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Montrose Voice, No. 275, January 31, 1986
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Montrose Voice, No. 275, January 31, 1986 - File 001. 1986-01-31. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/301/show/276.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-01-31). Montrose Voice, No. 275, January 31, 1986 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/301/show/276

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 275, January 31, 1986 - File 001, 1986-01-31, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/301/show/276.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 275, January 31, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 31, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript THINGS HAVE CHANGED AT THE 'BATHS' AN OWNER COMMENTS mnntrose 'Buddies' Explores Gay Friendship VOICE Scott Cutsinger, films inside 'The Newspaper of Montrose" Frida_v. J! nuary 31, 1986 Issue 275 (71 3) 529-8490 New Law Upgrades Massage Practices in Texas State Bill Was Authored by Montrose Businessowners, inside GPC President Gears Up for New Year Anise Parker, inside Longtime Club Owner Thinks of the Present Marion Pantzer, inside Local Attorney Protests 'Lack of Constitu­tionality' in Health Card Issue News, inside Montrose Softball League Reviving Lone Star Classic Coming March 28-29, sports inside NEIGHBORHOOD FEELS THE SHUTTLE TRAGEDY Community Leaders Offer Condolences, Thoughts Compiled By Connie WoodR Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Tuesday's explosion of the space shuttle Challenger had Houston residents reeling in shock and disbelief. Montrose residents and community leaders shared with the rest of the nation in the grief surrounding the national tragedy. The Montrose Voice asked several of our neighbors and friends to comment on their feelings and thoughts concerning the accident that claimed the lives of seven Americans. Ron Pogue, pastor, Bering Memorial United Methodist Church: ''I realized when I was 11stemng to the news, I thought I had started to take the space program for granted. My reaction and feeling was devastation. I had strong feelings. We are saddened. They represented the pioneer spirit in all of us. We vicariously participated in their quest We lose something of ourselves with their loss. I was saddened by the news of the transport of the military several weeks ago. Yet, I had a stronger reaction yesterday (Tuesday). The families are suffering no less than the families of those who died yesterday. But there's an attachment to them, their task and their pioneering spirit. J J Marian Coleman, prin ting fi rm and nightclub owner: ''I basically agree with what Ronald Reagan said yesterday (Tuesday). It was a very eloquent and sensitive speech. I cannot add much to it, but I do think we must keep on with the program. I know it means a lot of suffering to go through but we must keep going. J J Lee Harrington, travel agent: ''It 's amazing that while I feel so removed from most of the country's leaders and many of its programs, I can feel so much a part of the nation today. No one can take my thoughts away from me and I think that is very significant. People really do control their own destiny and dignity- a lesson our community seems to have such a difficult time understanding. We have no business tolerating, as we do, even a moment of exclusion. J J George Greanias, Houston City Councilman: '' Houston is the headquarters for our nation 's space effort. Six of the seven who died lived here. Christa McAuliffe trained here. For these reasons we feel a special mea.•ure of loss. The space program will go on. Indeed. I believe that from this tragedy we will take a reneu·ed commitm<'nt to that effort. But right now we are a family that has lost loved ones. As a family ue must deal with our grief, and as a community come to terms with the awful loss we have suffered. J J 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31. 1986 MIDNIGHT SPECIALS . ,.. WESTHEIMER CAFE 1525 Westheimer FroM Midnight to 5al'T' Daily $1.99 Huevos Rancheros with bacon or sausage, toast and hash browns OR Scrambled Eggs with diced ham, toast and hash browns Bring your favorite bartender and receive 10% off total price! on the Alley's intimate Arena Stage, February 6 - Morch 2. Preview performances: February 1, 2, 4, 5. (Previews at 8:00 P.M.) Tue.day through Friday at 8,00 . Saturday at 4,00 and 9,00 . Sonday at 2,30 and 7,30 CALL FOR TICKET INFORMATION 228-842) ----------- ~ 2-for-1 COUPON/ 2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 (') ~ 0 ;:> " This coupon, when pre~ted ot the_ Alley box office, 615 Texas Avenue, C 0 , entitles the beoret" to 2 tickets for the pnce of J to (5: ~ BALM IN GILEAD ~ ;,,,. for these performances only: N I ~ i Any preview performance (Saturday, February 1; Sunday, February 2; ;. N Tuesday, Februory.C; Wednesday, February 5. Previews at 8:00 PM.) ! Z Or any perfor_monce between Thundoy, February 6, ond Wednasdoy, February 12 n ~ For further 1nformollon ond reservations, coll the Alley box offtce at 228-8421 . O :;> Thiscouponvolidonlyfor Februoryl , 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1, 9, 11 , 12. ~ 8 2-for-I ~OUPON/ 2-for-I COUPON/2-for-1 COUPON/2-for-1 ~ 'BETTER LAIDUS & qARDEilS Total lawn maintenance mc~;.idinq mounnq, edginq. \rimmmq. prumnq ferlihzmq spra4inq • firewood :?'. • Bed mulching l~-1 • Azdled feed1nq .f~:1 j~ • Debris Remov.11 ~~~;:...,.,,~ • Complete Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Told.I Fencinq Services (Cedar notched Picket. Treated. elc ) • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN ()nt[llOC.\l -,ortl FREE MEMBERSHIP NOW AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASEt " Taxi Zum Kio," "You Are Not Alone," " Mal• Couple, ·• ''Ernesto, ·• "EIDeputado" No Deposit for Membenl • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFIOITES llV/llUIBLE • SllME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS •/Ill TAPES GUllRllNTEED JANUARY 31. 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 3 State Bill Was Authored by Montrose Businessowners New Law Upgrades Massage Practices in Texas By Pete Diamond Montrose Voice Staff Reporter You've had a long, stressful day at work, and even though it's Friday, you stil1 can't seem to relax and get your mind off the day's toils. Wouldn't a massage be a great way to unwind and think about more plea­sant thoughts like how you're going to spend your weekend? A quick glance through telephone book listings under "massage'' reveals an unus­ual variety of offerings, fr&m "escort servi­ces" to "modeling studios" and "secretary services." How do you find a legitimate massage service amongst these numerous listings? Thanks to a new state law requiring massage practitioners to be registered with the Texas Board of Health, that pro­cess has gotten much easier. The law­House Bill 2012-regulates massage therapists and massage establishments. It also requires all massage therapists to be registered with the state by Jan. I, 1986. Under the law, only persons who are regis­tered as massage therapists may use the montrose VOICE MONTROSE. TEXAS Popu .. lloo (ffl t'Ol8!:.i J.2 • ..100 Cenavt 1r.ett 401 01. 401 02. 402 01 402 02. 405 02. 403 end 404 01 Zip COd• rroughty' 71006, 17019 (portoon). 77098 Boundl<I (r0U9hlyl ~d Of (wlttll. Allen P9<11.way fN>rthJ. Mam St (Hsi}. US 59 rsouth) Ufltudt 1M<WtrOH Blvd •I Wfft"-'"* Rd l 29"44'13 N Long•tucle 95•275(Yw Al11tllde 40' ELECTED OFFIC•ALS FOR MONTROSE George Oruniu. HOU1t011 C•ly COi.inc I (dist Cl SIOIB•gby.f113!122-.5ill33 El f r.nco LH, Hal"" Gounty Comm1nioner (pct H IOOIPr•tt00.(113!211-3111 W11lhtr R_..ktn. Con.IDlfl IJICI 11 .101 $An JKinto, r7f3} 211·.'iXIO Dtibt• O.,,burg. t., ... HOl,IM ol Aepr-nl•l•v• d•tl 1371 191 I.SW f..,y 1713) 5ZO.f068 Craig Wutungton. Tex .. Senet11 !dist 13) 23'3C•rol1ne 1713Jtt5j-4343 M•tltey Lelolnd. US Hool.I"' ol Flep•-tat.ves (liist 13) 1919$m1111•001113)131J.l.J39 The Newspaper of Montrose Estabhshed 1980 OUR 275th ISSUE. JAN 31, 1986 Published every Friday Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 01STRIBUTION 11 ~ copies .., .. kty In Houlton ltuouoh 140 ma,or d"lribu1ion poiNs tn ,,,. MontlOH. lh• V•U•g•. lhe HelgMI esf1mated ~··on r.tt• l1etor 2 8 HI me1.a r•.O•tJhlp ,2. 200 wHlr/y ~O copies wMltty elsP-where •t1mat«1,,.u-onrat•l•ttor25 •tr•m"•d readerahip 125 wHlrly TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (GUARANTEED! 11.550 top1&1 wNkly 10111 Hllm•l•d rHd•,,hlp 31.32!> WHlrly Contents copyright 1986 Office hours 10am-5:30pm Henry McClurg oubl11h9r·e<t•KH Linda Wychem•"-s1'"g w1 '"' Connie WoOds.n ..... ~ Pete 01amonQ-news David RoumlOlt prodvctiOn Scon Cutsinger. 8111 o·Rourk&'"'"'••s Steve Warren n.tt1011-' to ruporid8nt ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT H~ton (713) 529-8490 EISf>Where TelfllS 1800) 22~1537 EKT 995220 Elsewhere US 1900) 225--0227 EXT 995220 "erry Mulholl1nd.edqff11mg dJ1.ctor Rick H11Lo'.cco..m1 ••KUfN• FolJfldlng .v .. mb•~ Greater MOt>!tOM Bv1me11 Gu Id. G11y •!Wt Lnbllfl PrtH Astoelet )fl N11 ... 1 g,,.,~., Nflwl OM. Pac•l•t News Servoe• Syl'!d1cl/ad F .. /ure Sarv•cH & Wflt•rs Br"n McN41.lgh1 Un1~1e1 P1e11 Syndicate, N1>W1 Amenc:• Syn<ii< .at<• POS'TMASTER Send eddreu .-.on-r11ont to 408 Avondale. Hotrtto TX 77006·'J021 Sutncripl '" ,.,,. S SH/ed en~/Ope $49 pet' yNr 152 tnuetJ S29oersu month1(2e11SU .. ) orS 2SperwlMlk~teu 1Nn 26 llJltll Betit Ill~ $2 00 MCh N•tlOIYr ·~ s1r10 r•p1.senr1tw. .loft D1Sabato R•v~ll ~erlilMing tee &th A,,.,..ue Nt-• von. •0011 12•21 2•2 6813 Ain.rtiam11 dead • Wednnd-r lOp"'ll '°' llSue '"•IHHd fnd•y ...-.nino Notrt:9 to «lvetllfe" L-x:el ed¥'9rtls1og fl\91C~ Seven-A w.1.1.e trec:bv•Oct 12 984 endEigtll·Aw ')eettect1¥9 an 3 word "massage" to describe their services in advertising. Bob and Maxine Petteway, owners of Montrose-based SOMA Theraputic Mas­sage, worked for 10 years writing the bill and pushing for its passage. They feel their efforts have upgraded massage ther­apy and set in motion further legitimation of the massage industry. "It's about time that massage waa brought out of the bedroom and into the therapy room where it belongs," Maxine says. "It's time we separated sex and the-­raputic massage." The Petteways believe that as Ameri­cans have become more aware of the importance of good nutrition and what is going on inside bodies, they have also become more concerned about better body maintenance. Medical researchers have shown massage to be beneficial to a per­son's circulatory, muscular and digestive systems. "We do not intrude into a physical thera­pist's domain," Maxine says. "We see peo­ple who are in good condition, but may be under a lot of stress or athletes or weight­lifters who may have problems of minor soreness." The Petteways say more and more peo­ple are becoming aware of the benefits massage can provide. The new Jaw will likely increase the visibility of theraputic massage and separate it from the "mas­sage" practiced by massage parlors and escort services. According to Maxine, the law also upgrades the educational requirements a person must have before they can register as a massage therapist with the state. Applicants must now complete a 25(}.bout massage therapy course before they can be accredited by the state. Students are required to take 125 hours of Swedish mas· sage therapy techniques as well as courseE in anatomy, physiology, health and hygiene and business practices and pn> fessional ethics. Prior to enactment of the state law, al l "massage establishments" in Houston were regulated by the city health depart ment, which licensed businesses rathei than individual practitioners. Maxim says the regulations were often enforceC by members of the city vice squad. "It waE evident we needed better laws and govern ing of the massage industry," she says. Over the past two years, the number of businesses advertising massage services in telephone directories has dropped to 33, a decrease of almost50 percent. After Jan­uary 1, many more of these businesses were forced to close. Bob explained, how­ever, that there are actually as many as 200 to 300 legitimate massage therapists MW\Wlillf STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON -FRI 8.30AM-S PM SAME DAY APPOINTMU>Tr MON , WED • FRI EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 ELIA BLVD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 IN TiiE HEIGHTS practicing in Houston. In addition to setting educational guid~ lines, the law will provide greater regula­tion for massage therapy in the future and establish it as a recognized profession. Although the law has been in effect for a short time, Bob says "Our business has increased and people seem to have a better attitude about massage. They feel more comfortable with it." The Petteways say they have also been receiving more calls for legitimate mas­sages. This is much changed from a time when for every 35 to 40 calls they received, only one was for a legitimate massage. The new law has had a different affect on other people such as Bill O'Rourke and Randy Horan, who have not yet been offi­cially registered with the state. While they may sti11 give massages, O'Rourke and Horan cannot use the word "massage" in their advertising until the state recognizes them as massage therapists. Nevertheless, both O'Rourke and Horan agree the new law is a good one that will be beneficial to the future of the massage industry. "Escort services and modeling studios have been asRociated with mas­sage for too long," Horan says. "But the state law will help. It's a step in the right direction and it creates some uniformity for massage therapists throughout the state." 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31, 1986 :------------. c3fn ~emorimn CHARLES ALLEN WYATT Fundraiser Will Kick Off '86 Political Season s10°0 : In memory of Charles Allen Wyatt. March 18. 1948-January 23. 1986 We knew a quiet man who cared: A man with an easy smile and knowing eyes We knew a simple man who loved; ready to listen or cry or to hold a friend close We knew a pnvate man who shpped away as he lived .• caring for those he loved far more than himself Your fnends will miss you. Allen You are loved and admired and we thank you for the lessons you taught us by example Good­bye. dear friend A memorial service will be held for Allen on Sunday, February 2 at 2617 Yupan at Calt­fornra at 11:00 a.m, A champagne toast at the Ripcord follows All his friends are welcome The Republican and Democratic commit­tees of the Houston Gay Political Caucus will sponsor a fundraiser on Monday, Feb. 3, 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Eaglecrestlnn, 104 Avondale. ThiR f'Vtnt will kickoff the 1986 political KPFI' Declares Fundraiser a Success By Connie Woods M1Jntrose \lo1ce Staff Reportt'r Exceeding it.B $k6,000 goal, Subscriptions Chairperson Sonja McMorris considers the KPF'T Winterthon fundraiser a suc­ce" sful effort. "We received pledges of $87,366 by the end of the two-week event," McMorris said. She pointed out that $50,000 waH pledged during the first week During the eight days of special pro· grammrng, she said willing volunteers donated their time to the fundraiser with eeveral businesses donating food for the volunteers. She also pointed out that the winter fun draiser far exceeded the one held in the fall of 191'5 when only 50% of the goal was reached through pledges. For people who pledged donations dur ing the recent drive but have failed to send their pledges, McMorris said second reminders will be sent soon. Donations from the fundraisers are used for the public station's operational expemoes including the cost of the tower and programming l\ 1 ~ (:l:~:~~~::.:~::i: .ti 1·1· •Remodeling • Tiie/Masonry •Sheetrock/Painting •Carpet I •Plum bing/Electrical •Cabinets " I I •Foundations Repaired •Decks/Hot Tubs •Tree & Trash Removed •Room Additions •Insulation •Concrete No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Olglhll Pager 891-4053 "/ sea.qon. Feb. 3 is the last day of candidate filing for the primary elections. According to Dale Beverly, GPC secre­tary, "The proceeds from the benefit go to increase the involvement of lesbians and gays in primary and district conven· tions." The two political party committees of GPC will be jointly holding meetings in 23 Harris County election precincts during March and April. The proceeds of this fundraiser will hf. used for that project. A $l5 donation, payable at the door, is requeRted. More information is available by calling the GPC at 521-1000. 