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Montrose Voice, No. 84, June 4, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 84, June 4, 1982 - File 001. 1982-06-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 14, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3221/show/3196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-04). Montrose Voice, No. 84, June 4, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3221/show/3196

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 84, June 4, 1982 - File 001, 1982-06-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 14, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/3221/show/3196.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 84, June 4, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 4, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Gay Health Workers convene in Houston this weekend Montrose News, page 3 v 0 I c E Vote Saturday, June 5 tht' MOSTRO~E \'OICF: ucommend.s you cast your votes m the Uemoc b1,; Priman.- Runoff for John Hannah, Texas Attorney General Gary Mauro. Texas Land Commissioner Mike Andrews, t:s Congress. Dist. 25 Larry Evans, State Rep .• Dist. 147 Frumencio Reyes. State Rf'p., Dist. 148 Michael O'Brien Civil Di6t. Court 125 The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #84, Publi•hed Weekly Friday June4 1982 Good Evening Montro8e weather tonight: Fair and warm with a 1ow of 73"'. ~l~~u;~?~d i~~n;rth6;1~h !r'91P' Sun~et 8:20P~ Tommy Williams, M ntrose entertainer Montrose Live, page 13 Baths raided in Florida The Nation, page 5 Houston wins Dallas bowling tourney Sports, page 13 The Art League of Houston explored Montrose Art, page 17 - 2 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 4 , 1982 This week at Mary's ... Friday, GPC Rally, 10pm Sunday, 4pm Beer Bust Saturday, Full Moon Madness Tuesday, Movie Night, "Auntie Mame" starring Roz Russell 1022 Westheimer, Naturally MontroseNews /TheNation JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 National gay health gathering is this weekend in Houston sexual proposition to the officer and his friend, off-duty officer Steven Cain. McCoy testified last September that his gun had accidently discharged while he was holding it to Paez's head and Paez by Ed Martinez had attempted to grab for the pistol. Between 300 and 500 registrants from across the country were being expected in Houston for the Fourth National Lesbian­/ Gay Health Conference, J une 4-6, at the University of Houston Con tinuing Educa­tion Center. More than 30 workshops addressing various mental and physical health issues were planned, a ll related to the conference theme, "Survival Issues in Health Care: Lesbian/Gay People as Providers, as Con­sumers." A panel of experts were planning on discussing the recent, and as yet unex­plained, emergence of Kaposi's sarcoma and other opportunistic infections. Thie discuBBion was to be chaired by Dr. Peter W.A. Mansell of the the University of Tex­as's M.D. Anderson Hospital. Set to highlight the conference was key· note speakers Virgi nia "Ginny" M. Apuzzo (former Assistant Commissioner for Operations, New York City Depart­ment of Health) and Travis L Peterson, MSW, SP (psychotherapist and instructor of social work at the University of Houston). The confe rence is being sponsored by the Task Force on Lesbian and Gay Issues, Texas Chapter, NASW; the Gradu­ate School of Social Work, University of Houston; the National Gay Health Educa­tion Foundation; and the Montrose Coun­seling Center A full range of activities, social and pro­fessional, was planned for those attending the conference. The agenda featured. work­shops on topics such as alcohol abuse, problems on aging in the gay community, holistic gay health care, problems of gay parents, lesbians and sexual child abuse, and alas, handling the family crisis of dying in the gay community, Saturday afternoon was to fea ture a lengthy session on the subject of Kaposi's sarcoma, which has recently gained wide­spread attt>ntion from all public health officials. This session will last from 1 :30 p.m. until 5:00 p.m. The social side of the conference has not been neglected, and there was a hospital-ity suite Thursday evening at the Continu­ing Education Center that was open to the public. For Friday night, Numbers 2 Disco, 300 Westheimer, scheduled a "Wel­come to Houston" party Entertainment at this party was to be provided by Mary Hooper, singer and comedienne, and local personality Danny Villa. This party was planned to benefit the Montrose Counseling Center. Saturday at lunch, the Montrose Sin­gers wee scheduled to perform in a concert billed as "Dessert for Lunch." Saturday night, both the Montrose Counseling Center and the Montrose Clinic were to sponsor open houses, with Alice Schroeder, comedienne, to be present at the Montrose Clinic. Ed Henderson, hospitality coordinator for this national event and himself a social worker in Houston, said his job was to make Houston aware of the im(X>rtance of the conference, not-only to this city, but to the nation as well. Paez family files suit The Houston Police Department, HPD offi­cer Kevin McCoy and Best Delivery Sys· terns, Inc. are being sued by the family of Fred Paez for unspecified damages result­ing from the shooting death of the gay activist on June 28, 1980. Though a jury acquitted McCoy of charges of criminally negligent homicide last September, the lawsuit cha rges that HPD, McCoy and Best Delivery Systems were grossly negligent. The suit alleges that McCoy's consump­tion of five beers prior to the shooting had affected his judgement, that Best Delivery failod to properly supervise McCoy as its employee, and that HPD had not given McCoy proper training in the use of his non-standard issue gun or consumption of a lcohol while working an extra job. The death of Paez occurred at the begin­ning of Gay Pride Week 1980when McCoy was arresting Paez for allegedly making a The amount of the suit was unspecified. Gay minister leaving church International Gay News Agency A methodist minister who stirred up con­troversy when he said he was gay now says he is leaving his Colorado home and probably the ministry itself. Julian Rush, 45, said he has applied to the Rocky Mountain Conference of the United Methodist Church for an "appoint· ment to education" so that he can take a graduate position at Emporia State Uni­versity in Kansas. Rush said he doubts that he will return to Colorado and "I doubt I will go back to church work." He said he would like to go into counseling. Melvin Wheatley, Jr., bishop of the Rocky Mountain Conference, said he would recommend that Rush's request be approved. Just days earlier, Wheatley was absolved by regiona l Methodist church officials of doctrinal wrongdoing in appointing Rush to St. Paul's United Methodist Church in Denver. Some church members had accused Wheatley of defying Methodist dogma by appointing a homosexual as a minister. But the church's investigative commit­tee determined that the United Methodist Church had no rules against the ordina­tion of gay people to the ministry. N eeks are next If there was any doubt that the age of designer jeans is passing, this should put an end to it. The latest fashion trend is neckties. But not just any necktie. It was reported that trendy neckware for the 15 to 30 set includes ties made of leather, corduroy and flannel. And they're even beginning to sport dei-;igner names like Sergio Valente. M 'lAA\ I WEU., IT M• SOUNLt>S~ GOQP.~ :'f.f.i \NG~S~: DAD .. .. ... - . . GOOl> ~ti>.~, SOJ~ Ul<C ~t ~lS MUSr'~ Wllmi~AI~ .. ----Llrli:~· .~.' ·----1 ~~ Montrose Mouth How Mary's got its name Last week we promised to tell you how Mary'• got its name. So here it 1s The club was originally named Tommy's Lounge and was owned by the wife of the deceased Tommy Musselwhite, who also called herself Tommy Joe Anthony had the vending machines in the place and one night while Joe was in there. he expressed an interest m Tommy's antique cash register •·How much do you want for that thing," he said 16000." said I ommy. What! $6000 for a cash register," said Joe 'Yea. but ru throw in the bar along w1th it Joe was feeling no pain at the moment (he was drunk). so he peeled off 60 Sl~bills , and he bought the cash register-and the bar Next day, in the attorney's office finalizing everything, Joe's son Mike said. ·well Mary, now that you own the place, what are you gonna call it." .. That's it. Mary·s That's what we'll call it," said Joe This was m November, 1969. In January, 1974, Joe sold the bar to Its present owner. J im Fanner -·- The MONTROSE VOICE staffers had a grand time at the Gay Preas Auoclatlon convention last weekend in Denver Especially en1oying himself was ad salesman Lyt Han1t at a bar-b-que hosted by Charlie's Charlie's is the Miss Charlotte's of Denver After about six beers. Lyt was sw:lBpmg the dance floor with some number that resembled Tallulah Bankhead David's 1s Denver's best disco-with a crowd s1m1lar to Numbers. but with a leather bar in the back The Cherry Creek Mining Company is much larger than its Houston counterpart. since it has a dance floor and a J.R.'s-type restaurant And the gay press was given royal treatment by the Ballpark Baths Denver's super tubs ·- The Mr., Mt. and Ml11 National Gay Reno-Texas ·12 Contest is this Sunday, June 6. 6:00 p_m. at the Holiday Inn Central, 4640 (South) Mam -·- Montrose attorney Robert Schwab informs us that the second edition of the National Lesbian & Gay Referral Directory •s about to go to press Attorneys who wish to be •isled should write the Texas Human Rights: Foundation at 3128 Lemmon Ave. East. #304, Dallas. TX 75204 Schwab also tells us that he's still wai ting on a ruling from Dallas in the constitutional challenge of section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. the so-called sodomy statute It's been a year now since the trial. and Schwab says the ruling is rkely to be a complex one. -·- Houtton Data ProfH1lonel1. a gay group. 1s to hold a reception for some of the convent1oneers at the National Computer Conference. in progress this coming week m Houston The reception 1s to be Tuesday evening at the Bra11erte Too This national convention is expected to draw 100.CXX> computer people from around the world to Houston. It's natural that a big chunk of these people are going to be gay . • This year's Fred Paez Memortel Concert for Gay Pride Week will be at Cullen Auditorium on the U of H campus June 26 The Montrose Symphonic Band. the MontroH Singers, the MCCR Choir and the Oak/awn Symphonic Band from Dallas will all combine for a spectacular show There will be a free shuttle bus from Mary·s. naturally -·- The snazzy Gay Pnde Week T-shirts are on sale around town for $6.00. Profits from the T-shirts go to the Gay Pnde Week committee. So. buy a T-shirt and help finance Gay Pride Week 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 4, 1982 Come September we're going to make a little history ... together azygos It means unmatched one of a kind A ma1or new men's fragrance that captures the essence of your hfestyle The first time the natrona. launch of a maior men's fragrance has been conceived for and directed toward our community The first of its kind AZYGOS a fragrance that captures a lifestyle. A way of business whose lime has come ... a• --zyI- g-o. I azygos azygos will provide co-op advertising to the retailer with an opoortunrty to be a part of the most extensive advertising campaign ever done worldwide: 1nclud1ng 800# customer referral, at no cost to the •eta1ler Directed to our market, the most aware consumer Available 1n 3 3 oz cologne and after shave. 3.5 oz. cleansing bar. WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... BC CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..... . 1 YearAgo June 4, 1981: Integrity became Interact Houston's oJdest gay rights organization voted to change its name to avoid confusion with a gay re1igious group that was using a similar name. Integrity/Houston, which is not a religious-affiliated group, voted to become Interact/Houston. Ju,.,, 4, 1981 Cops staged crackdown on lower Westheimer hustlers Houston vice squad Police began the second day of a roundup of male prostitutes and oth­ers in the lower Westheimer and Avondale area known as "the circuit." At least 40 people were arrested. They were charged with prostitution and s~licitation of prostitution, both m18deameanors. June 5, 1981. Bryant was moving to Alabama, wedding bells were starting to ring Anita Bryant announced she planned to move to Selma, Alabama, from Tulsa, Okla· homa, where she returned last year following her divorC"e in Florida. &-Ima is the headquarters for her "Protect America's Children" organization and also the home of Larry Striplin of "Circle S" enter· priRes, with whom she had been romanti­cally linked. June 6. 198/· Police hunt for man charged with killing A Montroae male was charged in the shoot­ing death of a man gunned down in a quiet dead-end street with an M·16 automatic rifle in Southeast Houston. Police were •o.id to be hunting for David Henry Southworth of 820 W. Alabama after Stuart Joseph Pradin, 20, was killed near his home in southeast Houston about 8:30 p.m. the day before He reported ly was trapped at the end of the deadend street and executed. Montrose Voice the newspaper of Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Content• copynght •1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McClurg pu0haher1Nitor 8 1ll1e Duncan .,,t11rt•mmMt11portaad1tor Ed Martinez r.,,arter Nick Fede Acel Clark gr•phJa Todd Belvm 1ypn•tt•ng"d'8r11lw11on Wilham Marberry Mtv9rt111nf1 dlfeCJOI Randy Brown advtHl4Jng David Petluck ao.-ert'8Jng Lyt Harns l/thertisk'lg Found1r>g MemO.r Gay Pren A1socl•tt0n Nt1wt Ser.