attacks or strokes. Smee the purpose of exercising 1s to improve your health, you h.we to know vour limits, which is why aerobics instruc­tors frequen tly stop at some point during the class to measure your heart rate. Ideally, when exercising you never want your heart rate to go above 70 percent to 80 percent of its maximum working capacity. Usually, 1f you go above that, your body will send out .ilarm signals. ~ Yet thert>'s another form of m·erdomg It ~ where the body's alarm signals arc not as ob\1- vo ous. Over-training almost S{'('mS like an oxy· ~ momn. I low c.1n you O\"l'r train' The more you "' exem..o;e, the healthier you'll get, right' The bet· Over-training can lead to strained muscles, loss ter conditioned? So how can you owrtr,1in? of flexibility and even reduced strength. To understand this better, it's nen•ss.iry to understand a little bit .ibout the muscu- 1.ir system .ind how it v.orks. To simplify, muscles are made up of proteins. When you exercise the muscle, the bodv pumps blood to the muscle working. The blood carnes oxvgen to the muscle, wh.-h will wnvert to energ} to do the work. The ob1cct of the exercise is to fatigue the muscle so much that the body Will work to repair the muscle have II grow and become stronger so the next time the work will be easier In order for th(; muscle to grm' ,rnd become stronger, 1t needs an· adequate recoverv time Working the muscle ag.1111 before It has recovered from the stre~s of thl• previous exercise 1s counter-productive ~\'hen the muscle ism a st.ite of recowry, 1t 1s not .is strong as it was in1t1.illy. The body is focu ing on healing the muscle, so It 1s vulnerable Putting stress on 1t again could e.isily cause .in in1ury, hkc muscle fibers being torn or pulled to the point of severe pain If you've never experienced the pam of ,1 pulled, strained or torn mus· de, consider yourself lucky The reCO\'ery time for .in 1n1ured mus­cle 1s .i great deal longer th.in the exercise recovery period The traditional alceptcd amount of lime in the industry 1s 48 hours-two da}S between working out muscle groups. When vou arc JU5t start­m~ <lut, most tramtrs '' 111 put vou on .1 fu 1 body v.orkout .ind rernmrr1end three d.i\s a \\elk, like \1onda}s, \\1•dre~days .ind Fnd.ws. The intc ns ty of vour workouh ~hould ,1111' ~ c IM cl'l 1'll&t~onq1ficrellen "eme rev pie exercise one or two body part~ per workout, since that workout is more intense, the recovery lime needt•d 1s long\•r, generally three days to as lorg .1s a week I low can you tell 1f you'rt> over-trammg? It's actually pretty simple The first sign 1s soreness ,mJ pam. The d.1y after a good work out, the rr1usclt'S workt'<i should be fatigued, l>ut .ible to move without p.11n. If the muscles cannot bt• moved without .i foehng of tight­ness. soreness .md even p.un, they'n' been O\ e.r-tr.11ned .mJ .you need .i longer recmwy period. (On'r tra1ri ng also inhibits thL• fll'Xi­bility of tlw m11sclL•, which is also self-deteat­lllg bccaw;e the tighter the musclt•, thl• less opportumty 1t h.is for gmwth.) A second sign 1s .in inability to get stronger. If your muscles arm't getting stronger, you are possibly mw-tr,1ining. Sometimes, over-training can cause ,1 loss of strength, like when a weight you used pre­viously 1s too much for you to handle again. A proper period of rest 1s crucial You have to take care of your muscles and your body daily. 1 .ilw.iys recommend th.it soml•one who 1s starting an exercise pro­gram should incm1sl' their protem intake, protein 1~ what the bodv usl'S to rrp.i1r .ind rebuild the musdes. M.iss,1ges .ire also 1mport.111t, .1s thl'Y hl'lp force the l.ictlc .iud built up dunng exrrc1se out of the muscles and help to kel'P the musclt s relaxed, flexible .ind supple Grl'i: H rren .~ 11 ccrt1f1ed ererc•s(' profc s•on 1/ H 1111 b rm /, ti at f. n•::;l,Z J Ir' ar.' er. m HOUSTON VOICE • FEBRUARY 4, 2000 COMMUNITY 27 community calendar saturday, feb. 5 Afttr Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM, 12. m to 3 a.m 713-526-5738. Q-Patrol walks lh• stree" at 8:45 p.m. 713-528-SAFE. Visual Arts Alliance. 10 a.m. 281-583-8408 Dogmty mass at 7:30 p.m. for gay Cathohcs. 713-880-2872. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary at 8 a.m. 1805 W. Alabama 713-528-6665. HOU'ltOn Chaon Gang Bocy<le Club. 713-863-1860. Rainbow Fishing Club 713-526·7070. Houston Lesbian and Gay drop 1n houn from noon to 4 pm 803 H.awthorne 713·524 3818. Montrose Writer's Pro1ect 3 to 4 30 p.m 7t3-956-1866. sunday, feb. 6 Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homowxuals meets. 713· 942 7002 Rainbow Roders A bqcle <1ub for women. 713 869-1686 Chi.:rch of the XII Apostles Af\9l1can Rite Old <:atholic Church Holy Commuf\10n 10:30 a.m at 239 Westfie1mer. 7131665·7903. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Rite Eucharist I at 7·45 am .• Holy Rite Eucharist I at 8.55 a.m.; Education hour at 10 am; Choral Euchamt at 11 a.m 1805 W Alabama. 713-528-6665 MaranJtha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. •Preaching the Gospel"
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