11 02 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON [7131 522-3332 NEW DINNER SPECIALS Starting 5pm-til IMON.-FRIJ Open 24 Hours, 7 Days a Week For the finest dining in Montrose Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner I off i I CLIP THIS AD and attach it to 1 1 I your next order for S 10.00 off 1 any of the following items: • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms • 2-Color Printing •Flyers • Contracts • Menus • Resumes • Envelopes •Announcements • Invitations • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet Copying• Invoices SPEEDY PRINTING SERVICE OF TE>t'AS fast. Reliable Servtee. Exce-llent Qualrty, Low Cost 5400 BEUAIRE BLVD. CCWl\lenJent Souttwest locatK>n CAll 667-7417 PICK UP AND DELIVERY MEMBER GREATER MONTROSE BUSINESS GUILD. GRE.A TER BEMIRE CHM-1BER OF COMMERCE _:~~_~~_~~s_=.,_,~_:~1_'= _J1 OPENING SOON! 608 WESTHEIMER Across from Jim's Gym We will be featuring your favorite entertainers! Everyday drink specials and Beer Bust on Sundays l<eep Watching for Grand Opening! JANUARY 31. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 5 Local Attorney Protests 'Lack of Constitutionality' in Health Card Issue By Pete Diamond Montros~ Vmcr Staff Reportn In the final day of testimony before a City Council committee debating the merits of health cards aa a means of stopping AIDS, a civil rights attorney denounced the prop­osal as "arbitrary and capricious and not related to its stated objective." Testifying at the Jan. 23hearingon the health card issue, Houston attorney Louise Gilmore said although the pro­posed ordinance "may be constitutional on its f BC{': be<-ause it would promote public health." there is a lackof ron:-;titutionality in the operation of the ordinance. Gilmore explained that under Texas Civil ~:itatute Article 4476-10, cities and employers have the right to issue health cards to insure that employees are "free of any transmiRsable condition of any dis· ease or local infection commonly trans­mitted through handling of food or drink." In 1939, when it was thought that food handlerR could transmit comunicable dis· eases, the Texas legislature asked the attorney general for an opinion on the con· stitutionnlity of Article4476-10, the health ct•rtificnte statute. Given the medical knowledge o( the timf", the attorney gen· era] found the law constitutional hoth in its face and in its operation. Howevf'r. thr legality of instating such an ordinance today to control the spread of AIDS would have to be qu('stioned, occording to Gilmore. In reference to Aru de 4476-10, it is known with almost com· plete certainty that the HTLV·lll LAV virus is not "commonly transmitted through handling of food or drink." Based on this, Gilmore tiay~ the use of health <'ard~ is totallv unrelated to AIDS. She addR, "Tht.>re is ~o medical or logical connection between the public's desire to limit the spread of AIDS and health cards." Furthermore, Gilmore said the ordi­nance, as it stands, does not bear a direct or rational relationship to its objective of controll ing the spread of AIDS. Aside from their questioned accuracy, the HTLV-111 and other AIDS antibody tests are only good for the day they are given. Health cards, issued on the basis of thm1e tei;:t results. would not take into account the possibility of a ·•certified" worker con tracting the disease at a later date. Gilmore also believeA that if passed, the health card ordinance would be intrusive. She feels it would result in the violation of individuals' fundamental rights, from per· sonal and property right.ti to thoee of pri· vacy. When obtaining a job depends on tht" results ofa medical test, it becomes an economic isame as well as a pen;on's right to employment. Gilmore added that for intrav<'nous drug users, the issue of self~ incrimination and Fifth Ammendment rights also arises. An ordinanc<' such as the one under con· sideration by the Houston City Council, aimed at controlling or stopping the sprt'ad of AIDS from individuals in high riE>k groups or those in the food handling business for ex11mple, would have a 'MWt't·pin~ .. effect. Gilmore sayi-;. "It would affect everyone. not JUSt the gay communily," she says. "It's not the w<'ighmg of one group against another. It would affect evervone eventuallv There should not he anYthing to preve;..t a p .. son from admitting they nee-d medical attention and being able to get it." Gilmore believes there are better, 1efls intrusive and more effective means of con­trolling AIDS than issuing health cards. "There must be no terror attached and vie-tims of the disease must not be threa­tened," she said. lm;tead. "progressive and positive" measures for dealing with AIDS must be pursued. Nate Sebastian, executive director of KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston. also spoke at last week's hearing, further stressing the importance of education, and calling it "the best defense against AIDS." He requested that the city "commit (their) resources to an educational cam­paign." A third speaker. Sul Robs, regiona1 director of day care licensing for the Texas Department of Human Services, did not endorse the health card propo!">al. Ross explained that his office is resporu;ible for issuing operational standards for day care centers within the state. •·we would not require a person with AIDS to be excluded from a day care center unless he or ~he also had an air-borne dis­ease." He added. however, that the deci· sion to dismiss a day care center employee with AIDS ultimately rests with each cen· ter . Ross ali;:o said that children who have AIDS •hould not be barred from attending a day care center, although a restrictive enVU"Onment may be necessary for ~ome children, Ruch as those who have a ten· denc-y to bite or are unable to control their body fluid•. ••••••••••••••••• • TAFT Al_TTOMOTIVE • 1-1-11 'l'. \F"l', 5::.?::.?-::.?1!)() • FEBRUARY SPECIALS • • * Oil Change $1995 • T * A/C Check & Charge $1995 T * Check Cooling System $2795 'f $10 off on repairs. (Doesnot 1nc1udespec101s ) 'f • D o. -~E~~~~:~;p~~'rsY! • M AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION T ELECTRONIC TUNEUP AIR CONDITIONING • ••••••••••••••••• 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31, 1986 Reward Offered for Info in Pete St. George Killing Crune Stoppers offers reu·ard for mformatum. on the killinR of Pete St. George The BeHaire Police Department and Crime Stoppers are offering a $1000 reward for information leading to the arrest of the person that killed former Montrose restaurant owner Pete St. George. Montrose Symphonic Band Elects Board From a press releaae The Montrose Symphonic Band elected its board of directors at its regular meeting on Tuesday. Jan. 21. The new board coneiste of Debbie Holmes, chairman: Steve Darby. vice chairman: David Wright. secretary: Rufus Chaney. treasurer; Doug Watson. I H representative, and David Christianson. artistic director The band also announced plans for a bake sale to be held Feb 1 and 2 at three Jocations-JR'a, the Barn. and on '1"he Curve" at 1403 Westhtimer. Funds will be used for the band lo play at the Gay Games in San Francisco in August. For more information call 527-9454 GPC Kicking Off Drive for Voters From a press relerue The Houston Gny Political Caucus will kick off 1ts 1986 voter registration drive at the Feb. 5 meeting. An official from the Harris County Registrar's office will be deputizing volunteer voter registrars. The caucus oleo plans to register voters at Montrose--area nightspots during the post-Mardi Gras weekend, Feb. 14 and 15. Anyone interested in assisting in the drive should call the GPC office, 521·1000. The Feb. 5 meeting begins at 7:30 p.m. at the Dignity Center 3217 Fannin. He we:-; found dead in his Bellaire home Dec. 27. His brown 1971 Pontiac LeMans was found at the corner of Holman and Mosley in front of the Holman apart­ments. According to a Bellaire Police Dept. statement, "It is possible that the person who killed Pete St. George was injured and is living in the area. St. George was known to frequent the Dot Shop Cafe(1920 Main) and would make a date with unknown white males where they would later go to St. George's residence~ ' St. George formerly owned the Brasserie restaurants in Montrose. Police are uking that "anyone who knows anyone that has been robbed or injurt'd after making a date ¥tith an unknown person" to contact Del. Jim Har ris or Officer D.l. Oglesby at 668-0487 or Crime Stoppers, 2'l2-8477. Phy/Jia Frye is the neu president of the GrC'ater .\font rose Business Guild tConnlP Woods photo) Business Guild Elects Officers The Greater Montrose Business Guild elected officers for 1986 at their regulaar meeting held .Jan 29. Phyllis Frye will serve as president of the guild, assisted by Bill Yon, vice presi· dent. Sandy Devolve is secretary Board members are Clark Moore, .John Curcio, Bob Bagot, Thom Rourke, Carl Bohannon, Bruce Herman and Joe Porro. Special service awards were preHented to past pre11oident~ Thom Rourke and Lyt Harris. The GreatPr Montrose Business Guild was founded in 1982 as a "'chamber of com· merce" type orgamzation to represent the business intereets of the Montrose. 808 Lovett ~\..-~~ 521-1015 i-----~~ CAf~ ~...__------4 ~ Boulevard Big Bang ~ $1.99 Breakfast - Monday-Friday ..:::iii:. 2 Eggs, Bacon or Sausage and 2 Pancakes Complimentary Coffee with any regular breakfast before 9am r---------------. Mon.·Thurs. with coupon I I Buy One Blackboard Special at the I I regular price and get one for $1 I I _ (Evenings Only) ___ _, ·} I , I I' Fri. Feb. 7 8pm New Orleans Jazz Partv Sat. Feb. 8, Co1tume I/all, Crowning oF /(i!'a":,ueen at Midnlte ALL-CITY BARTENDERS DRAG SHOW Sunday, Feb.2nd, 8pm Benefitting our friends of KS/AIDS Foundation and FOCUSS 2303 Richmond 522·7616 JANUARY 31. 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 7 GPC President Gears Up for New Year By Connie Woods Montrose Voice Staff Reporter Looking forward to her first term as presi­dent of the Houston Gay Political Caucus, Annise Parker is ready to get down to busi­ness. Citing an important task at hand, Parker said the caucus must begin to gear up for the upcoming elections, especially the judicial elections. "If candidates don't come to us for an endorsement, we have to look at the situa­tion closely," said the 29-year·old presi­dent. She considers it important to get people involved in the election process. Parker pointed out that it is important to build the membership of the organization. "It's not enough to be registered to vote; it's not enough to be on the GPC mailing list. "The next step," she said, "is getting other people registered and educating them on the candidates and issues" through the caucus membership. She a lso emphasized that the GPC is a political organization and should not "pretend to be anything else." This impor· tent aspect of the caucus means electing "progressive, unbiased officials who are active advocates of civil rights." The growth of membership in the GPC is of utmost importance to the organization, according to Parker. "Every member of the caucus has a vote; each has a voice in the organization,'' she said. MERIDIEN LEASING INC. 325 528' 73Si '86 BMW 309/mo 395/mo 569/mo __'8 .6 CADILLAC OeVille 329/mo __ '_86 ~AZDA 209/mo 178/mo '86 MERCEDES BENZ 190E lOOE 560Sl l49/mo 498/mo nslmo ~ P()RSCHE 944 398/mo 944 Turbo 498/mo '86 TOYOTA C•mry ---- 1m;;; Celiu 185/mo CALL LEE BORBA (713) 975-1986 '86 HONDA Accord P~lulh 159/mo 17'9/mo '86 JAGUAR KJ& 569/mo '86 BUICK J!!lll&. -!!ill =-. -=·- .!tit.' NO OOWN PAYMlNT • LOWfR MONTHLY PAl"MlNT • CA)H FOR YOUR TRADf Not only do the members have a voice on political issues and endorsements, they also have an opportunity to service in the education of the community through the mailing list and registering voters. "The primary tool of the GPC in an elec­tion is the mailing list." she explained. "There is no reason why every gay person in Houston is not on the mailing list." Parker added. "It is a confidential list." By being on the mailing list, people receive information about the canclidates in an election as well as information on issues whether or not they are members of the GPC. In addition to educating the community through the mailings, Parker pointed out that registering other voters is also impor- Annise Parker tanL "Not enough gays realize how impor· tant it is to vote. There have been elections where 13 votes made a difference in the outcome of the election," she emphasized. Addressing the process of registering voters, Parker said there are many jobs to be done in the organization. "It takes a lot of people to get these jobs done like block walking to encourage registration of voters as well as presenting information and fundraisers." Another goal of the new president is the strengthening of the caucus committees. She said she feels an important responsi· bility of the Democratic and Republican committees is to get caucus members into the precinct workings. Expanding her comments on the com· mittee functions, she pointed out that each committee elects itb own chairperson and holds fundraisers. "Party candidates and issues should be the responsibility of the committees. When time to endorse (candi­dates), we <GPC) are blind to party identifi· cation." Emphasizing that the caucus is a non· partisan organization-neither Demo· cratic nor Republican-endorsements are based on the vote of the caucus member· ship. "We have a good organization." she said ... What I would like to see is stronger fundraising, tougher budgeting and accounting process, and stronger media relations with all the media " Citing some oftheissues of the past year in,,·olvlntt the c-aucus, the Rice Univeuity graduate said. '1'he community deserves more than to have us always in a crisis situation. 'The GPC has betn fin) a defensive pos· ture this year. The only way out of adefen· sive posture is to go on the offense." Another goal the newly-elected pres1· dent has for theGPC is make the meetings more interesting. She said that an organ· ized, precise agenda and meetingwould be more interesting and fa.-;ter while still covering the necessary business. In addition, she would like to see speak· ers from other organizations be included in the programs to inform the caucus what other organizations are doing. For longer programs she believes spe­cial guest speakers from the general popu­lation would be interesting. From within the cauC'Us, Parker encour· ages the Speakers Bureau to address more groups and organization~ within the city In clarifying where the caucus is con· t"emmg AIDS, Parker said, "AIDS is a health issue. It is made into a political 1s..que by our homuphobic (government) bodies. We have people. individuals, the mayors task force and other groups who shouJd be in the forefront 8pt>aking about AID$. ''The caucus will be involved 'in dealing wtth government bod.Jes like the city and state health departments. I will do what 18 necessary for me to do as the pttfo'ident ("f tht> CBUC'US," she pledged_ Parker is no stranger to the workings of the GPC' The five-year member of the cau­cus has ~erved as board chairman for three years under three pre!">idents. In addition, she has experience in several areBA of caucus busin~ including media spokesperson, speakers bureau represen· tative, finanet:~. bvlawi:; and others. She is currently- serving as president of the Houston Women·s Softball l.A"ague, board member of the Lesbian/ Gay Advo­cateA, board member of LeAbian Gay Dt>mocraU. of Texas and member of the National Gay Task Fotte and !