-ICH lntet"ri1t1on•• Gay ~ws Apency. Pacific Ntow1 !l.erv•C9 Synd1c•fad Future S.r.-1eu 4 W"'•" (Sin Fr•ricllcol Chro­riici. F"turn. Uri•ted F•eture Syrid•cate. J•llr•y Wilton Randy Allred. Stontt'lll•IJ F••lur• Sy~•cate. Bnari Mc Naught POSTMASTER Send addr ... correct•Ofll to 3317 MootrOH 1308, Houston TX 77009 $ubtCflplKHt rell Ut US $4g pef YNf (52 tUUMI). $29 I*" II.It morithe (2'0 •uet). or S1 25 P9f *"II (Ins theri 26 iuu•I N1t1onat -'""''''"'9 r•ptN#tfllW JM OiS.abato. R1vendell M.1rti.e1<ng 8M 8tf\ A...-nue N- York 10011. f212) 242-9883 A<l .... t••lng dNdt:n• EKh Tund•Y e OOprn, lot lesue rtlMMd .. ch Fridey ~ CHE meeting date changed Citizens for Human Equality announced that its regular June8 meeting will be held Wednesday, June 9, instead, due to •ched­uling problems at the Watson DeNagy Gallery, where the meetings are held. Dwaine Huckabay, director of manage­ment services with the City Treasurer, is to speak on property tax evaluation at that meeting. He is to focus on the method of evalua· tion, the interpretation of homestead exemption laws and how to file a formal appeal The forum is to being at 7:30 p.m. Gay lobby announces new co-sponsors !The Gay Rights National Lobby in Washington, D.C., announced May 26 that two additonal membeTS of Congress agreed to co-sponsor H.R. 1454, the national Gay Civil Rights Bill. This brings the total co-sponsorship to 54-just ~~i~~hort of the previ01.•s record high, they The two new co-sponsors are Rep. Harold Washington (D-IL) and Rep. Henry Reuss (D-W!). GRNI.. Executive Director Steve Endean said that their co-sponsorship comes as a direct result of the assistance of Rep. Phil Burton (D-CA), another co-sponsor. Police raid gay club in Tampa Wednesday night, May 12. units of the Tampa Police Department served a search warrant on Club Tampa, a member of the nationwide Club Bath chain, reported The Weekly New•. . A l~rge number of police officers, some m uniform, others in plain clothes, pre­sented the search warrant, were admitted to the club, and proceeded to round up the patrons and methodically arrest, photo­graph and book them on various misde­meanor charges, the newspaper said. JUNE 4. 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 During a conversation with Club Tampa manager Peter Esfakis, The Weekly News said it learned that the com" plaint came from a previous visitor to Club Tampa, a ''bit;exual," according to Esfa­kis, who, after ente-ring the club on his initial visit, was so "'disgusted and rep­ulRC< I" by what he saw there, made a second visit and then decided to follow up with the complaint to the authorities. At the unknown man's insistence, the newspaper reported, Tampa Police were obliged to conduct a two-month investiga­tion, gained entrance to the club through a sponsorship by the unknown complain­tant, and then capped their investigation with the raid. Arrested at the club were approximately 73 individuals, the newspaper said. Of that number, 69 were said to have been issued miAdemeanor citations of var· ying descriptions but only four men were actually taken into custody. They were identified as the three employees on duty at the time and one man who was arrested for po~ReRsion of marijuana. Don't leave home without it If you think you've got credit problems, considor the plight of Bobby Baker. the one lime senate aide and protege of Lyn· don Johnson. Baker, who was convicted of tax evasion in 1967, has filed for bankruptcy in Mary· land, reports the Wall Street Journal Among his debts is a whopping $72,000 bill to American Express. How Baker managed to run up such a bill is somewhat of a mystery to his court· appointed bankruptcy trustee, who says m his own experience, ''If you don't send tht-m $150, they're after you fast." American Express had no comment. 'Gay' nnequ·ns going out International Gay New• Agency Realistic mannequins are still popular with visual merchandisers, but increas­ingly featureless, high-tech mannequins are coming into style. Especially for male fashions is this high-tech design growing, because male customers have complained of "gay-looking'' mannequins, which dis· ~made some of them from buying the rlothing. Men can identify more with an abstract mannequin than one they find "too gay," according to Ralph Pucci of Pucci, a New York-based company whose Varsity AbHtract Collection of male mannequins is used in a number of stores nationwide. In keeping with the idea of mannequin machismo, abstract mannequins are often shown in athletic poses: riding a bicycle, swimming, or running. Some have well­defined stomarh muscles so that they reveal at least realistic body parts when wearing bathing suits and T-shirts. Female mannequins now are often mod­ified, softer versions of punk fashion, with the roots of the hair painted bright colors and with makeup that is outrageously overdone. Generally mannt>quins used to display designer cloth1•s have a haughty expres· sion. while tho8e modeling sportswear have a more wholesome, inviting look. Overall, friendliness, instead of aloofness. is now in, As for poses, standing is the most popu· Jar because it shows off the clothes. Other options are available, including a choice of wigs and skin tones. In California many department stores like a suntan on their mannequins. With proper care, a mannequin can last as long as 20 yt-ars. Some companies, including Barrango and Arthur Court Designs in San Francisco, specialize in mannequin refinishing and repair. Some mannequins are sent to suburban branches of stores once they are past their prime. The growth of western civilization Been feeling a bit bloated lately? Well, there may be a good reason, says Develop· ment Education News. A new study says the average American consumes 30 tons of food in a lifetime. The total includes 9000 pounds of meat and sauRage, and 3200 pounds of sugar. The average A. .. ian, by comparison, eats only 573 pounds of meat, fish and eggs combined. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 4, 198.2 ........................ Police drop libel suit against gay newspaper International Gay ~ewa Agency Two police officers apprently have dropped their $20 million libel suit against the Bay Area Reporter, a San Francisco weekly gay newspaper. American Civil Liberties Union lawyer Amitai Schwartz earlier had successfully argued that the lawsuit, as filed, did not show valid reasons why the newspaper should be sued. Superior Court Judge Ira L. Brown twice had ordered the litigants, officers Holly C. Pera and Corbett Dickey, to amend the complaint. The deadline for amending the lawsuit the second time passed without the ammendment being made. Therefore the cue was to be dropped automatically, although the judge's decision could be appealed. Janice Musante, attorney for the offi. cers. said, "We have tentatively decided not to appeal." The two police officers claimed they were libeled in a B.A.R. article that described a meeting of the Alice B. Toki as Democratic Club, where allegations of police brutalitay against gay people were discu11Bed. Pera and Dickey were specifi­cally named at the meeting and in the newa story. Vandals topple Falwell's radio tower The !:J8.foot·htgh tower of a radio station operated by the Rev. Jerry Falwell col· las-ed when vandals cut its support wires, station officials said. Th.is ia according to a report from Asso­ciated Preea. Jerry Edwards, director of operations said station WRVL-FM went off the air at 1:48 a.m. May 31 , AP reported. It was reported that the station had created controversy in the area because its signal interferes with television reception in a number of homea. Asked about the tower collap80, Falwell was quoted, .. Well, obviously there are those peTBOns committed to preventing a 24-hour Christian radio station from broadcasting in the central Virginia area. AP reported that Falwell said the sta· tion had ''tried very hard to work to cure the problem·• of interference. But some people "simply oppoee the station because it represents the Gospel, Thomas Road Baptist Church and Jerry Falwell." ... We're not accueing anybody of any· thing. but children didn't do this." Falwell was quoted. ..It was obviously well planned and calculated ... The Amherst County Sheriffs Depart· ment said it was investigating the inci· dent, and Falwell said the FBI had been called in, AP reported. Gunning for military chaplains Parifie Ne'We Service The Air Force w'JI have to stop flying on a wing and a prayer, if atheist leader Madalyn Munay O'Hair has her way. O'Hair'a latest crusade is against mil­itary chaplains, whose government pay­checks, she says, violate the separation of church and 1tate. O'Hair, who unsuccessfully tried to get Congreu to fire its own chaplains. says the military 1hould depend on off-base religious services. To fuel her fight, O'Hair has asked mil· 1tary officials to open the boob and reveal how much they've spent on religious pro­grams over the Jaat 50 years. State Muscular Dystrophy Fund Raising Contest will be June 6, 6-lopm, Holiday Inn, 4640 South Main Tickets will be available at Briar Patch Kindred Spirits The Drum The Barn $5.00 in advance $7.50 at the door ~~ Servin~ontrose w The ROUGH CUT * Custom jewelry design for your lifestyle * Jewelers & appraisers to the Montrose for 8 years • We also BUY GOLD, class ring&, watches, old mountings, coins, dental gold • Anything made of SILVER ... jewelry, tea sets, silverware, pre-1964 coins • Diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds Immediate cash now * FREE APPRAISAL * Mon thru Fri 10am-5pm or by appointment 520 Westheimer suite K 520-7050 JUNE 4, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Your Mother Wears Ann~ Boots! Green canvas-topped jungle boots (new)-•1999 U.S. & German combat boots (used)-•1796 Lost Our Lease Sale COMPANY "B" reserv•tion1 neceuuy LOIS YVONNE Now Appearing 2702 Kirby 524-6272 Army/Na~ surplus from around the world 5366 Westheimer 10-6:30 Mon-Sat, till 7pm Thurs 965-9753 1ervin1 Lunch Monday-Friday 11:30-2:00 Dinner Monday-Thursday 6:30-11:00, Friday a. Saturday 6:30-12:00 IS YOUR TIME FOR LUNCH LIMITED??? PLEASE COME TO INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY , f 1 "AMERICAN CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" } II J 11 Ji • ALL YOU CAN EAT .•• Only $3.75 ~' l 1 [ 1. Pepper Beef 8. Oriental Chkken ' 2. Moo Goo Gai Pan 9. Chop Suey 3. Sweet & Sour Pork 10. International Fried Rice 4. Egg Roll 11. Chicken Almondine 5. Sweet & Sour Chicken 12. Won Ton Soup 6. Fried Wonton 13. Chicken Rice Soup 7. Teryaki Chicken 14. Daily Dessert LUNCHEON BUFFET 11AM-2:30PM Monday thru Friday DINNER SERVED NIGHTLY (4-10:30PM) *DIFFERENT SELECTED DISHES SERVED EACH DAY* Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 8 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 4, 1982 French flock to photos of gay life International Gay News Agency One of the largest turnouts for a photo­graphy exhibition in Paris this spring was 14Homopo1is," a look at gay life in San Francisco. 150,000 Parisians visited the Snac Gallery to see it. Photographer Robert van der Hilst shot 250 pictures last year while on assignment for a story on the city's gay scene for Ger­many's Der Stern magazine. The pictures range from shots of a les­bian marriage to pictures of gay men in leather. "People are almost stunned at the exhi­bition," Hilst told reporter Randy Shilts of the San Francisco Chronicle, "seeing things they've never seen before, like the gay cowboys dancing together in bars." Some French gay activists first worried that the show might prove too controver­sial at a time when leftist French Presi­dent Francois Mitterand is pushing for pro-gay legislation in the national assem· bly, he said, but the exhibition instead has drawn critic al acclaim. French, German, and Italian photo magazines have carried major spreads of the exhibition. The show was scheduled to visit 10 more French cities. M-B-AAu Vin Wine, the nectar of the gods, may also be the boon of the business executive, reports the New York Times. With that in mind, the University of Chicago is offering its M-B-A candi· dates a course in ordering wine. The two classes-one on reds, the other on whites-will be taught by accounting professor Roman Weil, who says, "While lack of knowledge about choosing the proper wine may not kill a business deal, selecting the proper wine leaves a lot of room to impress a client." Duophonic 'Dallas' headed your way There's nothing unusual in having two or even four speakers for your record player, and now you can start saving up for a stereo television, reports the New York Times. Industry experts are predicting stereo· phonic sound could come to TV before the end of 1983. The Federal Communications Commie· sion is waiting to hear recommended standards for stereo television, but video cassette recorders and videodisks with ste­reo capability are already on the market. GARGO HOU8E A new shop for Montrose Imports from around the world Furniture accessories Clothing Baskets 1802 Park St. Between We1thelmer & W. Gray 529-0334 BED HOUSE SALE! SAVEi SALE! SIMMONS BEAUTY REST DISCOUNT CENTER K• REG 1ngs $600.00 $175°0 Queens $~o~~o $125°0 Other Sizes Available 523-8278 Open 10-7 Mon-Sat 2115 Norfolk Rodney Chapmen, our HOT new bartender, direct from Lafitte's in New Orleans, invites all of you to come on down to meet him, and to ask him about our drink special. Playgirl Follies This Saturday, June 5, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Laura Lee Love Lana Kane Eydie Mae with guest BUNNY LA CARA Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE "Oldest & Friendliest in Texas" 1218 Leeland 659-0040 Ask Yourself Where can you find over 18,000 discriminating shoppers whose unparalleled tastes drive them to nothing but the best? the readers of the Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE To advertise your business in the Montrose Voice, call 529-8490. Ask for William Marberry. Figuree are a.a estimated by Montroee Voice ~arch ------------------------, I We're doing our part ... FREE RESUMES 50 COPIES PRINTED FREE! That's right ... Absolutely Free! What's the catch? There's really only one. In order to take advantage of this limited time offer, you must be currently unemployed and actively seeking employment. Bring us a clean, camera-ready copy of your resume• (along with a copy of this ad) and we'll print 50 copies on quality paper absolutely FREE! Why are we doing this? Because we feel private indus­try must do more if we expect the government to do less. This offer is valid through the month of June and will be honored for the first 150 applicants presenting this coupon. Quality is the difference at Speedv Printing Service Be'!laire Store 667-7417 The Community's Quality Printer &: Stationer •Offer limited to·2 pages; please, no anboords. I I I I I I I ------------------------- Join us Saturday Morning for Breakfast with Dee Special: Bloody Marys 50¢ and Sunday Afternoon for our BBQ Buffet 528-9066 109 Tuam &~p-~~~t~~~ Every Thursday, Friday, Saturday Bob Williams &. the Trail Riders Every Sunday 8-llpm The Dixie Kings 715 Fairview Open Noon-2am 7 Days a Week 521-2792 WEDNESDAY: STEAK NIGHT 7PM ON THE PATIO 220 Avondale 529-7525 JUNE 4, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 9 Horrors Ethiopian Cuisinr A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Reggae Music every Friday and Saturday night Featuring Harrar's Club Dancing 10 to 2, Mixed Music There 's never a dull moment Tuesday is lady's night Free drinks 10-11pm OPEN for lunch and dinner This weekend's softball games Saturday, June 5 Dirty Sally's vs. Montrose Voice, 7pm Dirty Sally's vs. Mary's, Bpm Sunday, June 6 Dirty Sally's vs. Brazos River Bottom, Bpm By popular demand, our Weekend Booze Special expands to 7 Days a Week $5 Liquor Bust 4-7pm ~~ ~ [gf)f' [Q) ffe\ 'Yr Houston's Wettest Happy Hour 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 4, 1982 Gay press holds Denver convention Members of the Gay Press Association held their first convention over the Memo­rial Day weekend in Denver. Over JOO memhen of the association from around the United States attended the three-day conference held at the city's downtown Holiday Inn. The Gay Preas Association is a non­profit, profe88ional trade organization dedicated to the betterment of journalism in the gay community. GPA's members include publishers. editors, writers, sales­people, photographera, artists and admi­nistrative personnel from the gay media as well as gay journalists who work in the non-gay media. Three representatives of the MON­TROSE VOICE attended. Realizing a need to bring all members of the gay prese together into one cohesive national organization, the GPA was orga­nized in 1981. The group is attempting to make an impact on the quality of gay jour­nalism by establishing ethical and stylis­tic guidelines, sponsoring educational programs, and taking stands to uphold the rights of the gay media by fostering a strong national network of journalistH and business people. Keynote speakers at the convention were Randy Shilts, openly gay reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle and author of 0 The Mayor of Castor Street," a bio­graphy of Harvey Milk; and Arthur Bell, well-known gay C?lumnist for New York's VilJa!le Voice. Association elections were held on Sun· day and Joe DiSabato of New York, owner of Rivendell Marketing, an advertising representative firm specializing in the gay press, was re-elected president. Mark Segal of the Philadelphia Gay News was reelected vice president, Jack Campbell of the Club Baths Chain and president of Campbell Publishing, which has connections to F1orida's gay newspaper. The Weekly News, was picked by the ~outhern states caucus, which includes Texas, as its representative on the board of directors. The southern cau· cue also voted to hold a regional conven­tion in Atlanta in November. A highlight of the convention waa the unveiling of a new computer system and the eatablishment of the "GPA Wire Ser· vice." DiSabito said the new service will revolutionize the transmission of gay news fTom around the country-news that formerly traveled by mail from one gay publication to another. National gay news will be available to members who join the service instantane­ously, thereby shortening the time gap between the time that news happens and the time that it is made available to read­ers of gay publications. Publications sub­scribing to the GPA WireServicew~llhave the capability of both receiving and tram;· mitting news stories and features, which means that late-breaking news stories in Houston could be put on the wire service by the VOICE and these stories will be immediately available to other gay publi· cations around the country for inclusion Greg Davis Baek by popular dnnarul Sunday, S:JO-l:JO Virgil Dixon Happy hour, all wttk Special Tuesday Ni~ Kenton Parton S:JO-I:JO in their next issues. The VOICE said it expects to be "on line" on the wire service by August 1 DiSabito said that the real beneficiaries of this new technology will be the readers of member gay publications. In addition to seminars and workshops JOHN PAUL 8ARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW LEGAL SERVICES 3317 MONTROSE SUITE 318 (71 3) 523-5006 I Joe DiSabato, a Neu: York media representative spf.•cializing in gay publications. u·as re-elt>cted president of the Gay Press Association 2. Elf'cted to represent Houston and thl' aouthern district on the GPA 's board of director. u·as Jack Campbell (left) of Campbell Publishing. Also shown IS Mark Segal, publisher of "Ph1ladeph1a Gay New , "who was reelected vice preS1dent of the GPA. 3. Randy Shilts, openly gay reporter for the "San Francisco Chronicle," was a keyrwte speaker. 4.Noted New York "Village Voice" openly-gay columniat Arthur Bell was a keynote speaker. 5. MONTROSE VOICE publisher Henry McClurg (ri/lhtl chats with Lucia Valeska, executive director of the National Gay Task Force. Valeska will appear in Houston during Gay Pride Week. Jn Denver she conducted a u1orkshop for the Ray press, "From Local Clout to National Muscle: Dialog About the Next Step." on the GPA Wire Service, delegates were kept busy most of the weekend attending a number of other seminars on various sub­jects, including businf'EIS management and organization, graphic design, legal and ethical aspects of the gay press and feature article writing. Full Bookkeeping Services for Clubs, Restaurants, Retail Shops Tax Returns for Individuals Partnerships Corporations All JtcnuntinJ.t fit•rviu.:t performed pnsonally. (We are not a pre­pruJ. trommt>d cnmpuln service.) ._o years experienrn 1n servic:ing all types of hu1iness For information, call Edward Jones, 266-6511 Texas State Finals to determine Mr., Ms. and Miss Gay Rodeo Texas to represent Texas at the National Reno Gay Rodeo 6-10pm Sunday, June 6 Holiday Inn Central Meeting Hall 4640 South Main Contestants Jim from, Studs, Austin Bill from Snuffy's Saloon, San Antonio Mike from The Barn, Houston Ron Sioux from The Barn, Houston Tony from the Briar Patch, Houston Bill from the Briar Patch, Houston Miss Bonnie from Miss Charlotte's, Houston Tom from Miss Charlotte's, Houston Ron from the Drum, Houston Sandra from Kindred Spirits, Houston L A M Tickets available at sponsoring bars $5 in advance, $7.50 at the door Prescntrn~ MATA HARi fealunng MARYANNE MAHONEY every Friday and Saturday, 9pm-1am. UnJ1m1ted Engagemeni Sundays-Screwdrivers, Bloody Mar ys, $1, 2-6pm Mondays-Free Buff et, Bpm Tuesdays-All-Women Pool Tournament, Bpm 2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921 POST 2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921 JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 ~ Bonded Insured ATCO BASIC BAR GEAR ~ !~~ciePe0!!~°F~as Torn jeans, ripped cutoffs, roughcut shirts, God knows what you pick- 2 bucks while they last BASIC BROTHERS 1625 Richmond 1220 Westheimer Consignment at Westheimer Shop • Ticks • Rats • Mice Home or Business FAST SERVICE STRONG GUARANTEE LOWEST PRICES 988-1331 lntroductorv Special '38~0 Call Now for Information SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR OUR COMMUNITY BE A PART OF THE 2No ANNUAL GAY PRIDE DAY Tuesday, June 15th 6 p.m. - 2 a.m. Disco Gra nd ma Jo ins Kindred Spirits in Presenting Rawslyn Ruffin 6:45 Lyra 7:45 Houston Off Broadway 8 45 Montrose Symphonic Band 9:30 Gala Revue 10:00 Vickie Eddie & Her Global Review Kika (The Martian Woman) Our Special Guest Ron Sioux Wear a Gay Pride Week T-shirt and gel a free drink 25¢ per drink will go to support Houston Gay Pride Week 1982 5245 Buffalo Speedway (713) 665-9756 12 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 4 , 1982 Happy Open Grant Hour Everyday ~t k ?am- at ac son ?pm ?am 528- 8234 The Deep Buffet every Sunday, 3pm till Sometimes you get more than you're itching for. Intimate moments can make for pleasant memories, but occasionally, something a lot less pleasant lingers as well­crabs, for example. Now there's RID,• a liquid treatment that kills crabs in 10 minutes and provides rapid relief of itching. RID contains a safe. medically proven natural ingredient at al most twice the concentration of the leading non-prescription product. Each package also includes an in· struction brochure and fine-too. th comb for c lice and nit removal. You can buy RID at your pharmacy without a prescription and begin treatment at once. But remember, 38% of the people with u;la;. crabs have been found to have something n.ir Ells worse, like VD So if you think you may have :.~ been exposed to something more than iff-... ,-...;;,b crabs, see a doctor RID -Safe, 5-14 c.... effective treatment ; for crab• . of Pflrft Inc !'kw York ~ Yorl 10017 PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal • Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep . confidence . self -worth . shyness. memory. concentra · t1on . self-esteem. relaxation . habits love emotion OVERCOME: Fear. anxiety guilt. depres­sion . nervousness. drug abuse. alcohol abu se. anger. lonel1· ness. weight STUDENT AND FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977 -2485 DISCOUNT TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Come play In our new upstairs video game room * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * New York-Style hand-thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza * Alsa avallable with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian pizza 2111 NORFOLK * Starburst deluxe pizza (the worksl) HOURS: * Super sandwiches & salads Mon: 11 :30am·11pm * Fantastic deserts Tue: sorry, closed * Imported & domestic beer TWheud1: 1 111:3:300aamm-1-111ppmm CALL 523-0800 Fri: 11130am-mldnlght Sat: 4pm-mldnlght PLEASE AUOW 1 HOUR FOR DELIVERY Sun: 4pm·10:30pm JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Montrose bowlers clean up at Dallas tournament By Billie Duncan The International Gay Bowling Organiza­tion Tournament in Dallas last weekend was right up the Montrose Sports Associa­tion bowlers' alley. MSA pin poppers rolled on back to Hous­ton with a rightous share of the tourna­ment awards, including the first place in the All Events Team catagory. Actually, out of a possible five first places, the MSA bowlers brought home three. In addition to the All Events Team award that went to Houston Strike Force Number 2, Daddy's won first place in the Team Event and Richard Peel (of Dad­dy's) won the first place in Individual A11 F.ventM. One neat thing about Houston Strike Force Number 2 winning the top prize was that the teom was what is known as a sludge team. Only three of the members of the team were Montrose bowlers. The other was n fill-in single bowler from Pho­enix that the Dallas tourney officials were kind enough to place with the partial Houston team. What a stroke of luck! And what a nice way to show the com· munity feeling of the entire tournament. Ron Quintero probably went back to Pho­enix with the idea in mind that he just might pay a visit to his new-found team­mates in Houston sometime soon. "Last year the most coveted award was the first place Team Event award," explained Mike Steiniger, president of MSA Monday Bowling League. But he went on to say that since the tournament was expanded this year to include five events, "the most coveted is now the first place in the All Events Team." Other top winners included third place in the All Events Team, won by Lazy J Boozers and fifth place, won by Daddy's. Out of a field of 108 teams, MSA ball· rollers took fouroutoffiveofthetop places in the Team Event. Besides the first place Daddy's, the Barnyard Biddies grabbed thir..:, Lazy J Boozers snatched fourth and Houston Strike Force Number 2 (that old sludge team) strutted off with fifth. In the Individual All Events were Richard Peel topped the field, there were six MSA bowlers in the top 20, three of which were in the top 10, including eighth MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday. May 29 No games sc11eduled Sunday. May 30 No games scheduled STANDINGS Woo Loot South Division Galleon 5 2 J1m·s Gym 3 3 A&K Jewelry 2 3 Briar Patch 2 Montrose Voice , North Division Dirty Sally's 6 0 Montrose Mtntng 4 2 Mary's 3 2 Brazos River Btm 2 3 Barn 1 6 P<l 714 500 400 333 200 1 000 667 600 400 143 THIS WEEK·s GAMES !All o-met II Levy F1 .. d From MontrOH. go oul Richmond, pasl Kirby, lelt on EHlt•cJe ) Saturday. June 5 Briar Patch vs Barn. 4pm Jim's Gym vs Brazos River Btm. 5pm A&K Jewelry vs Mary's. 6pm Dirty Sally's vs Montrose Voice. 7pm Mary·s vs Dirty Sally's. 8pm Jim's Gym vs. Montrose Voice. 