\OW VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Renl th•I tlOUN or •partment through • Montrose Voice Ctassihed Call ~8-490 ~7!~~~rub·.'c!:rr~::e~~~:b.~ or Visa 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31. 1986 Montrose Live Playhouse Plot: 'Communist Takeover Threatens Artists' By Bill O'Rourke Montroae Voice Theater Cr,tic The Great Seba8tian~ fCountry Play· house) 18 a thriller, brimming over with bravura and good comedy The show was originally written for a husband and wife team. Alfred Lunt and Lynne Fontane~ It is being performed here by another husband and .,.,.-jfe team, Mar· tin and Loia f"!.r-ck. They are nothing short of magnificet"t I knew from the first sentence out of Mart.n's mouth that I was in for a real treaL His deep mellifluous voice nngs Wlth the golden, pear-shaped tones of the honey tongued orator This 18 one of thee hallmarks of a weL'. trained, seasoned stage actor. LolB is equally wonderful She has a superb grBBp of this absolutely realized theater person with her preoccupations with money, food and her first husband. The play begins with the two of them working directly with the audience. They offered astounding feats of mind reading. If I was not completely taken in by it, it's only because I was working double time trying to figure out the trick Back in their dressing room. they explain the trick as they start arguing about some tricks that didn't work. Their love for each other is obvious, but she keeps tbrowmg her first husband up at him. Wlll he ever be able to make her respect him as much as the other.., Unfortunately for both of them. there has been an electron. Although he was born here in Prague, she is a cockney and London is their home base now. They don't pay much attention to local politics and don't understand it. The nervous stage manager (well played by Steve Powell) cannot make them understand that they are putting themselves in danger. The Communist.Fl are in power now. They convince party member General Zandek that their powers are genuine. (Richard Zamecki'a acting is improving dramatically. Thie g(neral is the best work I've seen him do.) He forceR them to come up to his villa to put on a free mid-night show While they are there, the general is deposed in a coup by his aide. (Ron Jones iA a fittingly suave, usually nicely under­stated menace.) And theSebastians admit to having had lunch with a pawerful friend. who this evening officially "com m1ts suicide." They cannot believe that and will not he to substantiate it. Tht>y must either escape tomght or go to prison The large, strong support ng cast includes standouts Mark Stephenson and Ann Berry and a flnc:k of neophytes mek· ing very auspicious debuts. Director Bon· me McFerreri 18 to be congratulated on making sure this H ~ward Lindsay and Russel Crouse play is an evening wer worth attending. This is the last weekend for Pasties at Theater Southwest. Due to the scheduling of their next play. the theater was only able to add one performance. a matinee this Sunday. Even it is probably sold out by the time you read this. I wouldn't feel too sorry about that if I were you. Eddie Cope and Joe McHale wrote this comedic murder mystery set in a burleMque school. Then McHale directed it. That turned out to be a mistake. Another direc­tor might have required them to beef up the plot and might have pulled this tal~ ented cast mto the polished, glitzy product this script requires. The original songs are quite nice, but when will everyone learn that uptempo musical comedy songs simply do not work when sung unacccmpanied? There was one song done- thnt way this time and I tuned it out. Unfortunately, I think it may ha ... ·e contained some vital dues to the solution of the myetery. Most of the other clues were very well planted, but there was no way I could have figured an integral part of the motive That's not playing fair. o Notes Something interesting 1& starting tomor­row at the Children·s Museum at Waugh and the Allen Parkway. Adult volunteers will be raising a log house for an imagi nary pioneer family. Then there will be a celebration: fiddle music, stenciling, wool carding and spinning, furniture making, square dancing and folk toy demonstra­tions. On Sunday, everyone will help stuff a mattress and the demonstrations will include quilting and making hinges with tools from the frontier period. If our hardy pioneer family can make a go of it, they'll be joined by a commercial center in June and a schoolhouse in September Also tomorrow. Stages, in the same bu "ding as the Children's Museum, will show readings of all thrN! oft he new plays 1:1 the competition associated with our Texas Playwrights Festival: Wunderlick ot 11, Tw1l111ht at 2, and Clint Easl1L'Ood, Seriously at 4. Francesca Primus, contri­buting editor of Entertainment New York magazine, will give an oral critique follow· ing each reading. The Museum of Fine Arts exhibition, The Ancient Art of the American Wood· land Indians, closes on March 9 You can still register for the Museum of Fine Arts SK run between 6:45 and 7:45 tomorrow morning at the museum, just before the race .. •. It looks like either the Alley or the Uni· versity of Houston (or both?) might com­mission a play from Edward Albee. For those of you tumingthe Alley into a dinner theater (and a very charming one it is. indeed), the current entree it; stuffed quail. ..• Jack Carter will not be in Guys and Dolls for TUTS The Performing Arts Sampler Series will sell you a card which will let you into one performance of each of these six groups: Delia Stewart Dance Co .• Pro Arte Musical Ensemble, Rit1ky BusinesH. Comedy Workshop, Main Street, and Chocolate Bayou (when they get a theater). The card is good for one full year and also entitles you to discounts at lead­ing area restaurants .. Don "t forget the Showtix booth in Tran· quihty Park where discount tickets are always available . Popular director William Burford will be starting three new class &e&l'iions at Main Street Theater this week: Acting Realism 213, Shakespeare for the Actor 2'4. and Voice and Movement for the Actor 215. 524-6706. '. The Band. Deborah Burrell. Sharon Brown, Arnetia Walker and Herbert L. Rawlings, Jr., m "Stepp1n' to the Bod Side" in o •cene from "Dreamgirl&." now playing at the MUJJic Hall Celebrate! There are as many Tallulah Bankhead !itnriet1 as there are Sophie Tucker stories. If you have never imagined her dN•p husky voice saying, "Then do you have two fives for a ten, darling?" you will have to c<·lt•brate Schubert's birthday today instead of hers. Pity. Other birthdays: Frankly, my dear, it's Clark Gable, I; early sexologist Havelock Ellis (I have always loved thatname.)and scholar of gay history Jonathan Kotz. and Jamee .Joyce, 2; Gertrude Stein, 3; (,Joyce> and Stein-The world's foremost purvey· ors of quality but difficult fiction); Metm Grief (to whose Gay Engagement CaJend· are I staod ever indebted I, 4; Adlai Strven­son (who knew how to make the l!.!'I'. work for us), 5; and Ramon Novarro(Latin lover of the movies who met a most bizarre death), 6. .. Pigeons in the grass. alal'is."-G. Stein. "So enjoy, anyway1"-B. O'Rourke o Openings Barnum (Stratford High School)-A wonderful, ragtime musical capturing the life of P.T. Barnum, the Prince of Humbug. Join the circus! Texas S•lect (Art League of Houston)­an invitational showing by 15 artists. Berlioz (Jones. I )-Tenor Glenn Siebert. ComisHiona conducting the Houston Sym­phony and the Houston Symphony Cho­rale. Narrated by Jeremy Huntl>rof All My Children. Balm m G<i•ad (Alley, 6)-Lanford (5th of July1 Wilson's first major ~uccess. Thf largest cast ever a88embled in the Alie\ Arena. A ~eedy all night coffee 8hop an~ its denizf'ns. The Miraculous Mandann (Jones, 6)­Houston Ballet's new piece by Ben Steven son on a double bill with its riotouAI\ funny Grand Tour. - tire >NtrHhole Savin~s up to 75 Yo off For Temporary Location Call 522-1089 GENERAL AUTO REPAIR TUNE-UPS OIL CHANGES BRAKES JANUARY 31, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 9 Neighborhood Longtime Club Owner Thinks of the Present By Connie Wood• Montrose Voice Staff Reporter "I know where I've been and where I am going . . ," the woman said in a serious, authoritative voice as she sat surrounded by various clowns and photographs as well as a host of pets. Marion Pantzer, a community night club owner and active participant in the activities of the community,doesn't mince wordH when she speaks of her past, her present and her dedication to business She definitely knows where she has been and doesn't particularly care to talk about it. She has nothing to hide; she simply doNn 't fttl that anyone would be interested in knowing. "That wee a long time ago, and no one cares to hear about that, ' she Raid after several questions. However, she is willing to tell a little about herself in rPferenre to how she came to Houston, eventually to be a pillar of the community The native of New York City was eta· tioned near Victoria, Texas, in 1942 where she remained for several years. Her trips to Houston during that time eventually lead her to the city where she became a social worker in protective services. "Back then they didn't call it human resources," she said with a chuckle. While working with the county as a fulltime caseworker, she also worked at the Desert Room. While still working as a caseworker, Marion opened a new club in 1973 on Con· verse Street, Just Marion and Lynn's. The club remained at the Converse location for more than a decade. When she did retire as a social worker, she devoted full time to her business. "I felt women needed a place to go," she said Marion Pantzer, ou.mer of Marion and Lynn's, is dedicated to providing Houston women with a special plar-e to xo (Conni.I.• Woods photo) concl'rning her decision to open the club. "Once I retired, this has been the rest of my life," she explained with a smile. In addition to offering women a place to go, she wanted to keep her employees work ing. l...istening to Marion talk about her club, there is no doubt she is a serious business· person. "You can't go into business with· out longevity in mind," she said when asked how her club has remained active while other bars open and close. She attributes part of her success in bus· iness to her concern for people, both patrons and employees. "People need to talk and someone needs to listen," she explained. "People go to bars out of loneliness or need-a little love or to meet people," she continued. "I try to instill in my bartend­ers' minds people come to talk and to have Jnd tfie Parrnts of Miss Pidaes Polanski and Nfaria '.Jingennore announce tfil' engagement and f ortlicoming marri.i.ge of tlicse two humanoids(???) Attire-Anything you fuve in your closet '3riday '3e6. l'-1 tfi at 7:00pm at Mary's Natur,\lly Reception and Bartender's Drag Sliow 9:00 ti/?? All Proceeds 6enefilting tfir McAdory House someone to hsten to them." She also encourages her employees to show patrons "they care." For example, she wants them to know what a person drinks and to recognize them when they come in. Another suggestion for her bar­tenders is to introduce new people to other people sitting at the bar to make them feel welcome. Although Marion encourages such busi­ness practic-es from her employees, she also pointed out that working at the bar "is not a playground (for employees). It's a job!" After realizing her lease on Converse would not be renewed last fall. iihe began looking for a new location. The search for the hright" placf' took several month~. She found a building on Richmond Avenue near Montrose end looked at its possibilities. She said she had a "good feel­ing" about the place. To provide the kind of club she wanted, Marion knew the building would require remodeling. The remodeling, done by women in business and volunteeri:., took about a month. After the Converse location closed with a celebration on Sept. 29, 1985, the rem<r deling project began. The new location for Just Marion and Lynn's held its opening celebration in November Marion speaks with pride about her new location. Not only has her business increased but "we have a nice group of younger women and many of our older women are back." She attributes the increase partially to the design of the club. "If women want to sit and talk, we have an area for them. If they want to play pool, they can do that, too. And if they want music, they can tum the music loud in another area," she explained. And anyone who has been to Just Mar­ion and Lynn's is familiar with the clown motif that has been associated with the decor. Marion was willing to give a little insight to her attraction to the clowns. 0 When I was a child, I wanted to go" away to the circus to be a clown." she explained. My grandmother knew people with Ringling Brothen;, She was able to realize her dream and goal. Marion became a circus clown where she had the opportunity to study under Emmett Kelly a clown she much admired. Although the circus y'ear!- are behind her, Marion is known to take out the CO!­tumes and makeup for special appearan· ces, especlally benefits or fundraisers . In reference to h ~ clown appearances, Marion related a story about a fundra1s­ing event several years ago when she and members of a c'ub raised money for Mu& cular Dystrophy. She said they delivered the money to a local radio station. When they told the announcer the money came from a gay club, "he almost dropped his micro­phone.' Her recollection of the event lead to the question of what changes Marion has seen in the community. One important change she noted was "women are now in a posi· lion to have the courage to speak up. I think they feel, if known to be lesbians, their jobs will be in jeopordy." However, she said she felt this position continues to change and attributes some of the changes to the younger group. "We've given a lot to the younger group, but we have learned from them," she explained. 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31, 1986 The Far Side by Gary Larson 1tl5 UN11/EASAL PfllESS SYNDICATE Edgar finds his purpose. Another case ot too many scientists and not enough hunchbacks. Beached whole surprise "Gee, that's a wonderful sensation. ... Early In the morning, you just woke up, you're tired, movln' kinda slow, and then that ooooold smell hits your nose blood In the water " Fortunes End of Month, End of Social Dry Spell for Gemini By Mark Orion For Fflday, Jan 31, 1986. through Thuraday, Feb 6, 1986 ARIES-Discretion is essential in all your dealings this week. Exercise res­traint in both words and action. People of importance will respond to your subtle actions. TAURUS-Your mental energies will turn to money matters. Use your natural financial savvy to lay plans for the future. At this time, setting more aside will have little effect on your entertainment budget GEMINI- The beginning of the new month ends a social dry spell. Get tuned up for the hectic Mardi Gras season. A phone call to someone you haven't been 1n touch with lately gets things rolling . CANCER- Now's the time to speak up Let those close to you know how you feel Your tight lips may cause you to lose oul on a special relationship. Be honest anc sincere in social circles but employ cau­tion when speaking up at work iEO- Countless times you've been warned about your argumentative nature. Now you've finally gotten the message. You find thatthe ability to com­promise yields more benefits than you ever imagined VIRGO- Work has been exceptionally demanding in past weeks. Now that the pressure is easing, regain your balance A weekend of leisure and recreation puts things back into perspective. LIBRA-Your number of acquaintan­ces has increased rapidly. Don't forget who your real friends are. A small, inti­mate gathering, to renew old ties, 1s in order for this weekend. SCORPIO- Romance and financial matters are closely related at this time. Follow your instincts but don't be too hasty with major purchases. Your roman­tic interest is attracted to you. not your financial status SAGITTARIUS- A minor health ail­ment is clearing up. You're ready to resume your full schedule. Don't overdo it. A health maintenance program will prevent a relapse. Good nutrition and exercise is a must for your fast-paced lifestyle. CAPRICORN- Thoughts of the upcoming Valentine's Day have you in a romantic mood Cupid is toying with you and a special someone. Don't rush into anything. Patience can turn what could be only a one night stand into something lasting AQUARIUS A business conflict resolves itself with little damage done. Avoid future problems by laying down the ground rules before entering into any agreements The resolution of business problems improves home life PISCES Your relat1onsh1p with co­workers is improving and so 1s the quality of your work. Your ability to get along 1s noticed by superiors. Don't hesitate when asked to attend a social event with some colleagues. Your vibrant personality will carry you through but watch what you sa.y. .. In Montrose, Nea-.:ly Eve-.:yone Reads the Voi'e JANUARY 31 1986 ' MONTROSE VOICE 11 Films 'Buddies' Explores Gay Friendship Geoff Edholm and David Schacter star m "Buddies" By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic It'a been quite a while since a gay-oriented film has hit Houston, so Buddies is quite a wekomt' sight. The film offers an insight­ful look at a man dying of AIDS, and at his assigned buddy who comforts him and learns to love him. The relationship changes both of their lives as they cry, argue, and laugh about everything from sex to lost loves. Buddies is a small but important film because it actually portrays gay men in a non-stereotypical way, Two men must deal with the tragedy of AIDS, much the way our community will have to respond to our dying members. This first dramatic film about AIDS will be playing at the River Oaks Feb. 5 and 6only, sodon'tmiss it. The second film this week iB Murphy's Romance, a cotton candy movie that gives us Sally Field as the fiesty, strong-willed woman (one more time). James Garner is on hand in the Cary Grant roleofthe older man in love with younger Sally. Throw in a no good ex-husband and a cute kid, and we have the elements for another sweet down-on-the-farm drama. o Buddies With every aspect of the media turning its attention to the AIDS disease, it was inev· itable that feature films would start to deal with the subject. Broadway has The Nor mal Heart and As Is. Television had "An Early Frost." And now there is the first dramatic motion picture called Buddies. It is perhaps better that this film is a low-budget, independent feature. Think· ing back to big budget gay efforts like Making Loue or Partners makes one cringe at the thought of a major studio production about something like AIDS. Instead, direct.or Arthur Bressnn,Jr., pres· ents us with a stark, two-character rela­tionohip that cuts right to the heart of the matt.er. Buddies is a very simple film on almost every level, concentrating on the growing friendship between two gay men. One is Robert Willow, a bedridden AIDS patient dealing with the fears of an unknown dis­ease. His assigned "buddy" is Daniel Ben· nett, who doesn't realize the emotional strain he is going to put himself through. When the two first meet, the situation is strained because they are very different. Robert is politically outspoken, very for­ward, and often demanding. David, on the other hand, is shy and inward. He tells his lover at home that Robert is "not exactly what he thought an AIDS victim would be like." Slowly, the two men grow to love and respect. each other through daily visits. The dhtrussions become franker and more personal as Robert and David lower their barriers of fear and doubt. They watrh erotic movies together, argue about polit­ics, and share thoughts on the men they have loved in their lives. In a very tender and moving way,Bu& dies makes a quiet statement about how the gay community must react to a crisis. Beyond the research, the funding, and the political aspects, there is something much more important-care and understand· ing. David end Robert's relationship is a shining example of how we can all really give of ourselves. Of course, dealing with AIDS victims has many drawbacks, too. David must emotionally deal with the fact that Robert will die. It's difficult to commit yourself to become close to someone you know will slip away soon. Yet, in theend we may all be better persons as we deal closely with the effects of AIDS and even death. Arthur Bressan, Jr. is a director/ wri ~ ter I producer who felt like the time was right to deal calmly with the hysteria and prejudice sweeping the country. Filmed in nine days after five weeks rehearsal, most of the film takes place in a stark, white hospital room. While there are moments of happiness and pleBBure, the overall mood of the film is serious and oft.en depressing. I'm sure many people will leave Buddies saying that it sure was a downer. Yet, you need to think back through the mm and ask yourself what it means for you. Will you abandon your friends who have AIDS, or neglect to become a volunteer because you "just couldn't handle it?" Jn the end, the only people who ere going to really get. us through this crisis are the brothers and sisters who are about the community and its people. Buddies shows us how our meager efforts can bring happiness to thoRewhohavelosthope. It's time for the gay community to stop whin-ing about what others aren't doing and pitch in with love and understanding themselves. Buddies will be shown at the River Oaks Theater on Feb. 5 and 6 1Wedn .. day and Thursday) at 5:45, 7:30 and 9:15. o Murphy's Romance Director Martin Ritt hu always special­ized in small, character-oriented films like Sounder, Norma Rae. and Crms Creek. His newe'"t feature, Murphy's Romance, follows a similar pattern. concentrating on two small town people who fall in love very gradually. Ritt's style is slow and old-fashioned in the strictest sense, concentrating less on story end more on solid character develoi>­ment. The heroine is Emma Moriarty (Sally Field), a fiesty, divorced mother who is trying to begin a new life for her· self. Her success on an Arizona ranch as a horse trainer will come only through the hard work of her and her son. Unexpectantly, a man steps into her life who is genuinely appealing. The widowed town pharmacist Murphy Jones (James Garner) becomes a helpful friend, but we can see a romance blooming. Their friend· ship is cautious, especially since he is old enough to be her father Of course, the ol' ex-husband shows up on Emma's doorstep one day and wants to light the fire again. Bobby Jack is the lazy but cute type who never has a job or money. Emma lets him stay, but surpris­ingly doesn't give into his advances. With Murphy hanging around the ranch a lot (and staying for supper}, a hos­pitable menage a'trois develops with Emma and Bobby Jack. This is the moot enjoyable part of the film, watching Emma trying to decide what to do with these men. Her ex-husband is irresistable but basically a child who won't grow up. He gets along great with his son, but she realizes that he is not good for either one of them. Murphy uses tht subtle approach, sort of "courting" her without her realizing it. In fact, when Murphy announces his love for Emma near the end of the movie, she set>ms surprIBed. For a movie named.t\fur· phy's Romanre, the romance for Murphy is sure saved until the very end. The beot way to de•cribe this film is "cute."' The jokes are "polite," the charac· ters are besicaJly likeable, and we know exactly what is going to happen. Every· thing is so nice and in place that we kind of go with the flow, laughing and smiling at even the corniest jokes. As for Sally Field, I like her at the start of the film when she really acts like a tough ranch lady. Later on, her barriers seem to break down fast. and her charac­ter turned softer. Still, Sally is playing her Places in the Heart role again and she needs to move on to something else. It's great to see James Garner on the screen, although he basically plays James Gamer. Brian Kerwin does a great job as Bobby Jack, an unlikable guy who tries to make a comeback. Emma's son Jake is portrayed well by Corey Haim, a charm­ing 13-year-old seen recently in First Born and Silver Bullet. I had my doubts that a film like this could do well in today's market, but the teens at a sneak preview loved it. Maybe moviegoers are ready for more simple filmo that don't boggle the mind with vio­lence and speciaJ effects. Murphy's Rom· ance ia not a "great" film at all, but as light entertainment it goes down pretty good. In Montrose, Nea·rJy Everyone Reads the Voile • WINTER SCHEDULE MONDAYS HAT NITE 'HAPPY HOUR PRICES ALL NIGHT TUESDAYS FREE C&.W DANCE LESSONS WEDNESDAYS MARGARITAVILLE "DYNASlY," FREE NACHOS MARGARITAS. $1.50 all nite THURSDAYS HALF PRICE NITE ALL DRINKS 1/2 PRICE 8:(X}CLOSING FRIDAYS• SATURDAYS •SUNDAYS DANCE TO LMBAND BRAZOS RMRBAND D.J. DAVID ROYAL1Y SUNDAYS STEAK NIGHT MOVES TO SUNDAY 5:00 pm STEAK. ALL FIXINGS, $400 CHECK OUT OUR NEW QUIET BAA./ CLUBROOM OPEN WEEKENDS WATCH FOR LET US ENTERTAIN YOU SUNDAY FINALE! SHOWTIME 2:00. FEB. 16 ~~ ~·~ ,;;1 ttGBG~ BRAZOS RMR BO TI OM 2400 BRAZOS 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31, 1986 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz By Salvatore ~. lJidato, Ph.D. N~w• America Syndicole S~cial to Montro8' Voiee It'• estimated that there are 5. 75 mil hon Americans who are alcoholics and another 5.75 mil1ion who are problem drinkers. The U.S Department of Health and Human Services reported in 1981 that about half of all patients in hospitals have aloohol-related disorders. Many illnesses like diabetes. high blood pressure and stomach ulcers are insidious, and alcoholism, too, can occur gradually. If you've noticed changes in your drink· ing patterns lately, you might be slipping into a drinking problem and not be aware of iL The quiz ahead highlights a few of the early warning signs of alcohol depen~ Can You Spot the Signs of 'Creeping Alcoholism?' dency. To find out if you might have a problem brewing, answer each item ''yes" or .. no." then read on for answers. Do you. l. Take a drink before going to a party where you know liquor will be served'' 2. Drink when blue? 3. Take a drink before a strei-;sful event? 4. Drink alone? 5. Drink more than your friends do? 6. Drink in the morning before going to work or school? 7. Drink to steady your nerves? 8. Gulp your drinks? 9. Feel the necessity of having drinks at certain times, i.e .• before lunch, dinner, after work? 10. Ever drink to the point of feeling ill? o Explanation No nation is more health-conscious than America and excessive use of alcohol is our most prevalent health concern. Authorities at the Menninger Foundation (for psychiatry), Topeka, Kan .• believe that most alcoholics have undiagnosed mental disturbances. These, of cou~e. profoundly affect manv others in the victim's family circle. AB a·n example of the price to be paid in dollars alone, to say nothing of its toll in human suffering, alcoholit1m costs the American economy some$40billion annu· ally. Imbibing too much is a worldwide dilemma and not restricted only to the U.S. In 1976, both France and Russia declared that alcoholism is their No. I public health problem. The gra:-1sroots organization MADD (Mothers Against Drunk Driving) has probably done more to publicize the mis­use of alcohol, within the few years of its existence, than any other group. Its cam· paigns are aimed primarily at teenagers who drink and drive. To younger persons, liquor is far and away the main substance addiction, exceeding that of tobacco and drugs. Indeed, the age group from 17 to 25 con­sumes proportionately far more cigarettes, liquor and drugs than any other age bracket and is a prime target of those who peddle such products. We hope our quiz is instructional. The itPms are similar to those found on questi· onnaires which test for problem drinking. Your srorr may suggest that you might be heading in the wrong direction. Give yourself one point for each "yes" answer. If your score is five or more, you may have a budding problem with alcohol and you should start right away to do something about it, perhaps by seeking professional help. Beyond 'Collapse' of Nuclear Family Blacks Turn Extended Family into Nationwide Safety Net By Louia Freedberg Pacific ~\'eu•s Seruice SJWcial to th~ MontTOBI! Voice For two decades policy-makers. ~eeking for deeper causes of black poverty, have made the disintegration of the black fam· ily a nationitl etereotype. Yet though cloee to half of all black fam· ilies are headed by single parents, blacks have a1so developed a different and more reeihent etructure for warding off crises: a strongly knit extended family often spread from coast to coast. And those networks ofrelatives survive even though government has barely rec· ognized their existence, much lees bol· sle?"ed them with aid programs, many researchers and family workers say. Luanna Johnson (not her real name) is 17 and liv .. in Oakland, Calif., with her parents-but her gTandmother's house in the tiny Louisiana town of Natchitoches is a kind of eecond home. When ehe wu six she moved with her parents from Louisiana to California Five years later, when her parents' mar· riage hit a rough spot, "the next thing I knew I wae back with my grandmother," she recalls. One day her father called to say she could come back to Oakland, where Jackson stayed with her aunt for about two months. until the two clashed over discipline. She eventuaJly moved back with her parents, who have recon­ciled. But it is to her grandmother that Jack· son turns during difficult times. "I just all her when I'm feehng bad." she says. "I can talk to her bettt>r than I can to my own mother. • Relatives living in far.flung places often gather at the grandmother's house, bought by her children. ''Everyone is close to my grandmother." Jackson, now a high school senior, is applying to colleges in Louisiana. Jackaon's experience is familiar to 1ocial workers and psychologists who report that in black families more often than white onee, if a child is having trou· ble with echool or the law, if parents are not getting along, or if a parent can no longer take care of children, relatives atep in to 611 the breach-even if they liveoutof 1tate. get any funding for it, says Weiissbourd. "One advantage black families have ... is that having a family member take care of one's children is not viewed negatively" Onf' advantage black families have, says anthropologist Stack, is that having a family member take care of one's child­ren is not viewed negatively. For blacks, 1'it'a not an insult or a proof of failure fora kid to stay with an aunt. Parents know that at some