9pm Sunday, June 6 A&K Jewelry vs. Galleon. 6pm Montrose Voice vs Bnar Patch, 7pm Brazos River Btm vs. Dirty Sally's. 8pm Mary's vs Barn. 9pm GB 1•.; 2 2'h 3 2 2•.; 3'h so.; Eddie Chavez, former president of the Montrose Sports Association, and a participant mallMSA sparts, shows his tennis form. place Kathy Winkler of Kindred Spirits Leather and Lace. Kathy is the vice president of the Eddie Chavez Mixed League that bowls on Thursdays. She also won a special award at the tournament for High Series Han­dicap with an astounding 732. The other Thursday bowler who placed in the top portions of the standings was Pam Weaver of 4 to 1 who was eighth in the Singles Event. Also placing in the top 10 in the Singles Event were sixth place Jim Reagan (MSA president) and seventh place Doug Campbell. The Doubles Event saw three MSA teams in the top 10: third place Lant Langley/John Owens, seventh place Den­nis Morales/James Grable, and eighth plare Steven Young/Steve Sanderson. MSA Monday Night Bo"ling League LEADING HITIERS (Based on 15 or more at-bats through May 16) Player flHml AB R H AVG 1 D. Davidson (Sally·s) 17 11 11 647 2 J Summerall (BAB) 15 3 9 600 3 M Marchena (Sally's) 22 12 13 591 4 B Schmidt (Barn) 16 8 9 562 5 W Romero (Mme) 18 8 10 555 6 J. Young (Sa11y·s1 20 9 11 550 7 A. Castillo (Galleon) 26 12 14 .538 8 A. Martin (Voice) 15 3 8 533 9 M. Morrison (Sally's) 19 12 10 526 10. R Gore (Galleon) 21 15 11 524 11 N Boqas (Sa11y·s1 16 4 8 500 HOMERUN LEADERS (Through May 16) Player (Team) MR Player (Team) HR J. OeSale (Sally's) 3 D. Davidson K. Johnston IA&K) 3 (Sauy·s) M. Marchena K. Gray (Sally's) (Sally's) D Kessler 8_ Schmidt (Barn) !Galleon) K. Bailey (Sally" 1 J. Moretta B. Fike (Galleon) 2 (Jim·s Gym) MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK·s RESULTS Sunday, May 30 No games scheduled STANDINGS Wl)n LOSI Pct GB Renegades 1.000 Hell Raisers 750 ~ Ducks 750 ~ Armadillo Grph 667 1 Chuck's Angels 500 1 ~ Kindred Spirits 500 111' Twins 250 211' Royal A's 250 2~ Special Blend 4 000 3~ THIS WEEK·s GAMES iAll~atfondl Paik Take i-4SSoutritoTetlipl'lonee•il Take feeder to Munger rlgtlt on Munger go 1 bloCk.1urnWt) president Mike Steiniger, who was all bu~ bles before the tournament, was shooting stars once everyone got home. A much repeated phrase from Mike was "It was wonderful!" • Correction It was incorrectly reported to the VOICE last week that Toronto won the IGBO Tournament last year. They won the Texas Roll Off Tournament last year. CBC Steamrollers of Houston won the IGBO last year • MSA Volleyball takes 4th at Denver Tourney The West End Stars, after going through the preliminaries undefeated, wound up in fourth place at the Denver Sunday, June 6 Twtns vs Ducks. 2pm Chuck's Angels vs. Special Blend. 3pm Kindred Spints vs_ Armadillo Graphics. 4pm Renegades vs. Royal A's. Spm MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK·s GAMES Monday. Msy 31 t-llGH GAMES HIGH SERIES No games scheduled No games scheduled STANDINGS Division A 1 Daddy"s 2 Barnyard Hoers 3 Eurotan I nt'I 4 69ers D1v1s1on B 1 Five Easy Pieces 2 Bushwackers 3 E/J's Protem Suppl1ments 4 Holee Rollers Division C 1_ The Hole 2_ Black & Blue Balls 3. Slow Hand 4 Cock-Tailers D1v1s1on D 1 Happy Trails 2_ Gator-Aid 3_ Galleon One 4 Next-T -Last MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League LAST WEEK GAMES Thursday, May 27 HIOH GAMES Results unavailable STANDINGS Results unavailable THIS WEEK·s GAMES (All games •I Stadium Bowl l200 BraH1N1n) Thur&rJay. June 10 Regular competition, 9pm Sports Invitational this past weekend. They beat the Wa,hington D.C Blue in the quarterfinals only to be edged by Denver High Country in the semis in very close straight games. In the fight to determine third and fourth, the Stars played the Seattle team that they beat last year for the champion­ship. The Stars won the first game deci­sively, then lost the second in a very close match. In the final and determining game, Seattle squeaked by the Stars to the third place spot. L.A. Studio One took the top spot, while Denver High Country 1'ettled for second. "The LA. team waEI just incredible," said Marcus Lee ofMSA Volleyball. According to Marcu. , they had all college players. Three of their mt·mbers made the all-star team. "The}' played a different style," said Marcus. "Japanese- style, very quick." The only 1<ame that I.A. gave up in the entire tournament was to a Texas team. Pegasus I from Dallas. Obviously L.A. still won that match. Another Texas honor (and a Montrose honor) was that Rusty Harris of the stars was elected to the all-star team. Rusty is know as a setter, but he is also a good hitter. "He does it all, really," explained Marcus. The all-stars were chosen for talent and sportsmanship. The other Montrose Sports Association team that went to Denver was Rascals (formerly the Houston Hit). The team started slowly and wound up in the second section of eight (pre-pool play determined three sections of eight each, with the top eight fighting for first through eighth place, the second eight bat­tling for ninth through SlXteenth place and the third eight scrambling for seven­teen through twenty-fourth place.). "If we had won the last game, we would have gone to the top section," said Marcus, who play• on the Ra•C'als team, "but we lost by two points." The next step was single elimination play and in their first round, they were defeated by Vancouver, who went on to place eighth (top of that pool). "It's ironic that we missed out of the top pool by two points. then wound up .in s~­teenth place," said Marcus. But smce it was a national tournament (made interna­tional by the inclusion of Vancouver), Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK·s GAMES Monday. June 7 K1nOred Sp1nts (5245 Buffalo SpeeOway. 665-9756) at 8.30pm. s1ngleel1m1nat1on. $2entry. winner take all Mary's 11022 Westhe1mer. 526-8851) at 9pm Ranch f6620'A Main, 529-9730) at 9 pm smgJeehm· mation. $2 entry. winner take all ($50 guarantee) Tuasday. Jvna 8 Lampost (2417 Times Blvd., 528--8921) at Bpm, sm­gle elirrunat.on, $?entry_ winner take all Wedne.sday. Jun• 9 Briar Patch (2294 W Holcombe. 665-9678) at 9Pm. amgle ehm1nallon, $2 entry. $50 prize GB I. (1419 R1Chmond. 528-8903) at Spm, !i1ng1e ehm1na11on, $2 entry. winner takes all ~us new pool cue Th11rsday, June 10 Barn (710 Pacific:, 528-9427) at 9pm, double ehm1A natiOn, $2 entry. $25 fi-~1 round pnze. $15 second round pt1ze -Just Manon and Lynn's (817 Fa1rv1ew. 528-9110) at EJJ-s (1213 R1chmood. 527-9071) at 9 30pm. dou· ble e1tm1natt !'"I $2 e11try. wtnl"Ntf t•e ail MSA Tennis STANDINGS 1 Fred Lopez 2. Rich Ryan 3. Ron Landrum 4 John Ryan 5 Lester Vela 6. David Robicheaux 7 Jon Colbert 8 Rick DuPont 9 Michael Houston 10. Michael Green 11. Don "Rmger"' Smith 12. Rich Corder 13_ David Garza 14 Charhe Brown 15 Terry Rich 16 Eddfe Chavez 17 Daniel C8s1llas 18_ Jim Olson 19 Randy J1erscheck THIS WEEK·s GAMES fCourb IOClted on the nortri MOt ol Me•nonal Drive Jn Memonal Peril ) Sunday, June 6 Regular compet1llon, 4.JOpm 522-8227 5719 KIBRY I SUITE 20 HOUSTON, TEXAS 77005 FORT LAUDERDALE $149 HAWAII $499 NEW YORK $149 0 Round Trip Air. Call for Details. Attention Group Leaders: Your group booking can make you eligible for free air fare. Call for details Serving the Gay Community 11:30 AM to 2 00 AM 1408 WESTHEIMER 528-3878 W ine Bar and Restaurant Three Blocks west of the Tower Perfect for after the theatre ... 11 SUPERB OFFICE SPACE At 3317 MONTROSE at Hawthorne Small offices & large suites available, short term and long term leases, remodeled to suit tenant Call Tim Crockett 626-8880 • • • • LIVE at the T()W~V Tt1~ATV~ D1r1·1 I From New York ancl Los Anyeles MR 81 COASTAL" Academy award winner ' Complete with 25 piece orchestra PETER ALLEN JUNE 8-13 ALL TICKETS RES ERVED Musical director Tues ., Thurs. 8PM. F11 & Sat 8PM & 11PM. Sun. 730PM TICKETS NOW ON SALE: Tower Theatre Box Office and all T1cketmaster outlets. For VISA or MC CALL: 713 522 2452 ENTERTAl~MENT llCOUPONSNOT AVAILABLE FOR THIS PERFORMANCE PrDffced by PACE CNcerts & Ttwtr V1t1tuc11 Marcus brightened up to comment, "[ don't mind being called sixteenth in the nation a bit!" In closing, Marcus remarked, "Houston definately made a name for itself at this tourney." • Underdogs gearing up in women's softball Of the four game to be played this Sun­day in the Women's Softball League, the one to watch just might be the 5:00 p.m. bat battle between the top ranked Rene­gades, who remain undefeated, and the Royal A's, who have only won one game. However, the statCJ do not accurately reflect the talent of the Royal A's. Perhaps they need a little time to gear up into the winning machine that they can be. Marion Coleman of Kindred Spirits said sometime ago that any team can be defeated, "including the Renegades." Of course, she went on to say that eve­ryone who plays wins merely by the fact of the healthy participation and community feeling that sports affords to people. • All Star Time! (Sung to the tune of "Sunny Side of the Street") "Grab your vote and get your bat. And just scurry to Galleon's doorstep. Results announced next week ... for the All Star softball peak'" On Thursday of next week, the MSA Softball League will announce the All Stars at the Galleon, 2303 Richmond. With all the high-powered hiters and fantastic fielders, it is just not safe to make any predictions. But the VOICE will go so far as to say to look for at lea.st one player from the Dirty Sally's team. The All Stars will be picked this week· end by the voting of the players. Players wi11 vote within their own division • Tennis tangles full of fi re Roses are red Violets are blue Fashionably late The struggle for the top seven spots on the MSA Tennis Ladder is getting hotter than the 90 degree weather that the play­ers faced last Sunday. Ron Landrum challenged second seeded John Ryan this past week and managed to upset him 6-2 and 7-5. The last game included a ripping 7-5 tiebreaker that was as scorching as the Texas sun. But Ron did not keep his spot for long. Tuesday, Rich Ryan (John Ryan's doubles partner, but no relation) demolished Lan­drum 6-3, 6-0. David Robicheaux challenged Jon Col­bert this past week also. David's first chal­lenge on the ladder had been Jon and he had lost, so he had to work his way up the ladder. Last week he moved up twice. But the match with the man who had stuck him at the bottom of the ladder to start out with was a game he looked forward to. He won. Oh, yeah, did he win: 6-0,6-2. Other action saw David Garza valiently challenging Michael Green to no avail. He went down 6-3, 6-2. Aloo, Jim Olson tried on Eddie Chavez and gave him quite a fight, finally going down to defeat 6-4, 7-5. A tight match. "It's going to get tighter and tighter as we go ulong," said number four ranked ,John Ryan. John predicted that he and Rich Ryan will be the top of the ladder before the Texas Challenge Cup. Said John, "Fred Lopez has been up there too Jong." HP also predicted that he and Rich will be the top doubles team, upsetting the favored Fred Lopez.I Bobby Hopkins combination. Thia coming Tuesday, June 8, there will be a meeting of doubles participants to determine who will play in the Texas Challenge Cup. The top four teams will enter, with possible two alternate teams being chosen. The competition for the tournament But our uniforms are new W4.e ®all.eon 522-7616 2303 Richmond Open 2pm-2am JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 spots is hot and heavy, but perhaps a good-sportsmanship award might be in order for some of the good-tempered and good-natured players who are having to put up with some unfortunate bitching from not-so-good-natured players. Some people seem to be p·laymg John McEnroe tennis. At least on the sidelines. • MSA Softball fundraiser Check vour change, because there is Next week in the Voice The movies of the summer another fundraiser on its way. This one is a joint fundraiRer for MSA SoftbaII League and CHE (Citizen• for Human Equality), and it will take place on June 17 at Miss Charlotte's Dance Hall and Saloon. The planned festivities for the evening include a hot dog supper, country western and rock & roll music by the F1ying Blind Band, a pep rally for the game with the Fire Department on June 19, and a "Jock Auction." Well, most of the festivities are .self­explanitory, but perhaps some elucidation on the term "Jock Auction" might be in order. According to Jim Wells of CHE, David Prejean (Mr. Gay Texas) and a softball player (as yet unnamed) will give the shirts off their backs for the cause. The audience will be able to bid on the outer items of clothing that the two gentle­men are wearing, until an item of under· clothing remains. Then the audience may bid as to who gets a chance to dance with the gentlemen so clad. David is an aC'complished dancer and teaches dance, but Jim Wells said, "!don't know if the damn softball player can dance or not." The tickets are $5 and the proceeds go directly to the fund from ticket sales. They are available through individual team members and through the efforts of a long list of bars. Tickets will be available on the 13th at the Copa, which is the night of the farewell performance of Mr. Tiffany Jones (Ken Whitehead). Other clubs that will help in the ticket selling at dates and times to be announced, are Miss Charlotte's, J.R.'s, Mining Company, Galleon, Brazos River Bottom, Chases, The Drum, Mary's, Numbers 2. Briar Patch, Dirty Sally's, Loading Dock, Rascals, Baja's, The Barn and The Ranch. The choice of Miss Charlotte's as the site of the fund raiser was informally protested by several women becauc~ of the club's dicriminatory policy towards women, but in the spirit of the theme of Gay Pride Week, there will probably be support from the increasingly-active female