time they may have to take care of the aunt's children." Extended family networks may be strengthened by the recent return of blacks to southern states as economic con· ditions in northern cities worsen. Between 1970 and 1980, 90,000 black adults and children returned to North Carolina alone. And modern technology, like buses, jets and telephones, make it easier than ever for black children to find a calm port among relatives whenever a storm hits home. In 1965 Harvard sociologist Daniel P. Moynihan (now a U.S. Senator) published a report that set the tone for much black­oriented policy to follow. Its central thesis: " • the heart of the deterioration of the failire of the Negro society is the deteriora· lion of the family.'' But Moynihan and other sociologists may have mistakenly focused on the tw<>­parent family as the standard measure of family stability. Some researchers now say that having a single parent does not necessarily mean one is shut off from fam­ily support. "As people are poorer, families become more valuable," says Carol Stack, an anthropologist at Duke University end author of All Our Kin, a widely acclaimed study of black family networks in IJlinois. "For the mOAt part the single parent is still immersed in the extended family." That "elaborated social structure" gives a black child an e~sential "base of sup­port," echoes sociologist Troy Duster of the University of California at Berkeley Extended family ties seem to be as strong among middle class blacks as among the poor. It is not unusual for more affluent blacks in cities elsewhere to send their children to the South for summer vacations. or even to attend high school "Families in the urban north see them· selves as sateJhtes to the rural family," drawing "spiritual renewal" from rela· tivee closer to the land, says Stack. Stereotypes to the contrary, this endur· ing extended family structure-born of the ethic that blacks must take care of their own-has actually lessened the burden that blaclca place on the governmentspon· sored eocial progTams. Kin network. are a large reason why a smaller percentage of black children are placed in foster homes or put up for ado1> tion than whites, and fewer older blacks are placed in nursing homes. Placing a child in foster homes can cost the government nearly $100,000 from infancy to adolescence, points out Dr. Edward Zigler, Sterling Professor of Psy· chology at Yale and former head of the federal government's Children's Bureau. "Sometimes what stands in the way of a family member taking care of a child might be $1000 to cover the cost of clothes and an extra bed," he says. That kind of aid is not to be found, how· ever. "In terms of support for the extended family, (federal assistance) is just non· existent," says Bernice Weissbourd, preei· dent of Family Focus, a Chicago-based non·profit organization. "There has to be a recognition that if families are going to eupport themselves, they are going to have to get some kind of help. "A mother will get funding for day care for her child, but if she puts the child into the home of her own mother, Mhe doesn'• When 17-year-old Tammy Kirk's par· ents divorced five years ago, she went to live with her aunt and then her sister while her parents tried to decide who should have custody of the children. The Oakland senior now stays permanently with her sister. Kirk (not her real name) visits her mother across town several times a week . And her father, who moved to Dallas, calls her three times a week at exactly 7:30 in the evening. "Nobody better be on the phone when he call•." Aside fTom that. she says, "It's been a pretty good armnge­ment. and I'm not in the middle of som~ thing I don't want to be.'' ADVERTISING SALES If you make o good impression on people and ore conscientious about your Job. then consider this: The Montrose Voice is seeking on additional advertising representative 1986 is going to beouryeor. and we need to odd to our sales staff. On&OO-One soles experience preferred. For an appointment. call Heniy McClurg. 529-8490. JANUARY 31, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 13 GREENWAY PI.ACE APARTMENTS 3333 CUMMINS LANE HOUSTON (713) 623-2034 February Move-In Special HAIR LOSS­NEWMEDICAL TREATMENT Male patrem baldness occurs when the hormone DHT acts on hair folli­cles. Proxidil 8 is an advanced! combination of topical DHT-block­ing agents with the hair growth­stimulator Minoxidil. It commonly arrests and reverses balding when Minoxidil alone does not. Call today for a consultation. Peter H. Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 To better sen•e your needs ... Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community 24 Hours Daily 2 Bedroom/2 Baths with all bills paid Lease by February 1st and TEXAS STATE OPTICAL announces new hours at these locations TSO-Village 2515 University 528-1589 TSO-South !\fain 4414 S. !\fain 523-5109 Receive 1 Month Free Tues.-Sat. !\fon.-Fri. JO a.m.-6:30 p.m. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Monday Closed Saturday Office Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:30 Hours' Saturday 10:00-5:00 Sunday 1:00-5:00 Effective Feb. I, 1986 GRAND OPENING TONIGHT with Complimentary Cocktails 8-9pm Bar will remain open after 9pm Food Service Starting Saturday LUNCH DINNER SUNDAY BRUNCH Serving from 11am Daily Full Menu 'til 2am LATE NIGHT BREAKFAST Food SeNice 'til 4am Friday & Saturday FESTIVE SUNDAY BRUNCH Special Menu. Patio Seating "Fresh Table Buffet' Cocktail & Wine Specials HAPPY HOUR 3-7pm Daily Drink Specials & Complimentary Snacks 804 Pacific 524-07933 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31 1986 Sports\Toice -------------8-~-o-rt_s_Vi_o-ic_e_C_a_l_en_da _r_& _S_ ta__nd i_ n_g_s ____________ _ Holmes Takes Lead in Houston Tennis Club By Rich Corder Robert Holmes caught previous No. 1 Rick Hadnot sleeping late two Sundays ago and thereby got a default into the No. 1 rank on the Houston Tennis Club singles challenge ladder. He defended his newly acquired No. 1 against the challenge of Rich Corder 6-1, 1-6, 6-1. Hadnot can cha!· :enge back after the week's wait. Rich C<lrder defended his Top Ten rank· ing against newcomer Randy Lunsford 6· 2, 6-1 Since .. Dynasty" has again taken over the airwaves on Wednesday nights. HTC has moved its week night play to Thurs· day. Play begins at 7;30 p.m. at the Homer Ford Tennis Center (MacGregor Parkl. 5225 Calhoun. HTC still plays on Sunday mornings at Homer Ford from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Call Rich Corder, 524-2151, for more information Community Softball League Reviving Lone Star Classic Dust off your hat and grab your bats, ,-.porta fans, its time once again to make plans for the Lone Star Classic softball tournament. The event began in 1983, was suspended for 1984 when Houston hosted the national Gay World Series, and failed to materialize in 1985. But this is the year for it to resume, officials say. Sponsored by the Montrose Softball League. this year's tournament will be held at an earlier date than in 1983. The double-elimination games are scheduled for Easter weekend. March 28-29, begin­ning Friday and continuing through Sat· urday, depending on weather conditions. Organizers of the event expect nearly 20 softball leagues from throughout the U.S. to participate in the Clauic. Teams from San Diego and San Francisco have already Hnt in their applications. For more information about theClaH.Sic, or to obtain an application. contact the Montrose Softball League office at 524 '3144 Applications and entry fees must be completed by March 8. 6 Challenge Matches Highlight HoutexPlay La.at Sunday's Houtex Tennis Club action was highlighted by six challenge matches with three players ouccessfully defending their poeition and three players losing their position. Steve Bearden fended off a strong show­ing again•! Pat Power 4-6, 6-3, 6-3 to hold hia No. 4 poaition in the top ten. He has fought hi1 way recently to the highest ranking since joining the club. Ron Rudd fought off Mr. Bill 7-5, 6-1. Steve Bryant also defended against Henry Eckhardt by the score of 6-0, 6-1. Thomas Cortez upended Eddie Chavez 7-5, 6-4. Rich Martinez defeated Daiwid Hendrickson 6-2, 6-0. Rick Massey defeated Rich Knapp 7-5, 6-2. Hout.a Tennis Club meet& at Homer Ford Tennis Center. Information may be obtained by calling David at 926-7171. Play ia at 10:30 a.m-1:30 p.m. Sundays. Players of all abilities are welcome. HouTex Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through .;an 19 TOP TEN ..ADDER 1,,1mK1tch 2 Randall Dickerson 3 Donny Kelley 4 JC Barrera 5 Pat Powers 1 Sabe Velez 6 Aon Bell 7 Steve Bearden 8 Arm1 Albanza 9 David Garza 10TnyT·m BLADDER 6 Eddie Chavez 2 Edward de Leon 7 Joe L 1 Ron McCauley 4 Eugene Brown 5 Lou Garza 8 Thomas Cortez 9 Ronn AOdd 1 ._arry Ja,....is 2 Mark Deardorff 3Mr Bill 4 Rick Knapp 5 Gabe Herp1n 1 Roy Mendiola 2 John Murphy 3 Henry Eckhardt 10 Ron Mauss C 1.AOOEA 6 Rick Massey 7 Billy Green 8 Randy Mille< 9 Steve Bryant 10 Bil' Santa1t1 D LADDER 6 Rick Martinez 7 Rudy Garcia 8 JoeD 4 Oa1w1d Hendrickson 9JV Khnger 5 Oscar Ysass1 10 David Moskowitz E LADDER 1 Howard Brown 3 Steve Chesney 2 Randy J1erscheck DOUBLES LADDER 1 Jim Kitch & Dick Collen 2 Arm1 Alabanza & Dav•d Garza 3 Steve Be•den & 8+11 Santa1t1 4 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 5 Billy Green & Paul Brown 6 Eddie Ch8\lez & Henry Eckhardt MSA Pool League Team Standings. Winter League. Week 8 TEAM Recent Weelil, Total Matches. Total games D VISION A 1Four611 2 Mary·s Naturally 3 Ranch Hands 4 Bacchus I 5 Too 611 6 Bacchus II 7 Manon & Lynn's 8 BAB Shoot1tr1 ~ 7·1 10.5 6-1 11-4 6-2 6-9 5-2 15-0 4-3 5-10 4-11 ()-15 4-4 4-4 4-4 75-45 66-39 69-51 63-42 61-44 57-63 57-63 S0-70 9 Street Cats 100utlaws 8-7 7-8 1Te8arn 2 The 611 3 611111 DIVIS.I,O. N 4 Kindred SpirHs I 5 The Gaf"eon 6 L1pst1Ck 7 Kindred Spmts II 8 JR'S 9 Hooters I '0 Lone Stars 11 Hooters II 15-0 8-7 •l>-5 8-7 8-7 7-8 7-8 7-8 5-10 l>-15 3-5 2-5 B 7-0 5-2 5-3 4-3 4-3 4-4 3-4 2-6 1-1 1-7 l>-7 Houston Tennis Cl.ub Challenge Ladder match• through Jan 26 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Robert Holmes 6 Rich Corder 2 JC Barrera 7 Osc• Martinez 63-57 51.44 68-37 58-47 70.50 61·44 54-52 62-58 58-47 52-68 41-69 34--86 17-84 3 Arm1 Albanza 8 Edward de Leon 4 Ron Bell 9 Ron McCauley 5 Rick Hadnot 10 Silty Green BLADDER 1 Randy Miller 2 SteYe Bryant 3 Roy Mendiola 4 Da1w1d Hendrickson 6 Rudy Garcia 7 JV Klinger 8 Joe D 9 Howard Brown Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Center HouTex Tennis Club 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women·s Bowlmg League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7 30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten• nis Center MSA "'Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool League plays 8pm, vanous locations You Asked for Himl You've Got Himl 11\R S~FES£l Special Appearance by Sgt. Glenn Swann "Mr. Safe Sex" CWBBODY CENTER HOUSTON 2205 Fannin Friday, January 31st, 10pm THURSDAY: frontrunners Memorial Park Tenms Center "Whatever Happened to Baby Jane· MSA Mixed Bowhng League 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl Special Events Feb. 14·16. IGBO-affil1ated Bluegrass Clas­sic, Louisville Feb. 2B·Mar. 2· tGBO-affiliated Spring Break Invitational, Ft Lauderdale Mar 27·30_ IGBO-affiliated Dixie Invitational. Atlanta Mar 29-31 IGBO-afliliated M.A K.I T Kansas City June_- Oak Lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge. Dallas. competing with Hous4 ton Tennis Club July 25-Aug. 3. 1986. US Olympic Festival, Houston Barn, Four 611 Still Lead in Pool The Barn, the lone undefeated team in the MSA Billiards League, remained Division B leader after the eighth week of the sea­son. Four 611, defeated by Bacchus I the previous week, won a rematch with Bac­chus I, and claimed the top spot in Div­ision A. Following Four 611 is Mary's Naturally, winners over Bacchus II, and third place Ranch Hands. Tailing the Barn in Div· ision Bis the 611 and 611111, winners of a narrow victory over JR's. The MSA Saturday Pool Tournament is in full swing with weekly tournaments now through March. All league members are eligible in the 2:00 p.m. tourney. Charlie Hurst, league president, will now be helping any team who needs a sub­stitute to find one. His phone number is 522-0840. J f he is not at home, please leave a message on the recorder. Dutch Boys Lead in Baby Jane Bowling League The Little Dutch Boys remained in first place in the Baby Jane Mixed Bowling League as of the week ending Jan. 25. The Kings & Queens climbed from fourth to second. Tied for third are the Golden Girls and Hit the Gas Baby Jane. On Thursday Jan. 2.1, the league cele­brated the birthdays of three members. Ron Roubique, one of the birthday boys, bowled his highest game ever, a 215. The Baby Jane league is growing with members from as far north as Conroe/ Tomball and as far south as NASA. Those interested in the league may call Phill Blakeway at 668-6970 days or nights. ~ ..:-· . . •see the stars• ••... oroER NOW! Re•urn Of •he JecHt SPECIAL $69.95 DEADLINE 2/14/&6 MON -THURS 108m-8pm FRI-SAT., 108m-10pm SUN lpm-6pm WE CARRY ADULT FILMS 2016 MONTROSE Houston. Texas 77006 529-5544 " .. . In the heart of The City" $44 00 • FREE AIRPORT SHUTTLE •COMPLIMENTARY CHAMPAGNE• WINE • • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL IREAICFAST (large single/double occupancy) • VAi.Ei SliRVICE •Special Weekly and Monthly.Rates Reservations required plc;,:ise coll Toll Free 800·253·5263 (Notional) 800·521·4523 (Co hf J (415)·441 ·5141 (Son Fronc1sco) 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 TllE BEST LITilE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASO ABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVArE BATHS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 I :.1.1DJY~~'D2Y £}JfJ lj£j~I 'I tDJY£.J:JJ.J "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS, Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A Thayer JANUARY 31, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Stein & Toklas D ETE C TIVE S Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail. Here is $7.50 for Murder is Murder is Murder by Samuel Steward. name ________ address, _____ _ _ _ city state ·P - ---- Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 Tom Graham Pres. ALL KIND 0 ROPICAL FISH AND SUPPLIES FOR 'EM 224 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON Ph. 520-644~ Srzial ~cf' Ui \O Gaifon lo.Jc. f 'I 'f i~; -rax Tank, heater, gravel, fil ter, pump, tubing, hood, lights, dual gang valve, aquarium guide and thermometer All you add is plants, fish & L9va. 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31. 