portion of the MSA and of CHE. In explaining the door policy of the club several week~ ago, Miss Bonnie (of TLC Booking and Miss Charlotte's) pointed out that there was no exclusion policy during the wH.'k. She went on to say, "You know how Rtraight clubs offer special rate~ to women on certain nights? Well, our stand· ard door charge on weekend nights is $10. But we offer a special for the men of $2." On the 17th, equaHty prevails, however, and one price pay~ for all. Said Jim Wells of Miss Charlottes efforts on behalf of the organizations, "Charlotte has bePn vory generous to us." 16 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 4, 1982 Get Your A/C Ready for a Long, Hot Summer Try our expert oir conditioning service We service all makes of central systems & window units Other mechanical services available • Lowest prices • 24-hour service • Reliable-licensed & bonded J.E. STAHL AIR & HEAT 376-8028 -----G--Y-R--O- -G--Y-R--O-S-- ---~ SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JUNE SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 -with this ad Open 11am-10pm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~------------------------ "Sold out house at NYC world premiere-3 weeks running" "Exhilarating• HUNK IS HERE! A MUSTANG PRODUCTION 24-HOUR HOT SHOT Commercial/ Industrial COURTEOUS BONDED DRIVERS. AND CARGO INSURANCE FOR YOUR SHIPMENTS f!l3ee !!l,u,'c~ <JlJeli11e1y #nc. dfout>lon / PfexaJ 723 5959 * *GRANT STREET* * * STATION * * * ** ** ** ********** The Montrose Voice 7000 COPIES distributed each week In Houston through 105 DISTRIBUTION POINTS resulting in an estimated readership of 18,800 TWT 4000 COPIES distributed each week in Houston through 80 DISTRIBUllDN POINTS resulting in an eslimated readership of 10.900 Just thought you'd like to know Figur• ate u 91timated by Montrose YOice lor 1vM•O• wMk through M•y 1982 TWT declined to lurn11h .ccurate distnbull(ln l1gur• 1n wnt1ng W•'-• uMd the l1gura 2 8 h the put-on r•t• !actor in •t1mat1ng readef1h1p. •lter deduc11ng 11\!efaga relurna of 300 COP•• lor Monlrose VOlcti <A~ ~~ We ~~ Understand <i Your Type 2011 SW Fwy 526-6940 Half block east of Shepherd on ~~ • Letterhead/ Service Rd Envelopes Open 10am-7pm daily Qr.. • Business Cards (Noon to 6pm Sunday) ~! (Closed Wednesday) • Party Invitations Good selection of fresh and ,. • Ads/Flyers saltwater fish & exotic birds Complete supplies E-< • Layout Service Under new management ~ ~~ Stop by and say hello ~o 0 ·~ C..11 Bill Lubing •t 522-4251 JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Montrose Art 'Sculpture and Fiber Hangings' at the Art League Photoetory by Ed Martinez Across the street from Texas Art Supply at 1953 MontroRe sits a modest little house that has been converted into the home of the Art League of Houston. This fellow· ship of Houston area artists and patrons was founded in l948 to promote interest in the achievements of its members by pro­viding a showcaRe for artists' work and studio workshops for learning. This non-profit league, a community· oriented, educational organization con sisting of over 700 members, has become a vital force in the development of Houston artists. It is the only institution in the city providing continuous juried exhibitions with the opportunity for workshop and studio participation. The current exhibit at the Art League, "Sculpture and Fiber Hangings," is open to the public at no charge through June 16. The judges for the exhibit are Mary Ellen Whitworth, M.E.'s Gallery, for fiber hang­ings, and Charles Hooks, Hooks-Epstein Galleries, Inc., for sculpture. The Art League offers continuing educa­tion for its members in the form of meet­ings and programs with speakers, demonstrations and films, as well as workshops in painting. The League has been serving our community for almost 35 years. The exhibit currently underway is one of the more exl'iting and interesting shows the gyoup has presented. The sculpture entri~s are particu1ar1y good, and the fiber hangmgs are a medium that seldom receives its just consideration in the art world. Of particular interest is a sculpture by Elsie Azadian entitled "Woman number 2," in clay. It has depth and intensity that is compelling. The viewer seems drawn in by a cavernous feel created by the space within the work. The piece represents a woman's head and, like all good sculpture, makes you want to touch it, to feel how the artist achieved her effect. This same artist has another work, "Mother and Child," a bronze which has a strong resemblance to the work of Bran­cusi, or perhaps reminds one of Brancusi. All three of the works of this talented woman ore strong and display great talent. Of the fiber hangings, the works of Mer· ion E. Cole seemed most impressive, partly, of course because of their size. They are both large works, and display a range of feeling that, while representational, also portrays a kinship with recent trends in modern art. Both pieces depict the human form, the one in "Forces," and the other in "Defeated." Of interest also was the work of Trace Guthrie, whose"Reaching," a bronze, won third place in the sculpture category. He was represented by two other pieces in the show Mary Narum's sculpture "Mirror, Mir-ror" displayed a haunted face that indi­cated a depth of feeling often lacking in modern sculpture. She also had two other pieces in the exhibit. 906 Westheimer at Montrose 527-0188 "Defeated" fiber hanging by Marum E. Cole "Woman 2" clay by Elsie Azadian "Mirror, Mirror" clay by Mary Narum The winner of first place in sculpture want to buy. The first place winner in wall was an amusing bit of Tinkertoy crafts- hangings was a lovely saddle blanket that manship of the kind that one frequently apparently got placed on the wall by mis­sees at art festivals but usually doesn't take but won anyhow. MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 10-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA Depart July 30th •79900 RENO RODEO ca nights> HONOLULU (4 nights) SAN FRANCISCO c2 nights> ALL INCLUSIVE!! For details, call us today ~ ~ 2506 RALPH-522-8747 ~J:l~l.~~a.:t, __ \J 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 4, 1982 Montrose Live Tommy Williams and keyboard charisma By Billie Duncan mote themselves in other endeavors He is listed as Tom Williams in entertain- (mostly theater and opera), or just to keep ment schedules and in the Keyboard ads, the old golden vocals from getting rusty but everyone who knows him, knows him as "Tommy." And Tommy he should be, because he is the sort of person that no matter how old he gets he will probably be described as "boyish." But that "boy" can play piano. He comes from a musical family, with Mom and Dad both playing several instru­ments. So there was always music around the house. "'They always let us kids play along whether we knew what we were doing or not," said Tommy. Sometimes Tommy would strum on a little ukulele, which was probably not much in tune, and certainly not chorded properly if at all. But joining in was the important part, and everyone in the family joined in. When he was five, he started figuring out chords on the piano as his dad played the fiddle. When he was 11, he started taking piano lessons, but they only lasted for two years. "My Piano teacher got pissed off at me 'cause he'd play the music and then I'd play it by ear." But he picked up enough to be able to figure out sheet music and charts. Still, his strongest point is his ear. Tommy can listen to a person singing a song he has never beard before and start playing it before the person has finished. He can also transpose most songs instantaneously. However, it was a long trip from the family piano in Rockford, Illinois to the smokey reaches of the Keyboard on the edge of Montrose. One of the biggest chunks of time between was spent in the Air Force to which Tommy gave four years. He got in on the tag end of the Viet Nam War and saw combat at Camrah Bay where he was a security guard. The first eight months he was stationed there, no enemy fire was received, but the last two months the base was shelled sev­eral times. Strangely enough, Tommy was never frightened during those attacks. "I was concerned and aware of what could happen, but I've always been a brave little fucker." from lack of use. come in at least once a week in order to Tommy's abilities as an accompanist ' takeadvantageofhistalentsbyjoiningin are appreciated by many singers_ who with his music. They include (yours truly) There are different kinds of fear, though, and Tommy, like many other fine performers, suffers from stage fright. Catch that, the man faced death from rocket fire in Viet Nam without blinking, but he gets nervous when getting up in front of people to play the piano­something he has done for years. Tommy Williams, playing, with the Keyboard's Bill Yon looking over In particular, he gets jitters when he has to sing solo, but he is doing more and more solo singing at the Keyboard at the insist­ence of an appreciative audience. 0 l'm getting more nervey about doing it. I'm more relaxed." One thing with which any piano player in a piano bar has to cope with is the per­son who gets up to sing-and can't. Usu­ally these people do not even realize how awful they are. But the piano player catches on pretty quickly. Tommy does bis best to follow anyone, sometimes even changing keys several times per song in order to keep up with the wandering warblings of some would-be caruso. "At times I'm amused by it," Tommy admitted. "depends on if I've had a drink or two." When it is really bad Tommy feels that "it's kinda an insult to the people in the audience for someone to get up like that." Then be added, "But that's part of what this bar is about-giving people a chance." And the chances usually pay off, with some very talented people coming into the bar on a regular basis to take advantage of being able to work out new material, pro- Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose (Frld•y, June4, lhrough Thursday, June 10) • PIANO Loll Yvonne 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day) st Rascals, 2702 Kirby, 524-6272. Jim C1t1r 8:30pm Friday; Bill Hud•on 8:30pm Satur­day; Greg 01vte 5pm Saturday and 8:30pm Sunday; Tom Wllllan" 5pm Sunday and 8:30pm Monday, Wednesday and Thursday; and Vlrgll Dixon 5pm weekdays at Keyboard. 3012 Miiam, 528-6988 Richard A.akin and D•n• Rogan 10pm nightly (except Monday and Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar), 2631 Richmond, 528-2259 Ruth H•tlngs 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day) ; Llonshere 9pm Sunday and Monday at Baja's, 402 Lovett. 527-9866. Lee l.llForge 8:30pm nightly (except Sunday) with Vlkk• Ford Friday and Alexandr1 Hau Wednesday at Arno's, 4002 Montrose, 528-2993 Tered M1Uney 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Monday) and Austtn M•nn noon Sunday at Bacchus, 523 Lovett, 523-3396 •ORGAN K.ald Kon1 5pm Friday and Saturday, 3pm Sunday and 5pm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole, 109 Tuam, 528-9066 • COUNTRY 6 COUNTRY/ROCK Bob W111lams 1nd the Tr1ll Alden 9pm Friday, Satur-day and Thursday at Happy Trails, 715 Fairview, 521- 2792, and 9pm Wednesday at E/J's, 1213 Westheimer, 527-9071 . Ab a the ReNI Outlaws 9:30pm Friday and Saturday and 8:30pm Thursday at the Exile, 1011 Bell, 659- 0453; and 8:30pm Sunday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos, 528-9192 Flying Bllnd Bind nightly (except Monday and Tues­day) al Miss Charlotte's, 911 Drew, 528-8840. Mustling Bind 9:30pm Friday, Saturday, Wednesday and Thursday at Brazos River Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192; and with the MonlrOM Cloggen 9pm Tuedsday at Numbers 2, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551 •GUITAR '"L • 9pm Friday and Irish Folk 9pm Wednesday at the Parlour, 2402 Mandell, 529-8069. Susen Christl•n Spm Friday; Lyra/Kat Gr.ham I Lind• Aum Rhyme 5pm Monday, Wednesday and Thursday; and Rawslyn Ruffin Spm Tuesday at Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS Dixie Kings 4pm Saturday and 2pm Sunday at Happy Trails, 715 Fairv iew, 521 -2792 Dynasty 9pm Friday and Saturday and 6pm Sunday at Just Marlon & Lynn's, 817 Fairview, 528-9110 MIU. Hirt 9pm Friday and Saturd•y at Lampost, 2417 Times Blvd., 528-8921 John 01y a Co. 8pm Sunday at E/J's, 1213 Rich­mond, 527-9071 • JAU Robert Ceb1Uos Group 9pm Sunday and with Jimmy Ford 9pm Friday, Saturday, Wednesday and Thurs­day al Las Brlaas, 614 W. Gray, 528-9959. P•ul English 4pm dally (except weekends) al Arno's, 4002 Montrose, 528-2993. Kirk WtMllum nightly (except Sunday) at Cody's, 3400 Montrose, 522-9747 Rumors 9:30pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day); and Mickey Motley B1nd 9:30pm Sunday and Monday at Birdwatchers, 907 Westheimer, 527-o595 •NU WAVE Ric T1mg .. and the Onff 10:30pm Friday; the A1Us­aln• and the 8r01dcuten 10:30pm Saturday; RHlly Red and other bands 4pm Sunday; and the Explo­slvff 10:30pm Thursday at Omni, 1540 Westheimer, 528-4230 The Rockett and the Teddy Boy• 10pm Thursday at Numbers 2, 300 Westhelmer, 526-6556 • IMPRESSIONISTS TIU1ny Jones, Donn•Day, N•oml Sim• & Hot Choco­l1te Sunday evening at the Copa, 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Little Bobby, Jerry H1rper, T,.cey and guest Sunday evening at Exile, 1011 Belt, 659-0453. "Playglrl Follies" with l.llur• LH Love, Un• Kane. Eydie MM and guest 10:30pm Saturday at Pink Ele­phant, 1218 Leeland, 659-0040 • MISCELLANEOUS Talenl shows Tuesday evening at the Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528-2259; Wednesday evening at Mldnite Sun, 534 Westhelmer, 526-7519; and Thursday eve­ning at Twin•. 535 Westheimer, 520-0244 Billie Duncan, David Douglas, Bill Yon (of course), and the Jeanette McDonald of Montrose, Bobbie Willis. A Jot of local theater people drop in after rehearsal or after a show, and visiting per­sonalities from shows that are passing through are not uncommon at the Keyboard. In addition, many singers that are work­ing around town, come in on nights off to goof off and have fun. As much as Tommy enjoys what he does, he is thinking of doing something else for a living. He sees people who have been working in the bars for years and realJy have no other life and no longer appeal to the audience. He does not want to wind up like that. Besides, being an e!ltertainer is not con­sidered to be one of the most stable profes· s10ns by the outside world. "It's the security in the future. Someday we're all going to be over the hill. I think about insurance, credit, buying a car." Until he decides to chuck the late night melodies for the old nine to five, though, Tommy will be filling the Keyboard with his music, his talent, his warmth and his charismatic personality. Even when he makes his move towards normalcy, it will not be a denial of his musical life. "I hope to always keep on playing. If I weren't doing it, I'd be misera­ble. I know I would." • Duncan's Quick Notes The Mystical Magic or Mummen· ochanz: The tower has been very good to Montrose by taking chances and bringing us some high-quality, off-beat offerings. Mummf'nschanz is at the top of the list. These people are great. They put on a wonderful show. They make the audience laugh and think, What they do is not just a show. It is an experience. If the unusual creative mind appeals to your senses, Mummenschanz is playing at the Tower through this weekend, closing Sunday, June 6. ff/OB All the Day: Houston/ Off­Broadway and John Day & Company pre­sented a high-energy show last Tuesday night at E!J's as a Gay Pride Week fundraiser. Although the show was under· publicized, the tum-out was good and included in the audience ranks the ever· smiling John Kirk and the ever-speeching Larry Bagneris. (Now, Larry, don't go off. I like your speeches) From the response of the audience alone, it was easy to see that the show was a hit. At the end of the second show (there was one at 9:00 p.m. and one at 11:00 p.m.), HIOB and John Day & Company joined together, with John Day playing "Reach Out and Touch." Soon almost the entire audience had joined the performers, linking arms or holding hands in a large circle and singing. A night to be remembered. HIOB and John Day & Company will perform next at the Kinderd Spirits fund· raiser on June 15, and they might perform at the Rally. Auditions, Auditions, Auditions: All right, you wonderful Montrose actors and singers, it's time to get out there and get a job. Theatre Suburbia needs for males and six females between the ages of20 to 45 for their "summer meller drammer" Caught in the Villa Web. GoshowyourstuffJune6 at 2:00 p.m. and June 7 at 8:00 p.m. at the theater, 1410 West 43rd. Auditions for Don't Print That! will be on Sunday June 13 at 7:00 p.m. and Mon­day June 14 at 7:30 p.m. They need six women and four men between the ages of 19 and 49, plus six other actors of either sex. For info, call 747-3816. The Houston Grand Opera is expanding its chorus, so here's your chance to carry a spear and rub elbows with divas. Prelimi­nary auditions will beonJune19and20in Jones Hall, 615 Louisiana. Call backs will be June 26 and 27. To schedule an audition ] oin the Houston Grand Opera Chorus PLAY A PART IN A GREAT FUTURE llou•ton Grand Opern audiuons will be held June 19 & 20 in Jones Hall at 6J:. Louisiana, with call-back auditions sthtduled for June 26 and 27. To '>Chedult' an audition or for further information. call Pat Houk, Mu;ic and Production Adminmrator, at 227-0078. ·nw llowaon Grand Ope-rd is invol\'td in a major expansion of its nauonally n:rogni1C•d choru'i, a JX'rforming group that has built its tq>utation on a unique commitment to thr daring and ad\'rnturous prcxlunion'i which have brought Houston Grand Opera intrrna­uonal ardatm . It; di.iinguisht-d mtmlxnhip is compri'ied of mm and womc·n £rom a wide variety of profrssion.., and b•u kgrounds, all brought togethn by a lo\"e of singing and the operatic stagt. ·nie < urrtnt ta km \l·arch ... eeks not only tho~· who wish to participate in llGO\ full chm us season, but, as impo1tantl), thoS<· pmplt· whose \.'O<.·~uion.., may not }X'rmit a rommitmt·nt to t·H·ry production during t}lt' "('J\011. The 1982 .. ea;on, with chorus, will include I Pagliacci, The Merry Widow, Rigolello, Daughtrr of the Regm1mt, Woueck, Tura11dot and the Tale.1 of l/offma11. JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 or for further information, call Pat Houk, 227·0078. The Houston Symphony Chorale can use some of our rich Montrose voices also. Those auditions wiH be June 8 at River Oaks Baptist Church, 2300 Willowick, and June 19 at Jones Hall. To reserve a date and time for audition or for more informa­tion, call 224·4240. Caught Between the Moon and Houston: Peter Allen is coming! Peter Allen is coming! and lucky, lucky Mon· trose, because he will be at the Tower. The man is an incredible talent both in writing and performing, and if you miss this opportunity to see him, you might very well slap yourself in the face at a later date. Peter wrote "Quiet, Please, There's a Lady on Stage," as well as the academy award-winning "Arthur's Theme" ("When you get caught between the moon and New York City"). He is an outrageous and highly ener· getic performer. He will appear at the Tower June 8 through June 13. Shakespearean buff in the buff Actor Steve Powell is a Shakespearean buff with eight Bardian roles to his credit. And speaking of "buff," he is currently rehearsing the leading role, including a nude scene, in Bernard Slade's Romantic Comedy, which opened May 28 at Theatre Suburbia. Powell, a brown-haired mummer with a mobil, expressive face, is a drama gradu­ate of Baylor University. He ha.a emoted in 55 plays in Waco, Dallas and Houston. His film work includes two entertainment movies and several commercials. Asked about the nude scene, Powell shrugs and says he's used to it by now, having appeared in Steambath, The Ritz and The Changing Room in Dallas. Terri Ann Melton Tuesday, 9-1:30 In Romantic Comedy. the Texas native plays a sophisticated successful New York playwright who teams up with a shy writ­ing teacher from a small town in Vermont. The teacher is played by Minay Miller Others in the cast are Ronald W. Kirshy, Colette Dries, Linda Woodruff·Royce and Carolyn Montgomery. Bob Williams & The Trail Riders Wednesday, 9-1:30 1213 RICHMOND Tueaday 527-9071 Support the Gay Pride Week Benefit at Kindred Spirito Tuesday, June 15 Steak N~~~~~ive Band Country & Western Nigbt-Live Band Thursthiy Pool Tournament-10:00 p.m. Extra Morning Happy Hour 7am-Noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:30pm NEVER A COVER CHARGE arkin on the corner of Mt. Vernon & Richmond 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 4, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 4 5 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 6 7 8 9 10 For addit1onat information about events listed below. look for the sponsoring organization under .. Organ1zat1ons" 111 the Montrose Classified Selected Events through 7 Days aFRJDA Y: Interact/Houston's Co~unity Coffeehouse 7:30pm­midmght, 3405 Mulberry -.FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin -.FRIDAY-SATURDAY­SUNDA Y: National gay health workers convention in Houston -..sATURDAY: Democratic and Republican runoff elections -..sATURDAY: MSA's Softball League games, 4pm, Levy Field, off Richmond at East.side -..sATURDAY: Gay Atheist League of America, Texas chap­ters, meet in Austin rlSUNDA Y: Full moon, !O:OOam rlSUNDA Y: Gay Pride Week 82 Committee meets at Kindred Spir­its, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 2:30pm rlSUNDA Y: MSA's Softball League games, 6pm Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside rlSUNDA Y: State finals for Mr., Ms. & Miss Gay Rodeo Texas, 6-IOpm, Holidat Inn Central, 4640 (South) Main rlSUNDA Y: 8th anniversary of Dignity as a chartered chapter, ?pm, Rice Catholic Student Cen­ter, 1703 Bolsover mMONDA Y: Montrose Sports Bowling League games 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Houston Data Pro­fessionals host reception for attendees of the National Compu· ter Conference at Brasserie Too, 1322 Westheirner, 5:30-lOpm •TUESDA Y: Montrose Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft •WEDNESDAY: Texas Gay Conference IX planning session at Houston Guest House, 7:30pm, 106 Avondale •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-midnight on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks -.JN 1 WEEK: 2nd annual con­vention of International Associa· tion of Black & White Men Together opens June 16, Washington, D.C., lasting to June 19 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meeting, 4600 Main, 7:30pm, June 16 •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Pride Week: Opening night ceremonies at Mary's, 1022 Westheimer, June 17 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Salute to Gay Businesses, June 18 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Sports Association vs. Houston Fire Dept. softball games, June 19 -.JN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Sports Association and Black and White Men Together's joint Juneteenth Carnival June 19, Cherryhurst Park •IN 2 WEEKS: Father's Day, June 20 -.JN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Forum, June 21 •IN 2 WEEKS: Summer begins, June 21 ruN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: National Day of Remembrance, let Unitarian Church, 5210 Fan­nin, June 22 UN 2 WEEKS: 6th annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival opens June 21, lasting through June 26 -.JN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Bringing Men and Women Together Day, June 23, with 2nd annual Gay and Lesbian Artists Show -.JN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Youth Day, June 24 •IN 2 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week float committee meets 7pm, June 24, Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway •IN 8 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Gay Hispanic Caucus Day, June 25 -.JN 8 WEEKS: MSA sponsors Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Center -.JN 3 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week: Fred Paez Memorial Concert, Cullen Auditorium, U of H, June 26 Murphy's M anorbyKurtErichsen Montrose Classified BustNESS0wNERS 11) We 11s1 free each week in this directory (al business establishments serving as d1stnbut1on points tor lhe ne...,spaper {b) current display adver11sers (c) all Houston gay bars & private clubs {!or the benel•t olout-of· town YiSllon) and (d) noo-proltt community orgamzat1ons eJndlcat" MonhOM Vole• dllh1butlon poinlt Deadlines for next issues. Tues ~nl.JUn68. lor issue #85 to be released Fri evening. June 11 Tues .. 6pm. June 15, for 1ssue#86 lo be released Fri. evening. June 18 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Roommates of America Room­mates make sense-socially, eco­nomically and emotionally. Service provided by professional consul­tants. Member National Association of Roommate Referral Agencies 526-8002. Dallas: (214) 458-7227 Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED SPANISH TRANSLATOR VOLUNTEER needed to help gay liberation In Latin America. Pocaa horas. Paz Y Llbereclon, 219 Mar· shall, #115, Houston, TX 77006, or call evenings 523·9061. Bald male models wanted for photo­graph. No experience necessary. Paid 666-7478. POLICE OFFICERS WANTED Women and men. Good salary and benel1t1 $16.030 year starting Be a part of Hous1on·s future Call (713) 222·5201 HPO for details. today Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10¢ per regular word or 15C PER ALL CAPITAL WORD 1n 6-po1nt type. as shown here (JI using few words in this size or ii centering on a line compute at SOC a hne. using maximum &regular words or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a Une.J 25¢ per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 30C per regular word or 45C PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnt bold type, as ahown here. (If using few words In this size or If centering on a llne, compute at $1.50 • llne, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) 50¢ per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-polnt bold type, as shown here. (II using few words In this size or If cen­tering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few words in any one size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLlND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same classified 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your classified is lengthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of paper. Include your name, address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. Thi C1n(innah prople art marclr 1119 111 Clevtland Clevtland will march htre. C<>lumbas '.j<>¢S to CinC1nnal1, anJ Wit march on the Stat" HO<JS<! 1n CDlumb<Jsl GAY BARS (A.) Houston Tavern Guild member 1ndicat1on placed m th11 directory at their request •BAJA"S . .4Q2LOvett=:527.9866---;;th restau· rant. live entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, with more copies through more distribution poinls e..1.BAAN -7iOP:acliiC-52a~94V- counlfy See our ad elsewhere this issue eBRAZOS RIVER BOTIOM-2400 Brazos- 528·9192 country •BRIAR PATCH-2294 w Holcorllbe--665- 9678 See our ad elsewhere this issue eCHAsES°.:-1415 R1c/'lmond-:......S~:-disco eC111CKE.N COOP-535 Westheimer-528· 2240 eCOPA· ·2831 ·Aichmond-528-2259 disco with ShOWI COVE·-2912 S Shepherd 524-0170 Tremendous circulaiion in Montrose-the Voice •THE DEEP -2212 Converse-521-3751 See our ad elsewhere this issue e 61FFEAENT DRuM 1132 westheimer-:s2e-. 