1986 Gay and lesbian reading ============from=========== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBL I CATIONS HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about sale . c. , edited by fohn Preston, $8 00. The AIDS cnsis has closed off some forms of 'Jcxual activity for health·conscious gay men, but it has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexual ex· press100. Hcre, over a dozen of today's most popular gay wnters present new short stones that imaginatively eroticize !Safe sex Contributors mclude Toby Johnson, Frank Moc;ca, Marty Rubin, Sam Steward, George Whitmore and TR Witomsk1. SOCRATES, PLATO AND GUYS LIKE ME: Co nfc s~io n ~ of a gay schoolteacher, by Enc Roles, S7 00 When Eric Roles began tcadnng s1xth grade at a conscr· vativc private school, he soon felt c-:ie tram of a spltt identity Here tie dcscnbcs his two years of teaching from wnhm the c osct, his d1fhcult decision to ... me out at work, and rhe conse~ qurnces f that dee s10n i SECOnD CHAfiCES a now! boJ flonne De Veer SECOND CHANCES, by Flonne de Veer, $7 .00. ls it always harder to accept what ts offered freeJyl Jeremy, young and sull na1vC about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet he chooses to pursue the harn:~­some and unpredictable \-1.ark ONE TEENAGER 1:11 TEN: Writings by gay and le bian youth , cdaed by Ann Heron, S l 95. Twenty-eight young peo­ple from all ever the US and Canad.a, most.y in high school, share thctr commg·out expcnenccs STOLEN MOMENTS. by John Preston, $Cii ()( Wbo says heroes CJ.n't be gayl In the toe th of the ' M1ss100 of Alex Kane" se::ics, Kane and his partner Danny Fortelh head for Houston. There. they tak on a media baron whC' is intent on ~ mg homophob1'1 to build his tabloid's ... uculauon Aho dVa blc Sweet Dream~, Golden Years and Deadly Lies, each star· nng Alex and Dancy· SS.00 each EXTRA CREDIT, by fc'f Black, S6.00. Harper K mg has a bonng teaching job, stagnant relauonships, and a tank full of fish named after ex-lovers dying in the same order their namesakes were o;e­duced_ Can you blame him for wanting a fresh start? Enter Mick, a lover from the put talking about their future; Garrick, a first-year teacher lookm,g for con1unc­tions, and not necessanly in the class­room; and young Dean, an oversexed Dennis the Menace making all A's m some very advanced biology IRIS, by Janmc Veto, S7 00 The retelling of an ancient Greek myth of love, devo­tion and vengeance this ume with a lesbian theme REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A s tory about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, $4 9:'; The moving auto ~ biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na· uonal news when he took a gay date to h1> high school prom MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7 .00 This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stem and Ahce B Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside attcmptmg to solve the mystenous disappearance of a man who 1s their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener A new and very different treat from the author of the Pc•! A~d . s srone THE LAVENDER COUCH: A con­sumers' guide to therapy for lesbians and gay men, by Marny Hall, SS 00 Therapy can be tremendously helpful for lesbians and gay men. Yet how many of us really know how tO go about choosing a therapist, and how to be sure we can get the most out oi therapy? Marny Hall, herself a lesbian therapist, has written the first book ever to address this sub· JeCt. THE PEARL BASTARD, by Lillian Halegua, $4 00. Frankie is fifteen whe_n she leaves her large, suffocatmg Cathohc family m the mner cny for Montauk, work, and the sea She tells her story with a combination of pamful mnocence and acute v1s10n, beginning with the man 11 t~e tine green c;ar who docs not mourn rhe v10lent death of a seagull against his wmdshield The simplicity f Halegua's style is reminiscent ol The Color Purple; 1t is a powerful story of a girl's sudden entry into a harsh maturity MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patnoli, $ 1.1 00 Through some 46 photo , Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homa-.erouc territory m which. since the begmmng of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex 1Qvers1zc paperback! THE HUSTLER, by John Henry Mackay· tran.'I by Hubert Kc.:nncdy, SR.00. Gun­ther is fifteen when he arrives alone in the.: Berlin of the 1920s. There he dis· covers the boys of Fm:Jnc:h Street, and the men who stroll by and '>peak with them Soon he 1s spotted by Hermann Graff, a scn!'l1t1vc anJ naive young man who becomes hopelessly enamored with Gunther But love does not ht nratly in­to Gunther's new hfc as a hustler Gunther's story "'as hrst published m 1926 For today's read r, 1t combines a poignant love $tory with a colorful por· trayal of the gay subculture that thrived m Bcrho a half· century ago. DANCER DAWKINS AND THE CALIFORNIA KID, by Willycc Kim, $6.00 A new and very different lesbian novel, which Judy Grahn calls. 'A wonderful, rip-roanng Western Jcshian adventure that left me warm, tickled, and hoping she wn tcs a dozen more " The book of the year," writes Feminist Bookstore New8 ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. The story of a teenage love affau that should have been simple - but wasn't. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechao, $7 .00. Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year·old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white hanker with a 10 o'dock bedtime and muscks to <lie for This story of their love affair is one of the most engross-ing and funniest you'll ever read. ---·- ---·-- -TO ORDER·-· --- ··· -·--· Enclosed is$ Please send the books I've listed below !Add $ 1. 00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Please "lend me these books: I. 2. 3. - 4._ s. -- Visa and mastercard accepted: plem;e send acct number. exp. date, and ~lgnature name address cuy __ state_ zip ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept P-'> 40 Plympton St Boston, MA 02118 ············· ·· ······· ·················· JANUARY 31, 1986/ MONTROSE VOICE 17 Commentary Things Have Changed at the 'Baths' Safe Sex and Ethical Business By Jack Campbell Whm I opened the first Club Rath• in C'IE>vf'land in 1965, I wanted to make sure that there waH clean, honest and safe space whE"re gay men could enjoy them· selves. We were used to being forctad into the mo t squalid arenas for sex before ther. T wnntec" bright lights, spotkss rooms and effirent and car ng mar.age­mt ·nt. Thut simple formula allowed me to suc­ceed and to expand my business across the country. I'vemadeagood1ivingfrom Club Baths. I haven't forgotten where that 1iv· ing came from. I not only serve on six national boards of gay and lesbianorgani· zations, I've donated to many more. It's not patting myself on the back to say that, It's simply common sense that gay busi­ness people should support gay causes. That's especially true of my business and the link it had for many years with the gay activist movement. Sex was the core issue, after all. And not just in legal terms. If the society could force us to feel guilty about our sexuality and underline that by making us retreat to dirty bathrooms. dan­gerous alleyways and anonymous tea rooms, we could never aRsert our freedom and our right to C'ivil liberties. AlllS ha• ehanged a lot of things. It's C('rtainly changed the prioritieA of most of Letters Changes Needed in Mortgage Policies From Loran E. Doss It is em;y toeeewhy Montrose real estate is a buyer's market (Voice, Jan. 24). MoHt homes remain on the market without buy­ers because financing is quite difficult for single persons. For instance, a single per· son who has a good income and employ· ment history with a good credit record is rejected h(>('ause most mortgage compan· ies require that their clients be only mar­ried coup)('8. Just because a person is married C'er· tainly doesn't make them a better risk. With foreclosures at an all time high, it is about time mortgage companies stop operating on the illusion that only mar· ried couples be considered as a good risk When adequate financing is made availa­ble to those persons who have an estab­lished credit history whether married or not, it would certainly mean a great drop in the foredosure rate. It is much better to sell to tho8e who have a good credit hi.l';jtory than to thm1e who have none at all. This only makes good husiness sense. Kroger Parking: Customers Only From Marty Payne Manager. Kroger on Montrose Customers are the only reason we exiRt! And taking care of their needs is our No. I priority. We feel that insuring thatourcu~tomers have a place to park is our responsibility Due to the t"Xtremely limited spaces avail· able, we have, at a great expense to us, employed a full time lot attendant to inform persons crossing the street to other businesses that parking is for Kroger cus­tomers only. It is not our intention to offend anyone but rather to assure that when they decide the gay organizations I'm associated with. It-obviom;ly..-has changed my bus· iness. Long hC'fore we saw anything Jike the New York State cloBure of bar~ and baths, I knt>w that thl' entire basis for my enter· prise had to he altered. It wasn 'tjust a case of good business, though I know cvnics will sny it is. I've continualJy proven my ronviction that husin("Ss has to ~ ethical tr be smart The result has been the formation of the Club Body Centers. Those clubs in which I own a controlling percentage are now red· edicated to the new realities of gay men's lives. The invitations to anonymous sex­the glory holes. the orgy rooms-that we once thought were arenas of personal liberation-have gone. In their place are complete weight training facilities. There are eduC'ational materials on AIDS and other gay subjects on prominent display. The Club Rody Centers are available to public health officials for educational pur, poses. Yes, the cubicles remain. It's important that they do. The whole idea of gay libera· tion was to free us to enjoy our bodies. We have to listen to perRi8tent and real warn· ings about our health crisis. But it's not going to be healthy to becomecelibateorto go hack to hating ourse]ves. to go Krogering that they have a place to park. (Editor's Note: The preceding letter wa.t solicited and ij; in response to a letter which appeared in last week's Montrosr Voice criticizing Kroger's parking lot Hrcurity guard.) Thanking the A udit Committee From the Board of the KS/AIDS Foundation of Houston On behalf of the Board of the KS! AIDS Foundation of Houston, we would like (to) express our deep appreciation toJoeTum· Jinson and the audit Committee for their hard work in the preparation of the report to the community on the Foundation's financial and managerial situation. We realize it took many hours of volunteer time and professional skills to prepare such a document. Two points of information which need to be addressed regarding the press coverage of the report are (1) the services of Joe Tumlinson and the audit committee were volunteer and were not paid for, and (2}the computer mentioned as missing is in the posse.ssion of the Foundation and has been inventoried tf<:ditur':t Note: The Montrose Voice did not r«•port an)' computer:t misStn/l from the KS AIDS foundation.I Thanks from the Frontrunners From Joe Stovall President, Frontrunners Houston I wish to thnnk the management and staff of the Venture-N on Main Street for their help to our organization and all of the runners in the Houston-Tenneco Mara thon on Sunday, Jan. 19. They opened the building early to pro­vide water for the runners and coffee and donut.a to the people working at the Fron· trunner station there. With the assistance Safe sex guidelines give us a way to be cautious and responsbile and to go on with our lives, celebrating our sexuality in our special way ThE>re's been one great problem. How to ~ommunicnte safe sex to the whole gay ix>Pulation. Our press and our leaders hnv(' dont• a good job, but there've been a consistent and significant minority of men whr weren't hearing the message. That's how I came up with the idea of Mr. Safe Sex. If I oould find a great hunk who could get up on stage and ~how an audirnce what pos~ibilities for good sex still exist in our lives, I knew that I could contribute the most significant piece of education posRible to our movement. Glen Swann fits the bill perfectly. This humpy 6'2" pile of man with a body that most gay men dream of has proven he can get the guys in the baths to listen. Believr me, when he's on stage, he has their complete attention. Glen's now pt>rformed in Europe. in countleRs ritiea; and is working on a book of his safe sex fantasies. I've seen how ht> can capture the imaginations of men. When he gets on stage and tells them to follow along, the men are at his command. I will continue to support our fights for civil rights. I'll continue to make sure that my businesset> are models for the rest of of the Ventun.'-N staff and numerous volunteers, we had a very successful day. l would alt'o Jike to thank the communi· ty'R prei-;R for the excellent coverage. NEVER A COVER Jack Campbe!~ h•ad of tM Club Body CenW. and candidate for the U.S Srnate from Florida the gay E:"<..'Onom1c community. But wouldn't lead a retreat from our sexual revolution. Wt>'ve fought too hard to reclaim our bodiet" and we can't surrender them now. Think of that the next time you have an opportunity to watch Glen Swann's Mr. Safe Sex show. If you've been frightened into believing that gay sex is gone, that it's bad or that you should notdet;ireit any more, give Glen a chance to show you a hot alternative. rEditor·a Note: Businessman Campbell is a candidate in the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate from Florida Sgt. Gum Su·an, '"Mr. Safe Sex/'u.•i.ll appear toniRht, Frida)', Jan.. 31. at the Club Body Center Houston, 2205 Fannin. The shou• IN-gin.t at 10.{)()p.m.J Items in the "Letters11 section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MO.VTROSE VOICE. 523-2213 "WHAT HOSPITALITY IS ALL ABOUT'' LEA 1HER • LEVI • WESTERN --COMING IN FEBRUARY-­SUNDAYS 25¢ DRAFT 6pm till WEDNESDAYS "LEATHER NIGHT" HAPPY HOUR PRICES TO THOSE !N LEATHER DRAWING AT MIDNIGHT FOR A DIFFERENT PIECE OF LEATHER EACH WEEK THURSDAYS "STEAK NIGHT" $4" FOR A 16 oz. T-BONE w/BAKED POTATO AND SALAD 7pm till 25¢ DRAFT BEER -NOW OPEN AT NOON EVERYDAY- ~ EAGLE LEATHERS ~~~R THE MAN THAT KNOWS WHAT HE WANTS" MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 31, 1986 Reading the Monlrose Voice Evay is an lnformalive ·ence Thats because no other publication in the world covers the news of your neighborhood-Montrose-as thoroughly as the Montrose Voice. In fact. no other publication in the world has even a SINGLE journalist assigned fulltime to Montrose. Not the Post. not the Chronicle. not lWL not the Forum. not Inner View. not Town. Each of those other publications have their own attributes But Montrose news is not one of them. Montrose news is what we do better than anyone else. with THREE fulltime journalists (Linda Wyche. Connie Woods and Pete Diamond) who report only on the news of Montrose. And partly because of our extensive news coverage. the Montrose Voice leads all other publications in Montrose circulation-by thousands and thousands. The Voice now distributes 12.000 copies each Friday in Montrose-reaching an estimated 33.000 readers. Thats thousands more than any of the other local community publications. It's even more circulation-per issue-in Montrose than the Post or Chronicle. The Montrose Voice In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice! For home subscriptions or to advertise in the Montrose Voice, call 529-8490 Good reading for you ~==========from~========== A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS COWBOY BLUES, by Stephen Lewis, $7.00. Jake Lieberman is a gay detective in the typical California tradition. When a 45-year-old cowboy comes into his of· ficc to report that his younger partner i!io missing, Jake's first impulse is to gently explain to the guy that he's been dumped. But soon is investigation shows that Andy Joncs's disappearance is only part of a much wider scheme. The only quc~tion is: Will Jake live to uncover it am SAFE STUD The: safcsc:x chronicles of Max £under SAFESTUO: The safesex chronicles of Max Exander, by Max Exandcr, $7 .00. Max Exandcr's first reaction to the idea of safe sex is disappointment. But with time, he finds that the change from his old habits can he invigorating in uncx peered ways THE TWO OF US, hy Larry J. Uhng, $7 00. A practical handbook about how to m~kc a gay or lesbian relationship wr rk, with :-.pectal emphasis on the reli~ g1ous pee• of gay u~uons. DANCtR DAWKINS ANO THE CAl.IFORNIA KID, by w'"' < 1m, Sf. 00 In Bangor, Mame Lntle W t: c.. uthcnc renames hcr'>clf Th ( ahfo1r. a Kid stocks up on Rul bh:s Durb1c buflbk gum .i d he father's best ti vallJ c .gar anr' ticau: west 1 W ly Kim ha ere i a w1Jndcrtul, np- ar ng W stcr csbsan dventure th left me warm, t cklec: dOd Pupmg she wntcs a (.OZt more l aovcd • , wrnc~ •:idy Crab~ MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M Steward, $7 .00. This unusual mystery sends Gettrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas sleuthing through the French countrys1d.:, attempting: to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who i!i their neighbor and the father of thc:r handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories STOLEN MOMENTS, by John Preston, $5.00. Who says heroes can't be ~ay? In the fourth of the '' M 1ssion of Alex Kane" st.:rics, Kane- and his partner Danny Fortelli head for Houston_ There, they take on a media baron who is intent on usmg homophobia to build his tabloid\ c1rculatiun. Also available. Sweet Dreams, Golden Years and Deadly Lies, each star­ring AIC'x and Danny; $5 00 each EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Dup!echan, $ 7 00 Johnnte Ray Rousseau 1s a 22 year old black gav ,x>p ngcr whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller ts d white barker w lii a IO o'clock e it 1e ruse c.;. to ~ c for This story f t cir ove affair one ol the ost en;; . ssi. g and tunmest vot.::' ver read I HF. MOVIE LOVER, by R chara fr dcl, $6 95 Burton Raiders prolllerr.s "\Cgm m to gh ch( ol wh ~ h r cs e 1c lo" wi:h his 1end R1 ma1 As he gets Ider the problems 1 crea e tllld sr does the c .lffi01 of .. s SltUJtlOC IC w a Chrzstophtr Street calls 'the funniest gay novel 01 the year ' MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER, by Samuel M. Steward, $7.00. This unusual mystery sends Gertrude Stein and Ahcc B. Toklas sleuthing through the French countryside, attempting to solve the mysterious disappearance of a man who is their neighbor and the father of their handsome deaf-mute gardener. A new and very different treat from the author of the Phil Andros stories. THE LIONS' OEN, by Larry Howard, $8.00 As a close1cd college professor, Daniel has re!>igned himself to a life of loneliness. He even fights off the ad· vances of a gay student, Matthew Reid - for a time. Finally, however, he decides to risk all in order to be faithful to himself HOT LIVING: Erotic stories about safe sex, edited by John Preston, $8.00. rho AIDS crisis has clo .. ed off some forms of sexual activity for hcahh·consc1ous gay men, but tt has also encouraged many men to look for new forms of sexu.ai ex­pression. Herc, over a dozen of today's most popular gay writers eroucaHy describe those new possibilit es. STUD, by Phil Andros, with an mtroduc· tion hy John Preston, $6.95. Phil Andros 1s a hustler wi th a conscience, pursuing every form of sex including affection ~ without apology c L1/11an Hale-gua The Pea rl Bastard THE PEARL BASTARD bv l Hale~u.J $4 OC Frank 1s fifteen wh1 she lrav s h r ge su.: aung (. atn,.; family m the mn.. \;1ty f r ~ n .at.: wurk, and the sea fh1s storv of h su den entry into a harsh ID..3.turuy 1s told with a s1mphc1ty of s1yle rcmxmsccnt f The Color Purple. JANUARY 31 , 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE MEOITERRANEO, by Tony Patrio1., $I2.SO. Through some 46 photos, llalian photographer Tony Patrioh explores the "'ono-e- t c tcmtory m which, sxnce the l)eginning of umc, adole cent boys have discovered sex 10verstze paperback ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Writings by gay and le sbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. Twenty·eight young peo-­ple from all over the US and Canada, mostly in high c;chool, share their corning.out expcncnces. IN THE TENT, by David Rees, $6.00. Seventeen· year· oJd Tim realizes that he u attracted to his classmate Aaron, but Sh- caught up in the guilt ot a Cathohc upbringing, be has no idea what to do about it Then m the mtddle of a camp­ing tnp, a storm traps ..he two of thet!l ID a tent w1t'l. two other bey' and the sLes can no longer be avoided ~ · ··········· TO ORDER· ··· ········ Enclosed 1s _ Please send the books I've hstcd below IAdd $/. 00 postoge when ordwng just one hook, if vou order more than one we'll p<i.v postilge.1 Please send me these books: I. 2. 3. 4. 5. Visa and mastercard accepted, pleau send a ct nucnbe up date aild .signature "'me ddress c v •t ALY 0. PUBLICATIO. ·s l'ep p 41 lymptt'n M Boston l\1A t 2I 20 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 31 1986 Montrose Classified ANNOUNCEMENTS LEGAL NOTICES The Montrose Voice a general ~ir ulat Jn newspaper having pobhshed continu- =~:~~al'9,:i~~o~g:'ct~gq~:!1f~:.~~ paper's circulation area of Montrose CARS & BIKES FAMILY MOTORS 5210 Buffalo Speedway 667-6804 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VO'['< MERIOIEN-LEASING Lee Borba. 97!1-1985 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ASCOT LEASING. LTD. 303 Jpland 973-0070 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE SAN JACINTO MOTOR LEASING 10700 Richmond •100. 781·8566 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE DWELLINGS, ROOMMATES, HOUSESIAPTS. FOR SALE. RENT, LEASE 1920 WEST ALABAMA APTS. t92C W Alabama 52'~798 SEE OIJR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE CREENWAY PLACE APTS J:1 -umm ns Lane 6.2.:r:;: ~ SEE OUR D :;PLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Forte~ Wlhopt ;oitobuy Wedouble the dOllars you pay towards down pay· ment $2'00imonth 2bedroom 2 bk>Cks lrom TSU or 3 bedroom S3CO'month tMt• rnedical center and dOwnlOwn L >OkS Ike Old r.astle 937. 1889 Non-smoking roommatetostiareh0me1n the Heights S23&monlh plus ut1l11iet &U1510 Luxury Coodom1n11 .. ms Now Leas1rg wit"' option to purchase Great location Large beautiful swimming pool & Jacuzzi Controlled entry sect.inly Remote contnlled garage entry High ett1c1ency AC & heating Free cable TV Ore bedrooms fror1 $375 1$150 deposit) Two bedrooms from $650 ($250 deposit) 2507 Montrose Boulevard Call for appointment 524-0830 Roommate Nanted Any rac;:; One bed· room S 175. 5 mos only 521-2060 GWM needl roommate Prefer female MllSI be respon11ble. securl'! and prole1- 1t0nal It •nterested. call Dan 55&9023 8rMSwOOd·Bulfalo Speedway area. 3-2 ~~~=8:2!.;~~~h~i~27~ts BUILDER CLOSE-OUT 100% FINANCING 2206 Driscoll River Oaks shopping area. Italian design. one ond two bed­room townhomes From S70's. 2417 Dunlavy Spacious three bed­room. three bath tCMtnhouse. S180's 316 Hawthorne Two bedroom. two bath townhouse. Large lot. S180's. 810 Marshall Un que fou• story •CMtnhouse Two bed­rOOfTI, 2' 2 baths. Qut. door Jaccuzzi. frorr> S150's. 2421 Kingston Beh."d S• Anne's. BeouWul four story townhouse. Three bedroom 2 • baths. From mid S200's. 731 Heights Two bedroom. two both townhouse From $130'5. FOR INFORMATION CALL 523-1532 MONTROSE AFIEA DUPLEX 2nd noor 2 bedroom cowerea park ':'IQ share pool $750 470.1876. BRIARWAY Great IOcabon and great pnee. San Felipe at 610 Cable TV. small complex. IOts ol trees 1 & 2 BR 5225-$360 Call Neva 96< 0923 (Hylton Realty Co) AIVEA OAKStMONTROSE Newly renovated lu•ury duptex Two bed· room. 1 i\ bath. s1ng1e car garage olf street parking. hardwood f10o111n dining room. high etfie1ency a. c. washer/dryer ~;~ ~~:~t1~11~,';! ~k~~;ury features Non-smoiung mt1ture man seeks cons1d~ er ate lr1end to share hOuse or apartment Many interests. sense ol hlJmor accept­ing ol self and ctt"lert Travels often Box Holder. Bo11: 66263. Houston 77266 Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small community. Adults only, Nice pool. Large closets. Big windows, Free movie channel, *ell maintained I and 2 Bedrm. Effective Rent from $249 (Regular Rent $3.591 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 Small quiet Montrose complex New paint new double dOor ice boxes $100 depos: 1 bdrm$285ptuse:lec AJsoava1i. able 2 bdrm 529-8 178 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED Part-time delivery driver with own car wanted !or pnnt shop Apply 1n person Monday and Tuesday only R1nn·s Speedy Pnntrng. 1517 W Alabama RE..;PONSIBLE Individual wanled tor pos.i1ions as cuhler and lloor attendant Apply m person M•dlowne Spa. 3100 Fannin between 9a~pm EARN EXTRA SSS ~,:er: Z'w~nt~~e7!~1r:'1~;~:,~:e "1&1p Good personality and knowledge of the Hous1on area a must Cal &80-1975. Ask tor Jeff or Annette Telephane sollc tors needed Good hourty wage plus bonuses Star: today Call Steve 66G-9617 EARN EXTRA SS$ Eastern Oman· the- novelty telegram ser w1ce. is now ,nlervlew1ng tor lem•le impersonators and balloon c:trlvert 'I.- m1ted ava1Jab1hhes Cal 680-1975. Ask tor Annelle or Jeff (MISC.) FOR SALE f .al .electr• __ . lv1 s· :opler$200, ..,._ ~ea1 pump $4~ 5. MODELS, ESCORTS, MASSEURS BILL O'ROURKE, MST 869-2298 Rubs -Ronnie n/out 5~'.\ 147 GET THE KINKS OUT Massage. reheve tension and 1tress Call Ted for appomtrnen1 568-2544 THE CADILLAC OF TOUCH Body work at Ht b4>tl. O ol ET '713)622-4530 BODY MASSAGE F J'. body massage Hor o o or out Bruce 622-0370. PERSONALS G WiM. 32. 5'10" 165. browf\/ green Loolling for good friends who en1oy movies. travel. sports. safe sex, and good company Dislike smoking. drinking drugs, bars. It interested. please write deacr1phve letter to 7203 Stratlordsh1re No 1. 77030. Mean cowboy or other master needed by handsome orally unmh1b1ted. tubmlsSIVe GWM Reply Blmd Box 275-G CIO Voice Oriental guy. 30, 1 9·· seeks masc J1inelop and PDSS!ble relat1onsh1p Reply Blind a.. x 27S..K c o Voice. OWM with great sense of humo1 6. & 175, brn/brn Seeks someone who wrll laugh al my Jokes Honet!fy, they re nol ttiat bad A dark-haired tt'lln GWM will aavemyfutureasaelosetcomed1an Even 11 fa 1 we may be friends or more Reply Bl nd Bex 275-R c >Voice PHONE SEX Our service connects ~ ley Guys 24 hrs a day Oo1t now tor less"han$3.50an hOur 4 ) 346-8747 HORNY HISPANICS CALL 161-4172 Wanted Young GWM to share cabin on cruise 2/15-22186with GWM Reply with photo and phone no Free tor nght per· son P C" Box 66483. Houston 77266- &483. PERFORMING ARTS Ticket office personnel sought tull1par1 time ExceUent verbal skills required ~I~ 1~~! ~c;.~;'i;on Call Ms Knipp SALONOANIEL Hair Sly11$t w1tn some following Be pro teu1onal, creative current We prov1C1e everything for you '" a run modern atmosphere Commrss1onJbenef1ts. Call or come by 2431 B•ssonnet 520-9327 Tail man, m1i 3()>, se8ks sensitive guy for safe 58)(. sensual developmental relation· ship Write PO Box 701041, Houston, 77270 Educated. stable, G/W M. s·1r 155. brtbr mid 30s. seeks non-smokmg G 'W1M. 2().40 with varied interests and sense of humor Reply Blind Box 275"-T Clo Voice. B~'W.F _ C•ing. ettenltve. fun 'Ov1ng crazy (w1th0ut drugs). non--smok1ng. dis­creet professt0nal EnJoys Ille. people nature animals. sports. theater. mt1ma1e ~"!~a~l~I:~~: ?:7~1~~8.:'d ~~~~ 'r1endsh1p (always) maybe housematet And then who knows•• Tell me abOul ro~,~~~n~:::gu~! ~:~~·Id~~~~ Box 272671. Houston, ~e•as 77277·2671 MEET CHRISTIAN SINGLES LoealiWOrldw1de-- Pl'lone1ma1r mtroduc· Ilona text Let love, dat1n~. rnarnage change your life today1 Free mformat1on. Write Box 9020-BSO. Van NuysCA91409 CHUBBY WANTS CHASER ASIAN OR HISPANIC 869-8088 GJW/M 14. handsome, rntelligfl'nt. maa· culme. versatile seeks same for senous dating relationship. Reply Bhnd Box 274-­p co Voce GWM . .35. 6 l5 brown/blue People tell me Im good ookmg I work out three times we8"!y Architect wllh stable llfe :'air~ ~i:!1n~~';;k~ ~~:~hye~70 for shanng and possible relationatup My­photo for yours wr11e and retl me about ri.~J:xLet7~:~:~~:'perts R~ty PHONE SEX Ou1 Mrv1C8 connects Horny Guys 24 hrs day Do n now for less than $3 ~o an hour (41!'i) '346-8747 GWM .. 6, 6' 1 rs, brlbr, good .::iktng En1oys movies, music work out Seeks Intelligent, canng, ute GM. 22-308 101 pou1~e r&lat1onsh1p. AU races welcome No drugs Reply Blind Box 275-8 clo Voice 7 Day Montrose Events Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fn Sat JAN FEB 31 1 FEB FEB FEB FEB FEB 2 3 4 5 6 Crttenaformc:tusion 7·0ayC.IW!dar•l'tdMorurose~ 1 Even1orgrouprnw.tlJ)eclic.IJ y petl•in to '*Ol'lbot'~ of MontroM Of Hou1tori 1 g•y commun tv m .... m• ,, city ll•le or n•t ~• holiday OI m&JO!' n•flON.I gr, ....nt 2 StrlCTfy commerdl.l •~ts n~t lncJUO.C: 3 Bui '"' en •nd IOdl.I groupa •nd "'-'' .,..rits ar• g9nel'alty qua fl8d 4 Po111c.11 wants •'*'• on y one vi.w >I • 1Ubj<!'Cl candiaa1e ot p&rty • CSOtr; nant no qua l9d F-or a-odltiOnlil infotlTl,lhCM'I Ot phon9 num~ ook lo. tn. sponsonng orpn1Htl0tl una.r Typestyles 1nd1cate events' location: Events in Houston, Events of Local Interest Elsewhere. Events ol Aleo Interest SELECTED EVENTS THROUGH 7 DAYS •IN 3 WEEKS: Houaton Area Gay & Leebian Engineera & Scientists meet 7pm Feb. 25 • IN 3 WEEKS: Montrose Civic Club CNeartownl meets 7pm Feb. 25, 1413 We$theimer • FRIDAY: "Breakthrough'" lesbian-feminist program. KPF'T, FM-90. 8:15-llam •FRIDAY: Montro8{' Country Cloggers meet 7pm, MCCR, 1919 Decatur • FRIDAY· Baytown Lambda meels 7J()pm Jan. 31 llSATURDAY: KS1AllJS Foundation meets 3400 Montrose, no. 501, llam llSATURDAY: Houaton Gay Health Advocates meet 7:30pm Feb. I •'-'l .NPAY: Houston Tennie ( lub plays 10:30am-1:30pm, Homer Ford Tennie (enter &Sll!\DAY: Frontrunners run from MPmorial Park Tennis Center &."iUNDAY Women's howling league plays, Jpm, Stadium Bc)wl •SUNIJAY: W.W.B. Bowling League, 7:30pm, Post Oak Lanea •SATURDAY: Texas Gay Rodeo Ailso<-. mee .. 2pm Feb. 2, the Barn. 710 Par1fic, 528-9427 •SUNIJAY: Overeaters Anonymous meet 8pm Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett WI'UE8DAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennie CenU-r WJ'UESDA Y: MSA "Fun Volleyball League" plays, 7pm WJ'UESDA Y: Montrot<e Symphonic Band meets Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, 7:30pm •MONDAY: MSA Bowling. 9pm at Stadrnm Bowl, A200 BraeMmain •WEDNESDAY: Gay Politiral Caucus meet.a 3217 Fannin. 7::Jllpm Feb.5 •WEDNESDAY: MSA Pool l.Rague competition •WEDNF.SDAY: Overeatere Anonymous meet 8pm Bering Church, 1440 Harold 9THURSDAY: Frontrunners run from Memorial Park Tennis Cente'r lfl'HURSIJAY: "Wilde 'n Stein" gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio. FM 90 lfJ'HURSDAY: Mixed Bowling League, 8:45pm, Stadium Bowl. 8200 Braesmain SELECTED EVENTS IN FUTURE WEEKS • IN .. WF:F.KS UOth birthday of C1tv of How1ton. Aur.J ll Montrose Voice Classified Advertising " 1 • •i.t,; 1~'; ~~;::;::~~"f:,~~fl{je~8:r:'!'.:/ ~::::~•oer F, II' r19u1ar d•• •Y 1dvert•Mf} THE HEADLINES: Headline words in bold type, centered, ere $1 each word (minimum $3 per line). (Centered bold headlines can also appearw1th1n the text or at theend of the ad, andarealsoS1 per word. with a minimum of $3per line_) THE TEXT: Each word in regular type is 40¢ (Additional regular words in "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not in all caps are 55¢ each. Additional BOLO WORDS 1n ell caps are 70¢ each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 Then each additional word ltke this 40C THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each add1llona1 word like this 40C THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED, BOLD. $9.00 '!"hen each add1t1onar word like this Is 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS lN TEXT ARE 55¢ EACH Additional bofd words like this In text are 55C each ADDITIONAL SOLD, ALL CAPS, WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer. make no copy changes during the run, pay for the full run 1n advance, and deduct 15% Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same conditions and deduct 25,.,. BLIND AO NUMBERS: Want secrecy? Ask for a Blind Ad Number We'll f~en~~e;!