8528 leather •ADIRTY SALLY'S-220 Avondale-529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue eEfJ·1 -1213RiChm0nd-527·9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice •GALLEON· -2303 Richmond-522·7616 See our ad elsewhere this issue eGAY BOY INTERNATIONAL (G.B.1.)-1419 Richmorld--528·8903 •oRANi STREET STATION- 911 Fairview- 528·8342 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HOLE HOUSE-109 Tuam 528·9066 See our ad elsewhere this issue eJ.R.'s--808 Pacihc-521·2519 eJUST MARION & LYNN'S 817 Falf'Yi- 528-9110: lesbian eKEYBOAA"'D=-",,~1.-2" M"'•lo:::mc-<S0280e<-6;;:98;-;8-,:w ::::•"°lh piano entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Support the Montrose Clinic •KINDRED SPIRITS 5245 Bullalo Speedw•y-665-9756: predominantly lesbian See our ad elsewhere this issue eLAMP0ST-2417Tlmes Blv0.-528-9921: les· blan See our ad elsewhere this issue eL.AZY J-312 Tuam 528-9343 eLOADING DOCK 1735 Westhelmer 520- 1818 leather dl1co ~s-~10~22~w~.~.,,,,--,-=-;m-,-, ~.,~,.~.~ .,- :-,- See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice eAMIONtTE SUN-534 Westheimer-526-7519 disco. shows •MISS CHAR°"L°"O""'TT"°E'°''S~.,-=-1 -Cw~o~"-.~,,=•-. 8840 country See our ad elsewhere this issue eMONTAOSE MINING C0-805 Pacihc-529- 7488 •NUMBERi-2 ·300 Westheimer-526-6551 "'"S'°e e our ad elsewhere this issue •PINK ELEPHANT~ -1218 Leeland-659-0040 with lhOW1 See our ad elsewhere this issue •RAN-CH--6620.,., Maln-528·8730 •RASCALS ~2fo2 Kirby~ith res· taurant.hveentertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • ROCKY'S 341aW-0auu-5~8922 lesbcan • TWIN~- 515 Westheomer ~52o-02« lesbian (t1S<O e YENTURE·N -2923 Main 522-0000- See our ad elsewhere this issue ORGANIZATIONS A CAPEL _A Ct! in.11· partol (Mr 11toee) Church 1! Chnst ACLU -1236 W Gray--524-"925 AMeRtCAN LEATHERMEN (1oc11I clUb) meets at 01flerent Orum, 1732 Wetthe1mer­~~~~ 8 club night Wed Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice .f.sTRO -P11mbow .-1 ice 524-4793 1Vo1ce & TTY) BERING Memonat Method••! Church- ~.440 Hawtnor~-526-1017 UMed Methodist WOf­ah• p Mfvlce io SO.m Sun iETWEENTWOWorldtl _,,29.,913 meet1tr1ery otri.t Thurt BLACK & WHITE MEN Togell\er !BWMit -529- 5006, 7'1-9812 ~ Moritrose) CHURCH OF CHRISf:-521).K WMI helmer 777-92a9 wQJVl•p seno•cet 12 30pm Sun CHl..iACHoFCHRISTIANFAITH -·H3WHthe1 ~~~~.:0!!=:.n';~e~:. ~~u~y~~mj !_ues h_!!'l•nQI. choir practice Wed eYe01?g Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, with more copies through more distribution points CmzeNs FOR HUMAN EOiJALITY <CHE) eo9Fann1n11J01 236-8666 bollrdmeet1ng2nd Tu.days COLT 45·s (10C1al club) mNll 81 Brazos -R1Yer Bollom. 2400 Br•zo•-528-9192 COMMUNITY COFFEEHOUSE pro1ec1 ot nttrarl l ')NG BETH CHAIM meets 81 MCCR. 1919 D«alur -52&-4878. 624-5180· Ml'V1ce & social lpm 2nd & 411'1 Frid1y1 CONROE AREA Gey Women 756-0154 COURT OF THE SINGCEsT AR- -meets ,,-Pink E1epnan1. 1218 Leetand--6S9-0040 CRISIS HOTLINE 228=1505 Tremendous circu lation in Montrose-the Voice iJAT A PROFESSIONALS meets 11 LI OU1nt1 Motor Inn. 4015 Southwnt Fwy -522-7809 :~,,~~ ~~~.~~~.~~~~e~c::~~~~g; II e ..... ,,. Too. 1322 W•lll'l••mer. S30-10pm. Junee D1ANA FOUNoAnoN 2100Mason-=524-s191 DiGN1TY-mee11 at Ca1h011Cs1udenlcier119r. 1703 BollOYer-520-9269. 528-7644 meetongs 7pm &.lturd•y•. 8th ann1..,er11ry H chlrt8fed chapter 7pm June 6. Rice C.thohc Student een~ 191". 1703 Bol10Y8r EP1sCOPAL INTEG-RtTYIHou11on=mMilii1 Autry House. 6266 Mam--52&-0555 meeting 1 30pm !____~ TUffdays "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice FAMILY & FRIENDS Ot Gay1 .. '64-6663 F1RSTUNITARIANChufC:h -:5210FaMln--526- 1571 worship MrYICe t 1 15am Sun GR-iENSPOINT/FMiOt10 Arn Far-Away Friends 821 ·'Ul Support the Montrose Clinic GAY-ARCHtVES-ol Te•a P70Ject otlriteract GAY-ATHEISTS LNglHI ol Amence-524-2222 GAv-Hi-SPAN1c CAUCUs-2722 Newman 112- 521--0037 meets 3rd Thursdays GAY ITAuANGroW>-526-~ GAY NURSES &-PttYSICIANS of Houston- -cJo GPC. 4600 Main •217-777-2287 GAv POLITICAL CAUCUS !GpCJ::.-•600 Mam •217-521·1000 general bus1f'le11 meeting 7 30pm 111 Wednesdays, educa11on1I forum !_:30pm 3rd W~nesda_ya There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY PRIDE WEEK 8iCOmm1nee-mee11 al Kindred Spints. 5245 Buffalo Speedway_-78'· 8699 meeting 2 30pm June ti. '" our 7-dly C.lend1r"· elsewhere th1• uue for d.ly-by-day listing ol...,.ntt GAYSWtTCHBOARO- 5~3211 HEPATiruS HOTLINE .J•m or- O.y1d 11 -7n. 2287 a project of GPC"s Mtdic.I Commlrt• HOME CoAL1TiC>N- 1409 O.kdate--- 521-0196 HOM-0PHILE -1NTERFMTH At111nce.:..729 Mer10r ·523-Mfl9 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ~uaton Area GAY&l.ESBIAN ENGINEERS & Sc1ent1SIS· ·526-7386 meets 7pm 4th Wednes- ~·_v• - -- --- - - ---­HOUSTON COMMUNITY CLOWNS -862-8314 HOuSrON H-UMAN- R1GHTs- LEAGuE-"""523- 6969 HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLuB--c10 Mery"a. 1022 WesltMHmer 526-8851 HOUSTON TAVERN-GiJIL6 m9mbert inck.l<M Badland•. B1rn. Dirty $ally·•. E•1le. Mary's, Mid­nite Sun. Truck Stop e iNreRACTIHoutton (11H inc I -3405 Mulberry--529-7014, 61M-1732 Community ~ll~~M :.~~::<!'1~~~:;:.o~,=~~ ~ucahon11 lorum !.. JO~ 3r~ !!'ursda1.!.__ Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice e KfiFT ffad~o. -FM-90- 419 LO\letl Blvd -526- 4000 ~w11dl; ·n Stem .. gay rld•o ahow 10prn­m1dn1ghl Thurs LAMBDA ALA-NON--meeta II lat Unltari1n Churcri, 5210 Fannin-521-9772 meetmg Fro evening LESBIANS & GAY PEOPLE-In Medicine-665- 4760. meeting 7 JOpm 111 Slturd YI LUTHERANS CONCERNED meell 11 Grace Lulheran Church. 2515 Waugh- 52H)863, 453· ·1.!.!~m~·~~ 3~~:1e~n1!:~0~~:11o~'~nl~~~~ erans Concerned lot Gay People. July 29-Aug 1 MerAoPOLITAN-COinmunity ChurCn olihe Resurrection (MCCR)-1919 Oecatur-861· ~!! ro~~~ ~n7n~~;:>eun:, 5:' 1 ~~·~=· memberlh1p mQuirera cl&11 7 30pm Mon , Al1r10n meeting 8pm Mon . Alcohohcs Anonym­ous meeting 8pm Mon & Thurs Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, with more copies through more distribution points MONTROsE-clv1c Club \Neartown)· MMtt• 11 Benng Church. 1440 Hawthorne--522-1000 m891ing 7 30pm fourth Tue9d1y1 ~ <~ ~ft,~ Gf/11 --~~' r' ~ You're NEVER satisfied. Either "no one remembered" or ·everyone knows.·· A~ MONTROSE CLINIC- .104 -WHlhetmef--528:' 5531. open &-10pm Fri. , 1-5pm Sun., &-10pm Tue. & Thurs MONTROSE couNSEL1NG6enter-900lo....,ii •102-529--0037 N1t1on11 o•y heaJlh workers con\191'1hon 1n Houston June •-6 MONTROSE -PATFfo~::-52QWe11ht•mer-s28- 2273 MoNTRosE s·1NGERs ·meets al MCCR. 1919 Oeca1ur-·528-0SSO ~;foNTROSe-SPORrs ASSOC.Ar ONtMSAJ· 622-330< Montrose SportS-80wl1NG-play1 at Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braesmein--960 1518. 961-1523 ~mes Mon & Thurs evening! Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice Moniroae 5Ports "SOFTBALL --523-8802 days. 523-0413 eves season play April 17-July 18. playoffs July 24·A.ug 1 Mon1-roH-SPoris WOMEN·SS0FTBAL1. 121- 9371 Mont~Os.e SPorta TENNIS- ·524--21-51 Tells Cup Jorie 26 at Memor .. I Term1• Ctn!9f · U S Openly Gay· N1t1onat Tenn11 Tournament .n S.n Fr1ne1SC0 ~mor111 01y weekend Montrose--Spons VOLL°EYBALL.:.:~2930 game. 7 30pm Tllft, Gregory-t.1ncoLn school 1101 Taft; tournament Aug 14at FQrlde Recr .. llOf'l•I Cent« MONlROsESvMPHONIC M~-mHts 11 Ber· '"lg Churctl. 1440 Hawthome- 527-9689 meet· mg 730pm Tun MusTAN"GS-(.OOe1 Club ... ·meets •I the earn. 710 Plc1f1c--52&-SM27 ctub nigh! Thurs OPERATION oocUM{N-fAT10N Protect ot GPC RiCEffri;..,-G1ylle1b1an Support Cfroup-524- 0724 TeX.As BA v -AREA-Gaya-332.3737 m.eimo Thurs everi1np _ "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice TEXAS GAY CONFERENCE IX 889-7231 ~nn1ng sesslOn 7 30pm June 9. 106 AYondale; conference Sept 3-5 11'1 Houeton TEXAS QA-v-TASK FORCE 529-7014. -522~ 1659 •tale conl1rence m Houston Sept J.5 fExAS HUMAN A1GHTS Founclat10n.:1519 Maryland-526-9139 TEi:ASR10ERs::C/-o - Miry·s, 1022 Wntl'lei­~-- 528-8851 UNil AAiAN 'uN1VERSAusTG1y C.uet.11-eio 111 Umtanan Church. 5210 F1nn1n -520-9787 528-5842 meettng 3rd Suri 1lterrioon• ~E·iLAYA,..;- FELLOWSH-IP-=~ _ieii- Support the Montrose Clinic WESTHEiMER COLONY ARTS Auoc1ati0n- 908 Westheimer-521-0133 falt lesMI! Oct IS. " PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS Relax and enjoy the BodyWorks massage. Gift cert1f1cates. Call Bill. 526-2470 evenings, weekends fs-::':1 ~:sr.:-~=-.;:,~~'.s~~~ ALONE? NO LONG ERi Our beauti­ful people (men or women) will accompany you while you en1oy Houston more. TexEscort 751- 9000 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Going-on a trip soon? Is there gay life in Belleview, Nebraska? Walla Walla. Washington? The Gay Switchboard of Houston will be glad to tell you about all of the hotspots in these and other wild vacation resorts such as Kalispell. Montana and Wil­cox. Arizona. The Gay Switchboard is open daily from 6pm to midnight. 529-3211 FOR AN-ATMO~HERE of 10Ct.I Y•nety and h.lrmony. f01n BWMT. wllere tl'le .-npha9'111 on tnenctahopt For- nlorm11•on,cat1523-2997or 747· 9012 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 ~~~~~~~It :n,~;~~:.~:;. '::: ~:~ :;:.=.~11::=&::a~~ll:1~~ w11n open IP81k9f Thu,.daya Spm. Growth Group, w•th open dlSCUUlon Alto Al•non =~ ~~~~··=~!i':~~. t91g O.C.tur Come on by JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 A Disturbed Peace Feeling guilty By Brian McNaught If I was a merchandising genius, I would market Irish Catholics as "guiltsitters." lf peoplewanted to getrid of their guilt for the day, they would give us a call and, for a reasonable fee, we would feel guilty for them. It's normal for Irish Catholics to feel guilty, We seem to feel guilty about everything. Maybe it's in our genes or maybe we're the products of absent Fathers and domineering Sisters. Who knows? But we feel guilty about a lot, like the fact people are starving in Africa and we are not. In watching Roots and Holocaust, I accepted full responsibility. Homosexual Irish Catholics are perhaps even more guilt-prone than non-gay Irish Catholics, surely because we try so hard to be perfect. We seem to love to embrace the culpability for the world's inequalities. Some of our guilt is siJly, such as feeling badly that our grandparents had to "walk six miles to school through 10 feet of snow," and we had carpools. Andsomeofourguiltisnotsilly,suchas that which we share with people of all races and religions who contrib­ute to injustice. The difficulty is in separating the two. For instance, I feel guilty sometimes that I was not born female. Because I was a boy, I had a lot of encouragement and opportunities that women my age did not have. When I put myself in their place, I am enraged. Feeling guilty that I am a man, however. is silly. Thier is nothing wrong with being a man. Maleness is not a "sin." But sexism is a "sin." Sexism is something that sexist men should feel guilty about. If gay men tell jokes about women or make "fish" comments, they should feel guilty. If gay men refuse to share power with women merely because they are women, they should feel guilty. If gay men contribute in any way to the inequalities of the sexes, I suggest they should feel guilty. Likewise, lesbians who discredit gay men merely because they are men should also feel guilty. I feel guilty, too, because I was not born black or brown or yellow. Because I was born white, I have had privileges people of color in the United States have never had. When I imagine myself as a Third World homosexual struggling not only with straights for my rights but with other homosexuals too, I am sickened. But feeling guilty for being white is silly. There is nothing wrong with being white. There is no "rightness" or "wrongness" to skin color. But there is a "wrong· ness" to racism and within the gay community it is most heinous. White gay women and men who permit gay bars to require addi­tional pieces of identification from Third World homosexuals should feel guilty. White gay men and women who tell "nigger" jokes should feel guilty. White gay men and women who don't encourage the participation of the Third World homosexuals in their organizations and who do not share power with people of color, I suggest, ought to feel guilty about their racism. Likewise, Third World gay women and men who reject all white homosexuals merely because of their color should also feel guilty. Sometimes, when I am watching television or attending a lecture, I will close my f!ars so that I imagine what it would be like to have a hearing impairment I have also clot:ied my eyes and tried to walk down the street or around the house. Frequently, I feel guilty that I was born ablebodied. Especially when I imagine that I could easily Jose my senses and limbs and realize how that would effect the responses of other people to me, I am horrified. But it is silly to feel guilty that I am not blind. Being without physical challenge is not culpable but it is culpable to restrict the accesa of disabled gay men and women to gay functions and gathering places. Gay organizations which, when planning functions, do not con­sider wheelchair access and do not provide signers for the deaf, should feel guilty. Gay men and women who tell "Helen Keller" jokes should be ashamed. Gay establishments which discourage the patronage of physically challenged people, except when safety is a legitimatei•sue, I encourage to examine their consciences. It is silly to feel guilty that I wasn't born poor but it's not if I deliberately contribute to the inequalities of class privilege. Likmg people solely on the basis of their economic background is as offensive as hating people solely on the basis of from which part of the country they come. It is silly to feel guilty that I am not old but it i"n't if I contribute to the alienation of elderly gay women and me-n. It is silly to feel guilty that! am not an alcoholic bu tit isn't if! am so insensitive that I have a party without providing non-alcoholic beverages. It is silly to feel guilty because I was not born a Jew but it isn't ifl listen to "Jew jokes" without expressing my disgust. It is perfectly alright for me to be a young, ablebodied, white Irish Catholic gy male from an upper middle class backgroung. It's not just OK, it's great because that is all I can be. What is not OK is for me to feel guilty about who or what I am and it is not OK for me to make my qualifications the standard for everybody else_ I feel guilty that this column may sound a bit preachy, but I would have felt guiltier if I had allowed much more time to pass before I reminded myself and my friends about some of the injustices to which we contribute. And thot guilt wouldn't have been silly. 