~a~1Jr fg,~c;;dR~1:~fssfg~6re:a'gt!~~=~~~ :g~ubls~~i!~~~~~ecsa~irii~ forwa(ded indefinitely, however, for as long as they come in_) ORDERING YOUR AO: You may mail your ad 1n or phone it In. You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard. Visa. American Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche. Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Class1f1ed ads received by 3pm Wednesday will be placed in that week & newspaper Ads received later will be placed m the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Blind Ad number clo Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale, Houston. TX 77006-3028 It wilt be for­warded, unopened. to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word" is considered anything separated by ··spa­ces ... except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment is a recognized word if it stood on its own. A complete phone number, including area code, is 1 word City, state and zip is 3 words bold llne bold line text words ---------- bold line Use add1t1onal paper tf necessary CATEGORIES: OAnnouncements o Acco~Cd~~~e~J:~~~~~o~ ~~:i~?nn ~i~tA~sJ~m~~;~ & Bikes D Employment & Jobs Wanted ~ Items For Sale 0 Models. Escorts. Masseurs D Personals D Pets o Rides o Travel D Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AO UNDER ·-- __ _ _ IN THE '"GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY .. OPPOSITE PAGE ' bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) regular words in text at 40¢ each -- .ALL CAPS regular words in text at 55¢ each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLO ALL CAPS in text at 70¢ each Blind ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad in 1t mailed to me. $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15% discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) __ _ 0 Also. I wish .to receive The Voice home delivered each week. I have enclosed (or wilt be billed or charged. as indicated below) an add1t1onal O $29 for 6 months or O $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be bi lled or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed 0 Cash D VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge o Diners Club charge D Carte Blanche charge O Amerc1en Express charge o Bill me If charging, card exp1rat1on date Credit card number Signature ____ _ Name ------ Address----___ _ Phone(s) for vent1cat1on of ad, if necessary MAIL OR BRING TO Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 529-8490 weekdays 1Dam-5:30pm JANUARY 31 1986 . MONTROSE VOICE 21 MON TROSE RES01-TR CES SELECTED STATE_ NAT ORGANIZATION~ Bir~ Assn ol Tx (80AT)·-720 Brazos '602, A .. tin-(5121,72·3333 A1g~g:,~:'oo~~ri~·~:"pe~~;:~s :'~~ Wast111igton.DC20003.(212)5-47·3101 Gay & LestMin Pr.-Aan-POBA_ OlclChe!IMSll New Von_ NV 10011-1212) llfi-6622 Gay Rights NII LObtl)'-POB 1892. w .. 111ngton, DC 20013-(2021548-11!101 Human Roght1 Clmpe1gn Ful'ld-POB 13M. W9Stf­~ on. DC 20013-!2021 ~2025 lambda LIQll DelenM-132 W '3rd. New Vorti. NV 10039-121219'44-"81!1 l..O!lnlGay Rigl'lls Actvacal•- P08 &22. Al.lll•n 717&7 M«I•• Fund'°" Human RIQlllS· -POB A Oki c,.,..... Stl.~VOI'- NVl0011-a11) ... 66.22 Niii A11n of 9..,.,,_ Courac1ll-8o• 1S1'5. Ban F•8"ICllCO CA IM115-<•IS) aN-e3U NII AHnof Gay & L•b11n0e>moClull9-17•~ M .. Av SE WHl'llngtOl'I DC 20003-f;JQ7) '47·310C Nit 0..,. HHltft Educ: Foundalton-POB 78' New Yort< NV100Je-. 212'.IMl-631!.orO--G,_.,blrg ~7'13)~ NII 0..,. Rogtlts A'1"'1c:al•· S«> Castro Sin Frano ettlCO. CA 9411' -('1S) 118).382• NII Gly Task force 1NQTF .«) 51h lh. New YOO"• NY'I0011-'(212)7•t-~ NGTF'1 Crisis! "II flOOI 221 1041 >utlodl ,...... Yark StlW) RuralCc.lition cDWaller·Zar1QN 8c;ixSt1 Blul'I TX 7tllSV .... Gay/le.bian T ... FOft.a PCB AK Denton mo1-111n:se1"82111 us T ...... vestn.-TrenMau11 Contact Sole. 017·8 E F>tka. !Seam. 91112' (2()11) 62'·82Gfi ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing We list here each week name of organization. address. phone, regular meeting dates and times. and ~:d~~r~~t~~':i:~o~~tt~nf~r~~~d~s~~n~~! Voice, 408 A\londale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE YOICE­INYOLYED IN THE COMMUNITY A><1lor AID P0e&&4,, n266- szs-&of7 An ~Ila C. U9: Chor~" or cnn11- P(>B 11734, 772M A-Aace ""the Sun· 5 .. Z·7895 ACLU-1238 W Gray-"'62i~5925 AcOSHOlimii-.::-529-321i-iG.-yi-L1st»enSw11\.h­bo1rdJ ~icin Gily AtlW*lt. :-ro86e111.' 712ie­s21- 1255 AWORa."nbOW-SOc19ty tor 11'1• -09.,_-520-4732 'TTY) ~ AUn--=-POB"°61.-77-iM--mMt, 7 30pm 2"d Thurs. Women's Chnst11n Ctr. 310 Pacific Az:u110 womyn·s Magi1;r;9- --&130 ·sw-F;..y •335-~S237 ~~or:~=l-=-RObert-M~ d.~~ Bering Memon11 United Method1l1-C:hUr'Cti= 14'0 Haroid-526-1017 svc 10 SO.m Sun Choic:ea Unilm1ted=-POEi 7ci96. 77270--=529 3211 (Gay & Leab<an Switchboard) meett 1pm 3rd Sun. Muteraon YWCA. a81S W1l11. ~•II Mixer" 730pm111ern1te Frid1y1. Sund1ybrunc.h 1230pm 3rd Sun Ctmsh1n Ctu.i.rch0Tth9 GOO'd~~ Monlf'OM Ive lpm Sun., B•ble lludy 7 30pm Thurs Church_o_!Chr11to1n f.1tr1.: 18'0 Weattiemw.f­S2i- «IOS 1vcs 10 'Slim Sun. B1ti1eatudy 7 30pm Wed. Re\' Chris A Rice, pallor C.11ze11s tor Hun"11,;-£qU1l11fY !CHf1:.~Po8l045.. 712$3--Q0-334e. 937-3$11meet211dTuet. Hou Haine. 1817 F1nntr1. 9th floor actovoty room Cie.s. Lesbi1r. "i.4~ Grovp·-Sirr1113-3108 mMts 2nd & Ifft Thurs. Oigrttty Cir OipPM;:31~ -- COl145·s- mee1s a18rez~01-R;;r&uom, 2IOO Brazos-S28-9192 C.OmmttlMlo;"PUbi!CHU11n-Aw1renesl-POB 304S. 77253-52"333. 522-SO&I ·s111rrig Group for th9 Worned Well" tneet Fro 7-lpm Montrose Counsel ng Ctr commun•ty -POtitreal Ac11on com;;;,uM C· PAC)-POB 200S. n2S2-23&--16M commun7tYG01pe.Ct,:..3201 Montrose-521· 0511 Svct 11am Sun. 730pm Thurs ~Ayu Ch9y1m=18'0 W&111'1eomer- Ml-1987. 72&--5181 IVC & 10c11i 8pm 2nd & 4th Fn &s.l~ti;ne- -228-1505 Demo CofnmiltMot GPC-526-88i4 ~UclyGroup--=-'°8AVond11e--"52'-~ D•1n1 FoUr1iiii!On~27oo M110r1:::S2,:S'791 ~'h/1~n-lj:i ~~7~32;:; F.r;-nin- ESOPS Pr•va1ePtti19il~1 SoC.11 C.Ub· '861--: 9076 F.0.retoon ol Ch1nl'81 UMecl lorSOcli1 Sen-~ L:t.~~~~:~fLl':~tl'~ ·~~:!~~ MontroM Cl nit. MOf'lrOM CounM11ng Cir 1Sluni11n11"1 cmirct1-=5ii0-Finfi;,..~1571 svc: 11151m Sun ~,_.----=Joe 520-iOii-OfS.rvldor 529- 1288 runs Sun, TIJ9li & Thurs Memor•ll Park Tlf'll'\11 Ctr Q.y ~,;.St,i;;r..g Eaper·ieoc.-!GASEj -Sl&- 1311. 52&-0991 G.Y & L .. bt1n A;ch.:.S-01 Ta 1!flh1t1 OfitH Inc a.y··alnb18l;-'MQ,,;;c;n;:.:;-713 W•the•mer •8040. 770M-S6&-1,13 ~~a ~~~:fn5~12~~~;:'fj~''f~::,~~ Sw•ICl'lbolrdl lHou) Gay PriOe Week. Comm11t .. PUB~ .7.7.2.6,,6,-,-S. ten FOfd S23-76'1 Of Clttly Lenari1n Greater Montrose BusoneUGu1id.::_M,ie"Ne1IOn 630-0309 or Bruce woo11ey S29-3IM """11 7pm. 4th Wed. Brenri1ns Rest. 3300 Smrth The Gr0upl1'1eat8f workshop Joe Wii\S522= 22().4 meeta 7pm Thurs. Dignity Ctr. 3217 Fanmn Hi'ie1wotch Product10fls--·2tlt5 Wii..gh Or •2ii. 71006. lesbian concerts_ free m1111ng hst Homopl'lile lt11erf11th AU••nce-729 M---..;o,. S23-6969 Hou Area Gay & lffb~an Eng•nffti ·a Sc1&t1hsts-POB86631. 77006-'39-1879 meets 7pm 111'1 Tua HoU~Aisn~ -c/o B~aroa R1"'° Bot1am. 2400 8raz01-529-i192 meets 2Pf'n 2rld Wed Hou ... ..>mmut1rtyCio...-;:;;--862....,1• Hou Council ol Clubl -~ Hou Ol:ta Prolession11s- !.2J-i922.. ~ -is 7 30pm 2"d Tuea Hou ;:.:>IY Health Ac:lvOClll• 7i0-9118 MMta 7JOpn'l1Sls.t Hou G..,. Studenb AM· 717 3098 .H.O,u ,1_nte7 .f11Tt1 A11'8noe contact lhrough ~• Hou Motot~yell Club- :C,.O 'Mlir(s. 1022 w .... tteimer- 5~51 Hou N1>~11.-_::POB-;;&.O Humble 773U. -8111 11 821-7126 meet 7 30prn 2nd Sat .H.O..U.,"O, .u.t< ;toO; Group (H0Gl ~, OI' m Hou TenniiCiu-i;;.-R1Ch""1152'-21s1 play 9am­" 100fl Sun & 7 30-9Pm Thi.If'$. Ho~r Ford Tennis c.. .. , -M nc X>B16CW1, ni22.:_6,-.:,-17J25ig.7014 af1 1led groups 1'9 ln!l'...CI 9·.z:z1mo'1 A PllCI n t"9 Sun MonttOM Ar1 Alhanca. Gay & Lesbian Archives ot T11. Qly & usblan Switchboard. MonttOM Symphonic: Bind. bOlrd meet 7 lOl>m ISt Thurs 1varied k»cltionsl .OUCll onal lotum 1 30pm 3l'd Tl'IL"t'S tngerKWI Spe1ken" 8UrM11- POB 31U ~ .. ,. 17401- 469-1()64 1ntii~gf11YiMOU (Ep1acopa111nl -POB 66008 77296---~'-" 1'89- IT'Mtl 110pm 2nd & 411'1 J,llon A1 1ry House. 62615 J,1111n 1ntef9ci.:POe 16041. n212- -sn.1011 K,;>fl Rldao.-F~lMtt B*"-5~ 1000' ·11,...kttv(lygl'l~ lesbl1n-INn1nlSt PO"' Fr• .l1.S...-1.1.1 m "'W•IOl'nSl1m·gaypgmThUr'$7» In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Vot'e KSIA~111on-3317 Montrou Bo .. 1iS°S. 77006-524-2137 AIDS Rllk ReductiOn (Siie Sex) Wortr.shopslpm 21"ld & llh Mon 1n coniunc­tion w•tl'l MorilroM Counaeluig ee.i1 ... J9ny l(';jttmen Can~ Fund-771-,109 k7e~ 311 GrJiQ:ia;;:d. :e,-M..-ci9r 126-1032 l1~~s&A-1an()fl- 1211.Jo AnNe-521·9772 ~cz;~~.,~":"""'-.,..-.~~~QO<l--7~~°'=:. 230pm a1tam11e Tuea. Soindtetop Room. 2nd floor. Un"'ersity Ctr Lti(ijS-[n~°" w .... ena- P!"OllCI ot Hou Counal of Ck.lbs~ !he~ch-212 Fergo- 522*7886 -MS 230pcn Sun ~ng~n~,~~~;,2r;~1: t!,~ ;:: Je1ruie Leggett ~fNUdiSiGroup· -Poe7~72. 7127' LOw_.-W .. 1he-;;;;w---p;,ic:e Sub-St1t•on- «12 W•theorner-529-3100 LU"1hitri;;;co;;cemed-mffm -alGr1ce Luth; r1n Church. 2515 Waugh-521-0963. 4Sl-1113 meet 2nd & 111'1 Tua evenings Mr::Mo:;-H~ KS..AIDSFouriclatoon 3317 Montrose Bo• 1155-52'·2437 M;;-Aga11'1SI Oec9Pti0n Coun.IY-Cl\lt>---POB 511171. 77251--SN-3211 {Gay & L .. bJan Sw•tc.t'lboard) meets bt·wMllly .Z1rop01111n Commun1fy Ctiurch ol1Pie R9'ul' rection (J,iiCCRi-1919 Dec:atur-161-81'9 pot· luck dinner 7 30pm 111 Sit MOnthly. Svcs 1015am & 7 1Sptn Sun & 7 1Spm Wed INIT!ber­atup 1nqu1rttfS clau 7 30pm J,llon tlduQhon ct.sea Tues & Wed eves ~Houl 'iX~ndEiW.~10: Meets St Stephens Eposeopal Cflurch. 7 30 Wed MooilroMArtAJlill'ICe---4184·11"32.l!IM-9311 M,i: S332 1'11!o1te L"H Inc:; ti-ca 2rw:I Mon Mori1roae Business Gu.ta - Gr•t9r Mori1'f0.. Bus Guild Mont10M~Ch~~-"'-.-o1=c.,,...,.,,.,-~.,=oo Mon~*­n1- ez11 1Vc 11am SUn MontroM CiYIC Club ,.. Neert'Own Aun t.o100iro.e-~ twwt~me-52i-w1 open Mon, Tue Thurs &--9pm ~:"~~~~~1t~n:~ meet7- MontroM Counseling Ctr-900 Lo;.jti" 11203- 5.29-0037 AIDS Y1Ct1m support group g JOpm M()fl, Women's Support Group 7pm TuM. AIDS :1:~1i ~~~~~~:,:.·~.~O:t~s~n~ '"" ~Wtf'OMS•~.gayrnen·schonls M•k•~ MonlroM Softbllll LMQU*--P08 22272. 11227- 524-3111 MonttOM Sports A.an rMSA1 ... spec1ftc lu°t;. ·-· MontroH Sympl'lonic Bind PCB lie13 7ne&--S27·9't51 meM 7 30pm TuM. O.gnoty Ctr. 3217 Fenn1n. 1tfohat1 l/H inc MORE 5.26-MORE.53-0037 pt0,ect'"4~ Couneeftng Celi• u~- N ~ 1M·Ud L•gue) Bo ... ong­M ke WeHter1 It 973-135@ pl1y 9pm St10.uf'I latleS, 8200 Btaesm1m USA PoOi"fe, 1arciSlLNQ-;:;-;::D.~""973- 1lS8 or Oefln• Lora 6e(H)752 M$A.vo .eyblii=°M'111t 522-l~•met 7pm T..-s. Gregory-UnCOln school. 1101 Tlf1 Montrvse wiieh·'iu-bgroup Nnrtown Aun li:4oAt~s..:._m.eti-lf-ihe eam: 710 PIC•hC- -52i- 9'f27 duD night Thurs N11i0Ni'G.Y. -tffl.itr1 Eduie1>0n FoutWt111on "'3-5204 :c::~~:ti=:<W~~~0n~~·- ~ ... n-""ASSn ,MOnt;OS;-c.~c ;; Jb 1'1: Wel1tleuner fnft'I 1pm 'th T·.1es ~n euamesa Ailiince- 52g:.fa10: """ ... 1ptl'I 2n1 Wed L befty Bank 1001 Westneimef' ~ Freedom Cnnstian C"1,1rr-h· i""29Yl'­MJ- e:Jn SVC9 10em Sun ~ A~----::::clOMcintro.. Coun- :m~' :'::'1~~~~11~-=s Benng huret't 44( Hl;rold Pal'Wfttl&Fnltftcts-Oilftb.ens~ P.r9nt1 nAG>~ meets 2iim 1rd Sun Prnby· ten1n rlr 11 :>.kdlle P1rti; People· >CJ.> Neartown Comll'lun1ty FirehO"JH 111 521 Paz y u 9CtOn- NB 6J006.. 71250- J- 111e i>fe.D'(11r1en1 fet lnb 1n1.;1y ~ n:::erre Prwby1«1an Ctr 11 Oakdll .. 526-2s&A meets 710prn~T·JM iir.1defl1t ""uD (pDl-Pr.iStcierlts GPC, POB 196811 "'7266 523-«12, ReereeliONll laM fl.lf'd Comm11l1H- Mustang r Jbprqec"t ii1ce Univ Gey Lesbi., SoPPort Group- !.n. "1t sy & Lesb1al'I SwttC't\tlol;rO) Aotl'lkO h~ 1.&( i:;ui_f iOu- ~~l- Sh#lt1 l)f T• CO\ll'IMI ng <Jt •threaten ng Ml9el ~ SOii ~~~:flO~B~~ ~lMSt $oc-ety tor me Pturic.cio., c~ Amaze. S.cto­u-, c1·111m fSPASM) POB 10996. T721G- G.ty & nbtM S-ltd'ltloatd 521-32~1 Suftoanc•Cln coso..:;;ICi.Jt).--C.oTneBam 710 Peclftc. 521-9427 T• G;y'RoOio~--Ci.Mr 1191 POB6897J 17006-~• Ta Human R•ghis FOund11:0;:;"'-1&15 Commor>w .. 1#1-622-282' ~rs-ctoRipc=.,.,-o'i:,~,.~,,oc,~cc-c::c-_.,,,-.1-2tt2 VMi~MYn 1n-1,s5 bowls 130pm ~~~~:~_..."=-'""".,.=,. .. -- W•theirner Colony Arts Assn 1001 Westti-eo· rner •163--521-0133 Whal E.,« HaPP9·-_,~,-o ~e."'"'0y,,--,J°"•7ne0~=.,,. ::11tl 1~~~~'.'~i!'::Sle':!°213 evn Wocrien s &wmg -iug~-Oebbte 973-135i" 5?m &.in Stadium Lal'lel. 8200 BrM11T111n W<XNn 1 '-obi>\-. A 18.ice-1 CMiM'a 52...-0439 Women ...-sott;i l~--6431 Pinnrl.O. 77008 .C.thy or Carolyn 86&-6256 BAYT ... ~ 8aftc-,.*n l•mbO• Group-,27·13711 ~ 7.30Pm odd Fri ~roeA,...L~Ga'YM-•409J:J44-M·-.> ConroeArUi.eaban.=K8tl'lyat 40917~­l! Met tpm 2nd & '~fn GALVE l:JN -- lll'l'C>dll Alcohoflcs Anonymous· 16).-11()1 Metro~ in Community Church ot GIJvnton Sl&i 12181 ay 76.5-7626 QUICK REFERENCE (Tear Out & Post by Phone) AIDS Hothn&· 529"-- 11- AMBULANCE-111 C1ry H.1--222-3011 OOC.0.--~1 FI RE-111 ---­G.~ 1"CaUcui- "52,_ 1ooo Gay & iesbf.ln SwotchOOl'rd.:...529--3211 K&A~.~52....:2.tn ·­i:;;; y.,-=;;,;;;; or 529-3211 - Ubr;v=-221.-;:;w­MonttW. Q~m;-- -­~ t!'OMCoun~-r - l.fON~~--- POLICE-111 - - 1Lo- w..u;em- Police Sta-529-3100) Ta. ~IOIOOl'Z.36-1111 .:-, - temp_,,.,.,. ~ ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying 'by the word," you can purchase space here ··by the mch." When buying by the mch. you can include special art, logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $29 2"' $39 3• $49 4 WEEK RATE 1" $24 2· $34 3"' $44 13 WEEK RATE 1" $19 2" $29 3• $39 G22 rMeONaTRtOeSEr V Oi M E ' JANUARY 31 . 1986 To odverhse ,nth~ ontrosNJOeOS "S"'5e00 Jrs • opping poge coll 529-84QO cb rv1ce and Sh ISING E REPAI Mhokm:reo w$.6.2,. ~wvp11ce. p•cked up r us parts 520-~m your LES LEASIN S2 l0 Bu1ta1~A= MOTORS SEE OUR w•y. 667 IN THE Mg/SPLAY AD -6804 ... z.TROfS! VOICE ~';E~N. 97til:: LEASING -- IN THEutg~r:iLA Y AD -- ASC - D~ VDICE ~~ ci~•nd.0si;i~:JNG, l TD. IN THE tglSPLA y AD - SA NTRDSE VOIC 10700 N JACINTO M E SEE ;J~m;nd #1~.T~~-~SING IN THE MO~SPLAY AD Also tee ··c TROSE VOICE CIH S1ftecr· paargse & Bikes· on _M ontr_o s8 PAIR s15~ : ~'A7LJL~ nPdA. I6N5T9- ~,~~0Y SHOP IN THE Mg~r:iLA Y AD WEST OSE VOICE 238 (TEX STATGRAY AUTO SEEWO Gray 528-~SPECTION) IN THEutg~sTPRLOASYE AVDO ICE S1'E1E1 Taft. T5A2F2T-2 A19U0T O MOTIVE IN T~1Ftg~SPLAY AD - . TROSE VOICE 1901 T1ft. ~~~OWN KARZ SEE OUR 1 IN THE Mg/NSTPRLOASYE AVDO ICE Montrose Auto Repa· Free E . Ir All W st1mates Majo~~,~~r"~enteed Gas or Oies~a1rs Electr1ca/ Rep 526-372·3 2716 Taft ~TO REP 2001 Harold. sJ~~:s.I5O2O6-Y1 9S4H0O P SHOPS HAIR SALONS . ~~:y·s Barber Sh -- 8216 ca/ls $15 00 ~· Hair cuts s9- up For info 5~ See also EPING '"Ta" Preparat ion·• cat eoory UC Tl ON 520-906' HSK CONTRACTING SINE ET HOEU MROD ISPLA y AO NTROSE VOICE ING ~an ~ucha~-C Ounse11n 529-9004 DANIEL J. KUC~- 529-9004 SEE 0 HARS IN THEutg1sPLAY AD NTROSE VOICE s RonalDd M ·Butler 42 .D.S ~ Westheimer Monda st on, TX n 006 Hours ~~ru Saturday (713) 52f'~ent SSES 24542145 ~niTvEeXrAsiSt yS T(AVTil ~ OPTICAL SEE O~~ Main. 52~g:Je 52&-1589. & IN THE Mg~STPRLOASYE AVDO ICE DIRECTOR S1~E?EeU .OXeHlWchE,S 5T2 &F-U38N5E1 R AL DIRECTORS IN THEutg~sTPRLOAS yE AVDO ICE RE RESTO T SHOPS ~~~ Westhei~:;(~~~~~E SEE OU d Village). 621- /N THE tg/SNPTRLOASYE AVDO ICE OLYMPIA FITNESS 8313 SW F CLU: RACKETBALL SEE OURwy 988-8787 IN THE MglNSTPRLOAS yE AVDO ICE S SERVICE 5401 Dashw~P8 CLINIC - SEE OUR DIS #10 . 661-2321 IN THE MONRf(OAS yE AVDO ICE AIR CONDITIONING TIME FOR A/c REP - - 1Mrtl. CALL ....;. _?J::s plus Directory CARE ~~1 STEVE o Ella Blvd ·s~eRTINEZ. M.O. IN ~:kutg~sPLA;As;:•535 TROSE VOICE PROCTOLOGY CLINIC OF SOUTH TEXAS DR. C.E FONTAN I ER Diseases of the ;olon & Rectum * Colonoscopy Hemorrhoids * Constipation * Rectal Bleedin Me~~~al 9 & Surgl~al ement 872-7676 Answered 24 h 210 West Greenours
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