01182 BAI.AN MCNAUCH"" 22 M ONTROSE VOICE / J UNE 4, 1982 Q e"'--:=o---. <~~--- " Well, well ... Seems we've found what's been causing that ringing sensation in your ear, Mr. Foley." " Larry? Betty? . .. Stand up, will ya? ... These a'.e same friends of mine, folks, who flew all the way on from the dump." Gary Larson Dinner time for the young Wright brothers " Well, that should do it ... When Mr. Warner comes around, malc:e sure he gets all the ice cream he wants." / <(( . ...,. ~ " I was tempted but it looks loo high in cholesterol." PRIVATE GAY CLUBS •BOX OFFICE-1625 Richmond-522-1625 male See our ad elsewhere this issue. • CLUB HOUSTON Baths 2205 Fannln-&59· 4998 male See our ad elsewhere this issue. Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice •FRENCH QUARTER Theater 3201 loulsl­ana- 527-0782: male See our ad elsewhere this issue. eMtDTOWNE SPA 3100 Fannin 522-2379: male See our ad elsewhere this issue. • 2306 CUJB-2306 Genessee-528-6235 male RESTAURANTS e BACCHUS-523 Lovett-523-3396 eBAJA'S-402 Lovett-527-9866 See our ad elsewhere this issue. e BRASSERlf TOO 1322 Westheimer 526- 0355 e CHAPUL TAPEC-813 Aichmond-522-2365 • DECATUR CAFE-708 W Atabama-528- 8837 • GREEK ISLAND 302 Tuam 522-7040 Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, with more copies through more distribution points eGYRO GYROS Sandwich Shop 1536 WMlheimer-528-4655 See our ad elsewhere this issue eHAAAAR'S Ethiopian Cuisine-428 Westheimer-526-2895 See our ad elsewhere this issue e HOUSE OF PIES 3112 Kirby 528-3816 e JADE DRAGON 224 Weslheimer 526-2683 e MARCELo·s Ice Cream 1521 Westheimer 522-6994 • 9'ERS-13oa Westhelmer 528-8823 • OMAR'S 808 Lovett 528-3569 eRASCALS 2702 Ktrby 524-6272 See our ad elsewhere this issue. e RA UL'S BRASS RUBBING 914 W ~ama·-529-0627 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • SPUD-U-llKE-416 Weslheimer-520=0554 iSTAi:I PiZZA --2111 Norfolk 523-0SOlf See our ad elsewhere this issue . .-SrfA.1(·N-;-foG 4231 Montrose 528-8135 e YIM"S Collee Shop 1525 Westhe1mer sis- 2289 SERVICES LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nanette Bruckner, p1ychologlst, 523-2180. REMODELING/IMPROVEMENTS. Full carpentry including French doors, cabi n ets, k itc h e n s, bathrooms. Excellent workmanship, experienced, references. 529-3869. CLASSICAL PIANO/ SINGING. Pro­fessional teacher. 723-3254. ArCO PHI Conlrol -988-1331 See our ad elsewhere th is issue e FtTNESS EXCHANGE fitness center-3307 Alchmond-524-9932 • HAIRCAAF~T~h.~"cc"cc'.~2"11°"0 ,c:,cc,,,,,,c-,~--~,=,._ 5472 "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice ::o~~-~:~~20-~¥:1sr HOUSE lodging- 106 HOUSTON TRAVEL Consultants-820-4227 See our ad elsewhere this issue i lCeNHOWEA- Beauty Schoot-327 Weslheimer-520-7972 ~::es o.K RISflA.~N~.P ~h7D-.h -yp-,-ol-oglst-977· See our ad elsewhere th is issue :2~~~~KAli. Mail Bo)(es--3317 -Montrose· :2~~.~~DS Hilr -08sign-.::-ooe Westheimer- See our ad elsewhere this issue :4~1;>NEL Hair Dealgn 3220 Yo1kum_.::525~ MilNL.ANO SAVINGS -& L08ri=.34o-1 Allen P1rllw1y-"527·8446 See our ad elsewhere th is issue m~~JtOse HA1ROft1gn. -4317 Montrose- Support the Montrose Clinic iMONTAOSE TAAVE-L ·25oe- R11Pt\. -522- 8747 See our ad elsewhere this issue • MONTROSE VOICE newsJMi°Per --3317 Mon­lroM. tr11rd lloor -529-6490 MOPPITS CLEANING SERVICE - 493-6341 See our ad elsewhere this issue MOVING, HAULING. Movemastera, 521-3155. 9PRiVATE POSTAL SYSTEMS m11! bo ..... 1713 Wnthelm•r· ·52&-3020 eSALONOANIEL ·",;,--;;- cVe- -1826 -Ciierry· ~"'.1 - 5~~-2! T~ere's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Next week in the Voice The movies of the summer Dear Dorothy Having trouble meeting others? Dear Dorothy, I have Jived in Houston now for 6 months and am having trouble meeting other gays. I have trou­ble dealing with bars, book­stores, etc, Any idras on where to meet other gays who are not into these &C'enes'! Searching Dear Searching, Honey, you forgot the best of the "B's"-the baths! Really, if none of the!'le are your scene, you might try meeting someone at one of the churches who serve the gay C'Ommunity. There are groups like Dignity, Affirmation and even dating ser· viC'eB like Lambda, etl'. In a city as large as Houston there has to be someone out there for you! Keep Looking! And remember, assertil'eness and persistenC'e do pay off! Dorothy says: Did you remember your mother this year on her special day? Don't forget, Father's day is just around the comer! Whatever our relationship with our parents, we do need to reach out to them and let them know we care about them and appreciate their giving us the opportunity to be who we are today. If you are open with your par· ents, I affirm that relationship. If not, maybe now is the time, when you are feeling good about your gayness, to let them know where you are. Risking is hard but then so is loving someone. As a present to your parents, why not give them all of you? Let me know if you do because I do care, SPt:EDY PAINTING -SQ> Bellue 81vd-=te7- 7417 _ ~ ou~ a~ E!l~wh~~~-t~js _ 1ssue Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice TRAVEL TECH t7°a:e. agency --571"°iK-irb°Y--S22- 8227 See our ad elsewhere this issue SHOPS & STORES • ALL-STAR Adult News- ·1407 Rtehmond - 528-8405 e ALL THAT GLITTER-Sgolts--"325 MOnifOM-- 522-6976 • RICHARDALLENFlon-Si.- 1848w.u)eorMr­~ 7795 Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice e ASYlUM Aduit 800kstofe-1201 .R1Chmonc1~ • BALL PARK ...ei~., e0okt10re...:-1m----w-;.1; bam• .BASIC BR-OTHERS clo1h1n"g-ii25 Richmond- -522-1629 See our ad elsewhere this issue 9ntE BED HOUSE --2115 Noif0ik -~23-827& See our ad elsewhere this issue Only the Voice saturates Montrose each week, with more copies through more distribution points iBLUE IRIS --36185 S hepherd ·523-1 827 See our ad elsewhere this issue • BOOM TOWN BLOOMS !lowers ls210 S Sheptlef"d - 526-8110 ~u~~=~--=':'u~~!.,~~~ Fme 900N-E DANCEY/EAR----:::_-,.70' MorltrON 522· 1673 • COM PANY 8 m111iar y wear - 5Ji6 W•thetmer--965-9753 See our ad elsewhere this issue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • DOUBRAVA JONES. t"9 Milnooi. ·clolhing- 1983 W Gray-522-1089 e oowNBEA T Aecoi°d-1--=-:: 2111 Richmon<f- 523- 11348 e DRAMAflKA g•lts-3224 Yoakum':' 52a--:S:.S7 ~FACETS~ tts-=-1~~ ;;,ti .. mer-- ~~-141~ "Montrose Art" by Ed Martinez, exclusive each week in the Voice • FRAME of REFE_R_ENC-E pa7n1 - 1533 W•t!'\elmer-520-0710 .9.F ,R.t 0AY'SFIOrilt- 1i3a~we1ihe1me7:. 524· ilNFiNITe-FIECORoS.:528-Westhe.~ 521 0187 e JAROiNiJE~RA.NCIS -1o1t1P.den - -529- 7578 ,!~RBY-~5 Kirby~ -520=02~­SuppOrt the Montrose Clinic • DH aov1 lnltler GoOo. - 912 Wftthe1mer 524-7859 See our ad elsewhere this issue eOPTiONS tlowefi- -1-503 Ya1e at -1S1n..:aM- 3830 •PLANT HOUSE..::-812- westhe1mer--526."n95 See our ad elsewhere this issue !.~ l~~A-~~_!_8tl"le1mer-- 527-9').4 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice • RECORD RACK mU11C--3 10ii SS~d ~24-3fl02 e 5HEER- FANTA5Y g1tta- 1401 Wntn•mer- 528-3325 • SHOE WAREHOUSE- "2024 Westhe•mer - 524-6606 ti sPORTS LOCKER- clo1t11ng - 311 w .. u;.,_ mer - 5~5 eSTUDZ Adult ~I -1132 W Alabama eTEXASCARAV.t.NlArmad•ilO-F'-o~ -2115 Oiinlavy - 520-7019 • TOTALlfv STORE 1121 w- Grav- m -8180 Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • TI-·S iH1CeyewS.1r • J Westhehner- 5:8- 0078 e TREYMAN golts - 407Westtieuner 523-0228 • uNtON- JACK doth1rig - 1212 Westh .. mer f\28-9600 e weSTHf1MEff FLEA MARic:ET 1133 Wett· ~~mer Max Angst's comic satire­each week in the Voice ewiLOe&- STE1N-tx>oi"" st~·Sio Wnt'* mer - 529-7014 gay JUNE 4, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 Fortunes By Tycho For Friday &venmg, Jun& 4. through Friday &v&nmg. June 11, 1982 ARIES-Your mind's on overtime this week. figuring things out and getting them in order. You've got the energy and inclination to accomplish a lot. Don't let outside distractions get in your way, however humpy they seem. TAURUS-Jn your sign this week: Venus. Be cautious of a woman who makes big promises. Know what you need before you say yes to anything. "Down and dirty"means working in the garden; stay dose to earth, and don't get carried away. GEMINI-Jn your sign thia week: the Sun and Mercury. Fun in the sun time! Organize some crazy, original kind of get-together that no one else h88 thought of-how about a surprise birthday party for yourself! June is bus tin ' out, and so are you. CANCER-While you take care of that old business and tie up loose ends, someont:'s looking at you with a lot of intere8t. Don·t get so absorbed by what you have to take care of that you miss out on something beautiful that could happen. LEO-Try something new. Something weird been fascinating you? Sex-change? Cross-dressing? Even if it's not as dr&Btic as that, you might at least buy an outrageous new outfit, or Kd some kinky new toys to play with. Experiment! VIRGO-A very exciting one-night.er could tum out to be much more. At least, it will be a great distraction from all your concerns about where you're going and what you're going to do when you get there. Take a chance. LIBRA-Jn your sign this U'eek: Mart) . Saturn and Pluto. It's a take charge and do it, go get' em kind oftime. At work and at play, you're the one in the driver's seat. Whatever or whoever you're making will benefit. Enjoy your PoSition! SCORPIO-Jn your sign all week_. Jupiter. Leat·ing your sign this we~k. the Moon. Saturday mormng. Falling in love with love? Tt:mpting. isn'tit? PreASures on aJJ sides make romanC'e for its own sake terribly appealing. Know what you 're getting into before you get into it. Advice from an old friend might help. SAGITTARIUS-Jn your sign all week: Uranua and Neptune. Passing through this week: the Moon, from Saturda}· morning to Monday afternoon. When you're on the move, you're on the move, and this is one of those times. Whether it's down the street, around the world, or away from someone, this is the time for it. Quick decisions can be good ones. CAPRICORN-P48sing through your sign this week: the Moon, from Monday afternoon through Thursday morning. Let's get physical. You're feeling the need to touch, to hold, to embrace, Look:mg as good as you do, who can resist? Not those new friends a nd loves-but someone you've known a long time could find your embracing embarassing. Alas, you can't win them all. AQUAR IUS-Entering your sign late in thl' U'eek: the Moon, Thursday morning, June JO. Things are looking very green. Very interesting. This is a good time for investing, even gambhng. Whatever you do with money, do it with serious consideration, and you'll come out ahead. A lucky time. PISCES-You get by with a little help from your friends. All that impartant thinking you're doing is important, but the discovery you make is who your true friends are. When you learn thi~. you'll know how much they mean to you. •1M2 STONEWALL FEATURES SYNDICATE Last Word 'Gay wire service' coming By Henry McCiurg I want to tell you a little about the Gay Press Association's wire service. The service is now officially starting and was demon­strated last weekend at our convention in Denver. It will enable your MONTROSE VOICE to communicate directly and instantly with Philadelphia's Gay News, Miami's The Weekly News, New York's Native, Chicago's Gay Life, and dozens of others through a central New York computer. Each publication covers the gay news in its city or region and then files those stories into the New York computer which in turn sends it back out to all the publications on th~ network. Additionally, nationally syndicated gay columnists can feed their articles to their subscribing publications through t~e computer rather than through the U.S. mails.· Gay nghts groups can feed their press releases into the computer system. Free lance Writers can feed their stories into the system, whkh will have an accounting program built in to assure the Writers get properly paid. I believe that this computer system will do more for the g~y rights movement in America than any event before it. It will allow large and small gay publications instant com­munication with each other-and thus nearly instant com­munication to the gay communities of each city. No more delays due to the mails (the method we now use to exchange news items). The MONTROSE VOICE will be "on line" by August 1. 24 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 4, 1982 Numbers 2 UPCOMING EVENTS FOR JUNE SUNDAY, June 6-Tea Dance, beer bust, with $2 door cover. TUESDAY, June 8-Gay Rodeo Night, featuring the Montrose Country Cloggers, the Mustang Band. Proceeds go to sending the Cloggers to the National Gay Rodeo in Reno. SUNDAY, June 13-Claude Sacha, live, in concert. #f NUMBERS 2 300 WESTHEIMER 526-6551 Always-A Part Of ..• Not Apart From NU WAVE THURSDAY, JUNE 10 THE ROCKERS with the Teddy Bears Doors open 9pm General admission No advance ticket sales #f
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